Made It In Music: Interviews With Artists, Songwriters, And Music Industry Pros

By Full Circle Music: A Record Label & Songwriting / Music Production / Publishing Company

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Description

Many want to "make it" in the music industry. Few successfully make it in. Even fewer stay in. The goal of this podcast is to help bring some clarity to your path towards a music career. We want to help you not only get in, but stay in. To this end, hosts Seth Mosley and X O'Connor will dig deep with luminaries of the music industry. These are people who have "made it" and today have very notable careers. Many are Grammy winners and work with prominent record labels. Some of our listeners might be on the creative side as a songwriter, artist, producer, or engineer. Others might be on the business side interested in marketing, management, A&R, or radio. The "Made It In Music Podcast" is designed to serve both sides; we are certain you will find a place in this community. How do you get a record deal, get a hit artist to cut your song, build fans, or get on tours? We tackle these questions and more. Before you know it, you will be able to say that you too have "Made It In Music!"

Episode Date
Ryan Stevenson: What To Do After Record Label Rejection
38:29

Questions, questions, questions… you’ve been rejected too many times… or haven’t made a break in the music industry and are seeking answers or solutions? This episode of the Made it in Music podcast with Singer-songwriter, Ryan Stevenson, may have a few solutions you’ve been searching for.


You’ll Learn About:


  • How difficult it can be to finally make your break in the industry
  • How to overcome rejection from labels and continue pushing forward
  • And the stories behind Ryan’s second album release with Gotee Record, No Matter What.


Following a seven-year stint as a paramedic, Ryan Stevenson signed an agreement with Gotee Records in 2013 after capturing TobyMac’s attention by co-writing the No. 1 and Grammy nominated single “Speak Life". Ryan’s 2015 full-length album Fresh Start which featured the No. 1 radio single “Eye of the Storm” helped launch him into a new level of success. It never came easy and in fact took a lot of rejection. But Ryan kept picking himself up, supported his family, and followed his dreams. Ryan shares his struggles of rejection and how he overcame that and so much more with us.


In this episode, Ryan and Seth discuss the new record, Ryan’s success, and pushing through the trials and the journey rather than worrying about the next big thing. Throughout his stories, Ryan shares very insightful and useful tips that will help lead you in your own success and guide you through rejection to follow your calling. 


Ryan Stevenson is here to share his incredible story about how he made it in music, and he’s here to help you do the same.


Resources:


Books mentioned in this episode:

The Shack by William P. Young

 

Listen to Ryan’s new single out now:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/no-matter-what-feat-bart-millard/1350016308?i=1350016324


Find out more about Ryan Stevenson:

https://ryanstevensonmusic.com


Find Full Circle Music on social media

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Check us out at www.madeitinmusic.com

Subscribe to our YouTube Page for more incredible resources just like this one, all FREE for our friends like you.

As always, thanks for listening and be sure to give us a review on iTunes if you have not already done so. We appreciate your feedback!

Jun 18, 2018
Maggie Reed "Ruelle": How to Target Your Songwriting for Film and TV
36:15

What can you do to get your music heard on television? Songwriter Maggie Reed of RUELLE joins us to share her story of how she made it in music successfully writing for television and film.


You’ll Learn About:


  • How to write openly for film (to write for many scenarios rather than just one)
  • How failure can lead to greater opportunities
  • How to be efficient and helpful in your co-writing and not stand in the way
  • And much more…


Maggie Reed began her music career at a young age. She now goes by the artist name of RUELLE. It wasn't long before her haunting songs began to find their way onto multiple television shows and film trailers. In 2015, she released her first collection of music into the world via her EP entitled Up in Flames. While the songs were written and arranged with various producers, they all contain her graceful vocals accompanied by dark and cinematic production melodies that stay inside your head for days. Her songs have been heard on shows like Gotham, Grey’s Anatomy, The Walking Dead, Pretty Little Liars, and Dancing with the Stars - just to name a few.


In this episode, Maggie and Seth discuss her new record (looking to release this year), co-writing success and failure, and all things leading up to where she found her current success. Throughout her stories, Maggie shares very insightful and useful tips that will help lead you in your own success. 


Maggie Reed (RUELLE) is here to share her story about how she made it in music, and she’s here to help you do the same.


Resources:


Books mentioned in this episode:

Art & Fear by David Bayles and Ted Orland

 

Find out more about Maggie Reed:

ruellemusic.com 



Find Full Circle Music on social media

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Instagram

YouTube


Check us out at www.madeitinmusic.com

Subscribe to our YouTube Page for more incredible resources just like this one, all FREE for our friends like you.

Jun 04, 2018
Cody Carnes: How to Find Your Voice as a Worship Leader - episode 105
31:54

How do you find your voice in leading a congregation? Where can you start? Cody Carnes, husband to Kari Jobe, dives into the details and helpful tips to get you started wherever you are in your worship leading. 


You’ll Learn About:


  • What the Western Swing genre is (yes, we also have never heard of it before!)
  • How to find your voice and when voice lessons are necessary
  • How to find things you are good at and focus solely on those to avoid failure when possible
  • How to find God’s will for your life


Cody Carnes is a worship leader and songwriter whose passion is to create a meeting place for God and people with music. He spends most of his time traveling and leading worship with his wife Kari Jobe Carnes. The couple have co-written numerous songs together including “Closer To Your Heart,” “The Garden” and “Lover Of My Soul” from her album The Garden and “Let The Heavens Open” from her album Majestic. Cody is known popularly for his tunes “The Cross Has the Final Word”, “Hold it All”, and “Til the End of Time”, all of which are off his debut album The Darker the Night/The Brighter the Morning.


Cody Carnes is here to share his story about how he made it in music, and he’s here to help you do the same.


Resources:


Books mentioned in this episode:

The Song Machine by John Seabrook

 

Find out more about Cody Carnes:

codycarnes.com 


Find Full Circle Music on social media

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram

YouTube


Check us out at www.madeitinmusic.com

Subscribe to our YouTube Page for more incredible resources just like this one, all FREE for our friends like you.

As always, thanks for listening and be sure to give us a review on iTunes if you have not already done so. We appreciate your feedback!

May 21, 2018
Paul Brandt: How to Partner with Brands to Fund Your Music Addiction
35:47

How do you fund your music addictions? How can sponsorships help you in doing so? Canada’s country music veteran Paul Brandt dives into the relationships and benefits of partnering with brands and funding your music addictions.


You’ll Learn About:


·      How you can benefit from partnerships and how the partnerships benefit from you.

·      How authenticity can create a healthy and long lasting music career.

·      How to find your identity as an independent artist.

·      


Paul Brandt is the most awarded male Canadian country artist in history. He is no stranger to the music industry. Getting his start more than 25 years ago, Paul has earned his way from being a registered nurse at a children’s hospital to being a household name in the country music scene.  Paul is known popularly for his tunes “My Heart Has a History”, “I Do”, and “I’m An Open Road”, which was recently certified Gold.


Seth has been working with Paul and helped create songs for his new release The Journey: YYC Volume 1, which released April 6th this year.


In this episode, Paul and Seth discuss the new record, Paul’s success, and enjoying the journey rather than worrying about the next big thing. Throughout his stories, Paul shares very insightful and useful tips that will help lead you in your own success.


Paul Brandt is here to share his story about how he made it in music, and he’s here to help you do the same.


Resources:


Books mentioned in this episode:

Half Time by Bob Buford

 

Find out more about Paul Brandt:

paulbrandt.com


~ Enter to win a 1 hour coaching call with our Grammy award winning producer, Seth Mosely and a chance to win a $50 Full Circle Academy gift card at fcmcontest.com!


Find Full Circle Music on social media

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YouTube

May 07, 2018
Jen Ledger: Overcoming Doubt & Dreams Coming True as Skillet's Drummer and Emerging Solo Artist
25:06

How do you navigate breaking into the music industry? How do you start from giving up to living in God’s dream? Skillet’s Jen Ledger dives into the details of how God took something she loved and made it her career when she was ready to quit drums altogether.

 

You’ll Learn About:


·      The process of a dream becoming reality.

·      When Jen auditioned for Skillet and overcame her own doubts.

·      How to perform your best and not compare yourself to others.

·      Learn to “let go” and move forward in failure.


Jen Ledger has been the drummer for the band Skillet (Grammy nominated, Dove Award winning) for going on 10 years now. Skillet is one of the largest rock music touring acts in the world. Hit songs include “Monster,” “Hero,” “Whispers In The Dark,” “Feel Invincible,” and “Stars.” At the time of this episode’s release, their current radio single is “Lions.”

Seth has been working with Jen and wrote songs for her debut solo release Ledger, which released April 13th this year.


In this episode, Jen and Seth discuss the new record, Jen’s success, and finding true meaning in God (and not comparing yourself to others). Throughout her stories, Jen shares very insightful and useful tips that will help lead you in your own success.


Jen Ledger is here to share her story about how she made it in music, and she’s here to help you do the same.














Resources:


Albums mentioned in this episode

Flyleaf by Flyleaf


Books mentioned in this episode

God’s Lavish Grace by Terry Virgo

 

Find out more about Jen Ledger

Ledgerband.com


Find Full Circle Music on social media

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram

YouTube


Check us out at www.madeitinmusic.com

Subscribe to our YouTube Page for more incredible resources just like this one, all FREE for our friends like you.

As always, thanks for listening and be sure to give us a review on iTunes if you have not already done so. We appreciate your feedback!

Apr 23, 2018
How Dave Barnes Went From Zero to Pop and Country Songwriting Hero episode 102
39:46

This week on the Made It In Music podcast, Seth Mosley (Grammy Award Winning Producer) sits down with Dave Barnes (“God Gave Me You” - Writer). Dave has worked on songs with Reba McEntire, Bebo Norman, Blake Shelton, and Tim McGraw to name a few. An MTSU Grad, he began his career interning with Producer Ed Cash (Chris Tomlin, Steven Curtis Chapman, and Casting Crowns) in Nashville, TN.

 

In this episode, Dave and Seth discuss his new record, Who Knew It Would Be So Hard To Be Myself, his success, and the struggles of building a career in the ever changing music industry.


Join Dave Barnes as he shares his story about how he made it in music and be inspired to do the same.


Dave’s most commonly recommended books and records include the album The Rainy Season by Marc Cohn, Peace and Love by Tommy Sims and a book entitled Life Together by Dietrich Bonhoeffer.


Check us out at www.madeitinmusic.com

Follow us on Instagram @officialFCMusic

Subscribe to our YouTube Page for more incredible resources just like this one, all FREE for our friends like you.

As always, thanks for listening and be sure to give us a review on iTunes if you have not already done so. We appreciate your feedback!

Apr 09, 2018
John Cooper of Skillet Shares the Secrets of Their Worldwide Success - ep 101
41:59

This week on the first ever Made It In Music podcast, Seth Mosley (Grammy Award Winning Producer) sits down with John Cooper of Skillet (Grammy nominated - Dove Award Winning Artist). Join us on this journey telling stories of struggle and victory to the road to success. 


Hear Johns heartfelt rise to fame and how it didn’t just happen overnight like he had thought it would. And learn how God opened doors to take a label who originally opposed signing Christian artists and gave Skillet a try. 


Also, John gives a few recommendations for books he is currently into: The Sovereignty of God by A. W. Pink and Orthodoxy by G. K. Chesterton. So, be sure and check those out.


Check us out at www.madeitinmusic.com

Follow us on Instagram @officialFCMusic

Subscribe to our YouTube Page to see the video or for more incredible resources just like this one, all FREE for our friends like you.

As always, thanks for listening and be sure to give us a review on iTunes if you have not already done so. We appreciate your feedback!

Mar 26, 2018
Made It In Music - Teaser
2:04
Made It In Music premiers next Monday, March 26th. You don't want to miss it.
Mar 19, 2018
Made It In Music Podcast | Full Circle Music Show MEGA REMINDER | March 26 Alert
4:13

Full Circle Music Show listeners!!


We didn't want you to think we forgot you! In fact, it's quite the opposite. We've been hard at work behind the scenes to bring you the next season of our podcast, which will be called, the MADE IT IN MUSIC PODCAST. Season One starts March 26 2018, and will feature artists like Skillet, Dave Barnes, Paul Brandt, Cody Carnes, Josh Silverberg, Ruelle, and many many more. Do NOT miss this.

Mark your calendar for 3.26, and head over to iTunes or Youtube and SUBSCRIBE TODAY, so you don't miss any of the episodes.

A few changes, for the better:

1. We are branching out! As we've had continued success in our production, label, and publishing companies, we've blazed a lot of new territory outside the CCM and Worship Genres. Both will still be included and showcased, but consider this show to be moving in a multi-genre direction – so that no matter what style of music you work in, you will be able to learn something!

2. We are going bi-weekly! Look for a new episode every other week. This allows us to pack even more punch into each episode.

3. We are going VIDEO! Stay tuned on youtube for each episode. We now have a multi 4K camera setup in our studio and will be bringing you the thought leaders of the music business to you in FULL HD VIDEO, right to your screen, so you can not only HEAR the content (which you will still be able to, via audio, on iTunes Podcasts, and our website), but now SEE it.

The best is yet to come…

Look forward to the MADE IT IN MUSIC PODCAST, SEASON ONE, STARTING MARCH 26.

Award Show — Artist Starter Kit
Mar 08, 2018
Ep100 - The Best of The Full Circle Music Show
52:48



We are celebrating our 100th Episode by bringing you portions of the best podcasts selected by the FCM Team. Stacey, X, Jerricho, Logan, and Seth are all interviewed regarding their favorite FCMS episode and share why that guest was the most memorable for them. We want to thank all of our listeners for their continued support. 

We will return all new and all fresh on Monday, March 26th with our MADE IT IN MUSIC Podcast.

————————————

Episode 100

Full Circle Music Show

– Hi, I'm Seth Mosley from Full Circle Music, and man am I excited, this is episode 100 of our Full Circle Music Show podcast, and not only that, the day that we're making a massive announcement. And what is that announcement? It's that we are re-branding. Yes, we're changing the format, the title, everything of our podcast to make it even more packed with value, for free, for you guys. And the new title, drum roll please, is the Made It in Music Podcast, by Full Circle Music. It's resources for music makers just like you who wanna go full-time in music, and stay in. So I just wanted to do something a little special on this episode to go along with the announcement of the Made It in Music Podcast, episode 100, and what we're doing this week is we're bringing you a best of episode. We picked our very favorite moments from the Full Circle Music Show and broke down just some really key points, things that we think you would get a lot out of, things that we personally got a lot out of. I'm Seth Mosley, thank you so much for listening. Here with Stacey Willbur, VP of publishing and A&R here at Full Circle Music. Man, I loved that you picked the Ginny Owens episode, 'cause it was one of my favorite not only podcast episodes, but what a lot of people who're maybe gonna go back and listen to this clip don't realize is that it was recorded at one of our Full Circle Academy songwriter retreats. And man, if I haven't told you already, the people that you have relationships with that you've been able to bring in to pour into our students is just absolutely incredible. So Ginny was one of those, she was at our last one, and I feel like I probably got more feedback on her than a lot of speakers that come in. That's where this podcast was recorded at. So what stood out to you about that, what made you pick that as your favorite moment?

– Well, it was my favorite moment because, obviously 'cause we were there, we were actually in the moment, it was an experience. It was Ginny talking about very simple things, three key elements of songwriting. But what I loved about it is that she weaved her own story into all three of those elements. I loved hearing her story wrapped up into all of that.

– Yeah, she talked about it being, something that I had not heard, and I think you said the same thing, that she compares songwriting to being a journey with a friend.

– A journey with a friend, that was like an a-ha moment, I think, for so many, because I don't think everybody looks at it that way. It's a job, it's this, but as a friend, and the closer you get to a friend, you get to know each other, you get to know their hearts, you get to know their stories, and the same thing with songwriting. The more you spend time… Writing every day, getting to know your craft, understanding the different elements of songwriting, the better you become and the better you know yourself as a songwriter.

– Yeah, and she talks about how it is a sought after treasure, too, I thought that was such a cool way to put it. What did she mean by that?

– Well, it was interesting 'cause she said it was a sought after treasure pursued by an enemy. Which, the enemy, as she describes, are distractions. The distractions in your life that keep you from doing the thing that you love doing. So what are those things and how do you keep those distractions from keeping you from doing what God's plan and purpose is for your life, which is songwriting.

– Yeah, and I think, man, she just… There's podcast episodes that we've done that I feel like I just kinda wish I had like a notepad the whole time, 'cause she just kinda drops quote after quote after quote, and one thing that you shared with me, that I totally agree with is that good is the enemy of great, and perfection is the enemy of creativity. That was, I thought that was brilliant when she said that.

– Yeah, and I think, especially in this industry, we hear a lot of, oh, that's a good song, that's a good song, that's a good song. And we tend to leave it there, and we don't encourage each other to strive for the great. I think striving for the great is harder. ‘Cause it takes going back and rewriting, it takes time and effort. The good is, yeah, this is good, you know. But the great, I think, is you dig it in a little deeper. And she really shares that in the podcast, she shares the struggles that she went through as an artist. And just in her life personally to get to that point.

– Yeah, so good. Well I'm really glad you picked it 'cause it's one of my favorite moments too.

– Awesome.

– Here's a clip from Ginny Owens on the Full Circle Music Show live from the Full Circle Academy songwriter's retreat.

– [Ginny] I want to offer, just based on my experience as a songwriter over the past billion years, I wanna offer three key elements of a life of endless songwriting bliss. So three key elements to maintaining a songwriting life. So the first one is, songwriting is a journey with a friend. Show up every day so that you can go a little further together. Songwriting is an art form. The more you know the rules and master the skill, the freer you will be to let your heart guide the process. And, songwriting is a sought after treasure guarded by an enemy. In order to capture it, you must fight every day of your life. Listening, like, two different types of listening that I call active and passive listening. So, I really love pop music, so active listening for me is like, when I work out in the mornings, just rolling the Apple, new Apple, like whatever, pop playlist, or what they're playing at Apple List or Spotify, you know, playlist, and learning. What are they doing in the songs that you're hearing that you like? How are they creating hooks? What do the rhythm things sound like that they're doing. Things like, Chainsmokers came along and they sort of created this chorus, where you don't have to soar up in the top, you just do this, like, ♪ Baby hold me closer in the backseat — ♪ I probably shouldn't be singing that at the Christian — But you know, it's just this tiny little space of a chorus. So there are trends that you start to see as you listen to music. If you're a songwriter-ish type person, more of a James Taylor type person, then you can listen to current people that do that, like James Bay or John Mayer. Hear what they're doing, sort of study their technique. But the other thing is passive listening. And what I guess I mean by that is falling in love with music. One of the things I've recently discovered about myself is that I'm too busy thinking about… Analyzing songs, and I actually need to go fall in love with music again, 'cause it's just too easy to be critical. And so what I've learned is, probably the easiest way to do this, which is not something that streaming really lends itself towards, but to go get people's albums. And just listen to the full album and continue to immerse myself in it, and be patient. ‘Cause I'm sure, maybe some of you guys are like this too, I'm so impatient. I'll listen to half a song and then I flip to the next song. That does not create and inspire love for music. I think those things are key for deepening our skillsets, growing our skillsets, educating ourselves. And then there's another aspect, just as we talk about kind of this skill of songwriting. It's really simple, but I think it's really important, especially for new writers, and I kind of call it the accessibility scale. So on one end you have the more cerebral, the more personal kind of songs. Those are the songs you write for your grandma, or your brother, or a wedding. And then on the other end are the more super-commercial songs. So like, Bon Iver is super cerebral. Taylor, super commercial. Andrew Peterson is pretty cerebral. Tomlin, Jordan Feliz, super commercial. And so the more cerebral a song is, the more it's kinda written to please the writer. So most of those things fall kind of more in the middle, they're not generally purely one or the other. But the more cerebral, form matters less, it's kinda in the writer's head, and obviously the more commercial a song is, the more singable it is, the more melodic, the more many people can kinda follow what you're doing. You gotta know the difference. If you wanna write commercial, study it, learn the techniques, listen to the Full Circle podcast every week, because there's an art to expressing yourself that way. But if you're gonna write about family, if you're gonna write something super personal, don't let that out for critique, 'cause you don't want to hurt yourself in that way. You know what I mean? Protect the things that are really personal to you. And the more you kind of know the skill and the art of songwriting, the more you're gonna know how to do that. Skill, taking the journey, ultimately helps with our biggest challenge as songwriters, which is fighting for your songwriting. And if you don't believe me, I bet you do. Everybody probably believes that it's a fight. Songwriting is a treasure that's guarded by an enemy. And so in order to capture it, you must fight every day of your life. Not to be all dark and wage war-ish, but, we gotta wage some war. The hardest part of songwriting is what? Songwriting. You know, you always got something else to do. Or there's always a voice in your head that says not to do it. And I promise, lest you think it only happens to new writers I have this happen every day. I've just finally learned, oh, this is part of it. This is what I'm gonna fight every day. And especially when you've been doing it a long time, you can kinda even get more in your head, 'cause you're like, what if I don't know how to do anything current? So if you give up, then the enemy will win. So what exactly is the enemy? I do like how Kevin Pressfield, who wrote the Legend of Bagger Vance, but he has a book called The War of Art which I would highly recommend you all read. There's some swearing, but read it anyway. But he calls the enemy resistance. And he says any act that entails commitment of the heart is a reason for resistance. In other words, any act that rejects immediate gratification in favor of long term growth, health, or integrity, or any act that derives from our higher nature instead of our lower, will elicit resistance. Resistance cannot be seen, touched, heard, or smelled, but it can be felt. And the more important – get this. The more important a call or action is to our soul's evolution, the more resistance we will feel toward pursuing it. Ouch. And resistance takes all different forms. Sometimes it's you, right? It's the lack of discipline. That's what it is for me, a lot. I just wanna do all the other fun things. And I wanna think about songwriting, really I do. But, maybe I'll get to it. That's why scheduling is so key. And there are voices in your head, and that's why scheduling and showing up every day is so key. It diminishes the voices, I promise you. Sometimes it's 'cause you got a eat, and so you gotta work. So that's also why finding that time every week and putting it on a calendar can be so awesome to do. Another key in fighting resistance is knowing the people who are in your space. Knowing the people who are awesome and can hold you accountable, like probably some folks you've met here, and learning the people who are not safe for you to play music for. Another way to protect what you're writing, and who the safe people are not, when you're fighting resistance. Now, for those of us who are believers, who are people of faith, we know there is a deeper resistance from an enemy that is full-on against you. And especially when it comes to pursuing a gift that God has given you to inspire others.

– X O'Connor. I love it, we're here in the studio on this exciting day, episode 100.

– 100.

– Recapping some of our favorite moments from the Full Circle Music show, and… Tyler Bryant.

– Tyler Byant, man.

– Good choice.

– Man, my favorite, dude, we sat down with him, I remember it was kind of last minute, I got a call early in the morning like, hey, I think we're gonna do some Tyler Byrant interview today. So I remember driving down, and I was super pumped, I'd loosely known him from being in bands around Nashville and I was like, I love this dude's music, I'm excited to talk to this guy. And to sit down with him, he's a young kid, you know, and he's just got his head on in a way that very few other artist, songwriters, any musical person does, he just realizes that hard work comes above all else, everything in life. And this guy, his band is successful, but not necessarily at radio. No real radio number ones, no nothing like that, but he plays hundred thousand seat venues. It's like, that blows my mind. And to just hear him speak about hard work. No one's gonna work harder for you than you're gonna work for yourself, so take every opportunity that you've got and just make something out of it.

– Yeah, I love it, and I think he even shared in the episode something about, they do a lot in Europe.

– Yeah.

– And I think a fan, they were playing somewhere in Spain and a fan had like, tooken a night train like across…

– Across the continent, literally.

– The entire continent to get there, and they were so pumped about it. And you can just tell that when an artist is engaged, and the fans can tell that you really care, as the artist, they're gonna care.

– Yeah, absolutely, and… that was something that he also spoke about a lot in this interview is relationship building. Not just with the people around you, but with the fans. The fans can feel that level of commitment that you have to them. But then on the business side, too. They've been around labels and all that stuff a lot, and I just love the mentality of, be honest with the people you're with. Even if it's a hard conversation to have with somebody, the honesty is gonna preserve that relationship in the future. I think he talked about them leaving their label to kind of go out on their own, and the conversation he had with the label after the fact, like, hey, you guys are still always on the list at a Shakedown show, come out any time, you guys worked hard for us, just, it's time for us to go do something else. And I love that mentality.

– Yeah, and we went and saw them in Nashville at… Was it 12th?

– 3rd and Lindsley.

– 3rd and Lindsley, which is a really cool venue. And it was one of the best live shows I think I've ever seen.

– Yeah, they go for it. It's so tight, but it's just raw rock and roll. It was a fun night, I hadn't been to a show like that in a while.

– No click tracks.

– No click, it's just guys on stage just going for it, rock and rolling. I loved it, man, it was so much fun to just sit there and just, be like, yep, these guys own it. This is great.

– Inspiring.

– Inspiring, for sure.

– Well here's a clip from the Full Circle Music show episode with Tyler Bryant of Tyler Bryant and the Shakedown.

– [Tyler] We've talked about it a little bit, but I come from a blues background, I learned to play from an old bluesman in Texas. Even as a kid, I was offered a record deal, and it was like, we're gonna set you up with other kids and we're gonna start a band, and I was like, no, man, I just wanna play the blues. I wanna make, like, I remember Lyric Street records gave me a little $10,000 check to go make some recordings. I think they were legitimately upset when I handed them back like three Freddie King covers that I had made. You know, it's like, what did you expect, man? And I still kinda have that mentality where, I don't know if you guys ever have dove into this on your show, I'm sure you have, 'cause it's something that I feel like a lot of artists struggle with. It's mixing art, something that really moves you, and commerce. Let's eat and let's survive, and so all we try to do in our band is have a little bit of both, you know?

– [X] Yeah, yeah. So touring has been your bread and butter. Let's just talk about that, how do you get invited out on a AC/DC or Guns ‘n Roses Tour without radio, without big number one chart topping songs?

– [Tyler] It's hard to say, honestly. I think one, you gotta believe in what you're doing, you have to be convicted every time you put on a guitar. Whether it's in a writing room, whether it's in a coffee shop. That's what, you know, I have kids ask me at our shows who have bands, like, how do you get on these tours, how do you get these shows going? And it's like, you literally play every show you get offered. Whenever I was starting out, I had a fake email account. And I was the band's manager, my name was like Sarah, or something like this, and I represented, this was before the Shakedown, I represented Tyler Bryant.

– [X] What's the Spinal Tap manager?

– [Tyler] Yeah, and it would, there was another time where it's like, I literally called the box office of the House of Blues. This is when I was younger, I called them every single day until they finally told one of the booking agents, this guy won't stop calling, he wants to play. And he called me and was like, dude, you can't call the box office and book a show. And I was like, but, can you book me?

– [X] Yeah

– [Tyler] And he's like send me some recordings. So I sent him some recordings and some videos and he put my band on for Dickie Betts. And then I called the Dallas morning news, and I was like, my band's playing, opening up for Dickie Betts of the Allman Brothers, I think you should come film it and do a story. And they did, and it's that kind of hustle that I think is, what I've learned that we have to do because it's, any time we've waited on someone else to do something for us we fall short, and so it's, I think those, it's funny because we were at CAA, the booking agency for a long time, and they did great things for us, and after about a year and a half of not touring as much as we'd like, we thought, let's make a change, let's move agencies. But we had such a good relationship with our agent that he'd become family, it's a guy named John Huie. And so we left. We were on the road supporting Billy Gibbons from ZZ Top and I get a call from Huie going, he's just like, I love you guys and I wanted to know if it would be okay if I pitched you for the AC/DC world tour. And, of course we said yes, but this is someone who's not our agent. So that's where… Maintaining relationships, and always shooting people straight, and even if it's a tough conversation going, like, I think we have to move somewhere else, because we're not getting the love here. They kill it with country acts out of Nashville, and I'm sure that the rock department does great, too. We just weren't getting the love that we needed. Because maybe what we were doing didn't move them there, but I think even when a relationship has to stop, it doesn't – professionally, it doesn't have to stop emotionally and I think that's, you know. We're all from the South and believe in Southern hospitality and shooting people straight even when it's a tough conversation, and I think that's helped benefit our band.

– [X] Well I love that, because there's so many bands that we come across that are just constantly complaining about their teams. They're like, my label's not doing this, my manager's not doing this, we don't have our publisher getting songs on sync, our publicist is not scheduling – it's just excuses and complaining about people not doing stuff for them. And what I'm hearing you say is like, screw that, do it yourself.

– [Tyler] Oh yeah, absolutely. We just made our own record, and I called a few of the people from Universal Republic after we got out of our deal, and it was sort of an, I think both parties were like, this isn't really working for us. We weren't giving them what they need to do what they do best, and they were like, you guys just aren't setting yourself up to win. But I talked to a few people from the label who were like, wait, you guys aren't with us anymore? It's like hey, listen, you're always on the guest list at a Shakedown show, you guys come out, thanks for putting in the work, man. Because it's hard to find people to work for you, and it's hard to find people who will work as hard as you will, so you have to do it yourself. Or at least, even like when it comes to making music videos or setting up photo shoots, or finding the direction. I feel like that has to come from the artist, because I feel like a lot of artists fall short when they're waiting on someone else to show them the direction.

– Here at Full Circle Music studios with Jericho Scroggins.

– Hey, hey.

– Thanks for being on the show today, buddy.

– Thank you for having me.

– I love the clip that you picked, it was a Michael W. Smith interview, it was honestly one of my favorite ones to do. Why don't you talk just a little bit about what stood out to you from that, and why people should go back and listen to it?

– Yeah. The initial part of it is how he was talking about the start of his career, and even how that's when he got married with Debbie, that was like in '81. So when the Amy Grant thing and all that kind of stuff, it was a very busy time for his career. And so they saw a bunch of marriages around that time falling apart. And so he does think it's hard for people to tour 200, 250 shows a year and keep a healthy marriage. So it was super cool to hear how he… One thing I didn't know about Michael and his career was, he was never away from his family more than two weeks. And it was just, like, mind-blowing to me thinking about that, just knowing his career and that kind of stuff. And so just how he goes through and talks about the priorities of that. You do have a career, but you also have family, and making sure they know where priorities lie and stuff like that, and his family always came above his career.

– Yeah, and we get to interview a lot of super achievers on the show, so it's always cool to see that, you know what, they've not only got their stuff together on a career level, 'cause obviously Michael W. Smith's the top of the top, but he was really good about keeping accountability in place, as well.

– Right. Yeah, that was definitely another part of it that I really liked, because, it's not only, like, when you go out and do your thing and that kind of stuff, still keeping a good group of, a team around you, that makes sure you're still doing what you're supposed to be doing. Whether it's heart-wise, faith-wise, even mind-wise, you know what I mean? Like making sure it's, even having them help him keep accountable to making sure he makes it home every two weeks. Or being a servant on the road, and things like that.

– Yeah, and another really cool thing that I think you mentioned was this idea about talking to the younger you. What did you mean by that?

– Yeah, there's this cool part where, it's the giving the advice to the younger you part. And it really stood out to me when he said, if I could tell the younger me, I would say it's not about you. And what he means by that is like, just earlier on realizing… Yeah, you're given these gifts and stuff like that, but realistically the gifts help other people, it's being a servant, making sure you're using the gifts for the right reason. Everybody wants to be successful, but it's like, how you wanna be successful dictates a different way in the way you look at it, and that kind of stuff, and that's his thing. Earlier on he looked at it a little bit differently, like, how many CDs does he sell, how good was the merch and that kind of stuff, and he realized pretty early on after that, he's like, it's not about that. It's not about you. Is he reaching the lives, is he reaching other people, and I think that goes across anything we do. The stuff we work on, even we don't go out there and tour with it, but it's still putting in the 100%, because at the end of the day, it's not about me.

– That's right.

– It's about that.

– Yeah, that's good. Well here is a clip from our Full Circle Music Show episode with Michael W. Smith.

– [Seth] Thinking back over all the years being an artist I think one of the things that I struggle with and a lot of young artists, or writers, or producers struggle with is the whole balance of being a creative versus being a good family man. How have you found balance over the years to kinda keep all of that together, what's the secret for that?

– [Michael] Well, we made the rule, Deb and I, when this thing started really taking off, in the Amy thing, and then did the Friends tour, Big Picture tour, we started having children.

– [Seth] So you were married early.

– [Michael] I got married in '81 to Deb, so it'll be 35 years this year.

– [Seth] Congratulations.

– Thank you.

– That's amazing.

– [Michael] She's awesome. But we knew, I think we probably really knew, probably when I did the Lead Me On tour, which was… Probably the most successful, other than the Change Your World tour it was probably the most successful tour I've ever been a part of, 'cause we sold out arenas, me and Amy, all around the country, and in other countries, as well. And we just started seeing people in our genre and in other genres, when it came to being entertainers and all that sort of thing that marriages were falling apart left and right. And so we, I remember just having a talk with Deb and just going, you know… If we don't make some rules, there's probably more chances of us being a casualty than not. And we're not gonna be a casualty. And so we just made the rule, I'm not gonna ever be gone more than two weeks from my family, ever. Even if I had to cross the pond, and come back, and cross it again. And I was never gone from Deb and the kids for more than two weeks. Had a little aircraft, and I don't talk about that much, it was worth every penny, I thought, I've gotta get home to my family. And a lot of times I'd do a show and I would literally walk off stage, and got in a car, and I was on the jet and I was home at midnight and I'm driving carpool at 7:15. I did that for twelve-and-a-half years. And I think if you talked to my kids, I think, I think if you could have a private one-on-one, I think they would all say, we were more important to my dad than his career was. And now I got all these young bands, I got some of these young kids are all starting to come to me and ask me exactly what you asked me. And I think that's part of my role in the future is to sort of be a fatherly role and try to help kids. I just don't think you can do 250 shows on the road and keep a family together. And they say, well, we gotta pay the bills, we gotta make the house payment. My response is, then buy a smaller house.

– [Seth] Wow. Is there anything that you would kinda say to the younger you when you were first getting into it that you're like, okay, you might wanna do that a little differently. Is there anything that kinda comes to mind like that?

– [Michael] Well, I think heart-wise, I mean, obviously, we all grow up, we all make mistakes. If we really are seeking the Lord, we all get a little wiser as we get older, but I'd probably go back and tell myself at 23, 24 years old, I'd probably just say dude, it's not about you. That's probably the first thing I would say. I was so, like, how many records did we sell, and did we sell any t-shirts, and it was just so like… And it's hard, 'cause you're excited, and you wanna be successful and I think I just wish I'd have seen the bigger picture a little bit. And that's probably what I'd say to these young kids going, why are you here? Reconnect with why you're here, because you're not here to be a superstar. But there's nothing wrong with being successful, at all, but it just can't drive you, it can't just encompass everything that you do, it just can't. I always say, what's your contribution, think about… Even in the hard times, and trying to get the thing off the ground, are you making a contribution, are you changing somebody's life? So, it's that kind of stuff I'd probably say, and then, if I had to say something on the musical level, I'd say it all starts with a song.

– X O'Connor sitting here with Mr. Seth Mosley, founder of Full Circle Music. Getting ready to talk a little podcast action. So, your favorite episode out of the, we're at episode 100 now.

– Crazy, absolutely crazy.

– Yeah.

– And your favorite one was with Chris Houser under very interesting circumstances, from what I remember, kinda spontane, spontaneous.

– It was very spontane, I like that slang.

– You know, it's kinda like pre-Fontaine, that runner guy, but it's spontane, it kinda flows off the tongue.

– This was a spontane moment, we were in the car, actually on a radio tour, and one thing that I've learned by doing a podcast is, we're really, as sort of journalists, trying to bring interesting stories to our audience about stuff that they'll actually care about, you kinda just have to be ready at all times. So I've got this little pocket recorder and a couple microphones, I stuck it in the bag 'cause I felt like we might have some interesting conversations on this Matt Hammitt radio promo tour. I went out with him at the beginning of the year to promote his first single, ‘Tears', off his record. And so I just brought it with me, and we were spending a lot of time in the car, so I was like, okay, there's gonna be something good. So it was under interesting circumstances, but I think, what I've loved about our podcast is when our guests kinda just go off the rails a little bit and just feel free to tell stories, and just crazy. And Chris is such a great story teller. So it was one of my favorite episodes. And not only because of the episode itself, but really because of my story and how I met Chris in the first place. And one thing that he did that stuck out to me that I'll never forget, we touch on that in the podcast, as well.

– I love it. And he's known for hitting as many radio stations as humanly possible in a very brief time. I believe you said he has a record. Do you remember what the record is?

– He does have a record, he said he hit 13 stations in three days.

– Now, were you a part of that 13 stations in three days?

– I think we did, maybe, we might have done eight in two days.

– Eight in two, that's still rather impressive.

– It was a decent few. But I love it because, so often in this business we think about the result more than the relationship. And one thing that he drove home that you'll hear in this clip is that he talks about, really what he does for a living is to get to go talk to his friends about music that he loves. He actually cares about the people. And there are very few people that I know in life, let alone in music, in anything, that have spent three decades serving one group of people. And that's just dedication.

– Man, you said it right there.

– Yep.

– It's powerful.

– I'm ready to go back and listen to the episode myself.

– Me too.

– So let's jump into this episode with Chris Houser.

– [Seth] You talked about you started tapping into your skillset which, I don't even know if you remember this but when I first moved to Nashville, I talk a lot about this on our podcast that my first record that I got was Newsboys, Take Me to Your Leader, and my first label record I produced was this one called Newsboys Born Again which you were working on.

– Yes.

– [Seth] And I think I met you once, maybe at Wes' house. Then I saw you, I don't know, a month later or something and you were like, hey, Seth, it's good to see you, and the fact that you even just remembered my name —

– Oh, wow.

– was huge.

– [Seth] To me, your competitive advantage is you actually care about people and you're great with relationships.

– [Chris] Thank you, man. That means a lot, and again, it's a, this is a small industry we're in, and I'm in my 30th year of promotion, radio promotion. And I think I'm starting to get it figured out, but every once in a while something comes along and surprises me, but I've seen a lot of people come in and go out from this industry, and one of my favorite clients, Brash Music, who had Aaron Shust, and Gunger, their MO was life's too short to work with jerks. And I also believe very strongly that you reap what you sow, and whatever you sow, you reap way more, and you reap way later. It's just the way it is. You can go out to a field with a handful of seeds and throw it out into the field, you don't go out the next day and say oh my gosh, look at all the growth. It takes a long time, but all the growth that comes into a field from one handful of seeds. And so I've always tried to be about sowing good seed, doing my best to love people well, and not losing myself in the process, which at times has been a challenge for me. Yeah dude, I don't remember meeting you, and I wish I did, but it's been an amazing thing to watch your trajectory as well, and to be doing this. We're on a promo tour right now.

– [Seth] Yeah, that's the fun thing right now, we're out with an artist named Matt Hammitt.

– [Matt] Yeah, what's up?

– [Seth] We're actually promoting his new single, Tears. So this is what you do all the time, right?

– [Chris] Yes, so these radio stations, we're visiting six, seven radio stations in two days, my record is 13 stations in three days.

– [Seth] Wow.

– [Chris] That was up in the Midwest, that involved taking a high-speed ferry across Lake Michigan, from Muskegon, Michigan over to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, dropping off one rental car, picking up another rental car and continuing to go. But these radio stations have a hard job, they've got 50 to 75 singles getting work to them every week by 30 to 35 record promoters, both between labels and indies. And so one of the ways that we get noticed is by bringing artists directly to them. And Matt is so beloved for, you know, radio stations are gonna play Lead Me every day until Jesus comes back. It's just a matter of fact, no one's gonna get tired of Lead Me by Sanctus Real. And so I never worked a Sanctus Real record, I've watched them from afar and been so impressed with them and their ministry, and so, there are other people you could go to. But you came to me to take this record to radio, I'm very honored by it, but in addition, I'm moved by it. I have to love, this is what I tell people. I make a great living talking to my friends all day long about music I love.

– [Seth] That's a pretty good job.

– [Chris] So I turn down the records I don't love. I take the records that move me, and the records that I love, by artists that I respect. And, I'm calling my friends, I'm not calling adversaries, I'm not talking to people at radio that I have to buffalo, or steamroll, or belittle, or slam a phone down and swear, and call them jerks behind their backs. I love these people, these are my friends, so I get to just go bring Matt and you, Seth, to my friends for the next two days. And these are people who work hard, like me, back in the day, they do it way better than me but none of them are making major amounts of money. They're doing this for love and calling, and yet, they're the venue, they're the avenue that we will go through to get this song on the air. And it's already impacting countless, thousands of people around the country in a very, very short amount of time.

– [Seth] Yeah, well even, on the Sirius Highway, or Sirius XM The Message, they debuted the lyric video, we were just looking on the way up here and it's already at 37,000 views and 893 shares, which is a pretty substantial metric for a brand new label, essentially relaunching an artist.

– [Chris] Yes.

– [Seth] So that's a huge thing.

– [Chris] Yes.

– [Seth] Are you ever surprised and shocked with like a song that you think is gonna work doesn't work, or a song that you don't think is gonna work just blows up?

– [Chris] Yes. I would say, my joke on that is, through years of therapy I've been able to mellow out a little bit. But there were times 10 and 15 years ago that I was sure a song was gonna be a smash, and nobody wanted it. It's like these 115 radio PDs got together in a smoky room somewhere and all decided what they were going to tell us promoters for the next year, and then they'd all go like, break! And they'd clap hands and they'd walk out. And so when I would get this massive pushback on a song, in the early days of this kinda promotion, I would go like, I don't know what a hit is anymore, I've lost it. And then I would go to the next step, I'm like, Am I even a Christian? And then I'd go all the way to like, God, are you even there, if I can't… And so, again, years of therapy have helped mellow me out, and life experience, just to get into a better spot of going, you know what, sometimes I'm wrong, a lot of times I'm right, and sometimes it's the radio stations that will say, oh, no, that's not a hit. I try to slow the no, I try to slow them down, because it's like, if you make a pronouncement, a negative pronouncement on a song this early, it's gonna be that much harder for you to admit you're wrong eight months down the line, six months down the line, let's just calm down, you tell me no now, that's fine. I'm just gonna find 20 people that you respect and get them to play the song, and we'll come back around, we'll just keep talking about it.

– [Seth] And those people they respect, is that other radio promoters?

– [Chris] No, no, other radio stations.

– [Seth] Radio stations.

– [Chris] Other radio stations. So then they're watching around to see who else, 'cause it's all defensive posturing and maneuvering. It's all, they don't wanna add a record, a radio station will say, we'll never be hurt by a record we don't play. Do you get that?

– [Seth] Wow.

– [Chris] We can never be hurt by a record we don't play, meaning, we might be hurt if we go too early on a song that our listeners end up not liking. So we'd rather watch the landscape and see what people are playing out here, and it's like, okay, that's fine. There are leaders, there are followers. If you need to be a follower on this, no harm, no foul, we're just gonna keep working this.

– So I'm sitting here with Logan Crockett, VP of marketing for Full Circle Music and, man, what a ride it's been, we're on episode 100 on the Full Circle Music Show and we're talking about our favorites, favorite moments, and why listeners should probably go back and listen to some. And I love that you picked the Tony Wood episode. So what stood out to you about that, and why should people go back and listen?

– Yeah, for sure. So with me, my perspective on the podcast is probably a little bit different from a lot of the rest of the staff. I've been around for just over a year, now actually working for Full Circle, but initially, listening to this podcast, I was, completely from the outside looking in, I was just, kinda like a lot of the people probably listening and/or watching this, someone just trying to kind of find their lane, their path in the music industry. And this episode with Tony Wood and this clip that we're about to play just really stuck out to me as something that I've never, ever forgotten. For so long, I mean I've been pursuing the music industry for years. And it always felt like, man, if you can just get kinda that one meeting with that publisher or that record later, or whatever company, just meet that right person and get that connection. If you can just do that, that's kind of hopefully the gateway to greater things, that kind of, getting that meeting, basically. But in this clip, Tony explained that it was so much more about getting meeting number two than about getting meeting number one. Because it really does make sense, getting meeting number two means that, if you had meeting number one, they have to like you enough to invite you back. And the way that Tony explained it in this clip, it was just, it was such a massive mindset shift for me because it just, it reformed my entire strategy for what I was trying to do with the music industry. It became so much more about okay, yes, meeting one obviously has to happen, but actually that's the easy part. So my goal was how do I get meeting number two? Meeting number one kinda flew out the window, and everything became about how do I score meeting number two, no matter what relationship I'm building, no matter what opportunity I'm pursuing. The goal became meeting number two.

– Yeah, and in music, it's often about finding someone who is really where you want to be. And kind of emulating them. Wasn't there something that stood out in the episode about that, in particular?

– Yeah he, Tony had kinda got his start thanks to someone named Tom Long, who was kinda that first person who really believed in him and helped introduce him to other people. And that was another big mindset thing for me, too, was this idea that, there's a lot in the music industry that you can control, there's a lot of things that you can do yourself to push yourself forward, but, it's going to be really, really, really difficult to get where you ultimately want to be if you're not finding someone else who can kinda elevate you. You need to find a champion, or a guide, someone who can get you further along the steps that you need to go.

– I love it, and there's also this concept of, do your homework that Tony hits on, what did you mean by that, 'cause you were saying that that stood out to you.

– Yeah. So yeah, again, all this stuff is in the clip that we're about to play, but Tony, it's a very kind of quick comment that Tony mentions, but when he was first meeting these other writers around town, and other publishers, he said that he did his homework on who they were and what they were up to. So basically, that really stood out to me 'cause now working for Full Circle, we have a lot of people who come through a lot of our events and things like that, but it feels like a lot of them haven't done their homework. A lot of them don't know like even, who is Full Circle and what are the different things that we do, what songs have we been working on, things like that. Normally I'm on a lot of calls with people through our academy and things like that, normally I have to completely explain almost from ground zero, what it is that we do, who we are, things like that. Not the case for everyone, but all that to say is if you are pursuing the music industry, before, and this kinda goes back into meeting one versus meeting two but before you get meeting one, make sure you do your homework, so that way you're giving your best first impression, and you're having amazing talking points when you do finally have the opportunity to sit down and have those interactions.

– That's good. One thing that I love that we get to do with the academy, with our events, with courses and all of this stuff that we're doing is that we're helping dreamers, essentially. And there's kind of this common thread that we've heard, and I think you mentioned that Tony hits on this in the podcast. But this concept of, just trying, just giving it a try.

– Yeah.

– And why is that important, do you think?

– Towards the end of the clip that we're about to play, Tony mentioned kind of his ultimate motivation towards, the big jump to moving to Nashville and pursuing all these opportunities. And his whole thing was like, you know, there's so many great opportunities in life. You don't have to be in the music industry, not everyone is meant to be in the music industry. The music industry is very competitive, not everyone who wants to be in it is going to be in it. But Tony's whole point was, that just really resonated with me was this idea of man, like if I don't just try and kind of give it everything that I have, a no is okay. Like if I meet the right people, and if I'm perfecting my craft and it's not good enough to be where it needs to be for the industry, then at least I tried, and I can live with that. But his big thing was like, man, if I don't try and give it all that I have, I won't be able to live with that. And that just resonated so much with me at the time, 'cause again, this was like, I think early 2016. So again, at the time, my involvement in the music industry was a little limited, I'd recently gotten out of college with my music business degree. I had a really great marketing job, but I wasn't that involved in the music industry, I was like running sound with my church and some things like that. But I knew that… In my being, I'm like, the music industry is where I ultimately want to be. And I was in a place where I kinda had a good job and all that sort of thing, but it was like, man, can I live with it if I don't do all that I can to get myself down to Nashville, to pursue these opportunities. And Tony just saying that, it's like, it was like he was speaking for me in that moment. Like yes, like that is ultimately where I'm at and I decided, there is no way that I will be able to live with it if I don't try, and give it all that I have, no matter what the outcome is.

– And here you are.

– Indeed.

– Fruit of the podcast, that's awesome. Well here is a clip from Tony Wood interview on the Full Circle Music Show.

– ASCAP was real helpful to me early as a songwriter, there was a conference that they offered like about five or six Monday nights in a row in October, where they brought in writers, producers, publishers, some great instruction. Something in that that was so significant, songwriter Dwight Liles said, the hardest meeting to get in Nashville with a publisher is not the first meeting, the hardest meeting to get is the second meeting. And it just killed me in that moment, 'cause I am such an introvert. And they would use the word networking and I hate the word, 'cause networking feels like, walk across this room and introduce yourself to this stranger, and tell them why they need to get to know you. And it's like, it's against everything within me, I'd rather just take a beating than do that. And I was like oh, no, if the hardest meeting to get is the second one, I'd better be ready when I get that, when I finally get the nerve up to go introduce myself, I gotta know that I'm ready. So that sends me into a month or so of panic about what do I do, what do I do. And I came up with this idea, Tom Long was the head of membership at ASCAP at that time, and he had put the conference on. The conference had happened three or four months earlier and I'd been stewing on that. And so here was the first professional initiation for me, I picked up the phone and I called Tom. And I said Tom, in the course that you moderated, somebody said the hardest meeting to get with a publisher is not the first, the hardest is the second. I need to be ready, I need somebody to tell me if I'm ready. And here comes the ask, Tom, will you be that man for me? And Tom says well, nobody's kinda ever asked me that, but okay, I tell you what, every couple of months, give me a call, bring me some of the lyrics that you're writing, and I'll take a look at them and tell you. I can't tell my story without such gratitude to Tom, Tom Long, for that. So I take the first meeting with Tom Long, walk in, the three current pieces of paper that I've typed up, put them on his desk, sit there, quietly feeling my organs separating while he's reading them all, just the tension, just dying right there. And Tom reads three and says, I've got some people you need to meet, get in the car. Drove me around to four publishers. I had done my homework, I knew who the publishers, I knew these people, I knew who their writers were, I knew the songs that they were having success with at that point. The first three dismissed me pretty quickly and go, eh, thanks but no thanks, and the fourth one was Michael Puryear who was with a small company, Lorenz Creative Services that was going at the time. They had just signed Steven Curtis, though before his first record, that was his first home, and they had recently signed Marcus Hummon who wrote God Bless the Broken Road. So it was kind of this small little boutique thing that was going, and Michael is more of a lyric guy, and he said, oh, why don't you start hanging around here some, and let me see if I can get some of our guys to write with you. And that was… The life changing moment for me, I'm so grateful to Michael for early belief in me.

– [Seth] Sure. So, backing up, 'cause just the move to Nashville is such a huge leap of faith in the moment, I don't wanna gloss over that, for you and your wife. I'm sure that was just like a monumental thing. How does somebody know when they're ready to do that.

– [Tony]Nobody knows, there is no knowing, there is nobody that's gonna say the time is right. It is that line between faith and foolishness. That's so close in there, you don't know. But I remembered, there was a point when I was finishing up school and still writing frantically, accumulating lots of sheets of paper. And they were in a box kinda under a bed. Early 20s, and I remember thinking, I can't imagine hitting 50 and not knowing, and not trying. I could live if I dared to show those to somebody and they said, ah, thanks but no, there's really not a place for you. But I couldn't live with myself if I didn't at least try. I remember sometimes feeling almost claustrophobic at that thought like, if I hit 50, and I've never at least tried, I almost couldn't breathe thinking about that. So that was some of the motivation that, you know if they had said, no thanks, go away, I could've lived with that, I could've gone and gotten, I could've worked at a church and been real happy with that, knowing that I tried. But not trying just was killer.

– [X] Hey everyone, this is X O'Connor and you've been listening to the Full Circle Music Show, they why of the music biz, hope everyone enjoyed our episode 100, the special episode. It's impossible to believe that it's been 100 episodes already. And again, this is our last episode for a little bit, we're gonna be coming back at you with our brand new, re-imagined, rebranded podcast, the Made It in Music podcast, it's gonna be starting Monday, March 26th. It's so exciting, we're so pumped. So again, remember, March 26th, that's a Monday, that's gonna be the official beginning of the Made It in Music podcast. And we have some huge names already lined up for this, you guys are gonna be super excited about what we've got to come. It's gonna be more great content, for free, for you. We're looking forward to seeing you Monday, March 26th.

The post Episode 100: The Best of The Full Circle Music Show appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Jan 30, 2018
Ep99 - The Work and Love It Takes To Finish A Song with Kalley Heiligenthal
35:40



This week on the Full Circle Music Show, we have the ever so wonderful, Kalley Heiligenthal! Kalley is a worship leader and songwriter at Bethel Church and with Bethel Music in Redding, California. You may be familiar with some of her own songs, “Spirit Move” and “Ever Be”. 

Kalley takes us through the adventurous undertaking of writing “Ever Be”. Sometimes songs can be spontaneous or on the contrary, take years to come into full shape. This song is a perfect use of both time frames. Listen in as we explore the birth of a song and the work and love it takes to complete it.

Check us out at www.fullcirclemusic.com

Follow us on Instagram @officialFCMusic

Subscribe to our YouTube Page for more incredible resources just like this one, all FREE for our friends like you.

As always, thanks for listening and be sure to give us a review on iTunes if you have not already done so. We appreciate your feedback!

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Jan 23, 2018
FCM098 – Music Marketing Veteran Wisdom Moon Spills His Secrets and Strategies
58:55

This week on the Full Circle Music Show, Wisdom Moon drops by with a ton of wisdom! Wisdom is the Head of Marketing for Integrity Music and started the All About Worship Podcast (a resource that is dedicated to equip, encourage, and inspire worship leaders, worship teams, and Christian songwriters).

In this episode, Wisdom takes a few questions from our Instagram live audience. Topics range anywhere between how to get gigs as independent bands to how your bands Instagram account can become more successful and help you get attention.

This episode is a must-listen for any aspiring artist looking to take their songs to the next level and get noticed by labels!
Check us out at www.fullcirclemusic.com
Follow us on Instagram @officialFCMusic
Subscribe to our YouTube Page for more incredible resources just like this one, all FREE for our friends like you.
As always, thanks for listening and be sure to give us a review on iTunes if you have not already done so. We appreciate your feedback!

The post FCM098 – Music Marketing Veteran Wisdom Moon Spills His Secrets and Strategies appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Jan 16, 2018
FCM097 – How To Create A Winning Songwriter/Publisher Relationship with David Leonard & Mike Murray
33:53

This week on the Full Circle Music Show, we are live at our Songwriter’s Retreat. Mike Murray, Publishing at Integrity music and David Leonard, Singer/Songwriter from All Sons & Daughters bring their experiences and knowledge to the crowd.

They answer some of our questions such as what is the relationship like between publisher and songwriter and how can a songwriter get their first publishing deal? How to take an idea and write about it, and how to complete it…

This and so much more is discussed. You don’t want to miss this week’s episode with Mike and David!

Check us out at www.fullcirclemusic.com
Follow us on Instagram @officialFCMusic
Subscribe to our YouTube Page for more incredible resources just like this one, all FREE for our friends like you.
As always, thanks for listening and be sure to give us a review on iTunes if you have not already done so. We appreciate your feedback!

The post FCM097 – How To Create A Winning Songwriter/Publisher Relationship with David Leonard & Mike Murray appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Jan 09, 2018
FCM096 – Story Time with Andy Karp, A&R Legend Who Has Signed Kid Rock, Skillet, Simple Plan, and Many More
54:14

This week on the Full Circle Music Show, we were fortunate enough to sit down with legendary Atlantic Records head of A&R, Andy Karp. Andy signed artists such as Skillet, Kid Rock, Uncle Cracker and Simple Plan under Atlantic and Lava records through the 90’s and early 2000’s.

Andy gives us helpful tips to take our internships and make them the most beneficial and productive. But we must be willing to work HARD.

Join Andy, Seth, and X as they share stories you won’t want to miss on this week’s episode!

Check us out at www.fullcirclemusic.com
Follow us on Instagram @officialFCMusic
Subscribe to our YouTube Page for more incredible resources just like this one, all FREE for our friends like you.
As always, thanks for listening and be sure to give us a review on iTunes if you have not already done so. We appreciate your feedback!

The post FCM096 – Story Time with Andy Karp, A&R Legend Who Has Signed Kid Rock, Skillet, Simple Plan, and Many More appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Jan 02, 2018
FCM095 – Live From Our Songwriters Retreat with Tim Timmons
32:18


On this week’s Full Circle Music Show, our live Songwriting Retreat audience sat down with CCM Singer/songwriter, Tim Timmons.

Some helpful tips Tim has for you this episode:
• Try writing songs influenced from your prayers.
• Where does your motivation come from?
• Think and pray about this: Does the church need YOUR songs?
• How important should your hooks be? (Hint: VERY)
• And so much more…

This episode is a must-listen for anyone looking to take their songwriting and faith to the next level.
Check us out at www.fullcirclemusic.com
Follow us on Instagram @officialFCMusic
Subscribe to our YouTube Page for more incredible resources just like this one, all FREE for our friends like you.
As always, thanks for listening and be sure to give us a review on iTunes if you have not already done so. We appreciate your feedback!

The post FCM095 – Live From Our Songwriters Retreat with Tim Timmons appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Dec 28, 2017
FCM094 [SPECIAL EPISODE] – Christmas stories from today’s biggest Christian artists!
21:42

Bart Millard of MercyMe, Trevor McNevan of Thousand Foot Krutch, Colton Dixon, I Am They, Matt Hammitt, Tim Timmons, Seth and Jen from Skillet, and Seth Mosley all share some stories that you've never heard before, about Christmas. Some are absolutely hilarious, so listen all the way through to the end, even if you don't know some of these artists. It's worth the listen.

Big announcement coming in the next month about our podcast! So don't miss it.

As we head into Christmas 2017, we want to wish you the merriest of Christmases from our team here at Full Circle Music!

www.fullcirclemusic.com

The post FCM094 [SPECIAL EPISODE] – Christmas stories from today's biggest Christian artists! appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Dec 23, 2017
FCM093 – The Big Questions Music Makers Are Asking About Today’s Industry with Full Circle Music
53:32

We are live from Full Circle Music Academy's Songwriters Retreat. Here we have many music makers asking questions about the music industry. The how to's on publishing, writing songs, future of music, music and family, etc. You get to hear from our staff give insight on each of these questions.

Seth Mosley – Founder of Full Circle Music and Songwriter/Producer

X – Producer/Engineer

Stacey Willbur – VP of A&R and Publishing

Jerricho Scroggins – VP of Operations and Engineer

Logan Crockett – VP of Marketing

To keep up with us throughout the week feel free to follow us on all socials @officialFCMusic

The post FCM093 – The Big Questions Music Makers Are Asking About Today's Industry with Full Circle Music appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Dec 12, 2017
FCM092 – How One Family Went from Farming to a Thriving Country Music Career: The Hunter Brothers
42:44

Hunter Brothers have had several country radio hits, including a current Top 10 with their song, “Born and Raised”, which was co-written by Seth Mosley, Brad Rempel from High Valley, and Jim Beavers, who has penned hits for Chris Stapleton, Tim McGraw, Luke Bryan, and more.

This episode is live from the Full Circle Music Academy Songwriter's Retreat, we have the Hunter Brothers telling you their story. How can a farmer, family man, and an ice hockey player have a music career? Listen to this podcast as these guys share the hurdles they have overcome and how they got to where they are today, as signed artists to Universal Records / Open Road Canada. 

Hunter Brothers' uncle is Jim Hunter, Canadian Olympic Skier, and their father was the first figure skater in the world to do a complete back-flip on ice.

Listen to this episode of the Full Circle Music Show and you'll see why the Hunter Brothers are among the most recognized up-and-coming acts to hit the country music scene.

www.fullcirclemusic.com
www.fullcirclemusicshow.com

Interview by Seth Mosley, Grammy-Winning Music Producer and Songwriter, Founder of Full Circle Music.

The post FCM092 – How One Family Went from Farming to a Thriving Country Music Career: The Hunter Brothers appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Dec 07, 2017
FCM091 – The 3 Key Elements of a Songwriting Career: with Ginny Owens
22:31

This week on the Full Circle Music Show, join our live Songwriting Retreat audience with Ginny Owens, a multiple Dove award-winning CCM Artist/Songwriter.

Ginny shares her heart and gives truths to being a successful songwriter. Throughout her 20+ year career, she has learned three key elements for a life of songwriting bliss:

1. Songwriting is a journey with a friend.
2. Songwriting is an art form.
3. Songwriting is a sought-after treasure guarded by an enemy.

This episode is a must-listen for any aspiring artist looking to take their songwriting to the next level.
Check us out at www.fullcirclemusic.com
Follow us on Instagram @officialFCMusic
Subscribe to our YouTube Page for more incredible resources just like this one, all FREE for our friends like you.
As always, thanks for listening and be sure to give us a review on iTunes if you have not already done so. We appreciate your feedback!

The post FCM091 – The 3 Key Elements of a Songwriting Career: with Ginny Owens appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Nov 28, 2017
FCM090 – Special Album Release Behind the Scenes with Matt Hammitt
37:58

Today's podcast is a special episode. Matt Hammitt has had an incredible journey. Most people met him during his days of Sanctus Real and so the big question is what has he been doing since then…

In this episode we hear about his journey from Sanctus Real til now. The walk of faith, trusting God, the trials his family has overcome, etc. All this can be heard and can also be heard throughout his new album that's available everywhere. 

This album was special for us since this was our first album released through our record label. We didn't believe the world needed another album but instead songs with a purpose and that's what Matt Hammitt's new album fulfills.

Follow @MattHammitt on all socials and signup for his email at matthammittmusic.com to keep up to date with what he's doing. Also make sure to follow @officialfcmusic to keep up to date with what we are doing as well.

The post FCM090 – Special Album Release Behind the Scenes with Matt Hammitt appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Nov 21, 2017
FCM089 – How To Win Record Label Attention with Jon Sell
33:05

This week on the Full Circle Music Show, Seth Mosley and X O’Connor, Grammy-Winning Music Producers, sit down with Jon Sell, Director of A&R at Capitol Christian Music Group. 

From online marketer to radio promoter to director of A&R, Jon shares his musical journey and gives great bits of advice on how to find your niche in the industry. Also, we go in depth to find out what things can help an artist get noticed, signed, and whether a label is the right route or if being independent could suit the artist better.

This one is a must-listen for any aspiring artist trying to be found.

Check us out at www.fullcirclemusic.com

Follow us on Instagram @officialFCMusic

Subscribe to our YouTube Page for more incredible resources just like this one, all FREE for our friends like you.

As always, thanks for listening and be sure to give us a review on iTunes if you have not already done so. We appreciate your feedback!

The post FCM089 – How To Win Record Label Attention with Jon Sell appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Nov 14, 2017
FCM088 – Don’t Compare Your Chapter One to Someone Else’s Chapter Thirty with Sam Tinnesz
37:14

On this week's Full Circle Music Show, Seth Mosley and X O'Connor, Grammy-Winning Music Producers, sit down with Sam Tinnesz, smash hit songwriter for Film and TV.

“Don't compare your chapter one to someone else's chapter thirty.”

Sam drops wisdom bomb after wisdom bomb on us, as he takes us through his story touring in a band and moving to Nashville, all the way up to having hits on Top 40 Radio and big songs in films like Spiderman: The Homecoming, The Hunger Games, Rio Olympics, and shows like the Walking Dead.

This one is a must-listen for any aspiring artist, songwriter, or musician.

Check us out at www.fullcirclemusic.com

Follow us on Instagram @officialFCMusic

Subscribe to our Youtube Page here for more incredible resources just like this one, all FREE for our friends like you.

The post FCM088 – Don't Compare Your Chapter One to Someone Else's Chapter Thirty with Sam Tinnesz appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Nov 07, 2017
FCM 087 – Mini Episode, 2 Life Changing Studio Tips from Seth Mosley and X O’Connor
12:57

We talk on our first mini episode about 2 huge things that every music producer needs to know.

We talk about 2 computer keys you should NEVER EVER EVER hit at the same time simultaneously in Pro Tools…

We talk about the main things important to setting a singer up to win when you're producing vocals…

And we also announce that we have less than 12 hours left in our 50% off Launch Sale for Music Production Mastery!

Get it before Midnight tonight CST at www.musicproductionmastery.com

And as a bonus to all of you podcast listeners, we are giving away my favorite module from the course, “The Birth of a Song”. It documents, for the first time in history, the beginnings of a songwriting process in our studio. It shows my thought process behind programming and making beats. And much, much more.

Get the FREE LESSON at www.fullcirclemusic.com/lesson

The post FCM 087 – Mini Episode, 2 Life Changing Studio Tips from Seth Mosley and X O'Connor appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Nov 01, 2017
FCM086 – The Remarkable Career Of A Music Producer with Matt Bronleewe
52:08

What do Chris Tomlin, Selena Gomez, DC Talk, Dierks Bentley, Michael W Smith, Natalie Imbruglia & Veggie Tales have in common?

Matt Bronleewe has been a mastermind producer and songwriter that has worked with all the above, and continues to spread his creative wings into areas even outside of music.

Some may say he is “The man that cannot be boxed in.” He is:

-Producer
-Songwriter
-Label Founder
-Artist
-Author

And has worked in genres across the board:

-Christian
-Country
-Pop
-Film and TV
-Rock

Bronleewe and Seth will discuss important topics to stay ahead of the game in the ever-changing music industry. Some topics to highlight:

– Always Stay Curious.

– Surround yourself with the right people.

– Be Entrepreneurial.

– Keep yourself reading a lot.

Are you interested in getting our brand-new course?!

Yesterday, October 30th, we re-released our Music Production Mastery Course. Bigger, better, and more detailed, 2.0 will be a must-have for all music producers and hopefully inspires you to stretch the boundaries. Head on over to musicproductionmastery.com to purchase and become a part of our Mastery Course.

Also, be sure to follow us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook at @officialfcmusic to stay up to date with everything going on in the world of Full Circle Music.

As always, thanks for listening and be sure to give us a review on iTunes if you have not already done so. We appreciate your feedback!

The post FCM086 – The Remarkable Career Of A Music Producer with Matt Bronleewe appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Oct 31, 2017
FCM085 – Real Stories from Music Production Mastery Course
1:09:00

Tyson, Jared, and Corey have the honor of closing out our Music Production Series month. Three music makers share what they have learned from our Music Production Mastery Course 1.0 as we await the release of our 2.0 Course!

Some producers, some songwriters and some performers, music making is what they do. They share stories of how they took their productions to the next level applying things they have learned from our course and help you decide if it can benefit you too. But we guarantee it will!

Interested in getting our brand-new course?!

Next Monday, October 30th, we will be releasing 2.0 of our Music Production Mastery Course. Bigger, better, and more detailed, 2.0 will be a must-have for all music producers and hopefully inspires you to stretch the boundaries.

Head on over to fullcirclegoeslive.com to register and become a part of our mailing list to get up to date information about the next Music Production Mastery Course and stay in touch with all things Full Circle Music.

Also, be sure to follow us on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook at @officialfcmusic to stay up to date with everything going on in the world of Full Circle Music.

As always, thanks for listening and be sure to give us a review on iTunes if you have not already done so. We appreciate your feedback!

The post FCM085 – Real Stories from Music Production Mastery Course appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Oct 25, 2017
FCM084 – The Making of A Hit: From Start to Finish with Calling Glory
43:40

Dana Potvin and Rico Acosta of Calling Glory are in the house! For the 3rd edition of our music production podcast series, Dana and Rico take us behind the scenes of what it was like to help create the first Music Production Mastery Course. They share their favorite stories and how they both have exponentially excelled in their own production of music since being a part of the course and taking the course. 

Interested in getting involved and wanting to take your production skills to the next level? 

Monday, October 30th we will be releasing 2.0 of our Music Production Mastery Course. Bigger, better, and more detailed, 2.0 will be a must-have for all music producers and hopefully inspire you to stretch the boundaries. 

Head on over to fullcirclegoeslive.com to register and become a part of our mailing list to get up to date information about the next Music Production Mastery Course and stay in touch with all things Full Circle Music. 

Also, be sure to follow us at our new Instagram and Facebook at @officialfcmusic to stay up to date with everything going on in the world of Full Circle Music. 

As always, thanks for listening and be sure to give us a review on iTunes if you have not already done so. We appreciate your feedback!

The post FCM084 – The Making of A Hit: From Start to Finish with Calling Glory appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Oct 18, 2017
FCM083 – 4 Must Have Tools that Music Producers Are Using and How We Use Them with Seth Mosley and X
40:16

This week on our Music Production Series, we had our own Seth Mosley and X O’Connor in the house! We talked extensively about 4 hacks to bring your productions to the next level.

Here they are listed for you in the order they appear in this episode:

Logic Pro X “Playlists”
Universal Audio Plugins
Tuning and Editing: Revoice Pro, Antares Auto-Tune, Celemony Melodyne, Flex Pitch (Logic Pro) and Elastic Audio (Pro Tools)
Referencing 
Take notes and apply these helpful tools and you’ll be sure to hear much improvement in your audio!

Also, be sure to follow us at our new Instagram and Facebook at @officialfcmusic to stay up to date with everything going on in the world of Full Circle Music.

As always, thanks for listening and be sure to give us a review on iTunes if you have not already done so. We appreciate your feedback!

The post FCM083 – 4 Must Have Tools that Music Producers Are Using and How We Use Them with Seth Mosley and X appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Oct 10, 2017
FCM082 – Producing Music for Film and TV with Tommee Profitt
40:27

This week begins our Music Production Series and we had the pleasure of interviewing Tommee Profitt. 

Tommee is a Dove Award Winning Producer/Composer/Songwriter signed to Capitol CMG and produces full-time in his studio in Franklin, TN. He works with signed artists, as well as independent clients of all genres, and has had his productions placed in Movie Trailers, Video Games, ABC, NBC, FOX, CBS, ESPN, MTV, VH1, HBO, CW, OWN, GOLF, Freeform, Showtime, Monday Night Football and more. 

In this podcast, we discuss topics relating to all things music production:

The balance of work and family
Balancing how much work to take on at a time
Finding good sample libraries for instruments that you program
And how producing music for film and television has its similarities as well as its many differences to Artist music production. 
Instrument Sample Libraries mentioned in this episode:

Berlin Strings by Orchestral Tools

Requiem Professional by 8DIO

CineBrass PRO by Cinesamples

Be sure to follow us at our new Instagram and Facebook at @officialfcmusic to stay up to date with everything going on in the world of Full Circle Music.

As always, thanks for listening and be sure to give us a review on iTunes if you have not already done so.

The post FCM082 – Producing Music for Film and TV with Tommee Profitt appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Oct 03, 2017
FCM081 – The Heart Of Music with Paul Colman
43:42

This week we had the pleasure of interviewing guitarist/songwriter formerly of the Newsboys and Paul Colman Trio, Paul Colman! 

In this episode, we discuss some of the issues songwriters have in the Christian music industry. We talk Christian music stereotypes and how Paul desires every artist to stay true to themselves and not conform to the artist before them. 

Hear what Paul has to say; it’s powerful and will speak to your heart. 

Be sure to follow us at our new Instagram and Facebook at @officialfcmusic to stay up to date with everything going on in the world of Full Circle Music.

As always, thanks for listening and be sure to give us a review on iTunes if you have not already done so.

The post FCM081 – The Heart Of Music with Paul Colman appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Sep 26, 2017
FCM080 – Leap Of Faith: The Realities Of Going All In Into The Music Industry with Steve Marcia
37:02

This week on the Full Circle Music Show, we welcome guitarist Steve Marcia! Steve was recently the Music Director at Buckhead Church in Atlanta, Georgia. Some of Steve’s credits include Francesca Battistelli, Brand X Music, Mercy Me, Phil Wickham, Fee Band, Tommy Walker, Shane & Shane and many more. 

We answer many questions you may have about Worship leading, being a touring musician and having family influence your music. A few things we talk about this episode: 

What type of person does it take to lead people in worship?
What does serving the song mean?
What it takes to make you desirable in the industry.
How do you get a gig on the road as a touring musician? Is there a more simple road to success?
Ways your family can impact and fuel your passion through them championing you.
Be sure to follow us at our new Instagram and Facebook at @officialfcmusic to stay up to date with everything going on in the world of Full Circle Music.

As always, thanks for listening and be sure to give us a review on iTunes if you have not already done so.

The post FCM080 – Leap Of Faith: The Realities Of Going All In Into The Music Industry with Steve Marcia appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Sep 20, 2017
FCM079 – How To Make Songwriting A Career Instead Of A Hobby Live From FCMA Songwriters Retreat 2017
32:29

This week we bring you a professional songwriting panel recorded live at Full Circle Music Studios at our Songwriting Retreat Secret Event. Joining our panel, we have Marti Dodson (Saving Jane), Ben Calhoun (Citizen Way), and veteran songwriters Tony Wood and Bruce Wallace (We know what you are thinking but no, not Bruce Willis).

Seth Mosley moderates the panel and asks a series of questions that attendees of our secret event came up with:

– How do you get through writer’s block?
– How did you get into the industry and get a publishing deal?
– How often or what length of time are you writing each week?
– How do you know when a song is good enough and when do you know when it’s finished?
– What inspires you?

Be sure to follow us at our new Instagram and Facebook at @officialfcmusic to stay up to date with everything going on in the world of Full Circle Music.

As always, thanks for listening and be sure to give us a review on iTunes if you have not already done so.

The post FCM079 – How To Make Songwriting A Career Instead Of A Hobby Live From FCMA Songwriters Retreat 2017 appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Sep 12, 2017
FCM078 – Aspiring Artist and Veteran Manager A Father Daughter Story with Tori Harper and Dave Steunebrink
34:15

Tori Harper is an up and coming 19-year-old songwriter and artist from Nashville, TN. Whether she is performing solo, with her band, leading in Worship, or performing featured appearances, Harper's goal is the same, to make Christ known and to point her audience to the truth of the gospel. She has been working on her debut album that will release soon. Her newest singles are out now and can be streamed on Spotify and Apple Music. 

She is joined by her manager (who is also her father), Dave Steunebrink (Paramore and Tenth Avenue North Artist manager) on this episode of the Full Circle Music Show. 

Be sure to follow us at our new Instagram and Facebook at @officialfcmusic to stay up to date with everything going on in the world of Full Circle Music.

As always, thanks for listening and be sure to give us a review on iTunes if you have not already done so.

The post FCM078 – Aspiring Artist and Veteran Manager A Father Daughter Story with Tori Harper and Dave Steunebrink appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Sep 05, 2017
FCM077 – State Of Full Circle Music
31:53

In this episode, we are joined by our very own Seth Mosley, X, Stacey Willbur, Logan Crockett, and Jerricho Scroggins. 

We dive into the success and growth that we have been experiencing here at Full Circle Music and talk about the journey getting here. We will touch on the state of our Record Label, Full Circle Academy and our internship program as well. We hope you enjoy our first ever, Full Circle “State of the Union” address. 

Be sure to follow us on our Instagram, Facebook and Twitter at @officialfcmusic to stay up to date with everything going on in the world of Full Circle Music.

As always, thanks for listening and feel free to give us a review on iTunes if you have not already done so.

The post FCM077 – State Of Full Circle Music appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Aug 29, 2017
FCM076 – Hacks For Touring Indie Artists with About the Author
34:09

Indie artists About the Author are here to give you some mighty useful hacks for touring on a budget! Here are a few take-aways:

Learn how to effectively cold call venues to book your band.
Rent a compact (high MPG) car. And pack as light as you possibly can.
Offer your services (load in and load out, etc…) to a touring band for free room and board on their bus to save even more money!
Spend very little on food. Budget your food wisely. Some Chipotle locations offer free food for touring musicians. You’re welcome…
You can go ahead and give a listen to About the Author’s music. Find links to their social media outlets and so much more at

www.abouttheauthormusic.com 

More info on RYFO: [rye-foe] is a non-profit advocate for outreach to musicians.

www.ryfo.org

Be sure to follow us at our new Instagram and Facebook at @officialfcmusic to stay up to date with everything going on in the world of Full Circle Music.

As always, thanks for listening and be sure to give us a review on iTunes if you have not already done so.

The post FCM076 – Hacks For Touring Indie Artists with About the Author appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Aug 22, 2017
FCM075 – How To Make $40 From Every Album with Scott Moran
1:04:25

In the final edition of our Music Marketing Series, we were privileged to interview SamCart Product Expert, Scott Moran.

SamCart is a web-based shopping cart software built for business owners or anyone who is looking for a powerfully simple way to sell more of their products online. Scott is the brother of Brian Moran, the founder and CEO of the company. Scott gives amazing insight into how his company can make you more money with less work.

We will…
Learn about up-sells and how to make $40 selling a $10 item.
What musicians can sell as up-sells.
Why direct to fans (or sale funnels) is the superior way to market.
How staying away from selling in markets that have a lot of competition (Amazon and iTunes for example) may benefit you.
And of course, how SamCart can benefit you!

To get involved and get FREE stuff, go to this link:

WWW.FULLCIRCLEMUSIC.COM/SAMCART

Be sure to follow us at our new Instagram at @officialfcmusic to stay up to date with everything going on in the world of Full Circle Music.

As always, thanks for listening and be sure to give us a review on iTunes if you have not already done so.

The post FCM075 – How To Make $40 From Every Album with Scott Moran appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Aug 15, 2017
FCM074 – Building A $ix Figure Youtube Page with Sarah Reeves and Philip Kothlow
1:12:10

In this edition of our ‘Music Marketing Series’, Seth and Logan interview the wonderful Sarah Reeves and her manager/husband Phillip Kothlow. Sarah and Philip give so many useful tips in this 60+ minute podcast. Here are just a few points:

START a YouTube channel. You do not know who could be watching.
Learn how to budget wisely.
Consistent uploads are key.
Use your iPhone at first if you have no other camera to use. You can record in 4K with newer iPhone editions.
Pre-Record your audio and lip-sync during your video for maximum quality.

They give us insight about the licensing you need to upload and sell your covers on YouTube and outside of YouTube as well.

For anyone working in the industry, these are marketing strategies you must know, and WANT to know. So, have your pen and paper ready, this one is packed full of great resources.

Please go ahead and check out Sarah Reeves music if you’d like. You can find links to her social media outlets and so much more at sarahreevesmusic.com.

Be sure to follow us at our new Instagram and Facebook at @officialfcmusic to stay up to date with everything going on in the world of Full Circle Music.

As always, thanks for listening and be sure to give us a review on iTunes if you have not already done so.

The post FCM074 – Building A $ix Figure Youtube Page with Sarah Reeves and Philip Kothlow appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Aug 09, 2017
FCM073 – Build Raving Fans While You Sleep, feat. Logan Crockett
1:00:13

In this edition of ‘Meet the Team’ and our ‘Music Marketing Series’, we interview our very own Head of Marketing, Logan Crockett.

Email marketing lives on! Logan will discuss music marketing that not too many artists use to gain a larger fan base and start bringing in a lot more profit. Learn about such things as how to build up your email lists, what Auto-Responders are and do, and how to create a landing page for your website.

Logan’s important tip: Don’t leave your own marketing in the hands of others. Take initiative yourself.

Be sure to follow us at our new Instagram and Facebook at @officialfcmusic to stay up to date with everything going on in the world of Full Circle Music. Also, email Logan at logan@fullcirclemusic.com to receive guidance on how to put into action all the tips he shares in this episode.

As always, thanks for listening and be sure to give us a review on iTunes if you have not already done so.

The post FCM073 – Build Raving Fans While You Sleep, feat. Logan Crockett appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Aug 01, 2017
FCM072 – Marketing Church Music with Chris Estes of Bethel Music
39:34

Welcome to our Songs for the Church series! This week we have Chris Estes, VP of Bethel Music in Redding, California.

Chris grew up in New Orleans and quickly developed a love for Jazz and Metallica (like peanut butter and jelly)! He soon found himself in college for marketing and played in a few bands to keep his musical engine going. Soon after he began road managing a few bands from college for a few years, found a new life in the Lord, and began managing digital marketing for Integrity music in 2005. Shortly following his career there, he began digital marketing for Hillsong, then Hillsong United, and then Hillsong London. After his seven-year journey with Integrity and Hillsong, he began taking over digital marketing for Bethel Church.

In this episode, Chris tells us how the digital marketing role has changed since he started with Integrity Music and gives deep insight into how you can boost your online following and create great content for the web (what makes more and more people interested in your music). Chris will dive into his own strategies for us to take away and help grow our own audience.

Also, be sure to follow us at our new Instagram at @officialfcmusic to stay up to date with everything going on in the world of Full Circle Music. As always, thanks for listening and be sure to subscribe and give us a review on iTunes if you have not already done so.

The post FCM072 – Marketing Church Music with Chris Estes of Bethel Music appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Jul 27, 2017
FCM071 – From Internship To Income and a Grammy with Jerricho Scroggins
35:05

In this edition of ‘Meet The Team’ we interview our very own Jerricho Scroggins.

Jerricho went from a little town in central Indiana, graduated from Full Sail University in Florida, and then moved to Nashville and starting interning at Yamaha Music Group. We hear how the doors opened to Chris Stevens and Seth Mosley shortly after moving. Not long after getting a gig with Chris, Jerricho found himself with his very first Grammy Award. In his 5 years in the music industry, he has already garnered a whopping 4 Grammy Wins! Not something too many people can say about themselves…

In this episode, we learn so much about where he has been and how he got to become an engineer and head of operations for Full Circle Music. Jerricho also shares some great knowledge for those seeking internships and a career in the industry. This is one podcast you won’t want to miss!

Be sure to follow us on our new Instagram at @officialfcmusic to stay up to date with everything going on in the world of Full Circle Music. As always, thanks for listening and be sure to give us a review on iTunes if you have not already done so.

The post FCM071 – From Internship To Income and a Grammy with Jerricho Scroggins appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Jul 18, 2017
FCM070 – Live Backstage At The K-Love Fan Awards pt2 Honesty and Intentionality Why Your Music Connects With Your Audience
45:15



During this episode, we go live backstage at the K-Love Fan Awards. We are joined by so many artists and they all have something for sure that you can take away. We get their take on the why of their music. They give us their take on why they feel their music connects with so many people.

This 2 part series is jam packed as we interview David Crowder, Mercy Me, Jeremy Camp, Tauren Wells, Jesus Culture, Colton Dixon, and many more.

To continue following our adventure of moving to our new studio location, please go to www.instagram.com/officialfcmusic

The post FCM070 – Live Backstage At The K-Love Fan Awards pt2 Honesty and Intentionality Why Your Music Connects With Your Audience appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Jul 11, 2017
FCM069 – Live Backstage At The K-Love Fan Awards pt1 Honesty and Intentionality: Why Your Music Connects With Your Audience
0



During this episode, we go live backstage at the K-Love Fan Awards. We are joined by so many artists and they all have something for sure that you can take away. We get their take on the why of their music. They give us their take on why they feel their music connects with so many people.

This 2 part series is jam packed as we interview David Crowder, Mercy Me, Jeremy Camp, Tauren Wells, Jesus Culture, Colton Dixon, and many more.

To continue following our adventure of moving to our new studio location, please go to www.instagram.com/officialfcmusic

The post FCM069 – Live Backstage At The K-Love Fan Awards pt1 Honesty and Intentionality: Why Your Music Connects With Your Audience appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Jul 05, 2017
FCM068 – How Artists Can Dramatically Increase Returns Buying Selling CDs and T Shirts with Tom Laune
36:01



Tom Laune, mixing engineer, record producer and Bulletproof Wealth coach (special-ized financial service) joins us in the Full Circle Music Studio this week. Tom has re-corded and produced some of the biggest records in the christian music industry with artists such as Michael W. Smith, Amy Grant, Rich Mullins and many more.

During this episode, Tom gives up his secrets to finding security in your finances. De-voting himself full time to advising people on making wise choices with their finances and seeing big investments that will last for future generations, Tom tells us what it takes to see major profit, opposed to living paycheck to paycheck. This is a must listen for everyone and could help you immensely down the road.

For more information about Tom’s Bulletproof Wealth business and to get in touch with him you can go to www.stressfreeplanning.com

To continue following our adventure of moving to our new studio location, please go to www.instagram.com/officialfcmusic

The post FCM068 – How Artists Can Dramatically Increase Returns Buying Selling CDs and T Shirts with Tom Laune appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Jun 27, 2017
FCM067 – 11 Years Before The Record Deal with Chad Mattson
34:38



Chad Mattson, lead singer for soul-pop Christian rock-band Unspoken, was in the studio this week. He shares with us some gold nuggets of knowledge you don’t want to miss.

In an ever-changing industry where the singles are the driving force behind its success, Chad fills us in on how signing a publishing deal was an aid to his band. Publishers can help push songs to the next level, to never settle for 1st, 2nd, or 3rd drafts of songs.

Chad tells us the answer isn’t always a record deal. The answer to success in the industry is to follow the leading of God’s spirit and use your gifts to serve people and serve God. He tells us if you want to break into the indus-try you need to write as much as you can with as many people you can. For the up and coming songwriters, Chad advises to take every opportunity to write with whoever, whenever and start building those connections.

This and so much more on this episode of the Full Circle Music Show.

To continue following our adventure of moving to our new studio location, please go to www.instagram.com/officialfcmusic

The post FCM067 – 11 Years Before The Record Deal with Chad Mattson appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Jun 20, 2017
FCM066 – Inside The Minds Of Songwriting and Publishing Legends
42:08



In this podcast episode, we sit down with a panel of three industry professionals, in front of a live Full Circle Academy first ever secret Writers Retreat audience. The panel includes CCM Singer/Songwriter Jason Gray, Publisher and Creative Director for Full Circle Music Stacey Wilbur, and Citizen Way Leader Ben Calhoun.

Each panelist fills us in on how they feel about the doom of the album and how singles are key to making a break as an artist. They take questions from our live audience and give us some advice on how to get heard in the music industry, without relying on getting your songs to the labels being your only choice. This and much more knowledge is given to us in this amazing panel of friends who know what they are talking about! Prepare to get some great nuggets you can take away and apply to your life.

To continue following our adventure of moving to our new studio location, please go to www.instagram.com/officialfcmusic

The post FCM066 – Inside The Minds Of Songwriting and Publishing Legends appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Jun 16, 2017
FCM065 – How To Build A Massive Career On The Road Without Help From Radio with Tyler Bryant
33:55



Publishers, Labels, Managers etc. – When these are not working to your advantage, step up to the plate and become advantageous for yourself.

Texas guitarist, singer, and blues-rocker Tyler Bryant started playing guitar at the age of six. Since then, Bryant has assembled a powerhouse band, the Shakedown, quickly earning a buzz on the blues and rock touring circuit. The band has opened shows for the likes of Aerosmith, B.B. King, Clapton, AC/DC, and Guns N’ Roses.

Tyler will give some insight into how to get on the road and tour with such bands without having radio hits. This and much more in this episode of the Full Circle Music Show.

To continue following our adventure of moving to our new studio location, please go to www.instagram.com/officialfcmusic

The post FCM065 – How To Build A Massive Career On The Road Without Help From Radio with Tyler Bryant appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Jun 06, 2017
FCM064 – How Dustin Fennison Went from 0 to 40,000 On Spotify
45:16



As an independent artist, Dustin Fenison has acquired over 40,000 followers on his Spotify artist page. Lead singer of the worship band People of the Earth, based out of Somerset, Kentucky, Fenison shares with us some extremely helpful tips to grow and market our Spotify playlists.

A few things Fenison talks about:

• Searching for user playlists at the top of the search and pitching your song to be an addition to their playlist can help boost your streams.

• When creating playlists, know to stay in your genre and know your genre.

• Treat it as a radio station and add songs that you yourself would like to listen to.

So, grab your pen and paper and be prepared to record these practical tips to take your playlists to the next level.

To continue following our adventure of moving to our new studio location, please go to www.instagram.com/officialfcmusic

The post FCM064 – How Dustin Fennison Went from 0 to 40,000 On Spotify appeared first on Full Circle Music.

May 30, 2017
FCM063 – Ask Me Anything #4 with Seth Mosley and X
43:35



Drew Langhals is a Songwriting Major Freshman at Trevecca Nazarene University, bringing her questions to the podcast this week for our 4th “Ask Me Anything” with our own X O’Connor and Seth Mosley. Drew asks Seth and X what they think is contributing to Worship music becoming more and more popular on CCM Radio Stations and tips on how to write worship songs that will connect with our churches congregations. Later, she asks for advice on how to be a well bal-anced jack of all trades and how to not spread yourself too thin learning everything possible in the business and achieving subpar results.

All of this and more, on this episode of “Ask Me Anything” on the Full Circle Music Show.

To continue following our adventure of moving to our new studio location, please go to www.instagram.com/officialfcmusic

The post FCM063 – Ask Me Anything #4 with Seth Mosley and X appeared first on Full Circle Music.

May 17, 2017
FCM062 – How To Have Your Songs Sung In Church with Jared Anderson
47:31



There are musicians who know from the very start just what they want to do. The path for Centricity music artist, Jared Anderson, is not quite stereotypical.

Anderson received a degree in Music Composition from Oral Roberts University in 2001. He took a liking specifically to Jazz and Classical arrangements and admits that he had his misgiings about worship music, which sometimes contain simple melodies and repetitive lyrics. However in this scrutiny, he found himself beginning to lead worship for his home church in Colorado. Soon enough, it was evident to him that God was calling him to be obedient to write and lead worship songs. Not just to write them, but to live them and walk like He did.

In this obedience, Anderson tells us some stories that would lead him to writing such widely known worship tunes such as “Almighty”, “Hear Us From Heaven”, and one that spread through churches across the globe like wild fire, “The Great I Am”.

To continue following our adventure of moving to our new studio location, please go to www.instagram.com/officialfcmusic

The post FCM062 – How To Have Your Songs Sung In Church with Jared Anderson appeared first on Full Circle Music.

May 11, 2017
FCM061 – Talk Less Listen More with Pete Kipley
47:37

www.fullcirclemusic.org



“Talk less, Listen more. Don’t stop learning.”

Simple, yet extremely effective advice from Dove award-winning producer, Pete Kipley, for up and coming music producers. Singer/Songwriter Bart Millard (Mercy Me) and Kipley began Simple Records, their record label together in 2004, signing The Afters and Phil Wickham to name a few… He has since worked with countless artists in CCM including Mark Schultz, Kutless, and Matthew West.

Kipley talks about how to keep up with the ever changing music industry, still keeping his family first, and how his role as a producer is about protecting and serving the artist above all else.

To follow our adventure of moving to our new studio location, go to www.instagram.com/officialfcmusic

The post FCM061 – Talk Less Listen More with Pete Kipley appeared first on Full Circle Music.

May 02, 2017
FCM060 – Music Is A Team Sport with Brandon Bagby
45:36

fullcirclemusic.org



Brandon Bagby had a unique beginning to his career as a CCM Guitarist. From chasing a corporate career to playing bars at night and churches on weekends, Brandon walks us through his journey on how he broke into the music biz. He talks about his move to Nashville, his discovery of a passion to paint, finding his first mentor to help him become a session guitarist, and then eventually landing his position as guitarist for Audio Adrenaline.

Brandon is also the founder of Worship Team Builder, a company that focuses on training and empowering worship leaders around the globe to use their gifts to the fullest. To find out more about his company or to book him at your church, go to worshipteambuilder.com

To follow our adventure of moving to our new studio location, go to www.instagram.com/officialfcmusic

The post FCM060 – Music Is A Team Sport with Brandon Bagby appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Apr 25, 2017
FCM059 – Finding Success in Music with Jeff Pardo
53:52

www.fullcirclemusic.org

We have Jeff Pardo in today telling us his story from touring to writing songs and producing. He gives us good tips on transitioning and how he got started. One of the most recent songs that he has co-written and co-produced is Matt Hammitt's “Tears” https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/tears-single/id1192575000

-“Never Stop Learning”

-“Practice Gratitude”

-“Know What Your Goal Is.”

Those are a few highlights from Jeff Pardo's conversation with us on the Full Circle Music Show.

This episode is hosted by X O'Connor, Grammy-Winning Music Producer with Full Circle Music.

The post FCM059 – Finding Success in Music with Jeff Pardo appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Apr 18, 2017
FCM058 – How to Sell Your Royalties on Royalty Exchange with Jeff Schneider
40:04

Today we have Jeff Schneider who is the founder and president of Royalty Exchange, the #1 worldwide marketplace for buying and selling royalty streams.

-Did you know you can sell your songwriting royalties?

or bigger yet

-Did you know you can sell any of your royalty streams? SoundExchange, Producer Royalties, Artist Royalties, Book Royalties, it doesn't matter. There is a market for all of them. And you can make BIG MONEY off your own intellectual property, and get a HUGE tax break for it.

We get to hear from Jeff Schneider, president and founder of Royalty Exchange. Listen in.

The post FCM058 – How to Sell Your Royalties on Royalty Exchange with Jeff Schneider appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Apr 11, 2017
FCM057: Ask Me Anything #3 pt2 with Seth Mosley
35:26

“What is the timeline of the nuts and bolts of a song from creation to release?”

“What does the future of the Christian music business look like?”

“Top Three Desert Island Mix Plugins”

“Did you know I started a record label out of my house?”

All of this and more, on this episode of the Full Circle Music show, hosted by Seth Mosley, Grammy-Award Winning Music Producer and Songwriter.

The post FCM057: Ask Me Anything #3 pt2 with Seth Mosley appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Mar 31, 2017
FCM056 – Ask Me Anything #3 pt1 – How to Get Song Ideas, How to Stand out for Labels, Best Ways to Manage Time, and More with Seth Mosley
32:07

www.fullcirclemusic.org

Ask Me Anything, Part 1, with Grammy-Award Winning Producer and Songwriter Seth Mosley.

“What is the writing process like?”

“How do you get ideas for new songs?”

“What makes a great song?”

“How do you manage your time?”

“What can I do to stand out for record labels?”

These are just a few of the questions that we cover in this show!

If you're new and looking for where to start in breaking into the music business, start by listening to this episode of the Full Circle Music Show.

The post FCM056 – Ask Me Anything #3 pt1 – How to Get Song Ideas, How to Stand out for Labels, Best Ways to Manage Time, and More with Seth Mosley appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Mar 25, 2017
FCM055 – How To Get Played On Christian Radio with Chris Hauser and Matt Ingle
1:15:36

www.fullcirclemusic.org

In this episode, Chris gives us the behind-the-scenes look at his transition from radio communications to radio promotion. He talks about his passion for an expression of faith in music, why he decided to switch to radio promotion, and the struggles he faced. Chris also explains his approach to talking with radio people, and why it is beneficial to slow the “no” on a song.

We also have Matt Ingle who also gives the inside scoop on how radio promotion works. His most recent song was “Eye Of The Storm” by Ryan Stevenson. He talks about the troubles and benefits with pitching to radio as well as advice on writing for radio.

The post FCM055 – How To Get Played On Christian Radio with Chris Hauser and Matt Ingle appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Mar 18, 2017
FCM054 – What Do Labels Look For Live at MMBC2017
1:19:49

www.fullcirclemusic.org

We are live at the Music Makers Bootcamp. Here we have 3 A&R legends that include James Rueger (Fairtrade), Jon Mays (Centricity), and Josh Bailey (Word Entertainment) giving us the inside scoop about what Labels Look For. We here their stories on how they got to where they are now and go over the main questions most musicians, songwriters, and artists have for A&Rs. Halfway through it becomes an open Q&A so make sure to stick around because I'm sure your question gets answered.

The post FCM054 – What Do Labels Look For Live at MMBC2017 appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Mar 09, 2017
FCM053 – Making a Living In The Music Biz Panel Live at the Music Maker’s Bootcamp
38:33

fullcirclemusic.org

We are live at the Music Maker's Bootcamp. JJ and Dave Heller give us their story of their music career. Their story breaks every rule out there. Persistence, faith, and trust are key elements to their career. Go listen to how they went from no songs on the radio to now owning their own tour bus.

The post FCM053 – Making a Living In The Music Biz Panel Live at the Music Maker's Bootcamp appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Feb 28, 2017
FCM052 – How To Break Into The Biz Live Panel at the Music Maker’s Bootcamp
41:37

www.fullcirclemusic.org

In this podcast episode, we sit down with a panel of four industry professionals, in front of a live Full Circle Academy Bootcamp audience. These panelists have 90 years of music industry experience between them. They include Grammy-winning producer Tom Laune, Grammy-winning guitarist Mike Pane, music publishing expert Chad Segura, and manager Zach Kelm. Each panelist fills us in on how they got into the music industry, the moment they knew they got their break, and then take on questions from members of the audience. They fill us in on why independent artists may actually be better off playing in local spots than buying onto tours, and how radio could benefit them. They talk about the right time to hire a manager, and what role a manager should play. They also comment on the issue of feeling insecure when promoting oneself, what they wish they would have known before entering the industry, and some past experiences that future interns can learn from. This podcast is filled with advice for people already in, or looking to get into the music industry.

The post FCM052 – How To Break Into The Biz Live Panel at the Music Maker's Bootcamp appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Feb 16, 2017
FCM051 – Approaching The Business with Brandon Heath
29:38

fullcirclemusic.org

In this episode, we sit down with Grammy nominated contemporary Christian artist, Brandon Heath. From growing up in West Nashville, to releasing the platinum song, “Give Me Your Eyes,” he brings us through his experience in the music industry. He fills us in on how he got a publishing deal right out of college, why he didn’t initially plan on going into the Christian music industry, and why his single, “I’m Not Who I Was” actually breaks the rules of songwriting. He also reveals, what he calls his only, “real life” job. Brandon gives great advice to upcoming artists and songwriters about failure, how to approach people in the industry, and why it's ok to break the rules.

The post FCM051 – Approaching The Business with Brandon Heath appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Feb 09, 2017
FCM050 – The Music Career of Colton Dixon
33:33

fullcirclemusic.org

Colton Dixon is here with us today and opens up about his start. Going from baseball to singing that led to American Idol, we get the inside scoop of his journey. He talks about life through it all. A part of his story is what he's come to realize with being his own brand. The responsibilities that comes with that not only to himself, but his bandmates, label, and fans. Colton opens up about the most important strengths to have in music, so you do not want to miss this episode.

The post FCM050 – The Music Career of Colton Dixon appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Jan 30, 2017
FCM049 – Develop Your Craft with Marti Dodson
32:34

fullcirclemusic.org

Marti Dodson was a member of the band Saving Jane who eventually transitioned to the role of being a songwriter. She talks about her writing process and what it was like to begin writing full time after touring as an artist for so long. Marti also touches on being a female in the music industry, what that has entailed for her, and how she thinks that actually affects women going into this career field. She shares some insight on writing for an artist, having a song on hold, ultimately getting a song cut (most recently by artists like Luke Bryan and Thompson Square to name a couple), and some examples of what that process has looked like for her. Marti also teaches songwriting, so listen in to this episode of the Full Circle Music show to hear some of her tips on developing your craft.

The post FCM049 – Develop Your Craft with Marti Dodson appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Dec 16, 2016
FCM048 – Be True To Yourself with Leslie Jordan
36:03

www.fullcirclemusic.org

Leslie Jordan is an incredible songwriter and most know her from All Sons And Daughters. She talks about her journey from wanting to be in the music and how it started at a young age. The approach from a record label and how she told them no. You'll have to listen to find out why. Leslie gives you inside knowledge about knowing who you are, songwriting, love for other, and much more.

The post FCM048 – Be True To Yourself with Leslie Jordan appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Nov 29, 2016
FCM047 – Encourage Inspire Create with Stacey Willbur
41:50

fullcirclemusic.org

Stacey Wilbur is Part of running the music industry from behind the curtains. Having been a publisher for many years for a few different labels, she is still continuing to climb and see her story unfold. She has worked with many established artists and helped some find their voices. A dream that started from singing to now helping others live their dream is her story. Stacey has lots of good encouragement for anyone on the music business journey so make sure to have a pen and paper ready.

The post FCM047 – Encourage Inspire Create with Stacey Willbur appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Nov 22, 2016
FCM046 – Blurred Lines with Chris Stevens
1:02:22

fullcirclemusic.org

Chris Stevens has been in the music industry for more than 20 years. We hear his story from being influenced by his father as a kid to being a 4 time Grammy winner. Going from bands, music for games, to music for everyone he has had a career that has blurred the lines in all genres. He explains how important family is, mentors are, and advice for anyone in the music industry. Make sure to have a notepad and pen ready for this one.

The post FCM046 – Blurred Lines with Chris Stevens appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Nov 15, 2016
FCM045 – Ask Me Anything #2 with Katie Wynn
46:59

www.fullcirclemusic.org

Katie Wynn is a sophomore Songwriting major at Belmont University, taking on part two of the “Ask Me Anything.” Katie asks Seth about his start and journey in the music industry and what made him decide to start Full Circle Music. She also turns the conversation toward what a typical day for Seth looks like, how often they work with new artists, and several key things someone who is an up-and-coming songwriter/producer should know before they jump into the music industry. Tune in to this episode of the Full Circle Music show for some vital advice from our own Seth Mosley.

The post FCM045 – Ask Me Anything #2 with Katie Wynn appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Nov 01, 2016
FCM044 – Roads To Creativity with Jon Steingard
34:34

fullcirclemusic.org

Jon Steingard is the lead singer for the Christian-Rock band Hawk Nelson. Jon takes us on his journey from playing guitar for a band at 15, to signing his first record deal, to transitioning from being a side-man to the front-man. He talks about how touring has been Hawk Nelson’s focus and why, and he also touches on what that looks like while having a family. Jon has some great insight on the tension that sometimes comes with being a Christian artist and what it means to wrestle with that tension. Tune in to this episode of the Full Circle Music show to get some true gems of wisdom from experience.

The post FCM044 – Roads To Creativity with Jon Steingard appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Oct 25, 2016
FCM043 – Realistic Expectations with Barry Graul
53:40

fullcirclemusic.org

Barry Graul is a highly accomplished guitarist and twenty-seven-year music industry veteran. He shares some unique stories of how he started as a musician and how he eventually ended up full time in music, specifically the Christian industry. Most of his experience has been as a sideman for an artist – the most notable of whom he has been involved with to date is MercyMe. Barry has developed different techniques to serve each of those artist’s needs as a band member and to learn extremely quickly as new songs are constantly thrown at him. Find out more of his story in this episode of the Full Circle Music show.

The post FCM043 – Realistic Expectations with Barry Graul appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Oct 22, 2016
FCM042 – Life In The Industry with Karrie Hardwick Dawley
47:54

fullcirclemusic.org

Karrie Hardwick Dawley has a lot of insight on the label side of the industry. She has worked in radio promotion, A&R, and publishing for 10+ years. She shares her experience with the key pieces of being a successful artist, like balancing a strong artistic identity while at the same time being “commercial.” Karrie also talks about being a woman in an industry where there aren’t that many other females in leadership. She touches on how God’s path is usually so different than a path we would have chosen for ourselves, and what that has looked like for her.

The post FCM042 – Life In The Industry with Karrie Hardwick Dawley appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Oct 13, 2016
FCM041 – Gift Of Faith with Aaron Shust
40:38

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Aaron Shust had a unique beginning to his career as a CCM artist. He walks us through his journey of first moving away to college, leading worship at a church, writing songs for the church, and how that inadvertently led to him to make his first record. He talks about how the decisions he has made have been from having peace with believing God was calling him to do something, not making a list of pros and cons, and how that ultimately affected his path as a touring artist and a worship leader. Aaron has a lot of experience of needing to deeply rely on God’s provision, and so he has a lot to say about the gift of faith and what that means in his music.

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Oct 06, 2016
FCM040 – How To Be A Husband and Wife Touring Artist with Grayson Reed
45:18

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Mike and Molly (now musically known as Grayson Reed) share their stories of when they first crossed paths with music, followed it into a career, and then eventually crossed paths with each other. They both attended Belmont University, both separately choosing the school because of the “magic” of Nashville. They talk about their experiences first signing with a label and the importance of balancing between the business side of the industry and the heart of why you are making music. Mike and Molly also touch on what it looks like to be a husband-wife artist duo with a growing family and how important it is to have a great team around you. There is some stellar wisdom to be found in this FCM episode!

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Sep 27, 2016
FCM039 – What Perseverance Looks Like with Brad Rempel
46:58

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I had a chance to chat with long-time colleague Brad Rempel, who makes up half of the Canadian country band High Valley. Brad talks about his upbringing away from popular music and how he made his way into being involved in radio, making records and eventually touring as an artist. He also touches on the importance of building good relationships and how to go about doing it well, including the importance of being respectful and thankful no matter the situation you are in as a musician. Brad also talks about how important it is for the artist to be willing to put in the work to succeed as an artist, regarding their manager, booking agent, label, and especially their fans. Get a glimpse of what perseverance looks like in this episode of the Full Circle Music show.

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Sep 20, 2016
FCM038 – Film and TV Panel Live from Music Maker’s Bootcamp 2016
51:01

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We hear from three heavy hitters in the area of music for film and television. Songwriter Josh Silverberg, session musician and music producer Tim Lauer, and industry veteran publisher Chad Segura, unleash a wealth of information about what it is like to navigate the unique world of music for sync licensing. These expert panelists answer questions from our live studio audience pertaining to workflow, song creation and arrangement, how to dive in to the industry, and much more on this episode of the Full Circle Music Show!

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Sep 13, 2016
FCM037 – How To Break Into The Biz Live From Music Makers Bootcamp 2016
38:30

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Listen in as some of our boot camp mentors share their wisdom on relationships, location, learning from a mentor, and breaking into the music biz. Seth interviews A&R at Capitol Records Brad O’Donnell, songwriter Benji Cowart, lawyer Jason Turner, and Centricity publisher Chad Segura, all long-term music industry pros. Also included in this episode is a panel discussion with those who attended the boot camp. Keep your eye out for the next boot camp dates.

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Sep 08, 2016
FCM036 – Moments In A Performance with Tom Jackson
48:23

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Tom Jackson is a live music producer who helps artists and bands turn their commercial studio songs into live show hits. He has worked with a ton of major artists, both established (Taylor Swift) and more recent (Shawn Mendes). He talks about finding the moments within a song, whether it’s in the instruments, rhythm, or vocals, and playing on those for a more captivating show. He shares his insight into some of the pieces an artist should to build a relationship with their audience, how it’s not entirely about just having fun, and also about the difference between becoming famous and actually having a career. Tom explains why your personality and style are so important to your success as a performer. Find out what he has to say about it all in this episode of the Full Circle Music Podcast.

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Aug 31, 2016
FCM035 – From Obsession To Obsession with Ben Stennis
45:27

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Ben Stennis is a songwriter in which you might have been singing his song and not even known it. Life as a songwriter wasn't always the story though. Would you believe that he went to school and got a Business Management Degree? Or would you believe that before that he was wanting to become a stunt man…

Ben shares with us his story and how he got to where he is today. 10 years is a key number and shows how passionate he is about what he does. This is one you will want to take notes on.

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Aug 23, 2016
FCM034 – Purposeful In Relationships with Zach Kelm
36:45

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Zach Kelm is truly a super-manager, who says that the music industry found him. Working with artists like Skillet and Colton Dixon, he lets us see into the hectic life of a manager and why he still loves it so much. In this interview, Zach touches on some extremely difficult personal struggles that he and his family have gone through, and how they kept their careers going despite those hardships. He gives us a glimpse into family life and how he and his wife, both having very demanding jobs, still manage to put each other first. Also, we find out why Zach believes relationships are so important in the music industry in this interview with Full Circle Music!

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Aug 02, 2016
FCM033 – Created To Be Creative with Luke Sullivant
46:20

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Luke Sullivant is a multi-instrumentalist, who wears several hats in the music industry, including touring with major artists. In this interview he walks us through how his post-hippie musical upbringing and first gigs in the jazz world brought him to his understanding of music. He touches on technology, including going through the transition from analog to digital recording, how newer technology can both improve and impede the artistic process, and how it has influenced collaboration. Luke also has tons of experience both in the studio and performing live, so he gives us insight on their differences and similarities. Learn about how we are created to be creative, why that affects the purpose of music in our culture, and how it affects family life in this episode of the Full Circle Music Show.

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Jul 26, 2016
FCM032 – Staying Fresh with Chad Segura
48:02

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Chad Segura, 20-year music industry veteran publisher, explains his story on how he got into music and is now the Vice President of Centricity Publishing. His journey shows that with hard work and faith you can do anything.

We get the inside scoop of a huge medical surgery he and his family had to overcome. Then at the end he shares some inside tips on the music industry and for songwriters.

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Jul 20, 2016
FCM031 – Chasing The Dream with Tony Wood
38:02

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Dove award winning songwriter Tony Wood shares his story of how a quiet obsession for lyric writing lead to moving to Nashville and turning his dream into a reality as a successful songwriter. In this episode, Tony shares with us how he got his start as a songwriter, as well as his thoughts on the specific art of crafting a song and how to avoid some mistakes that can accompany the process. He provides insights on how, with over 600 song cuts to his name, he continues to write with new and fresh ideas. Enjoy all of this and much more in this episode of the Full Circle Music show!

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Jul 13, 2016
FCM030 – Grind It Out with Jordan Feliz
39:36

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In this episode, we have Jordan Feliz. Many of you might have heard his No.1 single on AC radio that has topped the chart for ten consecutive weeks. We get to hear his story about starting as a drummer, being thrown into singing, and how that lead into what is now his blossoming career. Jordan explains how much work he put into his music not only during the shows but in-between shows, and how embracing the slow climb to success can help fuel the passion and drive it takes continue on the path of growth as an artist.

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Jun 28, 2016
FCM029 – Work Ethic with Mike Snider
33:19

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Guest Mike Snider discusses his career as head of the Christian booking division for William Morris Entertainment, one of the premier booking agencies in the music business. He provides insight on facing the challenges and obstacles artists are presented with in a constantly evolving industry, what booking agencies look for in new artists, and much more in this episode of the Full Circle Music Show!

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Jun 16, 2016
FCM028 – Stop Competing, Go Collaborate and Congratulate with Casey Brown
54:46

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This episode, we have Casey Brown with us. He's been on quite the journey, from being a student at Belmont to songwriting/producing full-time and now touring with Rascal Flatts.
Ever wonder what the key skill for being a pro music producer is? Listen to this episode and you'll find out. It's probably not what you think.

He talks about the people who surround him, and the importance of having an excellent mentor. We also hear from him on work vs life balance and how that's difficult to manage.

A final note he leaves everyone with is to be an “Encourager”.

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Jun 09, 2016
FCM027 – The Key to Success in Music with Walt Smith
44:10

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Today we have Walt Smith. He is the bass player for Jeremy Camp. We hear the story of bass player to tour manager and the inside scoop and tips for that.

He offers up keys to success on landing a gig. One of them is Location and explains why. Other tips he offers to being a good tour manager. One of those tips is being detailed oriented. To find out the other tips you'll have to listen.

This is one of the podcasts you would benefit having a pencil and paper around.

I'll end on a quote before you check it out.

“Learning what you don't want to do is just as important as learning what you want to do”

The post FCM027 – The Key to Success in Music with Walt Smith appeared first on Full Circle Music.

May 25, 2016
FCM026 – How To Make A Living Playing Guitar with Mike Payne
32:32

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Today we have Mike Payne. We hear his story of growing up with music to touring as a guitar player to now living life as a successful session player.

Keys to focus on are parts, timing, and your tone. We also get the inside scoop of his favorite pieces of gear as of right now.

One thing he ends on is never stop learning. Always learn something new and keep tweaking for new sounds.

The post FCM026 – How To Make A Living Playing Guitar with Mike Payne appeared first on Full Circle Music.

May 18, 2016
FCM025 – 5 Things I Learned From Roger Love
22:56

You may not have heard of Roger Love. But we know you've heard of Eminem, John Mayer, Selena Gomez, Jeff Bridges, Tony Robbins, and Brendon Burchard. Who is behind helping them find their voice? It is Roger.

This week we take a personal turn and hear from Seth Mosley, Grammy Winning Producer and Songwriter, about his experience working with Roger love for 3 days.

This is the 5 lessons learned from working with Roger Love.

I learned the same tricks he taught Jeff Bridges, Eminem, John Mayer, Tony Robbins, Selena Gomez, and more.

He even taught Joaquin Phoenix to sing for his starring role in Hollywood Blockbuster about Johnny Cash, “Walk the Line”.

This one is a bit of a left turn for the Full Circle Music Show, but you will absolutely get a lot of value from listening.
Communication is everything.

How are you communicating?

The post FCM025 – 5 Things I Learned From Roger Love appeared first on Full Circle Music.

May 12, 2016
FCM024 – The Key To Success In Music Is Authenticity with Josh Bailey
48:49

www.fullcirclemusic.org

Today we have Josh Bailey, A&R at Word Entertainment. He dives into the process of being an A&R now and what his journey has been like. We get to hear his story on how he ended up where he is now. How does he have a degree unrelated to music and still end up where he is? You'll have to listen to find that out.

He answers a lot of questions I think most people have. The “how do I get my music to a label” question? “What if I don't live in the same state or same country”? “How helpful is getting signed”? “Why would I sign a 360 deal”?

He talks about what it's been to work with such successful breakout artists like For King & Country, and Francesca Battistelli, to name a couple.

Make sure to stick around til the end because he adds in a helpful tip for artists out there.

“You Can't Do It Alone” – Josh Bailey.

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May 03, 2016
FCM023 – Ask Me Anything #1 with Caylea Ingram
59:57

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This is a new segment we are adding into our podcasts. We are calling it “Ask Me Anything”

Here we have Caylea Ingram who is from Belmont and has been interning with us this semester. She dives into a more in depth look at Seth's career. Seth explains his heart on songwriting and his thoughts on workflow. This time he goes a little bit deeper and explains the servant mentality for a song.

We want to open this up to you. We want to bring this segment into the podcasts a few times a year. If you have a question then email them to info@fullcirclemusic.org

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Apr 26, 2016
FCM022 – Living What You’re Called To Do with Matt Hammitt
40:17

www.fullcirclemusic.org

Here we have Matt Hammitt. Hearing about his early days which went from drumming to singing to where he is now. Songwriting has always been a part of his life and we get to hear what helps him grow in that. Collaborations, the people you surround yourself with, watching production gurus, etc.

We also get to hear the inside story about how sometimes the music life can put strain onto relationships. Matt tells us his story about how his family was able to overcome and grow stronger to each other and to God.

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Apr 19, 2016
FCM021 – You Become Like The People You’re Around with Kyle Wilson
28:00

www.fullcirclemusic.org

Kyle Wilson dives into the media and how you can use it to reach other people. How to expand the tools that you use everyday. Marketing is about being genuine and connecting to people. At some point you have to be a marketer no matter what you're doing.

Another cool thing he touches on is who you surround yourself with. If you have a desire to be a guitar player. Then surround yourself with good guitar players. You become like those around you. You will be able to learn from them and study what works.

Click Here to get more information on the Brian Tracy event or to buy tickets.

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Apr 12, 2016
FCM020 – Every Day’s a Seminar with Jeff Moseley
44:02

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If you’ve heard of FairTrade Records then you have heard of Jeff Moseley. He talks about his first company INO and to what we know now as FairTrade. Being a part of songs like “Awesome God” and “I Can Only Imagine” amongst many more.

Jeff at first pursued to become a Pastor but then decided to go into broadcasting. We get the privilege to hear his story of being a DJ, internship, and his movement up through Word and the journey he took to get where he is today. He touches on what his company does and what he expects out of his employees and future ones.

A cool lesson I learned was his “Big Eyes and Big Ears” moment. Be on the look out for that.

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Apr 05, 2016
FCM019 – It All Starts With The Song with Michael W Smith
27:04

www.fullcirclemusic.org

We have Michael W Smith with us today. With a career that's been going on for more than 30 years, his next project marking it his 30th release, acting career, etc., he made time to come hangout with us.

He touches on his back story. Going through the different times and what choices he made on his journey. He shares some of the good times and the bad ones.

A topic that's widely discussed with all musicians is how they keep a healthy family and be on the road so much. Michael actually touches this topic and let's us know how his family has stayed so close throughout these years.
At the end of this he also touches on why he does music. His goal and purpose for doing it. He also sheds some wisdom for the next and coming artists.

The post FCM019 – It All Starts With The Song with Michael W Smith appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Mar 29, 2016
FCM018 – Don’t Let Pessimism Step On Your Dreams with Seth Morrison
53:40

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We have Seth Morrison the guitarist for Skillet with us today. He gives us the inside look of his story from playing guitar at church every weekend and working full-time for his dad to where he is now touring the world.

Seth talks about the perseverance he has with a never give up attitude. We find out that there are more important things than just being a good guitar player as well. A cool part of this segment is where he talks about his pessimistic side but keeping his faith and pushing forward.

Just a little side note too… Becoming friends with people is always a good thing. Listen to what one of Seth's friends helped him with.

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Mar 22, 2016
FCM017 – Songs About Your Story with Ben Calhoun
55:31

www.fullcirclemusic.org

Here is a new interview with Ben Calhoun (the lead singer of Citizen Way). He talks about his life and the journey his family have gone on. With an album that just came out, he mentioned the writing process that took place for it. The inspirations that came forth and the trust in God that he depended on.

He offers some good advice about planning for success, being around a good team, and looking at opportunities as gaining experiences.

Learning to love the process of songwriting is huge. Keeping the main focus on the main and leave the minor focus on the minors. Thinking too much could also damage the feeling and goal for a song.

The post FCM017 – Songs About Your Story with Ben Calhoun appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Mar 15, 2016
FCM016 – Servant To The Song with X
27:43

www.fullcirclemusic.org

X talks about his journey that took him from a marine biologist and garage band to now being a Grammy Winning Engineer / Producer. The commitment he put into his internship and the difference between him and some of his friends. Even with a degree he touches on the book knowledge vs real world knowledge. Learning how to multitask, gear repair, and truly being a servant of the song are some of the topics he touches on in this interview.

One of the coolest things about X is that he loves learning. That he feeds off people. Even though you rather be in your comfort zone he’s big on being a team player whether out of your element or not.

The post FCM016 – Servant To The Song with X appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Mar 08, 2016
FCM015 – Don’t Give Up with Manafest
20:38

www.fullcirclemusic.org

In this episode, we hear from Manafest as he tells his story of going from music hobbyist to the thriving artist he is today. He shares his experiences learning about the music business through touring, marketing albums through crowd funding campaigns, and much more.

www.fullcirclemusic.org

We just posted a free course on the Fundamentals of Songwriting at http://skl.sh/1L1m8om . Head over and enroll today!

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Feb 29, 2016
FCM014-Songwriting Over Skype with Paul Duncan
34:03

www.fullcirclemusic.org

In this episode, we sit down with fellow songwriter and podcaster, Paul Duncan. He shares a fantastic tip for us that you “don't have to let your location limit your collaboration”.

He talks about how he got his first CCM cut using this technique.

He also has a great podcast called, SongCraft, which we highly recommend.

We hear from him about the importance of his first mentor, who helped him get his first mainstream Country cut and radio single.

www.fullcirclemusic.org

We just posted a free course on the Fundamentals of Songwriting at http://skl.sh/1L1m8om . Head over and enroll today!

 

 

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Feb 23, 2016
FCM013 – The Love For Music with Brad O’Donnell
41:12

Brad O'Donnell joins us for a great interview at the Full Circle Music studios. He runs A&R at Capitol Records. He has been a part of or works with artists such as Michael W. Smith, Chris Tomlin, Hillsong, Amy Grant, and 2016 Grammy Winner for best contemporary album of the year, TobyMac. That's just to name a few.

In this podcast he talks about his life as a producer before taking on the role of an A&R. The similarities between them and the differences.

We also explore the workflow for established artists as well as new artists. You will also get to hear about Three Strands and other organizations he is actively a part of as well.

A continuing theme heard through this is it starts with the love for music.

Brad is the real deal and you will learn a ton from him. If you've ever wondered what it takes to work at a label and to help develop the careers of recording artists, this is an interview you don't want to miss. Also, if you wonder what it might take for you as an artist to get the attention of a label, this one is for you too.

Brad also shares the idea that “you're learning as you're going”, which will provide a lot of encouragement both to beginners and experts alike. We are always honing our craft and trying to make it work in this ever changing music industry.

For our free gift to you, we've created the TOP 10 TIPS FOR SUCCESSFUL SONGWRITING, download it now at www.fullcirclemusic.org right on the homepage.

 

 

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Feb 16, 2016
FCM012 – Writing 100 Songs A Year with Jason Ingram
37:19

We welcome Jason Ingram to Full Circle Music studios. He is a producer, songwriter, and artist with multiple SESAC songwriter of the year awards, Dove Awards, and Grammy Awards, with more #1 Radio Hits than most ever see. His credits include Brandon Heath, Hillsong, Chris Tomlin, Tenth Avenue North, Casting Crowns, and MercyMe.

He talks about the idea that “your calendar will tell me if you're a songwriter”. It is the discipline versus inspiration. Which comes first.

He also shares some personal insight into his story and his journey through the hard times in the beginning of trying to make it in a new city as a professional songwriter.

To get Top 10 Songwriting Tips click Here

 

AUDIO 37min:19sec

Podcast – Interview with hosts Seth Mosley, Chris Murphy & guest, Jason Ingram

Seth: Hey what's up. this is Seth Mosley, host of the Full Circle Music Show, thanks for listening. Again, this week we've got an awesome guest, one of my long time heroes of the music business, Jason Ingram, Sir Jason Ingram. He's a producer, song writer, artist, worship leader and all of the above. He has multiple awards on his mantle for Sesac songwriter of the year, he's won Dove Award producer of the year, more number ones than you can imagine and really has had, in the last several years, what has been an incredible career in the music business. And today we get to sit down and hear the story before Jason Ingram as the Jason Ingram that we know now.

That's half the reason why we do this show is to kind of shine a light on the blood, sweat and tears that goes into making a successful career in the music business and there's a lot of stuff that I learnt in this episode about Jason; some stories about how he got into it and believe it or not at one time he was touring as a merch manager for a band, him and his wife were selling blood plasma just to get back home for Christmas. I'm telling you there's some stuff that you don't know that goes into making a successful song writing and producing career. So stick around and before we dive into it we wanted to thank you for listening, thank you for subscribing, go over to iTunes, leave us a good rating and review. That helps us a ton as we're getting this podcast off the ground.

And for our next segment, Full Circle music trivia, the answer to last week's question: What is the highest selling album of all time? Well the answer for that is Michael Jackson Thriller. So to one of you guys who e-mailed in to trivia@fullcirclemusic.org, you get a free copy of the book ‘Hitmen'. And this week's question is: Who is the top Grammy award winner of all time? Again, who is the top Grammy award winner of all time? Email your response in to trivia@fullcirclemusic.org and this week the winner's going to take home ‘All you need to know about the music business' by Donald Passman, 8th Edition. Up to date information on new music business models including music streaming services and cloud lockers, the latest developments in digital rights and updated numbers and statistics for a traditional industry. Again, email your responses in to  trivia@fullcirclemusic.org and thanks for playing along.

Alright, let's just dive into the episode, we've got Jason Ingram in here, in the house. A good friend and without even probably knowing it, mentor of mine who I've looked up to since I've moved to Nashville and song writing and production. And just track record for days, the  guy has just had hit after hit after hit and his songs are being sang in churches all around the world.  So for you to take a few minutes to come and spend with us means a lot so thank you for doing this.

Jason: Yeah, it's an honour

Seth: So do you want to carry us in?

Chris: Yeah man, one of the things that I wanted to know from you Jason, is when did the song writing bug hit you or how long have you been doing it? Was it one of those things just where you were doodling in a notepad when you were 6 years old or even earlier or…?

Jason: I started taking piano lessons in middle school but I think I was a freshman in high school when I was introduced to just chord voicings so up until then I was just learning to read music and more classical sort of training and which I wasn't excelling at but I loved music and so I just stayed at it and then I think my freshman year in high school, someone just taught me how to play chords. And think about music as chords as opposed to just reading notes on a scale. And I instantly started writing songs once I had chords, I was a songwriter…not a very good one…but from then on, yeah, I mean I was writing songs.

Chris: Did it start for you at going on what you were hearing on the radio and just putting chords to that? Or was it truly like “I don't care what's going on, on the radio, I've  got my own vision that I'm…[4.06]

Jason: Yeah no, I was, I was writing my own things

Chris: That's great

Jason: Love songs for interest of mine, things like that

Chris: Yeah, wow that's great man. So were you that guy with the guitar who got the girl because you had the guitar?

Jason: Yeah…my wife…and then once I learnt chords I started leading worship as well and so my wife, we were on a little missions trip to Mexico, we lived in California and I was a  graduating senior and she was going into her junior year in high school and we went down there and I led worship at this thing that we were doing. And I didn't know her but she saw me leading worship and she knew, she told a camp counsellor that I was going to be her husband. And so, yeah, I think the guitar strummings, it helps man.

Seth: Absolutely

Jason: Helps make up for other things…

Chris: The lack of confidence [5.06] actually talking face to face.

Jason: Massive lack of confidence, man, growing up in the church, there's so many stories that sound similar to that, it's like going up to that youth pastor or whatever and pointing, like that's going to be my guy.

Seth: Did you know at that time or did you find that out later?

Jason: I found that out later, we started sort of dating a bit after that but yeah, I found that out later. And she's not that kind of person, she's actually…I wasn't one of the popular kids and she was so I wouldn't have even, like gone there.

Chris: Yeah, she was out of your league

Jason: She was [5.38] but yeah, I found that out later and I've just been writing songs out of a ‘heart place' you know. Ever since I first started writing songs I think that's been one of the, hopefully one of the things that people notice when they hear songs that I'm part of

Chris: Yeah, yeah. And has that always come naturally to you? To be able to express your heart on paper or in a recording?

Jason: I guess it has, yeah I guess it has. I've found music as the gift of…which is hard to hold onto sometimes when you've been doing something for a while and it becomes your career but there was a lot of years where the only reason I had to write a song was just to get something out. There wasn't any career in it

Chris: Alright

Jason: And so I did that long enough that I think that it's easy for me to sort of stay in that place

Chris: Yeah, yeah, I think one of the hallmarks of the songs that I know of yours, I mean from a perspective of they've got a story or they've got an intention to it and it sounds like you were saying, in those early days before anybody was paying you to write a song; or asking you to go do something that it was because you had to get something out. And I feel like that there is a trend in, at least pop music these days, where there's not necessarily a story, it's  just the feeling, it's a vibe that's going on. Do you find that you would have a harder time if you were you know, if you needed to go write the next Justin Bieber song versus writing something that has more of a, a heart pouring so to speak?

Jason: I will say it, like a melody or a track or a vibe can bring out a lot of emotions so since you've mentioned Bieber…[7.16]…yeah, his most recent album is like, to me it's been the thing I've listened to the most this year. And so I just love it, I think the song writing is amazing, I think the production is phenomenal and it's emotional to me so it feels like, I feel like I can touch it. There is a lot of pop music that doesn't have that same sense to it.

Chris: Yeah, maybe Justin Bieber recently is not the best of those examples but it has that pop sheen to it, necessarily more than an emotion.

Jason: Yeah, what I'm kind of hearing you ask is, is it those songs that are less about the lyric and about just a vibe or something like that. Lyric is huge for me, especially in the lane that God has me in and I feel like in some regard  a lot of pop music, the lyric is real secondary to whether or not it's a hit or not right? And I think we're accountable to more, I look at songs in this lane that God has called me to, I've often called them life rafts for people and so if I'm throwing someone a life raft, if that's what God lets me do with my song, I want it to hold them up. And so our words often become people's prayers, you know, and that's phenomenal. Martin Luther said when I can't pray, I sing and we're able to throw these life rafts to people, a lot of times that don't even know what to pray and write the prayer that they need to re-engage their heart with the Lord and so it's a huge, I think a weight, that we need to carry when we're considering ‘do we have the words right?'

Seth: It's not  just that when you're in a session just like settling on something because at some point, you know, I mean, you've got deadlines and you've just got to get the song out. I mean you've got eight hours a day and you've got to get home to your family. But the intentionality in this genre of lyric is everything.

Jason: Yeah, it totally is

Seth: So, rewinding, we skipped forward a lot of years but from you leading worship on that mission trip, wherever you were in California to when you, you know, got your first pay check from doing music, what did that look like?

Jason: It was a lot of years. I definitely took the long road so I heard Christine Cane talk once on the distance between anointing and appointing and it's different for all of us but I really felt like God anointed me very specifically to write songs for His church, as a teenager. The appointing was probably some fifteen years later and so I went to Bible College, I became a worship pastor at a church in California and had a band, got a little bitty record deal, toured…sold four albums…it was off to an amazing start

Chris: All to your relatives right?

Jason: Right and then at some point my wife and I felt nudged to move here and so we did but I didn't have a job or anything in music and so my entry point into music, and I was working temp agency jobs, I mean it got pretty lean for us, there was a Christmas where we went to sell blood plasma to try to get home for Christmas.

Seth: [10.43] from going to Nashville to California? Wow

Jason: That year I just remember thinking, ‘This, this has got to turn around pretty soon', you know, ‘there's only so much blood available'

Seth: It was literally blood, sweat and tears

Jason: Yeah, right yeah.

Chris: That's amazing

Jason: My entry point into what I'm doing now, oddly enough, was getting a job doing merchandise for Sonicflood and this was back when they were sort of at the top of their thing. And so I needed a job, I didn't think…that's not what I moved here to do…but I started selling their merchandise and I heard they were about to make their second record and I heard that they wanted the title of the record to be ‘Resonate' and they didn't have a song called ‘Resonate', usually you don't title your album until you've got an album you know? Isn't that weird, so I pounced, ‘merch guy' saw an opportunity and wrote a song called ‘Resonate' which was a shoe in because you have to have a song called ‘Resonate' if the album's called ‘Resonate' and they didn't have it, so they had to record it. They recorded it, of course it was the title track but that happened before I wrote the song [11.53] it became their first single off that album. So that was the first time someone else recorded something that I wrote.

Seth: You were doing merch for them on a tour and heard some conversation that [12.09]

Jason: I heard a conversation, went to a hotel room, wrote a song, came back and said “Here's a song called ‘Resonate'”

Chris: What was that like when you presented it? Did you present it as though you had not heard that before but just randomly came up with a song that was…

Jason: No, I wasn't, I didn't play it off like I hadn't heard that they were calling the album ‘Resonate', so that was my entry point and then someone said “So that song made a little bit of money”, that was the first time that ever happened to me you know, ten years into writing songs, selling merchandise and blood. Some friends were saying “You should meet with publishers in town”, I'd never heard of a music publisher. I didn't know there was a career to be had in song writing, I had no idea. I was pretty naive to how the music industry worked and so I met with all the publishers in town, got a quick “No” from everybody. I just didn't have, I had this one song you know, and then…

Seth: And they were all like, “And what else?”

Jason: Right, right. And so the fourth publisher I met with, which was the last option, saw potential in the writing but really valued sort of, my heart for what I wanted to do with my writing so I entered my first publishing deal and that was, I guess, twelve years ago now.

Chris: Who was that with?

Jason: Cindy Wilt signed me to Word, so I wrote for Word for three years, she's my champion, she's with the Lord now…

Chris: Just this past year…

Jason: Yes, she signed me, I probably wrote a hundred songs my first year, as a writer at Word, with co-writes, almost every day. I didn't get one cut.

Chris: Wow! Out of a hundred?

Jason: A hundred yeah, yeah my batting average was pretty low, I wrote a hundred songs, no cuts but I really felt at the time that it was the most amazing year and I thought ‘Well, I'm not going to get my option picked up because I've made no money for the company but I was just really thankful to the Lord to have sort of lived a dream for a year. And so I was really ready to pack up and go back to something else and she picked up my option, wrote another hundred songs for another year, got my first cut, found out it was a hidden track…

Seth: So did you even get paid for this?

Jason: Well my…

Chris: He got paid with hidden money

Jason: Yes, hidden money, Cindy called and assured me that you get paid the same, just no one will hear it. I was like “Ah, awesome”. So again, I thought…

Seth: So one out of two hundred

Jason: One out of two hundred

Seth: That's amazing though just for her vision in you, you know. If I signed a writer, if I was a publisher…

Jason: You would not, no, you do not stick around, I would have never stuck with me so yeah, she really is a champion for me

Chris: Yeah, that's amazing

Jason: And so she picked up my option again…

Seth: After the hidden track

Jason: Really, really caught a wave, “So you're telling me there's a chance…”. So year three is when I finally kind of did catch my wave and I started having quite a few things work and the real sort of, another real pivotal album for me was Joy Williams did an album called Genesis and we wrote most of the songs on that album together…

Seth: You and Joy…

Jason: Yes, and it, it didn't necessarily go on to be the biggest album but everyone loved it. So it was like all of our peers loved it and so all of a sudden, doors started opening up and then I met a guy named Bebo Norman and we started writing songs for his album. And I'd never produced anything and I was just doing demos and stuff with the songs we wrote and then I ended up producing that record for him called Between the Dreaming and the Coming True

Seth: Was that just kind of like, hey, you had been doing these demos and they loved what you were doing, just keep…

Jason: Yeah, well what actually happened is we had written, I think, almost all the songs for his album, just the two of us and he went to the producer that they had hired to produce the first couple of songs and they just weren't thrilled with where they landed and so I think Bebo went and just said “Hey, do you mind if me and Jason sort of try to hit a couple?” I think he asked if we could hit a couple and record at the mall. So, then I was a producer you know and that's when I really did sort of catch a wave in that season. And another thing, so I started having lots of songs getting recorded, I started producing a lot. I really think this happened where I might have written a hundred songs and had no cuts, I think I've had a couple years where I've had a hundred songs cut.

Chris: Wow, wow

Jason: And which is nuts so things just got fast and exciting and I found was a part of a couple guys who stumbled into this band called 10th Avenue North and so we signed them to a little development deal and shot them a record deal and that thing's turned into something really significant. Brandon Heath and I wrote ‘Give me your eyes' which turned into something significant and then it just seemed, it seemed to be like…where Seth is right now

Seth: I don't know if I'm there yet

Jason: Just lots of songs doing really, really, really well and to some degree I'm still on that wave but I have had a bit of a shift in, for me personally, and like God uses music in so many different ways but the song that I was most desiring in my life was songs for the Church. Songs that the Church could bring in worship to the Lord and I had a picture in my mind since high school that one day I would walk in to the back of a room and hear God's people singing something that He let me be a part of writing. So this is relatively recent, about six and a half years ago, six years ago I had…the mailbox money was there…and the accolades and stuff with my peers was there but I had this sort of unfulfilled dream and passion of mine and I was asking the Lord, before I moved into another [18.51] deal, if I was meant to keep doing this because I truly, and I prayed this, and I truly meant it, that I would trade all of the other things and what it brought and the success that it brought for that experience of walking in the back of a church and hearing God's people singing something that He'd let me be a part of writing.

So I started bringing this prayer to the Lord about six and a half years ago, took some space from writing and it just seemed like that, at that time God shifted some things from me and really moved me into a place where that was going to become a much more significant part of my life. I remember the day I heard a church sing, I was in the back of a room and I heard a church sing something I wrote for the first time and it was six years ago. It was something I'd written with a guy named Reuben Morgan, because of the success that I'd had, he had come through town and he'd asked if he could get with Christian music's sort of top writer/producers and I was one of three he spent a day with and he didn't really want to write any songs. It was more to just sort of like talk philosophy, hang out, kind of get some exposure to some other ways of maybe approaching songs and take that back because they write their songs internally. So we spent a day and didn't write but we became friends instantly, it was like the brother that was out there that I hadn't met yet. So he came back through a couple of weeks later and on a Saturday morning we just decided to give a go at writing a little something and we wrote Forever Reign but he wasn't thinking that he would take it home and use it at church. So it was just a song that was just on a voice memo on two phones and I didn't know if that's all it would ever be and you really don't know.

I think songwriters out there kind of wonder if you know when you've got one of those and you really don't know. I think you should feel like you've got one of those with every song you ever write, so this song was sitting there and I'm still praying this prayer, “Lord, let me walk in the back of a church and hear your people singing something You let me write” and I get this email and it says “Hey, decided to give this a run at church, it's unbelievable what's happening, this is just a board mix so excuse it being rough but I just wanted you to hear it”. And so I'm by myself in my room at home and I push play and I'm listening to Hillsong church sing ‘Forever Reign' like their lives depend upon it and I realized at that moment I was in the back of a church, like, but in God's extravagant and beautiful way, I was by myself with Him but I was listening into the back of not just any church but the most influential church on worship in the world. That really marked a transition for me and I so love radio, it's so fun for me and hooks and pop melodies but if I had to give my life as a writer to one thing, it would certainly be songs that God's people are singing in the church and so I do as much of that as possible these days and really love it

Chris: What an amazing story

Seth: It's pretty crazy

Chris: Yeah, it is, and the fact that you were able to have kind of a private moment there but still have that experience that you kind of envisioned years and years before

Jason: Yeah, God's got this stuff you know, He's got us

Chris: Well speaking of that and the faith that it took to get to that point, what kind of faith did it take for you or ‘stick-to-it-iveness' that first year where you had the deal and you wrote a hundred songs and not one cut and then the second year where you finally got one but not many people would hear it unless they knew how to work a CD player the right way? What did it take for you to keep going and for Cindy to continue to have faith in you, just what was that experience like for you?

Jason: Well I think what keeps us going is that we love it, it's hard for me to come over here and talk with Seth and not be like ‘So let's write something' because I love it, I love when we write, I love writing songs and so it's what keeps you going is that you love it. Even if there's not the return of people hearing it, that's a big bonus but that kept me going at it. And also too, I'm a bit, I'm driven, I don't think anyone ends up in this world that's achieving things like you're going to find that drive is a big part of a common factor.

Seth: Well to push through two years of not having anything, it has to be

Jason: Right, it is and belief, people believing in you. The other thing, I do think it's important for songwriters in this era, we're such an instant gratification culture and an entitled culture that we don't appreciate the hours. There's this whole ten thousand hours thing that it takes to master anything that we're all familiar with but I really find that's true. I like to tell songwriters, I've got a good friend named Jimmy Abegg who was in The Ragamuffins with Rich Mullins and he's still a brilliant guitar player but his painting is probably his first love, so he's this brilliant painter; we have his paintings hanging all around our house. My wife dabbles in painting sometimes and so she had taken some pictures of the ocean out where we're from in Santa Cruz and had come home and was painting these ocean scenes, she had six canvasses hanging on the wall and she thought ‘Well I'm going to have Jimmy come out and give me some critique'. And I'm like ‘Oh, that'll be amazing, get critiqued by Jimmy Abegg' so he comes out and he looks at her six paintings and he tells her so many…like he just finds encouraging things to say about every inch of all six canvasses…but then he says, “Okay, so  you've got six, so go paint ninety four more and then paint your first painting”

Chris: Oh gosh…

Jason: But that's like, what good advice, I mean we always just want to fast track to…and some writers might write…their first song might be a world changing song, there's a difference between people who ‘happen' into a good song and people that constantly write great songs. And that comes from really honing your craft and honing your craft is…there's no shortcut to hours.

Chris: I was thinking as you were saying that, the hundred songs in the first year and the hundred songs in the second year, even if they didn't get put anywhere that either could equate to significance on the charts or every bottom dollar, whatever that is, like what a classroom that is, to be in front of someone else, doing a co-write, [25.56] writing. All those songs are building towards…just like you were saying Jimmy was saying that all of those hundred paintings build towards being able to put your first one out there that is really a statement

Seth: My competitiveness would probably go back and take some of those if I were in your position and play them for somebody and just watch how many of them would get cut. Now because you're Jason Ingram…

Jason: You're totally right, and that does happen, that does happen. I mean you don't…it's hard to get a fair listen…people always listen to things through the filter of what their expectation is and so if their expectation is that something is going to be great, they're more likely to hear it that way

Seth: Yeah, it's pre-informed, I'm sure

Chris: That's definitely true. So the kid that's getting out of Belmont and wanting to become the next Jason Ingram…what's your biggest word of advice to him or her?

Jason: Write songs that mean something to you and put your head down and work hard and write a lot. The other thing I…when I say write something that means something to you…is I do find that a lot of people sort of come out of these environments and they've learned some sort of craft but

Seth: Like meaning [27.17] haven't gone and gotten a degree

Jason: Yeah, like got a degree or they've kind of read some books so they want to do something so they study the craft and you can assemble a song because the rhyme is there or the hook is there but I just think the difference, even in the pop world, and certainly in Country and Christian, is the songs that are written because they matter to you is…those are always the ones that do something. And another thing I tell people is if you want to be a songwriter, make sure your calendar tells me you're a songwriter because if your calendar doesn't tell me you're a songwriter you're not a songwriter.

We sort of have this sort of idea that ‘Well, I'm just going to catch a song, I'm waiting for inspiration or…', the thing that we learn is,  we calendar our song writing and then good things happen. You tend to want to think that…like even ‘Forever Reign' as an example…or anything like that, that I was woken up in the middle of the night and the Lord said “I've got something for you”, so I got up, I sang something into my phone and the next morning I'm playing it back, and I'm like ‘Oh my goodness, this is amazing'. But, really it was just a date and a time that was scheduled on a calendar and had that not happened, that song would not exist and so I always tell people your calendar will tell me what you are in life and if you want to be a songwriter let's look at your calendar and let's see if you are. That's a big one is because it takes a lot of discipline to keep writing songs

Seth: Now that's a good word, it's kind of less of waiting for inspiration to strike and just showing up every day and then the inspiration comes because of who you're around and…

Chris: Definitely, definitely

Jason: Yeah, and another thing is, on that, because of who you're around, co-write. We both know, we all know co-writing is the key to my success, that wasn't something I was doing…none of the songs that people know me by would even exist…that's a very big deal

Seth: Do you sit down nowadays, ever, and just do anything by yourself anymore or is it just kind of like…that's…you don't do it that way anymore?

Jason: I really don't. Every now and then, I think last year I wrote a song by myself, I just…you know was in a moment where I felt like I needed to express something…but that's so rare. I have an unfair advantage in that I have access to a lot of talented friends and so I want to know what my idea shapes into with someone else's mind involved in it as well

Chris: Was that a process for you? In the early days when you say you sat in your room by yourself writing that song, to being mostly known as a person whose an amazing collaborator and co-writer, that process of transitioning into mostly co-writes

Jason: One of the things I told my first publisher when I signed my first publishing deal is that I write my best songs by myself and I really believed that and she said “Okay, well we'll see how that shapes up for you”. And it certainly was not true, what I said. I do not write my best songs by myself.

Chris: How long did that take for you to fully believe that?

Jason: About two years, of writing some by myself and writing a ton with other people, it makes sense though, I mean the community in strength. Like it just…it makes sense that when you do something as a team you're going to get better results than individuals

Seth: That word is recurring very many times in this podcast

Chris: Isn't it though? It's amazing

Seth: The importance of team and along with your team, when you were getting into it would you consider that publisher like your mentor, do you feel like you had a mentor, sort of shepherding you in your career?

Jason: She would have been my mentor in that season of life for sure, she would listen to everything I wrote and told me what was working and what wasn't, yeah that was just like school for me

Chris: Was it tough to hear?

Jason: No, because the heart was someone who was…when no one else wanted to give me any advance and tell me to write songs…this was the person that said “You can do it” so no, it definitely wasn't. I mean, it's always tough to hear in the regard that I think we put our hearts, we put ourselves into these things that we do and so it's always hard to hear things that are critical but it's so valuable

Seth: At this point in your career you've achieved some pretty big success by any world standard. Is there anything that you're still afraid of when you come into work every day?

Jason: Yes and it's that I'm afraid that I'm missing what God wants out of me and so I keep that in front of me, like the thing I'm really wanting to be mindful of in 2016 is if I didn't write another song [32.38] my family's going to be okay and I've accomplished something and I could come and write songs purely out of craft and gifting as can you and get good results but I…what I'm afraid of is, I'm not seeking what God wants…What does He want from me? What does He…what are the prayers that people need? What are the life rafts that we need to throw to people? What are the…not just writing songs [33.13] I just don't want to…in this space that I'm in…the music industry works unfortunately, I think, very much like any other industry, there's not a lot of conversation of mission, there's not a lot of conversation of, truly, of life impact, which is kind of sad you know. You want to hope that that's there but we're inundated by ‘Is it a hit?', I hate that word, I love when things become a hit but I…

Seth: If that's what you're shooting for

Jason: The fear in me is just that we would just write really catchy jingles that people enjoy but that we're not really bringing the people what God, what His heart for us to bring them is. So that's front and centre for me

Seth: Now that's good

Chris: You're kind of building on that, and borrowing from a term you said earlier that you feel you're still kind of riding that initial wave that you caught. Can you foresee what you either want your next wave to look like or what you feel like you're transitioning into now? If it's the same thing, that's fine but what is the next two, three, five years look like for Jason Ingram?

Jason: I've reached a place of freedom in my life where there's been a lot of hustle and  a lot of drive for a lot of years and I really want to sit in a place of rest and freedom and gratitude and so when you're too tired or there's something that happens when you're not taking care of yourself or your soul and your ‘get to's' become ‘got to's'. There is some years where I get to write a song, I get to be with this artist today, I get to come and talk about this. They become ‘got to's', I've got to do this, I've got to write today, I've got to be with that artist tomorrow. And there's no joy in that, there's no rest in that and for me, I'm just trying to move just into a space where everything is a ‘get to' again and however long God wants to use me in this capacity, like I'm pumped but holding it loosely.

But I am excited, I'm ready to write the best songs I've ever written and to dig deep and jump around a room [35.36] listening to you know, I'm super fired up so I don't know, I don't have another thing, you know, just this thing and I do think there's something to that. I don't often say to people like you can go so many paths when something starts working, when one thing's working it's easy to start thinking about all these other things that you're not doing. And I've just tried to live by this principle that I heard someone say which is so where you have favour and so where I have favour, that's where I'm going to continue to sow and not be thinking about ‘Well because this is working [36.18] what I can get in that door, that I could do that thing'

Chris: It's been a pleasure to  hear from you. I know that so many of your words have turned into songs that have turned into these personal words for other people. You know they've taken those as their own, as their prayer like you're saying. So it's been a pleasure for me to be able to sit here and just hear from you because so much of what I've heard from you have been the songs that you've created and so to hear personally from you about some of that with the struggles or the high points or the…what you're thinking of as some of those songs come to light has been a pleasure man, thank you

Seth: Yeah, super fun

Jason: Thanks so much for the time man

Seth: You've been listening to the Full Circle Music Show, leave us a nice rating and review on iTunes. Editing help this week thanks to Kayley Ingram and [37.05] Jerricho Scroggins, produced by the Full Circle Music Company. Check us out at fullcirclemusic.org/podcast

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The post FCM012 – Writing 100 Songs A Year with Jason Ingram appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Feb 09, 2016
FCM011 – “You Got it Man” with Tim Lauer
49:31

In today's interview, we dive into the back story of multi-talented Producer, Writer, Multi-Instrumentalist, and arranger, Tim Lauer. His credits include Taylor Swift, Blake Shelton, Megadeth, The Civil Wars, Michael W Smith, Coke, BMW, Kraft, and many more…In fact, he now has credits in four decades and is an EMMY AWARD NOMINEE.

He talks about a great system he calls “re-treds”, where he saves, tags, and organizes “rejected” song ideas for later use. A great reminder to never give up on an idea. Try it for yourself! He also talks about the best four words to use in this business: “You Got it Man.”
Make sure you listen all the way to the end of the episode. He shares, in a moment of vulnerability, how he feels about his journey in this music industry. Don't miss this one.

 


 

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Feb 02, 2016
FCM010 – Friendship with John Mays
41:47

In this episode we have the pleasure of sitting down with John Mays, Vice President of A&R with Centricity Music. John Mays is a legend in music and friendship, and as you listen you'll know why. Enjoy!

 

 

 

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Jan 26, 2016
FCM009 – Ally with Jason Turner
46:30

In this episode we sit down with entertainment lawyer Jason Turner from Keller Turner Ruth Andrews & Ghanem, PLLC. Jason has worked with so many in the music biz including OneRepublic, Backstreet Boys and our own Seth Mosley. Jason fills us in on the importance of great counsel in your corner, and why it's crucial to make sure you have the best chance of success.

 

 

 

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Jan 19, 2016
FCM008 – Enjoyment with Sean Moffitt
38:50

In this episode we sit down with mix engineer Sean Moffitt. When he's not earning awards he is mixing world renown records. Hear his insights, and enjoy!

 

 

 

The post FCM008 – Enjoyment with Sean Moffitt appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Jan 12, 2016
FCM007 – Relationships with Steve Ford
50:21

FCMSteve

In this episode we sit down with Centricity Music General Manager, Steve Ford. Steve talks about his history in the music biz, the importance of working your way up, winging it and having balance in the industry.

 

 

www.fullcirclemusic.org

FCM007_-_Relationships_with_Steve_Ford

Duration: 00:50:21

You're listening to The Full Circle Music Show. The why of the music biz.

Chris: Welcome back to the Full Circle Music Show, it’s Chris Murphy and I'm sitting right beside Seth Mosley. How are you buddy?

Seth: I'm good man. It's a busy week, lots of good stuff going on over here at the studio. And I’m excited to take just a few minutes out of our schedule to talk to one of our favorite people in the industry, Mister Steve Ford.

Steve has been a guy that I've known for a long time, was one of the people that I met moving to Nashville in the music business. And we've talked to a lot of people on the creative side so far but we haven't yet talked to anybody on the label side. So, you think of the guy that sits in a dark room with a suit in a corner office, that's this guy! Except for not, he actually sits in a what is a pretty awesome office, he's the general manager of a label company called Centricity Music; has been pretty massively successful in the past couple of years and really since they opened. But, he's a really great leader and speaks to what they look for in a good producer, in a good artist, in a good team member at their label.

So, if you're wanting to get involved in the music industry, this is a great episode to listened to. I learned a ton and I think you will too.

Chris: You know, being a podcast junky, it's nice to meet a fellow podcast enthusiast as well. We had some great conversations in the episode but also talked a lot about our favorite podcasts on and off the mic. He's just a great guy, great to get to know him and I really appreciate Seth you setting this up. Another great interview and I can't wait to listen to it.

Seth: And you can check out his company at centricitymusic.com. They have a lot of great artists that I think you'll dig.

Audio clip commences

Hey podcast listeners, something is coming February 1st 2016. Have you ever thought about a career in song writing or music production? We have created a couple courses with you guys in mind. We've been getting a lot of feedback on people wanting to know more about how to become a song worker; how to become a professional music producer or engineer. These courses were designed to answer some of those questions. Go to fullcirclemusic.org and sign up there for more information.

Audio clip ends

Chris: You were saying earlier before we started rolling that you were a podcast guy.

Steve: Oh yeah, big podcast guy.

Chris: And, you've heard this podcast before?

Steve: Yeah. I've listened to the first three.

Chris: Okay. So, can I ask you to go out on a limb and give us a grade so far?

Steve: You know what? I'd give them a solid B+. I want them longer. That's my thing; I want to go into the background. I want to hear when you did Brown Banishers which is funny because I've worked a lot with Brown but you didn't get past Amy Grant.

Seth: Sure.

Steve: I mean, this is the guy who worked with from everybody from Third Day to Mercy Me to Why Heart, he's done everybody like come one there are stories there. I tell people I'm on the corporate side because of Brown Banisher because of how he worked. I was an engineer in LA for ten years and he would come out and mix records with us, it was at a little place called Mama Joes and I would see him on the phone going, “Happy birthday sweetie.” Later knowing that it was Ellie; missed her first walk and all of these other things. And when my daughter was born, I was like, I can't do this. I needed a life and so I started praying and Peter York calls. So it’s because of him so it's fun to hear some his stories. I did a lot of records win Jack Joseph Puig and–

Seth: And you were engineering at the time?

Steve: Yeah. I was an engineer at LA.

Seth: And at the time that was really engineering?

Steve: Oh my gosh.

Seth: You were cutting tape and…

Steve: Yeah! I've cut a lot of two inch tape, quarter inch tape, half inch–

Seth: Stuff that I hope to never do.

Steve: You don't have to, Jericho does it for you.

[Laughter] 

Seth: I don't know if Jericho has ever cut tape? In school he did.

Steve: Now, I feel really old.

Chris: Is that kind of like when you're in a biology class and not in any other time of your life will you need to dissect a frog but you just have to do it for the experience of it. Is that what it's become cutting tape?

Steve: I don't know if you have to do it even that. It's sort of like this legend of starting a fire with flint, you know? It's sort of like, “Yeah. I used to cut tape.”

[Laughter] 

Seth: I mean there's probably a resurgence. I would imagine knowing the process of what coffee has become and how artists.

Steve: Yeah.

Seth: I think there's a big thing in maybe it's the millennial generation or whatever it is but I think people are drawn back to slower, older more hands on processes it seems like than just pushing the button or going through the drive through–

Steve: And somethings, don't you think, in some things its like just give me the button. Give me the filter on Instagram.

Seth: That is true! That's true but then you've got the whole wave of people roasting their own coffee beans now and then they're grinding the with a hand grinder, and then they're putting in a… And, I'm saying this because we have like three artists that we work with; that come in and they bring their whole coffee apparatus.

Steve: And they measure how much coffee goes in, weigh it?

Chris: Yeah.

Steve: My son has one of those has a scale that weighs, how much coffee goes in. Oh yeah just …

Chris: Yeah, I thought you were going to say some of the artists that you work with, they actually bring their own barista in the studio because–

Steve: I'm sure that will happen.

Seth: That’s kind of a prerequisite to be in a band. There has to be at least one barista.

Steve: True.

Seth: In the band.

Steve: There has to be one business guy in every band and one guy who can make great coffee.

Seth: And then the guy who can actually play the instruments.

Steve: Yeah. Then the artist.

[Laughter]

Chris: And then the fourth guy on base who just knows how to shape everybody's beards. He's more of a grooming guy.

Seth: And sometime there's a drummer.

[Laughter] 

Steve: You don't need a drummer; there are machines for that now.

[Laughter] 

Seth: Yeah. I mean, just take us through a little bit of your journey, you started in L.A.?

Steve: I was born and raised in L.A.; read an article when I was 14 years old about this guy named Sir George Martin. And I was like, “What? You can do that for a living?”

Seth: Who is George Martin?

Steve: He produced this little band called the Beatles, probably never heard of…most 20 year olds haven't heard of them so…

Chris: And then isn't true that he went on from there to write The Game of Thrones?

Steve: Did he? I'm not a Game of Throne person–

Chris: Okay that's R.R. Martin, sorry.

Steve: Wrong one. But I mean, you read about these guys and you sort of open a door into a new world that you didn't know existed. And so, I was 18 years old, junior out of high school walked into the recording studios and started from there.

Seth: So, you didn't wait to have some sort of a college thing to get internships?

Steve: My mom was like Reeds parents which was like, “That’s a nice hobby but let's make sure you have a backup plan, a plan B.” And so, I still went to school, I still went to college did all of that. Don't ask me my grade point average because I was going home at 4 o'clock in the morning, waking up at 8 to crawl into my first class, it was terrible. But yeah, my first job in the recording studio, I was making $500 a month from 6 o'clock to 3 o'clock in the morning.

Seth: Living in L.A?

Steve: Living in L.A.

Seth: And that probably paid for a tenth of the rent?

Steve: Maybe.

Chris: Or, just the gas to get around?

Steve: But I loved every second of it. And then from there you sort of work your way up. So, I did that… Like I said earlier my daughter was born and I was like an engineer’s life is a hard life in LA especially. Those were the days when you'd pay $1,500 a day block booking a studio; you booked a studio and you're paying $1,500 if your there six hours or eight there 24 hours. And a lot of them stayed 24 hours, and you just have next, next, next, next.

Chris: And you've got to be the first guy there.

Steve: First guy there, last guy out, yeah. You're sitting there winding tables at 6 o'clock in the morning going, “I just want to go home.”

Chris: When the bug caught you, from that point until the time that you walked into that first studio and got a job, what skills were you harnessing?

Steve: None.

Chris: Just reading liner notes?

Steve: Yeah. Lying in the floor, reading and going, there's one in North Hall and I'd write it down on a piece of paper because I grew up in the San Fernando Valley and start looking for them. Hey man that where Bill [inaudible 8:50] studio is or whatever the studio was and start. There wasn't really a whole lot you can do to prepare for it. It's no like in high school you go, “I wonder what class…”  I was in all the choirs and all the music stuff and that didn't prepare you for it. Probably the greatest skills for a studio engineer especially a starting one is being attentive, being hungry, being prepared and that depends on who you're working with.

When you working together with somebody so well, I'm sure you and your team, they know what you want in advance and plugin something in before you even have to ask, that’s just working together. I've told a lot of wannabe engineers who want to go to some of these very expensive schools, don’t do it. Take that money, live on it for two years and go give yourself away for free for two years. You learn more two years in a studio than you will however long you go to one of the expensive ones.

Chris: Yeah.

Steve: It's just doing it. Just aligning the tape machine which is once again, it's like starting fire with flint again, knowing the lines taped but you learn by doing that.

Chris: Absolutely.

Steve: You learn by making a lot of mistakes. I recorded a lot of bad drum sounds.

[Laughter] 

It just happened and then you go, “Oh if I do this, its better.” And 10,000 hours man, it takes 10,000 hours.

Chris: Again, I think that it's not that schooling is necessarily a bad thing but the way that you learn in life versus the way that you learn in a classroom is different because for the most part, a classroom will deduct points for the stakes and if you’re in the–

Steve: That's true. Good point.

Chris: Yeah. I heard that -actually going back to our love of podcasts here- I heard Tim Farris on his podcast talking about the fact that he was going to go to, was considering something like Princeton or Harvard or something to go get his MBA. And he thought instead of doing that -or maybe this was advice given to him and he took it- instead of taking that couple hundred thousand dollars worth of whatever I needed to go get my MBA. I'm going to invest that in myself, very similar to what you're saying. And I'm going to use that to live on so that way I can go and I can intern for that company that I would never be able to if the money mattered that much. Because once you get out of school its like, “Oo I've got to go do something with this.” But if you've got the money set aside to go get the MBA anyway, it goes a long way to really feeling free to not have to pay that rent or pay that car payment that you could really dive in.

Steve: And most people never use their college education for what they use. I had a meteorologist specialist. She had a degree in meteorology for TV and she was my marketing assistant. And you go, “I want to see what you spent four years doing versus what's your grade point average or what's you major.” I don't care about that stuff.

Seth: So to fast forward to today, you are general manager of a very successful record label. When you got to hire somebody to your team, do you even say, “Hey, send in your resume. Where did you go to college?” Or does that not even cross your mind?

Steve: I do want to see that. Four years in college gives me the impression that they follow through, they finish. You’ve said it before, finishing is such a hard art in today's world. To have somebody who finished is very valuable. Do I care about your grade point average? No. Do I even care about your major? No. Because if you have the right work ethic and the right heart, I can train you to do other things but I want to see how hard you're willing to work.

Seth: So, a college degree still carries some weight but maybe it doesn't carry the weight that people think it does in terms of having the training because you kind of have to relearn it all when you get out into the real world.

Steve: Exactly. Most college students that I see haven't learned anything that’s a really good use at a record label. My last five hires at Centricity have all come from internships. Now, I've had a lot of bad interns. I've wanted to fire a couple of interns, that's pretty bad when you want to fire somebody who works for free.

Seth: What defines a good intern and what defines a bad intern?

Steve: A bad intern sits on Facebook until you give them something to do and then they do exactly just to the letter of the law of what you asked them to do, hand it in to you and then get back on Facebook. A great intern does what you do and says, “Hey and I thought about this. And what about this more?” You give them to go to D and they go to G; then you give them to G and they go to S. I have a girl in my office, I asked her to do one thing and she says “Oh by the way while I was thinking about it I did these other three things that will help you out.” That type of proactivity and thinking ahead is so incredibly valuable. Like having somebody patching in your compressor before you ask for it. They know where you're going so fast that they're working ahead of you. And for all of those out there, that's old school once again patch bays.

[Laughter]

Seth: We have a small patch bay, we have two patch bays actually so we're probably on the old school end of things.

Chris: It looks very cool though. It's looks kind of old science fiction movie.

Steve: Spaghetti.

[Laughter] 

Seth: It's like a telephone operator kind of thing. I heard a thing on…man, we keep talking about podcast, we're all just podcasts nerds, dude. I think that’s what we do for a living is listen to podcasts. And I heard one last night, they did a study of millennials; if you had a dream job, pick out of these choices what would be your dream job. Number one was the president; number two was a senator; number three was a successful athlete; number four foreign diplomat; five was a CEO of Apple; and then the last choice was the personal assistant to a famous actor or athlete. And 45% I think picked that one, hands down.

Steve: They have no idea what that job looks like.

Seth: They don't but it also speaks to they don't want to take the responsibility. Like, when you're that person, when you're the boss, they want to have a boss and maybe you can speak to a little bit to that but I feel like when you were talking about the internships, the ones who go above and beyond are the ones who are willing to take some responsibility and say, “Here's an idea” and just put it out there. How many interns would you have to get, to get that one good one?

Steve: Probably 10 to 15.

Seth: 10 to 15 to 1?

Steve: Yeah, to 1. I think that’s what it is.

Chris: Wow.

Steve: Yeah, that's what it is. And I heard you, I think we had the conversation, there's such a different work ethic in today's young adults. And part of it is my fault, I'm a parent of a young adult they've been given everything in their whole life, they haven't had to work for anything. You want that iPhone! Here's that iPhone. You want that? Here's that. The art and the craft of working, the labor of getting something is a lost art, I think.

Seth: So, would you go back and do those things differently?

Steve: For my kids? My kids had to work.

[Laughter]

Seth: So, you weren't saying from my experience, you weren't–

Steve: I’m saying that personally and much more of…

[Laughter]

What we made our kids do is like when they wanted that $100 American girl doll is you buy half, we’ll buy half. And all of a sudden they're digging out rocks in the backyard at $1 a bucket out of the garden. Because you want to give your kids what the value of work is and that's that doll at the end.

In our world, I sat with an intern once and he was irritating everybody in the office. He's that guy who only asks questions because he wanted to tell you how much he knew. An intern needs to be quite and listen because there's a lot of information that flows around… And then they find the person that they can go to and go, what did that mean when he said this? So, what did that mean or… Come to me! I've told everyone in my internship, feel free to come to me and say, what does it mean when you said that? Versus this guy would come to you and tell you everything he knew. So, I was sitting him down one day and going,  “Man, you're irritating everybody. The whole office wants to prove you wrong.”

Seth: You literally said that?

Steve: I said that to him and later on, “I know I do that. I'm just trying to figure out where I fit and trying to find a job make $100, $120,000 a year and start in the music industry.” And I said, “You're in the wrong industry, man.”

Seth: Go into finance!

Steve: Go into finance, or go be an architect somewhere I guess or something. It was just about wanting to make as much money as his dad did, now! This generation wants to start where their parents have gotten to right now. I've seen it with artists, I've seen it with interns–

Chris: They don't want a drop in their lifestyle that they've become accustomed to.

Seth: A luxury once had, becomes a necessity.

Steve and Chris: Ooohh.

Steve: Very nice.

Seth: And I'm very guilty of that. You fly first class once and you feel like a swine by sitting in coach.

[Laughter] 

Steve: I've flown private jets twice in my whole life, in my whole career both times sort of accidentally. And man, once you do a private jet and you don't have to go through security and you’re just like, “Oh, I want that.” I say this all the time about artists. The worst thing you can do for an artist is start them touring in a bus because that's the expectation and then you know what happens? Is they got on the bus and they’re, “This isn't a very nice bus.” There are people in vans like when you were out in a van, to be on a bus, to be able to sleep horizontally would be the greatest thing ever and just because you started at this place and then you get into private jets. Everybody needs to start their first tour in a Silverado truck and then the next one to a bigger–

Seth: Graduate to a suburban!

Steve: A suburban would be great, then a 15 passenger old church van that you bought for $5,000 that the left side of the speakers don't work. And then, you work your way into a [inaudible 19:58] van and then into a bus. Then you're grateful for everything that's better along the way.

Seth: It's more about the process than anything.

Steve: Yeah.

Seth: And getting there.

Steve: A wise manager once said, his job is to make his artists life better every year, just a little bit better. I'm like, that's a good goal. That's a good goal to have.

Seth: It is. So, your transition, we shipped about 20 years–

Steve: We skipped through it very fast.

[Laughter] 

Your transition from doing that 6pm to 3 in the morning thing in LA, you had your baby…

Steve: Yep. My wife and I were praying at that point going, “God, please give us some sane clients or open another door.” And I just worked probably two months before with Peter York–

Seth: And for those out there listening, was this at a record label you got your first…

Steve: I was working with Peter in the studio and he called me up and said, “Hey, are you interested in A&R?” And I started in A&R in Sparrow…what's that 87, 88? Right around there and we were still in Chatsworth, California, spent time out there with him. So, I’ve been at Sparrow, moved from Sparrow to Star Songs and then back to Sparrow when they came up. Started in A&R worked my way into the marketing side, artist development side… So, yes back to Sparrow went to  Mer and worked my way up to Vice President at marketing at Mer, was general manager at [inaudible 21:34], general manager at SRI and now general manager at Centricity.

Chris: Wow.

Steve: It's been a long journey. If you’d ask me to 25 or 30 years ago, were you going to be general manager at Record Label? I would have laughed in your face.

[Laughter]

Chris: Because you didn't think it was attainable or because you didn't want have this job?

Steve: That was not the path I was on. I thought, I was going to be producing records and engineering records.  Jack Pueg is still mixing great great records out there and I thought I was going to follow that path. God had something very different in mind which makes me laugh going I was talking to [inaudible 22:09] this morning and I can't believe I’ve been doing this, this long. When you're now an industry veteran it means that you've been around a long time.

Seth: But I don't think looking back and I don’t want to put words in your mouth but you don't strike me as one of those people that's looking back and feeling like you’re working in the corporate side of the industry because you never made it on the creative side.

Steve: No, no.

Seth: You don't strike me as that at all.

Steve: I made that decision for my family. What's funny is I've learned more about engineering and more about mixing and more about mastering being on the corporate side of what we're trying accomplish and why trying to do what we're doing. I learned so much about that. And for the first year or so, I was mad at God going, “Why did I just spend 9, 10 years in studios, in dark rooms working long hours if this is where you wanted me?” But realize, every day of my life in the last 27 years in the corporate side I've used information I learned in the studio. Sometimes we can't ask God why until you're 20 years down and you go, “oh I get it.”

It's the path he puts us on, he brings people in and out of your life. I remember a girl over at Sparrow she was an accountant, that was her thing she loved accounting and God put me with her to learn that whole budgeting, it was only like for four months and then we were separated again but once again she changed my perspective and my life for the next 20 years. So, you don't know if these people that are coming in and out of your life are for a short period of how they're going to impact you.

But yeah, I've sort of worked my way, I was one of the strange guys everybody wants to be in A&R. I started in A&R and left to got to marketing and then got back into it as I moved back up into the but everybody wants to be an A&R guy, hang out in the studios and have dinner with the artists which is not what an A&R guy does.

Chris: Well it's the perception out there–

Steve: Yeah, exactly, that's what they think.

Chris: Just like you saying the artist is going to be in private jets.

Seth: And for honestly if somebody's out there, can you break down what exactly what it is A&R. What is that? What is that job?

Steve: A&R, we [inaudible 24:27] airports and restaurants which is [inaudible 24:28].

[Laughter]

It’s artist and repertoire. It’s basically looking for artist, finding people that have a seedling of something. Sometimes you don’t know what it is. We’ve all got our standards of what we feel like will lead to success. But finding that, nurturing it, grooming it, it’s sort of the mustard seed put into the ground, pat around and hopefully something really great grows out of it. Sometimes the plants don’t live, sometimes they give up. But it basically the music made by the A&R guy, we have one of the best in the industry in Centricity. When he’s done, when the music is done, he hands the baton over to me, and I go everywhere from there. But it’s his job to make sure we have hits, we have songs that work for live or work on the radio, an artist that’s got uniqueness to him that fits differently than everything else in the market place and sometimes it’s just plain old dumb luck. We’ve got all those where we’re like, “We though this person had everything they needed, was need for success and it didn’t work, and this one over here it’s that seedling and it’s just growing like crazy.

Seth: Yeah, sometimes you don’t know or probably more often than not, I would think.

Steve: How many songs have you worked on and said, “Man, that’s the hit.” I have a memory of I will eat my shoe if this is not [inaudible 26:04]

[Laughter] 

I believe you owe me a shoe eaten.

Seth: I’m wearing Nikes right now. I have a feeling that this material is not organic.

Chris: I was going to say, whatever you choose make sure its biodegradable.

Steve: I was going to send you a shoe after one particular sock.

[Laughter]

We’ve all got them dude.

Seth: Oh yeah, totally. I think more often than not and it’s honestly becoming a theme on this show is, we’re all just kind of winging it we’re all just guessing. So, my question to that is, I mean, it sounds like there’s a lot of responsibility placed on the shoulders of an A&R person. They’re the one that’s finding and nurturing talent and ultimately seeing what songs make it on records.

I think a lot of people listening in our podcast audience, we have a lot of producers and writers and people outside of the music industry but then there are also probably some people who are just wanting to get in on the music business side and people who maybe want to be in music marketing or be in music management or maybe do what you’re doing someday, run a record label. You said what you look for interns, what qualifies a person to be an A&R person?

Steve: Wow. Interesting. There are a few A&R guys you should interview. A great A&R person is able to inspire an artist beyond what they’ve every thought they could do. A great A&R person knows how to get a good song to a great song. We’re no longer in a society that good is not good enough, it has to be great. A great A&R guy can go, “You know what? There are seedlings, there are moments in here that are really great.” But you’re missing the mark I these two or three places. And then, coming in and sitting side by side with a producer like you and making sure that… I think that I’m a big movie buff and A&R guy is sort of like an executive producer on a movie where you put the team together and then sort of let the team go make the music. So, it’s the right producer for the right, for the right song and for the right artists and then let them shine where they go. It’s very much putting the pieces together. They’re not usually playing the music, they’re not [inaudible 28:34] musicians, they have to have a really good song sense and I think one of the skills an A&R guy has to know is, it’s not about them. They’ve got to know their audience, know what they’re making for because all of us have a tendency to gravitate towards music that’s on the fringe because we listen to so much stuff that all of the stuff in the middle starts mucking up. There’s a big muck in the middle. So, “you know what I like? I like this thing way over here or way over there.” Where a normal consumer listens to 10 records a year, the middle is the sweet spot for them. So, an A&R guy that understands who he’s trying to record for is very important.

Seth: That’s very good. And, you said that they have to have a great song sense, that is even a sticky situation because why is one person’s song sense better than the other? Is that determined by track record? And, if you’ve never done A&R before, how do you prove that, hey I know a hit when I hear one?

Steve: You know what? Our history of…John Mays is a 25 years somebody took a chance on him 27 years ago and said “You’re a great musician on the road, let me bring you in here.” Part is the relationship, you know, can they sit and hang with an artist? You know, you’ve been in these mediums. Where it’s like can you move an artist from A to Z while making the artist think it’s their move? As a producer it’s the same skill set of can you get an artist to bend without knowing that they’re bending? Or being able to move–

Seth: All the artists out there, they just had a–

Steve: I know they had a convulsion.

[Laughter]

And all the producer are like, yeah!

[Laughter]

But that’s part of it, of like how do you get a song… because you don’t want to tell an artist, “You know what? This song sucks.” You just want to say, “Let’s work on the chorus. The chorus isn’t paying off hard enough, let’s make it lift better. Let’s make it shine.” Whatever it may be, moving them away from, “I love this, this is my baby. It’s beautiful.” To let’s keep working on this song.

Seth: So, it sounds like it maybe starts with who they are as a person. Are they a good hang? Are they a servant? And then, the music kind of just follows and that taste follows.

Steve: Our young A&R guy over there, he went through our radio department so he was listening to radio hits, radio hits, radio hits. And part of it is… There’s marketing guy named Roy Williams, I went to a seminar with him and he said he has a friend that works at General Market Record Label to pick all the singles and I’m like, “How did you learn this?” And the guy basically said, “Since I was five years old, every week I’d get my allowance and I would go buy the number one song in America.” And so for his whole life, he poured into himself hits. This is what a hit sounds like, this is what a hit sounds like, this is what a hit sounds like.

Seth: That’s pretty good wisdom, right there.

Steve: And so, at a certain point you go, you got to know our music, you got to listen to our music, you got to know what a hit sounds like. I’ve heard a lot of kids come though “I hate listening to Christian radio.” Then why do you listen to Christian music? How many people in country music go, “[inaudible 32:11] but I hate country music.” Get out! You’re not going to succeed.

[Laughter]

But they almost wear it as a banner that I hate Christian music in our market place. We have an open concept office and I’ll try to listen to two hours of Christian radio every day in my office. And if I’m listening to it, everybody in my office is listening to it too; more for this is what a hit sounds like, this is what radio sounds lie. If you’re trying to meet a need at radio and you don’t know what they’re playing, how can you meet the need? So…I digress, sorry.

Seth: No, that’s gold. That’s all gold.

Steve: I think you nailed it in your earlier podcast when you said, this is a servant industry. It really is. And in my life, it took me a lot of time to figure out what my calling was. I knew I wasn’t an artist but God, what does that mean? And I was walking through Exodus with my kids when they were very young and hit Exodus 17 where God say to Moses, they’re out of Egypt heading towards the Promised Land and they hit the Analcites, God calls Moses up to the hill top; arms up in the air he wins, arms down they lose. But what never caught to me until I was reading it, Moses took two people along with him Aaron and Hur and I love to say I am the Hur in the Moses’ life. It’s my job, what Hur was up there to do is to hold Moses’ arms up, that’s all he did. When Moses was weak, when Moses needed help, Hur held his hands up. That’s my calling be a servant, be there to hold your hands up. Some people know Aaron “Aaron, you know, Moses’ little brother.” No one knows who Hur is. If you’re okay standing, holding someone’s arms up and no one recognizes, you are created to be in the music industry. Because you’re not in to be the rock stars; we’re in the back of the room with our arms folded, looking at the person on stage going, “Yeah. I was there to hold their arms up.”

Chris: That’s wise. One of my favorite movies is That Thing You Do, I don’t know if any of you have seen that.

Steve: Yeah. I’m the guy that goes, “You look great in black.”

[Laughter]

Chris: Has anyone told you that?

Steve: Yeah.

Chris: But, one of my favorite characters in the movie, and they’re filled with them. Anybody out there that hasn’t seen it, it’s a great movie.

Steve: Please, go see it.

Chris: But there’s Horus who’s basically the A&R guy that sees them in–

Steve: In the camper-

[Laughter]

Chris: Yeah, he lives in a camper and he’s essentially the A&R guy. But he sees them in a performance at an Italian restaurant or something and comes and buys their album and get’s them to sign a little deal. And then at the end, when they get signed to a major label and they’re going out to play these state fairs, Horus leaves and the main character drummer of the band says, “We don’t want you to leave.” And he goes, “My [inaudible 35:27] is done. I’ve done what I’m supposed to do.” And then move on to the next thing and so he wasn’t meant to ride that out the whole movie; he’s there for a specific piece to move it from A to C. He’s the B part of it, the Hur of that story so to speak.

Steve: Nowadays, you’d call them just production deals. You start working with an unknown artist who has a little bit of talent, you start developing them and then you start shopping them to record labels. And then you go, my job here is done. They then take the baton and now try to make to a national artist. If you make 2 out of 20, 3 out of 20, you’re in great shape. You’re a hall of fame baseball player if you hit 3 out of 10. And you’re a hall of fame A&R guy if 3 out of your 10 are hit artists.

It’s a cycle, you have the young artist going up; you have the artist at their peak; and then you have some that are on their way down. And you’ve got to keep that circle going because any artist that’s been at the top is going to be past its peak and slowly work its way down, and you got to have the new artist coming up behind to grow into. So it’s a continual cycle of in the music industry. The circle of life in music would be that.

Chris: I had a mentor –Scott [inaudible 36:48] if you’re listening I’m about to talk about you- but he always talked about how life in the ministry or in a career is kind of like looking at life or the people that you interact is like a watching a parade go by. There are things that are right in front of you, there are things that you just saw, and there are things that are coming down. And to really appreciate what is happening in the parade you have to absorb it all. And so there’s a little bit of grabbing from each of those in order to get the full experience of it all.

Steve: And the bigger what’s right in front of you, the bigger those artists are in front of you, sometimes you don’t have time to look behind and develop what’s behind and what happens is with a lot of these record labels and I’ve been at these where, man they’ve got the big, and they slowly slipping. The [inaudible 37:32] slowly start getting past their prime and they haven’t developed anything behind them and then you’re in trouble because you’ve got this machine you’ve got to feed and you haven’t created for the future, it’s only for the present.

And so, every A&R guy wants to sing but some of the big labels, the big artists, the A’s are so big that’s all they’re paying attention to. We’ve all seen it, we’ve all seen artists where we say, “Man, they’re amazing” but they got lost in the shuffle and that’s the sadness. We forget that we’re playing with people’s lives, especially on the record label side their dreams.

I signed this band at a label and they were 18 years old when I signed them and 21 years old when I had to drop them. So, their dreams had come true and shattered by the time they were 21. And it’s just hard when you start thinking about that stuff.

Chris: That’s true. And if you think about it there are some people that are fortunate enough to have a full career in the music industry and there are some people that have a three year window kind of like a profession sports guy or those things. There’s a window and the once you pass it, yeah but the guy is only 24 and the band is only 21. What’s coming up for them?

Steve: You know what, I think it’s a catalyst of those people leaving or burning out, is balance. You guys have said it; I can walk through a record label at 8 o’clock at night and I can tell you which employees will be gone in a year because they have nothing to put back into themselves. The music industry is a take industry, it just continues squeezing and it just wants more and more and more. If you have one they want five; if you have five we want ten; if we have ten we want twenty, and it’s never enough. My poor radio team goes, “Hey we got number one.” And I’m like, “Great. How do we keep it on number one for another week?” It’s never enough and so you continue squeezing out what this industry does, if you don’t have a ministry, if you don’t have a relationship, if you don’t have friends that give back to you that don’t care what you do  for a living and basically go, “Yeah, yeah. You do music, how are you?” You know, if there aren’t nursing students at the college that you got to that are your friends, you’re going to burn out.  Because there’s nothing giving back, there’s no one pouring into you. Sooner or later the candle ends, there’s no more fuel and it juts burns out.

So, I try to keep my staff saying, I want you to go to concerts and date people and go home at 6 o’clock and have a life. Because if you don’t have a life you have nothing to come back when you come back tomorrow.

Seth: That’s really good. You sound like a great person to work for so, where can I apply?

[Laughter]

Steve: Tell that to the few people I’ve fired in my life.

[Laughter]

We all have people who don’t like us. If everybody likes you, you’re not doing your job right. I hate to say it because sooner or later there are going to be artists that you have to hurt because you drop them. Take my word for it, we have wept over artists that we’ve had to drop before. We love these people, they’re our children and it’s just wrong place, wrong people, wrong time I don’t know what it is. I’m lucky enough to have an amazing team of people that work with us. I wouldn’t trade one of them. It’s a year ends, we are a little emotionally attached and warm fuzzies but–

Seth: No, I can vouch for that though. I’ve spent a lot of time at Centricity with the staff and you’ve done a good job to create really what feels like a family culture there.

Steve: And culture is a very important issue for us, as a record label. Our office is a house, we’ve even designed it in such a way that there’s seating areas almost in every place you go so if you’re not sitting at a desk, you’re sitting around on a couch. Our marketing meetings are on chairs and couches. You go into Publishing and he’s got four chairs sitting around a table. A&R its leather chairs and leather couch, it’s very much more relational. There are other places that you got to, that you need to get little buttons to pass and there’s a guy out front that will tackle you, if you, you know. You walk right into our offices, and welcome. It’s very different and we do that very intentionally.

Chris: And the fact that you were saying that office [inaudible 42:20] is open concept. So that if you’ve got your music going, everybody hears it because you’re in the mix of it with everybody–

Steve: So, I’ve listened to a lot of bad pop music because the other girl that controls the music in the office like all the really glossy Justin Biebers and…sorry I just called out an artist.

[Laughter]

We make fun of her because she keeps me on. I hear stuff from her going, “What is that? That’s really good” When she told me it was Justin Bieber I’m like, “Really?”

Seth: Hey if Justin Bieber is listening, I’m a huge fan of the new stuff.

[Laughter]

Steve: That is official kiss up.

Seth: That is a kiss up.

Chris: Well I have heard that he does listen to this show so apologies and–

Steve: I apologize. I also learned later in life that there’s a difference between not good and not for me.

Chris and Seth: Ooh.

Steve: Justin Bieber is not for me.

Chris: We all just grabbed for our pens writing that down.

Seth: I’m taking notes. I’m learning so much from this conversation.

Steve: Yeah, like I’m not a big horror movie fan, not for me. I can0t tell you if it’s good or bad but my life there are certain things I love–

Seth: Is Star Wars for you? Or, Star Track?

Steve: Not too much into Star Wars more in Star Treck.

Seth: Okay.

Steve: My kids are very much into the old Star Treck, they can quote you [inaudible 43:39] episodes.

Chris: You know what, that is so wise. I wanted to quickly mention that, I know that we need to let you get on with your day but it is so wise to say, not good versus not for me. Because often times again, the path that you have down in the music industry was not one you that could have foretold. And so you have had to work with people or artists or maybe eve industries or styles of music that may be for your personal taste or not necessarily…you could be in love with it or you could be there because  it was something you felt as important to the world but you didn’t’ necessarily like.

Steve: Sure.

Chris: Like Justin Bieber or whatever was going on but you’re not saying that it’s a bad thing, it’s just that it’s not for me. And so, sometimes you have to do the not for me even though you have to get up and–

Steve: You’re trying to market that record. You’re trying to sell a lot of those records. We’re privileged enough that we get to know the artist a little bit better so what you try to do is define the thing that you do love about that artist. I don’t love their music but I sure do love that he’s a reader. Something to find a connection that can drive that even when you listen to it and you go, “I don’t like that. Is this good?”

Seth: Well, I’m guessing that by the time you go through all the process to sign an artist you’ve already… If you didn't have something you loved about them you wouldn't  probably sign them

Steve: Correct. We even talk about, does the artist fit our culture? Because we are such a relationship driven, relationship being one of our core values within our company. If we don't want to have him over our house for dinner, then why are we signing them? Maybe we're not the right place for them. And that doesn't make them bad or us bad, you can't marry everybody you date. Sooners or later you've got to pick the ones or twos–

Seth: Well, depending where you're [inaudible 45:35]

[Laughter]

Monogamy is over rated.

Chris: So 2000.

Seth: Well, thanks so much for joining us in the show today.

Steve: Oh man, my pleasure.

Seth: Just to leave the audience with because it's a question that I always think about working in the music business, where do you feel like we're at today? I mean, there's definitely a lot of doom and gloom out there, there's a lot of music streaming is killing the industry. How are labels making money? How are artists supposed to  money? How are song writers supposed to make money? What is the hope in the music today that keeps you on the path of doing what you're doing?

Steve: There's a spiritual side to that and a financial side to that. The spiritual side is, we get notes sent to is artist do and going, “This song changed my life.” I had to pull over because I was crying in my car because it connected in such a deep level. We're in an industry that really, we're distinguished by our lyrical content and that lyrical content can cut to the heart like nothing else. This feeds us, that drives us if you're not moved to tears when you get some of these letters, you should probably think about another industry.

On the corporate side, on the business side as long as people are still listening to music and wanting to hear music, there will be people like us needed. There will always be artists that can make music but don't know how to get out of their bedroom with that music. Don't know, how do I get it to people? How do I get them to listen to it? I mean, there are so many opportunities in today's world to do, you know, you can make records for $1,500 where you can get the old studio I worked at for a day for that. There are a lot of opportunities but as long as we need to move amateur to professional for producers and engineers, we need the Reed [47:38] of the world. We need the Seth Mosleys. We need this Brown Banisher producers to make great records that are world class. Most people can't do that in their bedroom.

I mean, listen to the first so you ever wrote or the first record that you ever produced compared to what you're doing now, you learn, you grow, you're now a professional. There is money to be made. There is money to be made in streaming services when we break out our digital to physical. Now, if you were a physical retailer, I'd be worried because people aren't buying physical anymore. We're seeing those numbers continually drop. Where streaming has hit, the business side more than anything else is on the physical  sales and on the digital albums both of those are continuing to drop in our numbers. But streaming whether it be Spotify, Apple Music, Pandora, YouTube are all growing in numbers but because you make so much less, the numbers have to be so much more.

Chris: Sure.

Steve: What is it? 1,300 streams equals one album per [48:46]. So, that's a lot of streams to make up for. But as long as they're making music, they need people to promote the music and help make it better.

Seth: So, you're saying it’s a good time to be in music?

Steve: No. 1999 was a really good time for music.

[Laughter]

I mean the hard parts were measuring on the boom years. Most boom years in the music industry are all related to a new technology, if you think about it. The heights of  the Walkman helped. She you make a portable 1950s or 60s that thing you do, transistor radios changed how people consumed music. CDs, digital, now streaming has changed how we're consuming music. It's all–

Seth: Disruptive?

Steve: Yes, very much disruptive technology.

Seth: Well, a fascinating conversation and I wish we could do it all day.

Chris:  We could sit here all day, absolutely. It goes by way too fast!

Seth: It does, yeah. Well, thanks so much for joining us.

Steve: I appreciate it.

Chris: Good to have you again sometime.

Steve: Make me sound good.

[Laughter]

Seth: How do we find your labels?

Steve: Centricitymusic.com is where we're at.

Seth: Go check it out.

Hey we hope you've enjoyed this episode and we hope you join us again soon on the Full Circle Music Show. The why of the music biz.

 

 

The post FCM007 – Relationships with Steve Ford appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Jan 05, 2016
FCM006 – Tenacity with Mia Fieldes
37:40

FCMMia

In this episode we sit down with artist and songwriter Mia Fieldes. We talk about the importance of being tenacious in your craft, having a million (song) babies, waiting to eat the marshmallow and being generous with your gift. Enjoy!

 

 

 

The post FCM006 – Tenacity with Mia Fieldes appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Dec 29, 2015
FCM005 – Preparation with Neal Avron
43:25

FCMNeal

In this episode we sit down with Engineer and Producer Neal Avron. Neal's credits include everyone from Sara Bareilles and The Wallflowers to Everclear and Fall Out Boy.

 

 

 

The post FCM005 – Preparation with Neal Avron appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Dec 26, 2015
FCM004 – Vulnerability with Tom Douglas
47:41

FCMTomDouglas

In this episode we chat with songwriting hall of fame award winner, Tom Douglas. Tom has written hit songs for Lady Antebellum, Miranda Lambert, Tim McGraw and many, many others.

 

 

 

The post FCM004 – Vulnerability with Tom Douglas appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Dec 18, 2015
FCM003 – Servant with Brown Bannister
38:31

FCMBrown

In this episode we sit down with producing legend and Gospel Music Hall of Fame member, Brown Bannister. Brown has deservingly earned 14 Grammy Awards and 25 Dove Awards.

 

 

 

The post FCM003 – Servant with Brown Bannister appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Dec 10, 2015
FCM002 – Emergency with F. Reid Shippen
32:21

In this episode we sit down in the studio and chat with mixer and producer, Reid Shippen. Reid has mixed 10 Grammy winning projects, and has worked with everyone from Keith Urban and Kenny Chesney to India.Arie and Death Cab for Cutie.

 

 

 

The post FCM002 – Emergency with F. Reid Shippen appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Dec 03, 2015
FCM001 – Interview with Seth Mosley
28:31

 

Interview with Seth Mosley.

In this, our inaugural episode, we hear from host, Seth Mosley. He is a Grammy, SESAC, Billboard and Dove award winning songwriter and producer whose credits include For King and Country, Newsboys, Jon Foreman and High Valley.

 

FCM001_-_Interview_with_Seth_Mosley

You’re listening to the Full Circle Music Show, “The Why of the Music Business”.

Chris Murphy: Hey, guys. Welcome to the Full Circle Music Show. This is Chris Murphy sitting beside Seth Mosley. Hello, sir.

Seth Mosley: Hey, man.

Chris: We thought since we’re kicking off this podcast that we wanted to speak to the man himself, multiple Dove award-winning songwriter and producer as well as GRAMMY award-winning songwriter and producer, Seth Mosley’s got Full Circle Music right here in Franklin, Tennessee, just outside of Nashville. So without further ado, let’s get right into it, the interview with Seth Mosley at Full Circle Music.

Hi. I’m excited. This is our inaugural recording and I thought maybe what we could do for our audience is to give them a little taste as to why is the Full Circle Music Show a show. Why is it a podcast? What was your idea when you decided to start this and what you hope the audience can get out of it?

Seth: Yes. I think the big thing for us was just to get around other industry professionals and find out how they’re navigating today’s ever-changing music industry because we know how crazy it is on our end of doing what we do at Full Circle Music. I do believe that there’s strength in numbers and as a music industry united going forward to make sure we’re reeling in the same direction, so to speak.

Chris: Yes. It is quite a complex group of questions and thoughts and processes and it’s ever-changing all the time regardless of what industry or genre that you produce or you write for or that you are a fan of; that it’s constantly changing out there from a business perspective. What are some of the changes that you’ve seen in the years that you’ve been producing and song writing as well as being an artist?

Seth: Sure. Well, yes. I started out as an artist. That was my entry into the music business. I toured for about three years, pretty full time. We we’re doing anywhere from 100 to 150 shows a year.

I got burned out on it really quick and figured out that the part of the process I really enjoy is what we’re doing now which is the creative side where we’re writing and producing and tracking the stuff in the studio. So that’s what I had transitioned into. But since then, there have definitely been a lot of changes. I moved to Nashville probably officially six and a half-ish years ago.

Chris: So that’s 2009, 2008, something like that?

Seth: Yes, about 2008, 2009, exactly. So right as the market was tanking and everything so I came in at a very interesting time and we hear a lot of doom and gloom surrounding the music industry with sales and streaming and Spotify, Pandora, all that stuff, and how that affects our income. We can proudly say that at Full Circle Music that every year since we’ve been in business has been our best year.

Chris: Wow.

Seth: And I don’t think that’s coincidence. I have a very positive outlook on the music industry comparatively with a lot of my other peers and people that I work with, I think.

Chris: So quickly as a side note, for those that don’t know, what is Full Circle Music to you and to the world at large?

Seth: Well, Full Circle Music is a team. It was an effort for me to intentionally come out and say that yes, this is a team support; it’s not just me. And it really always has been from the beginning but even more so now. Right now, it’s a small team but we’re growing and hopefully, in the next couple of years, it’s going to be expanding into having some writers under our roster and some producers and eventually, if it makes sense and we find the right artist to be able to even do a joint venture with a label and help develop in that way.

But again, the key word is the right people so we’ve been actually probably going on the slow side just to make sure that, who is in our team is the right people. Right now, it’s me and X. O’Connor is my co-producer, engineer, mixer. He does a good chunk of everything.

And then, we’ve got another guy, Jerricho Scroggins, yes, Jerricho Scroggins, that is the name and he’s running the ships. So it’s a lean mean machine. And then we have five or six other guys who do editing stuff for us at any given moment as well.

Chris: Well, for a small team, you got a lot of hardware on the wall. I think, that’s probably a good thing then.

Seth: The hardware per person ratio, it has been good so far.

Chris: Well, building on that, you said that every year that you guys have been doing what you’re doing that it’s been growing. What do you attribute that to when everybody else or it seems like a lot of people out there are just talking about that doom and gloom that you mentioned earlier?

Seth: I mean, I think it’s the focus on two things. Number one is, I mean, and this is a cliché, especially in Nashville, our focus is the song. Everything comes back to song writing and that’s the starting point.

Production, that’s not to say production isn’t as important. It is. But if you don’t have anything, if you don’t have a good song at the beginning so I think that’s been more of my strength. A lot of people would say they’re a producer or a writer. I would say I’m probably more so a writer-producer, if anything, and that’s why having people like X and Jerricho around are key because their strengths complement for where I lack.

So I think that’s been one thing is focus on the song. And the second thing is just the fact that it’s just our why behind why we do what we do is we’re here to serve. That’s our first thing as we’re in a service business. A friend of mine taught me that really early on when I moved to Nashville and that stuck with me. This really is a service business.

Chris: And when you say service, do you mean servicing the song, servicing the artist, servicing the label?

Seth: Yes. Yes. It’s really whoever is in front of us at any given moment, “How can I serve you?” whether that is the song or whether that’s the artist. The fact is that we are just here to enable and help facilitate artists to pursue their dreams and their careers. So any way that we can add value to what somebody’s doing, that’s our mantra.

We’re always here to serve first. We’re not coming into a room with any sense of ego or, “What can we get out of this situation?” but, “Hey, we’re here to serve and give and give and give and give” and it seems like it’s just been, for lack of a better term, the universe’s way of giving back to us. We come in with that mentality and it seems to be working okay.

Chris: is there a tangible example of that that you can think of off the top of your head? And if you need to leave names out, that’s fine but maybe something that really shows that service.

Seth: Yes. I would say honestly and this wasn’t some brand new concept that we came up with; it was really more something that I learned by seeing how some other peers and mentors in the business were doing, it is just the fact of they don’t quit until they are as just happy.

And that’s the same with us. We’ll go rounds and rounds and rounds and rounds and sometimes, actually, I had a conversation with a friend of mine about this and we always have to remind ourselves that Michael Jackson’s Thriller underwent 97 or so versions before they settled on the final.

Chris: 97?

Seth: Something like 97. I know it’s almost 100.

Chris: Wow. Good grief.

Seth: But I think that’s one very tangible thing. We’re not stopping until the artist, the label, the manager, and everybody is really, really pumped and signed off and proud to have their names on it.

Chris: I was actually talking to Jerricho about this a couple of days ago, this exact topic. Before you, as a producer, writer, a person who is a go-between, when do you get to the point where you say, you know there’s that saying that the customer is always right?

Seth: Yes.

Chris: Is there ever a point in time where you say, “Well, I understand that but my experience says that maybe we need to go down this path. And then maybe…”, how do you lead that into that conversation if that’s the case for you?

Seth: Sure. No, that’s a great question and it could very often be the case where I have – obviously, this is a very subjective business.

Chris: Absolutely.

Seth: And it’s not a business of what’s right and what’s wrong. It’s really a business of again, I’m putting my preferences, opinions, and even “expertise” aside sometimes to serve what an artist’s vision is because there’s a lot of the times that yes, it probably isn’t the first thing that I would do. That doesn’t mean it’s right or wrong. It just means that I’m helping draw out the best version of them.

You said like my expertise on what works and what doesn’t work, that’s been another thing that served us really well is I think we try go on with the mentality of, “Hey, there’s no black and white; there’s no rules; there’s not a ‘this works and this doesn’t work’.”

Granted, we do work in some pretty narrow radio-driven formats, and there are things, but here’s the thing. I mean, we always chase the artist’s dream all the way to the moon. Sometimes, I have to pull it back to the earth. We could very easily, in those situations, just like you said, point to the hardware on the wall and say, “Check the score.” I’ve heard some guys say that. I can never imagine personally us doing that.

Chris: True.

Seth: I think we’re literally probably the opposite of that to a fault.

Chris: Well, again, I think that that’s probably why you’re in demand and a pleasure to work with. Because there are a lot of people out there, there are a lot of producers or songwriters that people could go to, so the fact that they’re choosing you, it’s because you bring that unique personality to it that draws people to it.

For a producer that’s getting started out there or a songwriter as well, what’s a tip or two that you could point them to when you talk about service and trying to find the artist’s vision if you’re producing a project? What’s something that’s an applicable take-away that somebody could jump into right now?

Seth: Well, I would say if you’re trying to learn to get good at your craft of production or song writing or anything in the music business, learn to do that but even more so, learn to be a collaborator. I think there are a lot of really good songwriters that we know that shoot themselves in the foot; that they are the most talented people in the world.

But they’d probably be a lot more successful if they just spent a little more energy learning how to be collaborators rather than just saying, “Here’s the idea. Here’s the vibe. Take it or leave it.” I would say focus on that and that just takes a lot of humility, really.

So just do some soul-searching and say, “Why am I in this in the first place? Am I in this because I’m trying to scratch some ego itch that I have or an insecurity or whatever?”

Chris: True.

Seth: So I would say that’s first and foremost because people look for collaborators. They’re not really looking, especially nowadays, for ultimatums.

Chris: Yes. That’s a really good point and it makes me think about when you were saying earlier that you were on the road, pretty hard core, for several years and it burned you out pretty badly. Was there a moment in that process that where you thought, “Okay. I’m a good writer. I produce stuff. This could be a path for me more so than being the artist on the road and the tour bus?”

Seth: Sure, or the tour van. We ended up in the bus on the very tail end of what we were doing and it’s ironic that yes, as soon as we got into a bus, I was already burned out. That’s kind of whatever you’ve been, shoot for it. It’s still like get on the road and hop a bus and be flying around and doing it that way. I think there was a really clear moment and that was in the beautiful, glorious state of Iowa. Every time we went through Iowa on tour, it seemed like something, the universe was just against us.

Chris: Sure.

Seth: Like God was saying, “Do not go to Iowa.”

Chris: “Just drive around the corner.”

Seth: “Drive around it.” So the last straw in Iowa, still probably story number three or four after having broken down there and stuck there in snowstorms and ice storms, all that other stuff, the last straw was we were on tour out there and it was, of course, snowing and sleeting and everything and the van, I think we were outside of Sioux City and we heard a giant bang and we looked around like “What in the world?” and then the van just grinds to a halt.

Chris: Oh, no.

Seth: We got out and it looked like somebody shot a cannonball through the bottom of the wall, like something literally blew up under it.

Chris: Wow.

Seth: So it was at that point that we had to call U-Haul, sit there in the cold for two and a half hours, and wait on them to show up. We finally got to the venue and in order to just stay and get home from that that weekend that we were doing it, to drive a U-Haul and run a rental car and drive all night, the choice was do we fix the van or do we just dump it and leave it there with the trailer and say, “Hasta la vista” because we owed money on it and that for me was like, I felt like it was God’s way of saying, “Hey, maybe it’s time to start focusing on something else.”

Chris: Sure.

Seth: We never went back for the van or the trailer.

Chris: Really?

Seth: Somebody’s still there with it.

Chris: Wow.

Seth: It was a tax write-off. That was the moment. And honestly, sometimes life does that where it just makes decisions for you and sometimes, that’s what we need and that’s what that was very clearly because I had been doing production and writing the whole time and was having some success at it and honestly, taking care of our family through that side of things, the financials of touring were not in our favor.

Chris: Sure.

Seth: But on the production and writing side, I already had some things rolling with these boys and some other projects as well, too. So it was a natural transition and a lot of people say, “You just make the leap of faith out and just switch.” But honestly for us, it wasn’t a leap of faith; for us it was a no-brainer.

It was, “Hey, I get to stay home with my wife” and we didn’t have kids at the time but we got to stay home, hang out, didn’t have to go get in the van and drive all night or a bus, and actually pay our bills with this. So for us, it was a bit of a no-brainer and that was definitely the situation that sparked it for us.

Chris: Oh, I think that’s a good transition that I’d love to hear. From somebody that’s been on many different sides of the music industry, being an artist and now producer, songwriter extraordinaire, is that process…

Seth: Extraordinaire, I don’t know about that.

Chris: Okay, then I’ll just that out loud. You don’t have to agree with it but I’ll say it for you; that I think that it makes sense to talk about you may have a sole passion in the music industry or whatever industry that you’re in but the fact that you had many different things going on, you didn’t have all your eggs on one basket, so to speak. Could you speak to that for those out there that are saying that, “You know what? I just want to be behind the boards. I just want to be in a bus and break down in the middle of Iowa like that’s my dream, that’s my passion?” Is there validity in having your eggs spread out or is there also validity in having all your eggs in one basket when you were chasing that dream?

Seth: I would say that I would go back to the proverb of chase two rabbits and you will catch neither. I think the moment that we made that decision to get off the road and focus on one thing was like a cannonball. It was like a spark for our career on the production and writing side.

Just, it was like, “Okay. Well, there’s no longer conflict of interest. There’s no longer making the decision of what do I focus my energy on? I only focus on one thing.”

Chris: Sure.

Seth: And it’s the Full Circle Music side so I’m a very big believer in being focused on one thing. I think in the financial industry, we hear a lot about diversify, diversify, diversify.

Chris: Sure.

Seth: And that is true, once you’ve achieved some success, to protect what you have.

Chris: Right.

Seth: When you’re in the beginning stages and growing and growing and growing, it’s really, “Put all of your eggs in one basket and watch that basket really carefully.” That’s what I’m leaning towards.

Chris: Yes, that makes sense. So watch that basket carefully and then when you get to the point where that’s on autopilot or that it’s running itself, whatever it is, then maybe you can move on to something else.

Seth: Yes. And even then, I don’t know that there is ever truly an autopilot. There’s some degree of yes, we can maybe take some time off and stuff will still happen and what not but I think no matter what the case is, if you’re focusing on one thing, that means it’s one thing that you’re not focusing on. You’re taking away from the other side of things.

Chris: Yes.

Seth: Honestly, there’s always going to be a little bit of trade-off there.

Chris: Right.

Seth: I think honestly, well, there’s a really good book. Actually, I would recommend it to all the listeners out there. It’s Gary Keller’s The ONE Thing. And we recently went through it and it was really good for me on focus.

Chris: Absolutely.

Seth: And that applies to people in music or investing or anything in life, to be honest. I’m very big on focus.

Chris: That’s great. Do you miss it? Do you miss the road? Do you miss being an artist?

Seth: Not for one second.

Chris: No?

Seth: Every time I see a bus drive by or a van or a trailer, I’m just like, “Oh, thank God that I’m not on it.” I start sweating for the people inside it.

Chris: Oh, man. Okay, you got some sort of a response to some PTSD or something from being on the road, huh?

Seth: Well, I’m making it sound really bad but honestly, I mean, there is a lot of great things. And probably the biggest thing for me was I met my wife through it. So had I not done it, I wouldn’t have known her and we wouldn’t be where are today.

So the universe definitely has its way of circling things back around and then we’re just part of how God used, and I think He used it honestly to our favor on even what we’re doing right now because we’re able to relate with artists in a different way than somebody who’s never been on the road.

Chris: It sure is.

Seth: We have first-hand experience to say, “Okay. I know. I know what you’re going through. I know how hard you’re working every night. I know what it is to play these songs every night and go to the radio tours” because we’ve done that and we’ve been there.

Chris: True.

Seth: So it helps us relate in a different way.

Chris: Other than just that experience of just being in the trenches for years and doing it and then transitioning to what you’re doing now with the producing and song writing or song writing and producing, what kind of education did you have behind you when you started?

Seth: A high school diploma.

Chris: Okay.

Seth: Where I grew up in Ohio, we had a thing called post-secondary education where you could take college classes in high school. And I did probably 12 credit hours of that so that was the extent of my education.

Chris: Oh, wow. Okay.

Seth: And YouTube really wasn’t even a thing now and that is a big part of education nowadays. You can learn to do anything you want on the internet.

Chris: Sure.

Seth: That really wasn’t as much of a thing that was available. People weren’t creating these tutorials and videos of how to do stuff; it was really just diving in and watching other people work.

Chris: So really from the music business standpoint, your life experiences was your classroom.

Seth: Exactly. Yes. But that’s not to discount – I would say that’s my classroom but the other part of that is just watching other professionals and what can I learn from them. And part of our servant mentality is walking into a room saying, “Hey, what can I learn?” not “What can I teach?”

A lot of people graduated from college nowadays that we find, because we have an internship program, and we have some great interns. But we’ve also sensed a little bit of a mentality and I don’t know, it’s just been in the past few years of maybe it is an entitlement thing where people think they’re going to graduate and get hired as a producer or a songwriter and get a job, a publishing deal or whatever it is.

That’s really not the way it works. You have to come into a room and show that, “Hey, I’m here to serve and I’m here to add value.” And only then do things start opening up for you.

Chris: Yes, that makes sense. So I guess the palm on the wall is great. But if it doesn’t have the experience behind it then it doesn’t speak too much.

Seth: Yes, and the heart behind it to serve. I mean, I think nowadays, this is so important. You just have to be going into a room, “How can I add value? How can I add value?” and not “What can I get out of this situation?”

Chris: Sure. What would you say to somebody who’s sitting in a music score right now or doing a production licensing or whatever that would look like that’s in the thick of it, that’s listening because they want to graduate in a few months and come in Nashville and be on the Seth Mosley plan?

Seth: Yes. No, I mean, we have, me and Jerricho, have these discussions all the time with our interns saying, “Okay. It’s really all about why am I doing what I’m doing?”

Chris: Sure.

Seth: Because we never want to put off the vibe that, “Hey, don’t go to college; that you’re not going to get anywhere with it.” That’s not what we’re saying at all. It’s more so, “Hey, if you’re going to college, how do you use that to further and get closer to where you want to be?”

Chris: Absolutely.

Seth: And really, it’s all what you make of it. It’s all what you put into it; who are meeting; who are you serving; what kind of experiences are you getting out of it; what are you learning. So I would say if you really feel strongly that you’re using that as something to get closer to where you’re going, keep on and finish strong.

Chris: That’s great. Yes.

Seth: But I would also say on a more down to earth, realistic, because we’re definitely a realist over here, on a realistic note that don’t think that just because you do graduate and get that diploma that it’s going to mean that you’re going to get hired right away.

Chris: Sure.

Seth: Maybe that’s one in a hundred or one in a thousand situations. But you’re going to get hired because of who you are and what dynamic you add to a room. If you have a diploma, maybe that’s icing on the cake but that’s definitely not what we look for in a company or in a student or somebody to hire.

Chris: So just to nail it down, what are you looking for when you’re reaching out to find either an intern or the next employee? So for someone out there that’s like, “Oh, okay. I get what stuff he’s saying but maybe what are a few things that I need to be working on to make sure that by the time I’m ready to strike, I’m ready to go?”

Seth: Well, I think and not to keep saying the same thing and be a broken record, but we look for servant hearts. That’s the first and foremost thing. Second thing is yes, I mean, there’s got to be some raw talent there. And again, that’s all subjective, too.

Chris: Sure.

Seth: But we have to at least really dig and connect on a creative level. Otherwise, it’s not going to work that way. And the third thing would just be work ethic and enthusiasm for it because it’s not a business that really lets you have typical 9am – 5pm, most weekends off.

I mean, we try really hard at Full Circle to have a pretty normal semblance of a normal life for me and for the guys that work with us because I think that’s important for balance. But that’s definitely on the beginning, maybe not the norm.

Chris: Yes.

Seth: It’s a little more the exception. So I would say just you got to know what you want to do and have the work ethic, have the enthusiasm to stay up all night and grind it out until you get good because it really is about that 10,000 hours and putting that in. And if even that, I’ mean, I’m still feeling like as we cross our 10,000-hour threshold like man, I’m still learning everyday and I feel like if you’re not, you’re just getting further and further behind.

Chris: Sure. Seth, this is great, man. In one of the opening episodes of this podcast, we both sat down and talked that we wanted to really hear from other industry professionals and their heart and their desire and their expertise so that can be something that others can grow from.

But I’m grateful that you’re willing to sit down with us today and give your heart and I know that you’re going to be giving that a lot because you’re going to be sitting at the microphone everytime.

But to hear from you and to see where you’ve come from and where you’re going and I think the biggest take-away is the fact that you said when you walk into a room, you think, “How can I serve?” Or, “What can I give not what can I get?” so to speak.

Seth: Yes.

Chris: I think that’s huge.

Seth: Yes.

Chris: And so I appreciate that. But is there anything else you’d like to leave the audience with as we step away here?

Seth: I mean, I would say, the other big thing is yes, serve but it’s also, it’s a kind of piggyback on what we were saying earlier. If I could put any title behind it, it’s no plan B. I think the people who have a fallback plan are going to do that fallback plan.

Chris: Absolutely.

Seth: At some point, you got a wife and kids and you got to do what’s responsible for them especially when you’re on the frontend. If you’re single or young or married or whatever, you just grind it on, figure out how to make it work.

Another friend of mine who’s in the industry who’s been in it for a long time, that was his advice in his panel, to a bunch of Belmont, probably 200 Belmont song writing students.

He had them raise their hand and say, “Hey, who has a plan B?” Probably 75% of the room put their hands up. And he said, “Okay. Get out now.” And he wasn’t saying that to be mean. He was just saying, “Hey, that’s the reality.” If you have a plan B, you’re going to do the plan B.

Chris: Yes, sure.

Seth: Honestly, I didn’t know growing up or in high school what else besides music I would do. It was just the only thing that I felt like I knew how to do and the only thing that drove me and get me happiness and satisfaction. Obviously, as life progresses, you develop those things. But honestly, not having a plan B is the best thing in the world for you because you’re going to figure out how to make it work because you have to.

Chris: That’s great. Seth, thank you so much, man. I really appreciate it.

Seth: Yes.

Chris: Hey, we hoped you’ve enjoyed this episode and will join us again soon on the Full Circle Music Show, The Why of the Music Hits.

Check us out at fullcirclemusic.org/podcast.

The post FCM001 – Interview with Seth Mosley appeared first on Full Circle Music.

Dec 01, 2015