Radiolab Presents: More Perfect

By WNYC Studios

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Description

From the producers of Radiolab, a series about how the Supreme Court got so supreme.

Episode Date
One Nation, Under Money
52:13
<p><span>An unassuming string of 16 words tucked into the Constitution grants Congress extensive power to make laws that impact the entire nation. The Commerce Clause has allowed Congress to intervene in all kinds of situations — from penalizing one man for growing too much wheat on his farm, to enforcing the end of racial segregation nationwide. That is, if the federal government can make an economic case for it. This seemingly all-powerful tool has the potential to unite the 50 states into one nation and protect the civil liberties of all. But it also challenges us to consider: when we make everything about money, what does it cost us?</span></p> <p> </p> <p><strong>The key voices:</strong></p> <p>- Roscoe Filbrun Jr., Son of Roscoe Filbrun Sr., respondent in Wickard v. Filburn<br>- Ollie McClung Jr., Son of Ollie McClung Sr., respondent in Katzenbach v. McClung<br>- <a href="http://www.law.msu.edu/faculty_staff/profile.php?prof=880">James M. Chen</a>, professor at Michigan State University College of Law<br>- <a href="https://www.wnyc.org/people/jami-floyd/">Jami Floyd</a>, legal analyst and host of WNYC’s All Things Considered who, as a domestic policy advisor in the Clinton White House, worked on the Violence Against Women Act<br>- <a href="https://www.wilmerhale.com/ari_savitzky/">Ari J. Savitzky</a>, lawyer at WilmerHale </p> <p> </p> <p><strong>The key cases:</strong></p> <p>- 1824: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1789-1850/22us1"><em>Gibbons v. Ogden</em></a><br>- 1942: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1940-1955/317us111"><em>Wickard v. Filburn</em></a><br>- 1964: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1964/543"><em>Katzenbach v. McClung</em></a><br>- 2000: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1999/99-5"><em>United States v. Morrison</em></a><br>- 2012: <em><a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2011/11-393">National Federation of Independent Businesses v. Sebelius</a></em></p> <p> </p> <p><em>Additional production for this episode by Derek John and Louis Mitchell.</em></p> <p><em>Special thanks to Jess Mador, Andrew Yeager, and Rachel Iacovone.                                                                                                                    </em></p> <p><em>Leadership support for More Perfect is provided by The Joyce Foundation. Additional funding is provided by The Charles Evans Hughes Memorial Foundation.</em></p> <p><em>Supreme Court archival audio comes from </em><a href="https://www.oyez.org/"><em>Oyez®</em></a><em>, a free law project in collaboration with the Legal Information Institute at Cornell.</em></p>
Jan 30, 2018
Justice, Interrupted
24:17
<p>The rules of oral argument at the Supreme Court are strict: when a justice speaks, the advocate has to shut up.  But a law student noticed that the rules were getting broken again and again <span>—</span> by men.  He and his professor set out to chart an epidemic of interruptions.  If women can’t catch a break in the boardroom or the legislature (or at the MTV VMA’s), what’s it going to take to let them speak from the bench of the highest court in the land?</p> <p>The key voices:</p> <p><a href="http://www.law.northwestern.edu/faculty/profiles/TonjaJacobi/">Tonja Jacobi</a>, professor at Northwestern University Pritzker School of Law</p> <p><a href="https://www.goodwinlaw.com/professionals/s/schweers-dylan">Dylan Schweers</a>, former student at Northwestern University Pritzker School of Law</p> <p>The key cases:</p> <p>2016: <em><a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2015/14-981">Fisher v. University of Texas</a></em></p> <p>The key links:</p> <p><em><a href="https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2933016">Justice Interrupted: The Effect of Gender, Ideology and Seniority at Supreme Court Oral Arguments</a></em></p> <p> </p> <p><em>Special thanks to Franklin Chen and Deborah Tannen.</em>&gt; <em>Leadership support for More Perfect is provided by The Joyce Foundation. Additional funding is provided by The Charles Evans Hughes Memorial Foundation.</em> <em>Supreme Court archival audio comes from </em><a href="https://www.oyez.org/"><em>Oyez®</em></a><em>, a free law project in collaboration with the Legal Information Institute at Cornell.</em></p>
Dec 19, 2017
The Architect
34:14
<p><span>On this episode, we revisit Edward Blum, a self-described “legal entrepreneur” and former stockbroker who has become something of a Supreme Court matchmaker: he takes an issue, finds the perfect plaintiff, matches them with lawyers, and helps the case work its way to the highest court in the land. His target: laws that differentiate between people based on race — including ones that empower minorities. <em>More Perfect </em><a href="http://www.wnyc.org/story/imperfect-plaintiff">profiled</a> Edward Blum in season one of the show. We catch up with him to hear about his latest effort to end affirmative action at Harvard. </span></p> <p><strong>The key voices:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Edward Blum, director of the <a href="https://www.projectonfairrepresentation.org/">Project on Fair Representation</a></li> <li><span>Sheila Jackson Lee, Congresswoman for the </span><a href="https://jacksonlee.house.gov/">18th district of Texas</a></li> </ul> <p><strong>The key cases:</strong></p> <ul> <li>1977: <em><a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1979/76-811">Regents of the University of California v. Bakke</a></em></li> <li><em>2003: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2002/02-241">Grutter v. Bollinger</a></em></li> <li>2013: <em><a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2012/12-96">Shelby County v. Holder</a></em></li> <li>2013: <em><a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2012/11-345">Fisher v. University of Texas (1)</a></em></li> <li>2016: <em><a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2015/14-981">Fisher v. University of Texas (2)</a></em></li> </ul> <p><strong>The key links:</strong></p> <ul> <li><span><em>More Perfect S</em>eason 1: <a href="http://www.wnyc.org/story/imperfect-plaintiff/">The Imperfect Plaintiffs</a></span></li> <li>Blum's websites seeking plaintiffs for cases he is building against <a href="http://harvardnotfair.org/">Harvard University</a>, the <a href="http://uncnotfair.org/">University of North Carolina</a>, and the <a href="http://uwnotfair.org/">University of Wisconsin</a></li> <li>Students for Fair Admissions' <a href="https://tinyurl.com/y8el87kp">complaint</a>; and Harvard's <a href="https://tinyurl.com/y7rr9anw">response</a>.</li> </ul> <p>“To become leaders in our diverse society, students must have the ability to work with people from different backgrounds, life experiences and perspectives. Many colleges across America – including Harvard College – receive applications from far more highly qualified individuals each year than they can possibly admit. When choosing among academically qualified applicants, colleges must continue to have the freedom and flexibility to consider each person’s unique backgrounds and life experiences, consistent with the legal standards established by the U.S. Supreme Court,  in order to provide the rigorous, enriching, and diverse campus environments that expand the horizons of all students. In doing so, American higher education institutions can continue to give every undergraduate exposure to peers with a deep and wide variety of academic interests, viewpoints, and talents in order to better challenge their own assumptions and develop the skills they need to succeed, and to lead, in an ever more diverse workforce and an increasingly interconnected world.” </p> <p>- Robert Iuliano, senior vice president and general counsel of Harvard University </p> <p><em>Special thanks to Guy Charles, Katherine Wells, and Matt Frassica.</em></p> <p><em>Leadership support for More Perfect is provided by The Joyce Foundation. Additional funding is provided by The Charles Evans Hughes Memorial Foundation.</em></p> <p><em>Supreme Court archival audio comes from </em><a href="https://www.oyez.org/"><em>Oyez®</em></a><em>, a free law project in collaboration with the Legal Information Institute at Cornell.</em></p>
Dec 07, 2017
Mr. Graham and the Reasonable Man
68:09
<p><span>On a fall afternoon in 1984, Dethorne Graham ran into a convenience store for a bottle of orange juice. Minutes later he was unconscious, injured, and in police handcuffs. In this episode, we explore a case that sent two Charlotte lawyers on a quest for true objectivity, and changed the face of policing in the US.</span></p> <p>The key voices:</p> <ul> <li>Dethorne Graham Jr., son of Dethorne Graham, appellant in <em>Graham v. Connor</em></li> <li><a href="https://www.essexrichards.com/attorneys/edward-g-woody-connette/">Edward G. (Woody) Connette</a>, lawyer who represented Graham in the lower courts</li> <li><a href="http://www.beavercourie.com/lawyers/h-gerald-beaver-partner/">Gerald Beaver</a>, lawyer who represented Graham at the Supreme Court</li> <li><a href="https://www.npr.org/people/131876588/kelly-mcevers">Kelly McEvers</a>, host of <em>Embedded</em> and <em>All Things Considered</em></li> </ul> <p>The key case:</p> <ul> <li>1989:<em> <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1988/87-6571">Graham v. Connor</a></em></li> </ul> <p><em>Additional production for this episode by Dylan Keefe and Derek John<em>; a</em>dditional music by Matt Kielty and Nicolas Carter.</em></p> <p><em>Special thanks to Cynthia Lee, Frank B. Aycock III, Josh Rosenkrantz, Leonard Feldman, Tom Dreisbach, and Ben Montgomery.</em></p> <p><em>Leadership support for More Perfect is provided by The Joyce Foundation. Additional funding is provided by The Charles Evans Hughes Memorial Foundation.</em></p> <p><em><span><em>Supreme Court archival audio comes from </em><a href="https://www.oyez.org/"><em>Oyez®</em></a><em>, a free law project in collaboration with the Legal Information Institute at Cornell.</em></span></em></p> <p> </p>
Nov 30, 2017
Sex Appeal
55:48
<p>“Equal protection of the laws” was granted to all persons by the <a href="https://www.law.cornell.edu/constitution/amendmentxiv">14th Amendment</a> in 1868. But for nearly a century after that, women had a hard time convincing the courts that they should be allowed to be jurors, lawyers, and bartenders, just the same as men. A then-lawyer at the ACLU named Ruth Bader Ginsburg set out to convince an all-male Supreme Court to take sex discrimination seriously with an unconventional strategy. She didn’t just bring cases where women were the victims of discrimination; she also brought cases where men were the victims. In this episode, we look at how a key battle for gender equality was won with frat boys and beer.</p> <p><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm139712933236752b340f35a-2ef2-4bde-baaf-a5ab4a90e83b"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/jN6Ro_cw7rE?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a269242046722740218" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://youtu.be/jN6Ro_cw7rE"></iframe></div></div>  </p> <p>The key voices:</p> <ul> <li>Carolyn Whitener, former owner of the Honk n’ Holler</li> <li>Curtis Craig, appellant in <em>Craig v. Boren</em></li> <li>Fred Gilbert, lawyer who represented Craig in <em>Craig v. Boren </em></li> <li><a href="https://www.law.georgetown.edu/faculty/hartnett-mary.cfm">Mary Hartnett</a>, adjunct professor at Georgetown Law</li> <li><a href="https://www.law.georgetown.edu/faculty/williams-wendy-webster.cfm">Wendy Williams</a>, professor emerita at Georgetown Law</li> </ul> <p>The key cases:</p> <ul> <li>1873: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1850-1900/83us130"><em>Bradwell v. The State</em></a></li> <li>1948: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1940-1955/335us464"><em>Goesart v. Cleary</em></a></li> <li>1961: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1961/31"><em>Hoyt v. Florida</em></a></li> <li>1971: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1971/70-4"><em>Reed v. Reed</em></a></li> <li>1973: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1972/71-1694"><em>Frontiero v. Richardson</em></a></li> <li>1975: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1974/73-1892"><em>Weinberger v. Wiesenfeld</em></a></li> <li>1976: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1976/75-628"><em>Craig v. Boren</em></a></li> <li>1996: <em><a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1995/94-1941">United States v. Virginia</a></em></li> </ul> <p>The key links:</p> <ul> <li><em><a href="https://www.aclu.org/issues/womens-rights">ACLU Women’s Rights Project</a></em></li> </ul> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.simonandschuster.com/books/My-Own-Words/Ruth-Bader-Ginsburg/9781501145247">My Own Words</a> by Ruth Bader Ginsburg, with Mary Hartnett and Wendy Williams</li> </ul> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.harpercollins.com/9780062238467/sisters-in-law">Sisters in Law</a> by Linda Hirshman</li> </ul> <ul> <li>“<a href="http://eagleforum.org/publications/psr/feb1972.html">What’s Wrong With ‘Equal Rights’ For Women</a>” by Phyllis Schlafly</li> </ul> <p> </p> <p><em>Special thanks to Stephen Wiesenfeld, Alison Keith, and Bob Darcy.</em></p> <p><em>Leadership support for More Perfect is provided by The Joyce Foundation. Additional funding is provided by The Charles Evans Hughes Memorial Foundation.</em></p> <p><em>Supreme Court archival audio comes from </em><a href="https://www.oyez.org/"><em>Oyez®</em></a><em>, a free law project in collaboration with the Legal Information Institute at Cornell.</em></p>
Nov 23, 2017
The Hate Debate
36:19
<p>Should you be able to say and do whatever you want online? And if not, who should police this?</p> <p><em>More Perfect</em> hosts a debate at WNYC's Jerome L. Greene Performance Space about online hate speech, fake news, and whether the First Amendment needs an update for the digital age.</p> <p>The key voices:</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.eff.org/about/staff/corynne-mcsherry">Corynne McSherry</a>, legal director at the Electronic Frontier Foundation</li> <li><a href="https://abovethelaw.com/tag/elie-mystal/">Elie Mystal</a>, executive editor at <em>Above the Law</em> and contributing legal editor at <em>More Perfect</em></li> <li><a href="http://brownwhitelaw.com/kenneth-p-white/">Ken White</a>, litigator and criminal defense attorney at Brown White &amp; Osborn LLP <span>—</span> he also runs <a href="https://www.popehat.com/">Popehat.com</a></li> </ul> <p>The key cases:</p> <ul> <li>1957: <em><a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1956/6">Yates v. United States</a></em></li> <li>1969: <em><a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1968/492">Brandenburg v. Ohio</a></em></li> </ul> <p>The key links:</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://www.propublica.org/article/facebook-hate-speech-censorship-internal-documents-algorithms">ProPublica's report on Facebook's censorship policies</a><em>  </em></li> </ul> <p><em>Special thanks to Elaine Chen, <span>Jennifer Keeney Sendrow, and the entire Greene Space team</span>. Additional engineering for this episode by </em><em>Chase Culpon, Louis Mitchell, and Alex Overington.</em></p> <p><em>Leadership support for More Perfect is provided by The Joyce Foundation. Additional funding is provided by The Charles Evans Hughes Memorial Foundation.</em> </p> <p><em>Watch the event below:</em></p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="360" scrolling="no" src="https://livestream.com/accounts/955973/events/7693769/player?width=640&amp;height=360&amp;enableInfoAndActivity=true&amp;defaultDrawer=&amp;autoPlay=true&amp;mute=false" width="640" id="ls_embed_1504635720"> </iframe></p> <p><em>NOTE: Because of the topic for the night, this discussion includes disturbing images and language, such as religious, ethnic and gender slurs and profanity. We have preserved this content so that our audience can understand the nature of this speech.</em></p> <p><em>ADDENDUM: During the debate one of debaters misspoke and said World War II when he meant World War I. The case he was referring to can be found <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1900-1940/249us47">here</a>.</em></p> <script type="text/javascript" src="https://livestream.com/assets/plugins/referrer_tracking.js" data-embed_id="ls_embed_1504635720"></script>
Nov 06, 2017
Citizens United
60:36
<p><span><em>Citizens United</em> <em>vs. Federal Election Commission</em> is one of <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/03/us/politics/poll-shows-americans-favor-overhaul-of-campaign-financing.html">the most polarizing</a> Supreme Court cases of all time. So what is it actually about, and why did the Justices decide the way they did? Justice Anthony Kennedy, often called the “most powerful man in America,” wrote the majority opinion in the case. In this episode, we examine Kennedy’s singular devotion to the First Amendment and look at how it may have influenced his decision in the case. </span></p> <p>The key voices:</p> <ul> <li>Kai Newkirk, <a href="http://www.99rise.org/">99 Rise</a> </li> <li><a href="http://www.citizensunited.org/about-michael-boos.aspx">Michael Boos</a>, vice president and general counsel of Citizens United </li> <li>Jim Bopp, lawyer, <a href="https://www.bopplaw.com/">The Bopp Law Firm</a></li> <li>Marcia Coyle, chief Washington correspondent for <em><a href="http://www.law.com/nationallawjournal/?slreturn=20170931173724">The National Law Journal</a></em></li> <li>Jeffrey Rosen, president and CEO of the <a href="https://constitutioncenter.org/press-room/expert-sources/jeffrey-rosen">National Constitution Center</a>, a contributing editor of <em><a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/author/jeffrey-rosen/">The Atlantic</a></em>, and a nonresident senior fellow at the <a href="https://www.brookings.edu/experts/jeffrey-rosen/">Brookings Institution</a></li> <li><a href="https://www.newyorker.com/contributors/jeffrey-toobin">Jeffrey Toobin</a>, writer and contributor to <em>The New Yorker</em> and CNN</li> <li><a href="http://www.lawschool.cornell.edu/faculty/bio_michael_dorf.cfm">Michael Dorf</a>, professor of law at Cornell University and former clerk to Justice Anthony Kennedy</li> <li>Alex Kozinski, circuit judge in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit and former clerk to Justice Anthony Kennedy**</li> </ul> <p>The key cases:</p> <ul> <li>2010: <em><a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2008/08-205">Citizens United vs. Federal Election Commision</a></em></li> </ul> <p>The key links:</p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.citizensunited.org/">Citizens United</a></li> <li>"<a href="https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2012/05/21/money-unlimited">Money Unlimited</a>," by Jeffrey Toobin</li> </ul> <p><em>Correction: A earlier version of this episode misstated the date of the last day of the 2009 term. </em></p> <p><em>Additional music for this episode by:</em></p> <p><em> <a href="http://gyanriley.com/">Gyan Riley</a> </em></p> <p><em><span><a href="http://incompetech.com/wordpress/">Kevin MacLeod </a><br>"Bad Ideas (distressed)"<br>Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)<br>Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0<br>http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/<br></span></em></p> <p><em>Special thanks to Justin Levitt, Guy-Uriel Charles, William Baude, Helen Knowles, and Derek John. </em></p> <p><em>Leadership support for More Perfect is provided by The Joyce Foundation. Additional funding is provided by The Charles Evans Hughes Memorial Foundation.</em></p> <p><span><em>Supreme Court archival audio comes from </em><a href="https://www.oyez.org/"><em>Oyez®</em></a><em>, a free law project in collaboration with the Legal Information Institute at Cornell.</em></span></p> <p><em>**</em>This episode was taped prior to <em>The Washington Post</em>'s <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/national-security/prominent-appeals-court-judge-alex-kozinski-accused-of-sexual-misconduct/2017/12/08/1763e2b8-d913-11e7-a841-2066faf731ef_story.html?utm_term=.e48c2731ad55">reporting</a> on Judge Alex Kozinski which was published on December 8, 2017. </p>
Nov 02, 2017
Enemy of Mankind
54:36
<p>Should the U.S. Supreme Court be the court of the world? In the 18th century, two feuding Frenchmen inspired a one-sentence law that helped launch American human rights litigation into the 20th century. The Alien Tort Statute allowed a Paraguayan woman to find justice for a terrible crime committed in her homeland. But as America reached further and further out into the world, the court was forced to confront the contradictions in our country’s ideology: sympathy vs. sovereignty. Earlier this month, the Supreme Court heard arguments in <em>Jesner v. Arab Bank</em>, a case that could reshape the way America responds to human rights abuses abroad. Does the A.T.S. secure human rights or is it a dangerous overreach?</p> <p>The key voices:</p> <ul> <li>Ken Saro-Wiwa Jr., son of activist Ken Saro-Wiwa Sr.</li> <li>Dolly Filártiga, sister of Joelito Filártiga</li> <li>Paloma Calles, daughter of Dolly Filártiga</li> <li><a href="https://ccrjustice.org/home/blog/2015/12/08/international-human-rights-pioneer-peter-weiss-celebrates-90">Peter Weiss</a>, lawyer at the Center for Constitutional Rights who represented Dolly Filártiga in <em>Filártiga v. Pe</em><em>ñ</em><em>a-Irala</em></li> <li><a href="https://ccrjustice.org/home/who-we-are/staff/gallagher-katherine">Katherine Gallagher</a>, lawyer at the Center for Constitutional Rights</li> <li><a href="http://www.losangelesemploymentlawyer.com/Attorneys/Paul-L-Hoffman.shtml">Paul Hoffman</a>, lawyer who represented Kiobel in <em>Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum</em></li> <li><a href="https://www.cfr.org/experts/john-b-bellinger-iii">John Bellinger</a>, former legal adviser for the U.S. Department of State and the National Security Council</li> <li><a href="https://www.depts.ttu.edu/law/faculty/w_casto.php">William Casto</a>, professor at Texas Tech University School of Law</li> <li><a href="https://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/posner-e">Eric Posner</a>, professor at University of Chicago Law School</li> <li><a href="http://history.yale.edu/people/samuel-moyn">Samuel Moyn</a>, professor at Yale University</li> <li><a href="https://history.appstate.edu/faculty-staff/full-time-faculty/rene-harder-horst">René Horst</a>, professor at Appalachian State University</li> </ul> <p>The key cases:</p> <ul> <li>1984: <a href="http://law.justia.com/cases/federal/district-courts/FSupp/577/860/1496989/"><em>Filártiga v. Pe</em><em>ñ</em><em>a-Irala</em></a></li> <li>2013: <em><a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2011/10-1491">Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum</a></em></li> <li>2017: <em><a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2017/16-499">Jesner v. Arab Bank</a></em></li> </ul> <p>The key links:</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://ccrjustice.org/">Center for Constitutional Rights</a></li> </ul> <p><span><span><br><em>Additional music for this episode by <a href="http://www.nicholascarter.com/">Nicolas Carter</a>.</em></span></span></p> <p><em>Special thanks to William J. Aceves, William Baude, Diego Calles, Alana Casanova-Burgess, William Dodge, Susan Farbstein, Jeffery Fisher, Joanne Freeman, Julian Ku, Nicholas Rosenkranz, Susan Simpson, Emily Vinson, Benjamin Wittes and Jamison York. Ken Saro-Wiwa Jr., who appears in this episode, passed away in October 2016</em><em>.</em></p> <p><em>Leadership support for More Perfect is provided by The Joyce Foundation. Additional funding is provided by The Charles Evans Hughes Memorial Foundation.</em></p> <p><em><span>Supreme Court archival audio comes from <a href="https://www.oyez.org/">Oyez®</a>, a free law project in collaboration with the Legal Information Institute at Cornell.</span></em></p>
Oct 24, 2017
The Heist
21:03
<p>The Supreme Court may not have been conceptualized as a co-equal branch of the federal government, but it became one as a result of the political maneuvering of Chief Justice John Marshall. The fourth (and longest-serving) chief justice was "a great lover of power," according to historian Jill Lepore, but he was also a great lover of secrecy. Marshall believed, in order for the justices to confer with each other candidly, their papers needed to remain secret in perpetuity. It was under this veil of secrecy that the biggest heist in the history of the Supreme Court took place. </p> <p>The key voices:</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://scholar.harvard.edu/jlepore/home">Jill Lepore</a>, professor of American history at Harvard University</li> </ul> <p>The key links:</p> <ul> <li>"<a href="https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2014/12/01/great-paper-caper">The</a><a href="https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2014/12/01/great-paper-caper"> Great Paper</a><a href="https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2014/12/01/great-paper-caper"> Caper</a>," <em>The New Yorker </em>(2014)</li> <li><a href="https://www.oyez.org/justices/felix_frankfurter">Felix Frankfurter</a>, Supreme Court justice 1939 to 1962</li> </ul> <p><em>Leadership support for More Perfect is provided by The Joyce Foundation. Additional funding is provided by The Charles Evans Hughes Memorial Foundation.</em></p> <p><em>Supreme Court archival audio comes from </em><a href="https://www.oyez.org/"><em>Oyez®</em></a><em>, a free law project in collaboration with the Legal Information Institute at Cornell.</em><em> </em></p>
Oct 16, 2017
The Gun Show
69:43
<p><span>For nearly 200 years of our nation’s history, the Second Amendment was an all-but-forgotten rule about the importance of militias. But in the 1960s and 70s, a movement emerged — led by Black Panthers and a recently-repositioned NRA — that insisted owning a firearm was the right of each and every American. So began a constitutional debate that only the Supreme Court could solve. That didn’t happen until 2008, when a Washington, D.C. security guard named Dick Heller made a compelling case.</span></p> <div class="embedded-image"><img class="mcePuppyImage" src="https://media2.wnyc.org/i/800/600/l/80/1/seale.jpg" alt=""> <div class="image-metadata"> <div class="image-caption">Sean Rameswaram interviews Black Panther co-founder Bobby Seale on the roof of the Oakland Museum of California, where “<a href="http://museumca.org/exhibit/all-power-people-black-panthers-50">All Power to the People: Black Panthers at 50</a>” was on display earlier this year.</div> <div class="image-credit">(Lisa Silberstein, <a href="http://museumca.org/">Oakland Museum of California</a>) </div> </div> </div> <div class="embedded-image"><img class="mcePuppyImage" src="https://media2.wnyc.org/i/800/600/l/80/1/tartaro.jpg" alt=""> <div class="image-metadata"> <div class="image-caption">Joseph P. Tartaro, president of the Second Amendment Foundation, at his desk in Buffalo, New York.</div> <div class="image-credit">(Sean Rameswaram)</div> </div> </div> <p>The key voices:</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://law.ucla.edu/faculty/faculty-profiles/adam-winkler/">Adam Winkler</a>, professor at UCLA School of Law, author of <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Gunfight-Battle-Over-Right-America/dp/0393345831"><em>Gunfight</em></a></li> <li><a href="https://scholar.harvard.edu/jlepore/home">Jill Lepore</a>, professor of American history at Harvard University</li> <li><a href="http://stephenhalbrook.com/" target="_blank">Stephen Halbrook</a>, attorney specializing in Second Amendment litigation</li> <li><a href="http://www.bobbyseale.com/">Bobby Seale</a>, co-founder of the Black Panther Party</li> <li>John Aquilino, former spokesman of the National Rifle Association</li> <li><a href="https://www.saf.org/key-people/">Joseph P. Tartaro</a>, president of the Second Amendment Foundation</li> <li><a href="https://law.utexas.edu/faculty/sanford-v-levinson" target="_blank">Sanford Levinson</a>, professor at the University of Texas Law School </li> <li><a href="https://www.cato.org/people/clark-neily">Clark Neily,</a> vice president for criminal justice at the Cato Institute, represented Dick Heller in<em> District of Columbia v. Heller</em></li> <li><a href="https://www.cato.org/people/robert-levy">Robert Levy</a>, chairman of the Cato Institute, helped finance Dick Heller’s case in <em>District of Columbia v. Heller</em></li> <li><a href="http://gurapllc.com/experience-and-qualifications/">Alan Gura</a>, appellate constitutional attorney, argued <em>District of Columbia v. Heller</em> on behalf of Dick Heller</li> <li>Dick Heller, plaintiff in <em>District of Columbia v. Heller</em></li> <li><span><a href="http://joanbiskupic.com/" target="_blank">Joan Biskupic</a>, author of <em><a href="http://joanbiskupic.com/books/american-original/overview/" target="_blank">American Original: The Life and Constitution of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia</a></em></span><em> </em></li> <li><a href="https://history.stanford.edu/people/jack-rakove" target="_blank">Jack Rakove</a>, professor of history and political science at Stanford University </li> </ul> <p>The key cases:</p> <ul> <li>2008: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2007/07-290"><em>District of Columbia v. Heller</em></a></li> </ul> <p>The key links:</p> <ul> <li>Black Panther Party protest the <a href="http://www.sacbee.com/news/local/history/article148667224.html">Mulford Act</a> at the California State Capitol in Sacramento</li> </ul> <div class="embedded-image"><img class="mcePuppyImage" src="https://media2.wnyc.org/i/800/1066/l/80/1/heller1.jpg" alt=""> <div class="image-metadata"> <div class="image-caption">Dick Heller and his hat outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C.</div> <div class="image-credit">(Sean Rameswaram)</div> </div> </div> <div class="embedded-image"><img class="mcePuppyImage" src="https://media2.wnyc.org/i/800/1066/l/80/1/heller2.jpg" alt=""> <div class="image-metadata"> <div class="image-caption">Dick Heller and his gun on the job at a federal building in Washington, D.C.</div> <div class="image-credit">(Sean Rameswaram)</div> </div> </div> <p><em>Special thanks to Mark Hughes, Sally Hadden, Jamal Greene, Emily Palmer, Sharon LaFraniere, Alan Morrison, Robert Pollie, Joseph Blocher, William Baude, Tara Grove, and</em><em> the </em><a href="http://museumca.org/exhibit/all-power-people-black-panthers-50"><em>Oakland Museum of California</em></a>.</p> <p><em>Leadership support for More Perfect is provided by The Joyce Foundation. Additional funding is provided by The Charles Evans Hughes Memorial Foundation.</em></p> <p><span><em>Supreme Court archival audio comes from </em><a href="https://www.oyez.org/"><em>Oyez®</em></a><em>, a free law project in collaboration with the Legal Information Institute at Cornell.</em></span></p>
Oct 12, 2017
Who’s Gerry and Why Is He So Bad at Drawing Maps?
21:12
<p>“It is an invidious, undemocratic, and unconstitutional practice,” Justice John Paul Stevens said of gerrymandering in <em>Vieth v. Jubelirer</em> (2004). Politicians have been manipulating district lines to favor one party over another since the founding of our nation. But with a case starting today, <em>Gill v. Whitford</em>, the Supreme Court may be in a position to crack this historical nut once and for all.</p> <p>Up until this point, the court didn’t have a standard measure or test for how much one side had unfairly drawn district lines. But “the efficiency gap” could be it. The mathematical formula measures how many votes Democrats and Republicans waste in elections — if either side is way outside the norm, there may be some foul play at hand. According to Loyola law professor Justin Levitt, both the case and the formula arrive at a critical time: “After the census in 2020, all sorts of different bodies will redraw all sorts of different lines and this case will help decide how and where.”</p> <p>The key voices:</p> <ul> <li><a href="http://mduchin.math.tufts.edu/">Moon Duchin</a>, Associate Professor at Tufts University</li> <li><a href="http://www.lls.edu/faculty/facultylistl-r/levittjustin/">Justin Levitt</a>, Professor of Law at Loyola Law School, Los Angeles</li> </ul> <p>The key cases:</p> <ul> <li>2004: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2003/02-1580"><em>Vieth v. Jubelirer</em></a></li> <li>2017: <em><a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2017/16-1161">Gill v. Whitford</a></em></li> </ul> <p>The key links:</p> <ul> <li>“<a href="https://tinyurl.com/ybb8afqu">A Formula Goes to Court</a>” by Mira Bernstein and Moon Duchin</li> <li>“<a href="http://chicagounbound.uchicago.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1946&amp;context=public_law_and_legal_theory">Partisan Gerrymandering and the Efficiency Gap</a>” by Nicholas Stephanopoulos and Eric McGhee </li> </ul> <p><em>Special thanks to David Herman.</em></p> <p><em>Leadership support for More Perfect is provided by The Joyce Foundation. Additional funding is provided by The Charles Evans Hughes Memorial Foundation.</em></p> <p><em>Supreme Court archival audio comes from </em><a href="https://www.oyez.org/"><em>Oyez®</em></a><em>, a free law project in collaboration with the Legal Information Institute at Cornell.</em><em> </em></p>
Oct 03, 2017
American Pendulum II
31:56
<p>In this episode of More Perfect, two families grapple with one terrible Supreme Court decision. <em>Dred Scott v. Sandford</em> is one of the most infamous cases in Supreme Court history: in 1857, a slave named Dred Scott filed a suit for his freedom and lost. In his decision, Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney wrote that black men “had no rights which the white man was bound to respect.”  One civil war and more than a century later, the Taneys and the Scotts reunite at a Hilton in Missouri to figure out what reconciliation looks like in the 21st century.</p> <div class="embedded-image"><img class="mcePuppyImage" src="https://media2.wnyc.org/i/800/1030/l/80/1/Dred_Scott_photograph_circa_1857.jpg" alt=""> <div class="image-metadata"> <div class="image-caption">Photograph of Dred Scott, c. 1857</div> <div class="image-credit">(<a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Dred_Scott_photograph_(circa_1857).jpg">Uncredited/Wikimedia Commons</a>)</div> </div> </div> <div class="embedded-image"><img class="mcePuppyImage" src="https://media2.wnyc.org/i/800/1160/l/80/1/Roger_B._Taney_-_Brady-Handy.jpg" alt=""> <div class="image-metadata"> <div class="image-caption"><span>Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney</span></div> <div class="image-credit">(<a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Roger_B._Taney_-_Brady-Handy.jpg">Library of Congress's Prints and Photographs division/Wikimedia Commons</a>)</div> </div> </div> <div class="embedded-image"><img class="mcePuppyImage" src="https://media2.wnyc.org/i/800/532/l/80/1/Dred_Scott_Descendants.png" alt=""> <div class="image-metadata"> <div class="image-caption"><span>Day 1 of the Dred Scott Sons and Daughters of Reconciliation conference at the Hilton Frontenac Hotel, December 2, 2016. Left to Right: Shannon LaNier (Thomas Jefferson descendant), Lynne Jackson (Dred Scott descendant), Bertram Hayes-Davis (Jefferson Davis descendant), Charlie Taney (Roger Brooke Taney descendant), Dred Scott Madison (Dred Scott descendant), Ashton LeBourgeois (Blow family descendant), John LeBourgeois (Blow family descendant), and Pastor Sylvester Turner. </span></div> <div class="image-credit">(<a href="http://photos.blacktie-missouri.com/event/dred-scott-reconciliation-conference-10th-anniversary/img_0039-57/">C. Webster, Courtesy of the Dred Scott Heritage Foundation/Black Tie Photos</a>)</div> </div> </div> <p>The key voices:</p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.thedredscottfoundation.org/dshf/index.php?option=com_content&amp;view=article&amp;id=104&amp;Itemid=86">Lynne Jackson</a>, great-great-granddaughter of Dred and Harriet Scott, president and founder of the Dred Scott Heritage Foundation</li> <li>Dred Scott Madison, great-great-grandson of Dred Scott</li> <li>Barbara McGregory, great-great-granddaughter of Dred Scott</li> <li>Charlie Taney, great-great-grandnephew of Roger Brooke Taney, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court who wrote the<em> Dred Scott v. Sandford </em>decision</li> <li>Richard Josey, Manager of Programs at the Minnesota Historical Society</li> </ul> <p>The key cases:</p> <ul> <li><em>1857: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1850-1900/60us393">Dred Scott v. Sandford</a></em></li> </ul> <p>The key links:</p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.thedredscottfoundation.org/">The Dred Scott Heritage Foundation</a> </li> </ul> <div class="embedded-image"><img class="mcePuppyImage" src="https://media2.wnyc.org/i/383/472/l/80/1/HarrietScott1857.jpg" alt=""> <div class="image-metadata"> <div class="image-caption">Harriet Scott, wife of Dred Scott, 1857</div> <div class="image-credit">(<a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:HarrietScott1857.jpg">Noted from “Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper, June 27,1857.” Minnesota Historical Society/Wikimedia Commons</a>)</div> </div> </div> <div class="embedded-image"><img class="mcePuppyImage" src="https://media2.wnyc.org/i/800/600/l/80/1/Dred_Harriet_Scott_Quarters.jpg" alt=""> <div class="image-metadata"> <div class="image-caption">These quarters (now restored) at Fort Snelling in Minnesota are believed to have been occupied by Dred and Harriet Scott between roughly 1836–1840.</div> <div class="image-credit">(<a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Dred_%26_Harriet_Scott_Quarters.jpg">McGhiever/Wikimedia Commons</a>)</div> </div> </div> <p><em>Special thanks to Kate Taney Billingsley, whose play, </em><em><a href="https://playingonair.org/2017/06/11/a-man-of-his-time-by-kate-t-billingsley/">A Man of His Time</a>,</em><em> inspired the story.</em></p> <p><em>Additional music for this episode by Gyan Riley.</em></p> <p><em>Thanks to Soren Shade for production help.</em></p> <p><em>Leadership support for More Perfect is provided by The Joyce Foundation. Additional funding is provided by The Charles Evans Hughes Memorial Foundation.</em></p> <p><em>Supreme Court archival audio comes from </em><a href="https://www.oyez.org/"><em>Oyez®</em></a><em>, a free law project in collaboration with the Legal Information Institute at Cornell.</em></p>
Oct 02, 2017
American Pendulum I
46:10
<p>What happens when the Supreme Court, the highest court in the land, seems to get it wrong? <em>Korematsu v. United States </em>is a case that’s been widely denounced and discredited, but it still remains on the books. This is the case that upheld President Franklin Roosevelt’s internment of American citizens during World War II based solely on their Japanese heritage, for the sake of national security. In this episode, we follow Fred Korematsu’s path to the Supreme Court, and we ask the question: if you can’t get justice in the Supreme Court, can you find it someplace else?</p> <div class="embedded-image"><img class="mcePuppyImage" src="https://media2.wnyc.org/i/800/923/l/80/1/Fred-young-portrait-from-Karen-high-res.jpg" alt=""> <div class="image-metadata"> <div class="image-caption">Fred Korematsu, c. 1940s</div> <div class="image-credit">(Courtesy of the Fred T. Korematsu Institute)</div> </div> </div> <p> </p> <div class="embedded-image"><img class="mcePuppyImage" src="https://media2.wnyc.org/i/800/642/l/80/1/Fred_Korematsu_and_Family.jpg" alt=""> <div class="image-metadata"> <div class="image-caption">Fred Korematsu, second from the right, is pictured with his family in the family flower nursery in Oakland, CA, 1939.</div> <div class="image-credit">(<a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Fred_Korematsu_and_Family.jpg">Courtesy of the family of Fred T. Korematsu, Wikimedia Commons</a>)</div> </div> </div> <p> The key voices:</p> <ul> <li>Fred Korematsu, plaintiff in <em>Korematsu v. United States</em> who resisted evacuation orders during World War II.</li> <li><a href="http://www.korematsuinstitute.org/karen-korematsu/">Karen Korematsu</a>, Fred’s daughter, Founder &amp; Executive Director of Fred T. Korematsu Institute</li> <li>Ernest Besig, ACLU lawyer who helped Fred Korematsu bring his case to the Supreme Court</li> <li><a href="https://law.seattleu.edu/faculty/profiles/lorraine-bannai">Lorraine Bannai</a>, Professor at Seattle University School of Law and Director of the Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality </li> <li>Richard Posner, retired Circuit Judge for the U.S. Court of Appeals, 7th Circuit</li> </ul> <p>The key cases:</p> <ul> <li>1944: <em><a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1940-1955/323us214">Korematsu v. United States</a></em></li> </ul> <p>The key links:</p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.korematsuinstitute.org/fred-t-korematsu-lifetime/">Fred T. Korematsu Institute</a></li> <li><a href="https://densho.org/archives/">Densho Archives</a></li> </ul> <p><em>Additional music for this episode by The Flamingos, Lulu, <a href="https://bridgerecords.com/pages/paul-lansky">Paul Lansky</a>, and <a href="http://austinvaughnmusic.com/">Austin Vaughn</a>.</em></p> <p><em>Special thanks to the <a href="https://densho.org/archives/">Densho</a> Archives for use of archival tape of Fred Korematsu and Ernest Besig.</em><em> </em></p> <p class="p1"><span><em>Leadership support for More Perfect</em></span><em><span> </span>is provided by The Joyce Foundation. Additional funding is provided by </em><em>The Charles Evans Hughes Memorial Foundation.</em></p> <p class="p1"><em>Supreme Court archival audio comes from </em><a href="https://www.oyez.org/"><span><em>Oyez®</em></span></a><em>, a free law project in collaboration with the Legal Information Institute at Cornell.</em></p>
Oct 01, 2017
We're Back
1:23
<p>More Perfect, the show that takes you inside the United States Supreme Court, is back on October 2, 2017. </p> <p><span>Sex, race, guns, executive orders: Season two has it all. </span></p> <p><span>We'll see you in court. </span></p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p> <p> </p>
Sep 28, 2017
Object Anyway
57:03
<p>At the trial of James Batson in 1982, the prosecution eliminated all the black jurors from the jury pool. Batson objected, setting off a complicated discussion about jury selection that would make its way all the way up to the Supreme Court. On this episode of More Perfect, the Supreme Court ruling that was supposed to prevent race-based jury selection, but may have only made the problem worse.</p> <div class="embedded-image"><img class="mcePuppyImage" src="https://media2.wnyc.org/i/800/1066/l/80/1/Batson-James-and-Rose.jpg" alt=""> <div class="image-metadata"> <div class="image-caption">James Batson (L) with his mother Rose (R)</div> <div class="image-credit">(Sean Rameswaram)</div> </div> </div> <div class="embedded-image"><img class="mcePuppyImage" src="https://media2.wnyc.org/i/800/600/l/80/1/Gutmann-Class.jpg" alt=""> <div class="image-metadata"> <div class="image-caption">Joe Gutmann with his students in the mock trial courtroom built at the back of Gutmann's classroom</div> <div class="image-credit">(Sean Rameswaram)</div> </div> </div> <div class="embedded-image"></div> <div class="embedded-image"><img class="mcePuppyImage" src="https://media2.wnyc.org/i/800/600/l/80/1/Gutmann-James2.jpg" alt=""> <div class="image-metadata"> <div class="image-caption">Joe Gutmann (L) and James Batson (R) sit together in Gutmann's classroom</div> <div class="image-credit">(Sean Rameswaram)</div> </div> </div> <p><strong>The key links:</strong></p> <p>-The <a href="https://media.wnyc.org/media/resources/2016/Jul/15/foster.jpg">prosecutor's papers</a> highlighting black jurors from the trial of Timothy Tyrone Foster</p> <p><strong>The key voices:</strong></p> <p>- James Batson, the original plaintiff in Batson v. Kentucky<br>- Joe Gutmann, the prosecutor in James Batson's case<br>- David Niehaus, lawyer at the Jefferson County Public Defender's Office<br>- <a href="https://www.aclu.org/bio/jeffery-robinson">Jeffrey Robinson</a>, director for the ACLU Center for Justice<br>- <a href="http://www.eji.org/BryanStevenson">Bryan Stevenson</a>, founder and executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative<br>- <a href="https://www.law.yale.edu/stephen-b-bright">Stephen B. Bright</a>, Harvey Karp Visiting Lecturer in Law at Yale Law School<br>- <a href="https://www.kentlaw.iit.edu/faculty/full-time-faculty/nancy-s-marder">Nancy Marder</a>, professor of law at IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law<br>- <a href="http://www.dickeycampbell.com/bio-gary-dickey.php">Gary Dickey</a>, lawyer for Kelvin Plain Sr.<br>- <a href="https://www.courts.wa.gov/appellate_trial_courts/supreme/bios/?fa=scbios.display_file&amp;fileID=owens">Justice Susan B. Owens</a>, Washington State Supreme Court</p> <p><strong>The key cases:</strong></p> <p>- 1986: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1985/84-6263">Batson v. Kentucky<br></a>- 2015: <a href="http://law.justia.com/cases/washington/supreme-court/2017/93408-8.html">City of Seattle v. Erickson</a> (Washington State Supreme Court)<br>- 2016: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2015/14-8349">Foster v. Chatman<br></a>- 2017: <a href="http://law.justia.com/cases/iowa/supreme-court/2017/160061.html">State v. Plain</a> (Iowa State Supreme Court)</p> <p><em>More Perfect is funded in part by The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, The Charles Evans Hughes Memorial Foundation, and the Joyce Foundation.</em></p> <p><em>Supreme Court archival audio comes from <a href="https://www.oyez.org/">Oyez®</a>, a free law project in collaboration with the Legal Information Institute at Cornell.</em></p> <p><span><em>Portions of this episode aired on July 16, 2016.</em></span></p>
Sep 22, 2017
The Imperfect Plaintiffs
57:03
<p><span>Last year, the court decided a case that could affect the future of affirmative action in this country. </span>The plaintiff was Abigail Fisher, a white woman, who said she was rejected from the University of Texas because the university unfairly considered race as one of many factors when evaluating applicants. And while Fisher’s claims were the focus of the case, the story behind how she ended up in front of the Supreme Court is a lot more complicated.</p> <p>On this episode of More Perfect, we visit Edward Blum, a self-described “legal entrepreneur” and former stockbroker who has become something of a Supreme Court matchmaker — he takes an issue, finds the perfect plaintiff, matches them with lawyers, and works his way to the highest court in the land. He’s had remarkable success, with six cases heard before the Supreme Court, including that of Abigail Fisher. We also head to Houston, Texas, where in 1998, an unusual 911 call led to one of the most important LGBTQ rights decisions in the Supreme Court’s history.</p> <center> <div class="embedded-image"><img class="mcePuppyImage" src="https://media2.wnyc.org/i/304/423/l/80/1/imageedit_1_5483384188.jpg" alt=""> <div class="image-metadata"> <div class="image-caption">Edward Blum is the director of the Project on Fair Representation</div> <div class="image-credit">(AEI)</div> </div> </div> </center> <div class="embedded-image"><img class="mcePuppyImage" src="https://media2.wnyc.org/i/646/486/l/80/1/tyronlawrence2.JPG" alt=""> <div class="image-metadata"> <div class="image-caption">John Lawrence (L) and Tyron Garner (R) at the 2004 Pride Parade in Houston</div> <div class="image-credit">(J.D. Doyle/Houston LGBT History)</div> </div> </div> <div class="embedded-image"><img class="mcePuppyImage" src="https://media2.wnyc.org/i/787/391/l/80/1/lawrencetyron3.jpg" alt=""> <div class="image-metadata"> <div class="image-caption">Mitchell Katine (L) introduces Tyron Garner (Middle) and John Lawrence (R) at a rally celebrating the court's decision</div> <div class="image-credit">(J.D. Doyle/Houston LGBT History)</div> </div> </div> <p><strong>The key links:</strong></p> <p>- The <a href="http://harvardnotfair.org/">website</a> Edward Blum is using to find plaintiffs for a case he is building against Harvard University<br>- Susan Carle's <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Lawyers-Ethics-Pursuit-Social-Justice/dp/0814716407?ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1466011809&amp;ref_=la_B00E7ROGKC_1_1&amp;s=books&amp;sr=1-1">book</a> on the history of legal ethics<br>- An <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2006/09/14/obituaries/14garner.html">obituary</a> for Tyron Garner when he died in 2006<br>- An <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/24/us/john-lawrence-plaintiff-in-lawrence-v-texas-dies-at-68.html">obituary</a> for John Lawrence when he died in 2011<br>- Dale Carpenter's <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Flagrant-Conduct-Story-Lawrence-Texas/dp/0393345122">book</a> on the history of Lawrence v. Texas<br>- A <a href="http://www.lambdalegal.org/in-court/cases/lawrence-v-texas">Lambda Legal documentary</a> on the story of Lawrence v. Texas</p> <p><strong>The key voices:</strong></p> <p>- Edward Blum, director of the <a href="https://www.projectonfairrepresentation.org/">Project on Fair Representation</a><br>- <a href="https://www.wcl.american.edu/faculty/carle/">Susan Carle</a>, professor of law at the American University Washington College of Law<br>- <a href="http://www.law.smu.edu/professor-profiles/carpenter-(1)">Dale Carpenter</a>, professor of Law at the SMU Dedman School of Law<br>- <a href="http://lawkn.com/attorneys/mitchell-katine">Mitchell Katine</a>, lawyer at Katine &amp; Nechman L.L.P. <br>- Lane Lewis, former chair of the <a href="http://www.harrisdemocrats.com/" target="_blank">Harris County Democratic Party</a><br>- <a href="https://jacksonlee.house.gov/">Sheila Jackson Lee</a>, Congresswoman for the 18th district of Texas</p> <p><strong>The key cases</strong>:</p> <p>- 1896: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1850-1900/163us537">Plessy v. Ferguson</a><br>- 1962: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1962/5">National Association for the Advancement of Colored People v. Button</a><br>- 1986: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1985/85-140">Bowers v. Hardwick</a><br>- 1996: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1995/94-805">Bush v. Vera</a><br>- 2003: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2002/02-102">Lawrence v. Texas</a><br>- 2009: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2008/08-322">Northwest Austin Municipal Utility District Number One v. Holder</a><br>- 2013: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2012/12-96">Shelby County v. Holder</a><br>- 2013: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2012/11-345">Fisher v. University of Texas (1)</a><br>- 2016: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2015/14-940">Evenwel v. Abbott</a><br>- 2016: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2015/14-981">Fisher v. University of Texas (2)</a></p> <p><em>Special thanks to Ari Berman. His book <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Give-Us-Ballot-Struggle-America/dp/0374158274/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1466106368&amp;sr=1-1&amp;keywords=ari+berman">Give Us the Ballot</a> and his reporting for <a href="https://www.thenation.com/article/conservatives-who-gutted-voting-rights-act-are-now-challenging-one-person-one-vote/">The Nation</a> were hugely helpful in reporting this episode.  </em></p> <p><em>More Perfect is funded in part by The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, The Charles Evans Hughes Memorial Foundation, and the Joyce Foundation.</em></p> <p><em>Supreme Court archival audio comes from <a href="https://www.oyez.org/">Oyez®</a>, a free law project in collaboration with the Legal Information Institute at Cornell.</em></p> <p><em><span>A <a href="http://www.wnyc.org/story/imperfect-plaintiff">longer version</a> of this episode aired on June 28, 2016.</span></em></p>
Sep 21, 2017
Cruel and Unusual
57:03
<p><span>On this episode of More Perfect, we explore three little words embedded in the 8th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution: “cruel and unusual.” </span>America has long wrestled with this concept in the context of our strongest punishment, the death penalty. A majority of “we the people” (<a href="http://www.gallup.com/poll/1606/death-penalty.aspx">61 percent</a>, to be exact) are in favor of having it, but inside the Supreme Court, opinions have evolved over time in surprising ways.</p> <p>And outside of the court, the debate drove one woman in the U.K. to take on the U.S. death penalty system from Europe. It also caused states to resuscitate old methods used for executing prisoners on death row. And perhaps more than anything, it forced a conversation on what constitutes cruel and unusual punishment.</p> <p><strong>The key links:</strong></p> <p>- <a href="https://media.wnyc.org/media/resources/2016/Jun/01/Invoice_from_Dream_Pharma_to_AZ.jpg">The invoice</a> that revealed the identity of Dream Pharma<br>- <a href="https://media.wnyc.org/media/resources/2016/Jun/01/ArkansasExecutionProtocolCalculations.jpg">Handwritten lethal injection protocols</a> from Arkansas<br>- <a href="http://www.newson6.com/story/25406037/oklahoma-man-who-developed-lethal-injection-recipe-lived-with-regret">An interview with Bill Wiseman</a>, the Oklahoma state legislator who invented lethal injection in America, conducted by Scott Thompson of KOTV.</p> <p><strong>The key voices:</strong></p> <p>- <a href="https://www.reprieve.org.uk/about/reprieve-staff-and-fellows/maya-foa/">Maya Foa</a>, Director of Reprieve's Death Penalty team<br>- <a href="http://le.utah.gov/house2/detail.jsp?i=RAYP">Paul Ray</a>, State Representative, House District 13, Utah<br>- <a href="http://www.nyls.edu/faculty/faculty-profiles/faculty_profiles/robert_blecker/">Robert Blecker</a>, Professor at New York Law School and author of <em><a href="https://www.amazon.com/Death-Punishment-Searching-Justice-among/dp/1137278560?ie=UTF8&amp;*Version*=1&amp;*entries*=0">The Death of Punishment<br></a></em>- <a href="http://hls.harvard.edu/faculty/directory/10840/Steiker">Carol S. Steiker</a>, Professor at Harvard Law School<br>- <a href="https://law.utexas.edu/faculty/jordan-m-steiker">Jordan M. Steiker</a>, Professor at University of Texas Law School</p> <p><strong>The key cases</strong>:</p> <p>- 1879: <a href="https://supreme.justia.com/cases/federal/us/99/130/case.html">Wilkerson v. Utah</a><br>- 1972: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1971/69-5030">Furman v. Georgia</a><br>- 1976: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1975/74-6257">Gregg v. Georgia</a><br>- 2008: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2007/07-5439">Baze v. Rees</a><br>- 2014: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2014/14-7955">Glossip v. Gross</a></p> <p><em>More Perfect is funded in part by The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, The Charles Evans Hughes Memorial Foundation, and the Joyce Foundation.</em></p> <p><em>Supreme Court archival audio comes from <a href="https://www.oyez.org/">Oyez®</a>, a free law project in collaboration with the Legal Information Institute at Cornell.</em></p> <p><em>Special thanks to Claire Phillips, Nina Perry, Stephanie Jenkins, Ralph Dellapiana, Byrd Pinkerton, Elisabeth Semel, Christina Spaulding, and The Marshall Project.</em></p> <p><em><span>Portions of this episode aired on June 2, 2016.</span></em></p>
Sep 20, 2017
The Political Thicket
57:01
<p>When Chief Justice Earl Warren was asked at the end of his career, “What was the most important case of your tenure?”, there were a lot of answers he could have given. After all, he had presided over some of the most important decisions in the court’s history — cases that dealt with segregation in schools, the right to an attorney, the right to remain silent, just to name a few. But his answer was a surprise: he said, “Baker v. Carr,” a 1962 redistricting case. </p> <p>On this episode of More Perfect, we talk about why this case was so important; important enough, in fact, that it pushed one Supreme Court justice to a nervous breakdown, brought a boiling feud to a head, put one justice in the hospital, and changed the course of the Supreme Court — and the nation — forever. <span>Plus, this term, the court revisits redistricting with a case that could turn voting districts across the country upside down. </span></p> <div class="embedded-image"><img class="mcePuppyImage" src="https://media2.wnyc.org/i/800/800/l/80/1/pjimage_b6uICRg.jpg" alt=""> <div class="image-metadata"> <div class="image-caption">Associate Justice William O. Douglas (L) and Associate Justice Felix Frankfurter (R)</div> <div class="image-credit">(Harris &amp; Ewing Photography/Library of Congress)</div> </div> </div> <div class="embedded-image"><img class="mcePuppyImage" src="https://media2.wnyc.org/i/600/383/l/80/1/warrencourt.jpg.jpeg" alt=""> <div class="image-metadata"> <div class="image-caption">Top row (Left-Right): Charles E. Whittaker, John M. Harlan, William J. Brennan, Jr., Potter Stewart. Bottom row (Left-Right): William O. Douglas, Hugo L. Black, Earl Warren, Felix Frankfurter, Tom C. Clark.</div> <div class="image-credit">(Library of Congress)</div> </div> </div> <p>  </p> <div class="embedded-image"><img class="mcePuppyImage" src="https://media2.wnyc.org/i/800/515/l/80/1/whittaker.jpeg" alt=""> <div class="image-metadata"> <div class="image-caption">Associate Supreme Court Justice Charles Evans Whittaker at his desk in his chambers.</div> <div class="image-credit">(Heywood Davis)</div> </div> </div> <p> <strong>The key links:</strong></p> <p>- Biographies of <a href="https://www.oyez.org/justices/charles_e_whittaker" target="_blank">Charles Evans Whittaker</a>, <a href="https://www.oyez.org/justices/felix_frankfurter" target="_blank">Felix Frankfurter</a>, and <a href="https://www.oyez.org/justices/william_o_douglas" target="_blank">William O. Douglas</a> from Oyez<br>- A <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Failing-Justice-Charles-Whittaker-Supreme/dp/0786421975?ie=UTF8&amp;*Version*=1&amp;*entries*=0">biography of Charles Evans Whittaker</a> written by Craig Smith<br>- A <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Enigma-Felix-Frankfurter-H-Hirsch/dp/046501979X?ie=UTF8&amp;*Version*=1&amp;*entries*=0">biography of Felix Frankfurter</a> written by H.N. Hirsch<br>- A <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Wild-Bill-Legend-William-Douglas/dp/0394576284?ie=UTF8&amp;*Version*=1&amp;*entries*=0">biography of William O. Douglas</a> written by Bruce Allen Murphy<br>- A <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Democracys-Doorstep-Inside-Supreme-Brought/dp/0809074249?ie=UTF8&amp;*Version*=1&amp;*entries*=0">book about the history of "one person, one vote"</a> written by J. Douglas Smith<br>- A <a href="http://landmarkcases.c-span.org/Case/10/Baker-V-Carr">roundtable discussion on C-SPAN</a> about Baker v. Carr</p> <p><strong>The key voices:</strong></p> <p>- <a href="http://www.calu.edu/academics/faculty/Craig-Smith.aspx" target="_blank">Craig Smith</a>, Charles Whittaker's biographer and Professor of History and Political Science at California University of Pennsylvania <br>- <a href="http://law2.wm.edu/faculty/bios/fulltime/tlgrove.php">Tara Grove</a>, Professor of Law and Robert and Elizabeth Scott Research Professor at William &amp; Mary Law School<br>- <a href="https://www.law.georgetown.edu/faculty/seidman-louis-michael.cfm" target="_blank">Louis Michael Seidman</a>, Carmack Waterhouse Professor of Constitutional Law at Georgetown Law<br>- <a href="https://law.duke.edu/fac/charles/" target="_blank">Guy-Uriel Charles</a>, Charles S. Rhyne Professor of Law at Duke Law<br>- <a href="https://its.law.nyu.edu/facultyprofiles/index.cfm?fuseaction=profile.overview&amp;personid=23845" target="_blank">Samuel Issacharoff</a>, Bonnie and Richard Reiss Professor of Constitutional Law, NYU Law<br>- <a href="http://us.macmillan.com/author/jdouglassmith" target="_blank">J. Douglas Smith</a>, author of <em><a href="http://www.amazon.com/Democracys-Doorstep-Inside-Supreme-Brought/dp/0809074249" target="_blank">On Democracy's Doorstep</a></em><br>- <a href="http://scwstl.com/attorneys/alan-c-kohn/" target="_blank">Alan Kohn</a>, former Supreme Court clerk for Charles Whittaker, 1957 Term<br>- Kent Whittaker, Charles Whittaker's son<br>- Kate Whittaker, Charles Whittaker's granddaughter<br>- <a href="http://www.lls.edu/faculty/facultylistl-r/levittjustin/">Justin Levitt</a>, Professor of Law at Loyola Law School, Los Angeles</p> <p><strong>The key cases:</strong></p> <p>- 1962: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1960/6">Baker v. Carr<br></a>- 2000: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2000/00-949">Bush v. Gore<br></a>- 2004: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2003/02-1580">Vieth v. Jubelirer</a><br>- 2016: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2015/14-940" target="_blank">Evenwel v. Abbott<br></a>- 2017: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2017/16-1161">Gill v. Whitford</a></p> <p><em>Music in this episode by <a href="http://gyanriley.com/" target="_blank">Gyan Riley</a>, <a href="http://www.wqxr.org/people/alexander-overington/" target="_blank">Alex Overington</a>, <a href="http://www.squirrelthing.com/" target="_blank">David Herman</a>, <a href="http://www.wnyc.org/people/tobin-low/" target="_blank">Tobin Low</a> and <a href="http://www.jadabumrad.com/music.html" target="_blank">Jad Abumrad</a>. </em></p> <p><em>More Perfect is funded in part by The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, The Charles Evans Hughes Memorial Foundation, and the Joyce Foundation.</em></p> <p><em>Supreme Court archival audio comes from <a href="https://www.oyez.org/">Oyez®</a>, a free law project in collaboration with the Legal Information Institute at Cornell.</em></p> <p><em>Archival interviews with Justice William O. Douglas come from the Department of Rare Books and Special Collections at Princeton University Library.</em></p> <p><em>Special thanks to Whittaker's clerks: Heywood Davis, Jerry Libin and James Adler. Also big thanks to Jerry Goldman at Oyez.</em></p> <p><em><span>Portions of this episode aired on June 10, 2016.</span></em></p>
Sep 19, 2017
Kittens Kick The Giggly Blue Robot All Summer
57:03
<p>We tend to think of the Supreme Court justices as all-powerful guardians of the constitution, issuing momentous rulings from on high. They seem at once powerful, and unknowable; all lacy collars and black robes.</p> <p>But they haven’t always been so, you know, supreme. On this episode of <em>More Perfect</em>, we go all the way back to the case that, in a lot of ways, is the beginning of the court we know today. Speaking of the current court, if you need help remembering the eight justices, we've made a mnemonic device (and song) to help you out. </p> <p>Plus, the twisted tale of the biggest heist in Supreme Court history — when reams of Justice Felix Frankfurter’s papers, stored at the Library of Congress, seemed to vanish into thin air.</p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/j4TENcocyss" width="100%"></iframe></p> <p><a class="twitter-share-button" href="https://twitter.com/share" data-url="https://youtu.be/j4TENcocyss" data-text="My #SCOTUSsong would be ___" data-via="Radiolab" data-size="large">Tweet</a></p> <p><strong>The key links:</strong></p> <p>- Akhil Reed Amar's book, <em><a href="https://www.amazon.com/Constitution-Today-Timeless-Lessons-Issues/dp/0465096336">The Constitution Today: Timeless Lessons for the Issues of Our Era</a></em><br>- Linda Monk's book, <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Words-Live-Annotated-Constitution-Stonesong/dp/078688620X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1467405824&amp;sr=1-1&amp;keywords=Linda+Monk"><em>The Words We Live By: Your Annotated Guide to the Constitution</em><br></a>- Jill Lepore’s article, <a href="https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2014/12/01/great-paper-caper">“The Supreme Court Caper”</a></p> <p><strong>The key voices:</strong></p> <p>- <a href="http://lindamonk.com/">Linda Monk</a>, author and constitutional scholar<br>- <a href="https://www.law.yale.edu/akhil-reed-amar">Akhil Reed Amar</a>, Sterling Professor of Law at Yale<br>- <a href="https://www.wilmerhale.com/ari_savitzky/">Ari J. Savitzky</a>, lawyer at WilmerHale<br>- <a href="https://scholar.harvard.edu/jlepore/home">Jill Lepore</a>, Professor of American History at Harvard University</p> <p><strong>The key cases:</strong></p> <p>- 1803: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1789-1850/5us137">Marbury v. Madison</a><br>- 1832: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1789-1850/31us515">Worcester v. Georgia</a><br>- 1954: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1940-1955/347us483">Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka (1)</a><br>- 1955: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1940-1955/349us294">Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka (2)</a></p> <p><em>Correction: In our segment about the preservation of Supreme Court justices' papers, our guest misspoke — Bushrod Washington was George Washington's nephew (not his cousin).</em></p> <p><em>Additional music for this episode by <a href="http://www.podingtonbear.com/wpnew/">Podington Bear</a>.</em></p> <p><em>Special thanks to Dylan Keefe and <a href="http://mitchboyer.com/">Mitch Boyer</a> for their work on the above video.</em></p> <p><em>More Perfect is funded in part by The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, The Charles Evans Hughes Memorial Foundation, and the Joyce Foundation.</em></p> <p><em>Supreme Court archival audio comes from <a href="https://www.oyez.org/">Oyez®</a>, a free law project in collaboration with the Legal Information Institute at Cornell.</em></p> <p><em>Portions of this episode aired on July 1, 2016.</em></p> <p> </p>
Sep 18, 2017
Object Anyway
48:16
<p>At the trial of James Batson in 1982, the prosecution eliminated all the black jurors from the jury pool. Batson objected, setting off a complicated discussion about jury selection that would make its way all the way up to the Supreme Court. On this episode of More Perfect, the Supreme Court ruling that was supposed to prevent race-based jury selection, but may have only made the problem worse.</p> <div class="embedded-image"><img class="mcePuppyImage" src="https://media2.wnyc.org/i/800/1066/l/80/1/Batson-James-and-Rose.jpg" alt=""> <div class="image-metadata"> <div class="image-caption">James Batson (L) with his mother Rose (R)</div> <div class="image-credit">(Sean Rameswaram)</div> </div> </div> <div class="embedded-image"><img class="mcePuppyImage" src="https://media2.wnyc.org/i/800/600/l/80/1/Gutmann-Class.jpg" alt=""> <div class="image-metadata"> <div class="image-caption">Joe Gutmann with his students in the mock trial courtroom built at the back of Gutmann's classroom</div> <div class="image-credit">(Sean Rameswaram)</div> </div> </div> <p> </p> <div class="embedded-image"></div> <div class="embedded-image"><img class="mcePuppyImage" src="https://media2.wnyc.org/i/800/600/l/80/1/Gutmann-James2.jpg" alt=""> <div class="image-metadata"> <div class="image-caption">Joe Gutmann (L) and James Batson (R) sit together in Gutmann's classroom</div> <div class="image-credit">(Sean Rameswaram)</div> </div> </div> <p><strong>The key links:</strong></p> <p>-The <a href="https://media.wnyc.org/media/resources/2016/Jul/15/foster.jpg">prosecutor's papers</a> highlighting black jurors from the trial of Timothy Tyrone Foster</p> <p><strong>The key voices:</strong></p> <p>- James Batson, the original plaintiff in Batson v. Kentucky<br>- Joe Guttman, the prosecutor in James Batson's case<br>- David Niehaus, lawyer at the Jefferson County Public Defender's Office<br>- Jeff Robinson, director for the <a href="https://www.aclu.org/bio/jeffery-robinson">ACLU Center for Justice</a><br>- Bryan Stevenson, founder and executive director of the <a href="http://www.eji.org/BryanStevenson">Equal Justice Initiative</a><br>- Stephen B. Bright, Harvey Karp Visiting Lecturer in Law at <a href="https://www.law.yale.edu/stephen-b-bright">Yale Law School</a><br>- Nancy Marder, professor of law at <a href="https://www.kentlaw.iit.edu/faculty/full-time-faculty/nancy-s-marder">IIT Chicago-Kent College of Law</a></p> <p><strong>The key cases:</strong></p> <p>- 1986: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1985/84-6263">Batson v. Kentucky</a><br>- 2016: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2015/14-8349">Foster v. Chatman</a></p>
Jul 16, 2016
Kittens Kick The Giggly Blue Robot All Summer
36:31
<p>We tend to think of the Supreme Court justices as all-powerful guardians of the constitution, issuing momentous rulings from on high. They seem at once powerful, and unknowable; all lacy collars and black robes.</p> <p>But they haven’t always been so, you know, supreme. On this episode of <em>More Perfect</em>, we go all the way back to the case that, in a lot of ways, is the beginning of the court we know today.</p> <p>Speaking of the current court, if you need help remembering the eight justices, we've made a mnemonic device (and song) to help you out. Listen and share below! </p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/j4TENcocyss" width="100%"></iframe></p> <p><a class="twitter-share-button" href="https://twitter.com/share" data-url="https://youtu.be/j4TENcocyss" data-text="My #SCOTUSsong would be ___" data-via="Radiolab" data-size="large">Tweet</a></p> <script>// <![CDATA[ !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+'://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js';fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document, 'script', 'twitter-wjs'); // ]]></script> <p><strong>The key links:</strong></p> <p>- Akhil Reed Amar's forthcoming book, <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Constitution-Today-Timeless-Lessons-Issues/dp/0465096336">The Constitution Today: Timeless Lessons for the Issues of Our Era</a><br>- Linda Monk's book, <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Words-Live-Annotated-Constitution-Stonesong/dp/078688620X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1467405824&amp;sr=1-1&amp;keywords=Linda+Monk">The Words We Live By: Your Annotated Guide to the Constitution</a></p> <p><strong>The key voices:</strong></p> <p>- Linda Monk, <a href="http://lindamonk.com/">author and constitutional scholar</a><br>- Akhil Reed Amar, <a href="https://www.law.yale.edu/akhil-reed-amar">Sterling Professor of Law at Yale</a><br>- Ari J. Savitzky, <a href="https://www.wilmerhale.com/ari_savitzky/">lawyer at WilmerHale</a></p> <p><strong>The key cases:</strong></p> <p>- 1803: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1789-1850/5us137">Marbury v. Madison</a><br>- 1832: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1789-1850/31us515">Worcester v. Georgia</a><br>- 1954: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1940-1955/347us483">Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka (1)</a><br>- 1955: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1940-1955/349us294">Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka (2)</a></p> <p><em>Additional music for this episode by <a href="http://www.podingtonbear.com/wpnew/">Podington Bear</a>.</em></p> <p><em>Special thanks to Dylan Keefe and <a href="http://mitchboyer.com/">Mitch Boyer</a> for their work on the above video.</em></p> <p> </p>
Jul 01, 2016
The Imperfect Plaintiffs
64:12
<p>Last week, the court decided one of this term’s blockbuster cases — a case that could affect the future of affirmative action in this country. The plaintiff was Abigail Fisher, a white woman, who said she was rejected from the University of Texas because the university unfairly considered race as one of many factors when evaluating applicants. And while Fisher’s claims were the focus of the case, the story behind how she ended up in front of the Supreme Court is a lot more complicated.</p> <center> <div class="embedded-image"><img class="mcePuppyImage" src="https://media2.wnyc.org/i/304/423/l/80/1/imageedit_1_5483384188.jpg" alt=""> <div class="image-metadata"> <div class="image-caption">Edward Blum is the director of the Project on Fair Representation</div> <div class="image-credit">(AEI)</div> </div> </div> </center> <p>On this episode, we visit Edward Blum, a 64-year-old “legal entrepreneur” and former stockbroker who has become something of a Supreme Court matchmaker — He takes an issue, finds the perfect plaintiff, matches them with lawyers, and works his way to the highest court in the land. He’s had remarkable success, with 6 cases heard before the Supreme Court, including that of Abigail Fisher. We also head to Houston, Texas, where in 1998, an unusual 911 call led to one of the most important LGBTQ rights decisions in the Supreme Court’s history.</p> <div class="embedded-image"><img class="mcePuppyImage" src="https://media2.wnyc.org/i/646/486/l/80/1/tyronlawrence2.JPG" alt=""> <div class="image-metadata"> <div class="image-caption">John Lawrence (L) and Tyron Garner (R) at the 2004 Pride Parade in Houston</div> <div class="image-credit">(J.D. Doyle/Houston LGBT History)</div> </div> </div> <div class="embedded-image"><img class="mcePuppyImage" src="https://media2.wnyc.org/i/787/391/l/80/1/lawrencetyron3.jpg" alt=""> <div class="image-metadata"> <div class="image-caption">Mitchell Katine (L) introduces Tyron Garner (Middle) and John Lawrence (R) at a rally celebrating the court's decision</div> <div class="image-credit">(J.D. Doyle/Houston LGBT History)</div> </div> </div> <p><strong>The key links:</strong></p> <p>- The <a href="http://harvardnotfair.org/">website</a> Edward Blum is using to find plaintiffs for a case he is building against Harvard University<br>- Susan Carle's <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Lawyers-Ethics-Pursuit-Social-Justice/dp/0814716407?ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1466011809&amp;ref_=la_B00E7ROGKC_1_1&amp;s=books&amp;sr=1-1">book</a> on the history of legal ethics<br>- An <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2006/09/14/obituaries/14garner.html">obituary</a> for Tyron Garner when he died in 2006<br>- An <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/24/us/john-lawrence-plaintiff-in-lawrence-v-texas-dies-at-68.html">obituary</a> for John Lawrence when he died in 2011<br>- Dale Carpenter's <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Flagrant-Conduct-Story-Lawrence-Texas/dp/0393345122">book</a> on the history of Lawrence v. Texas<br>- A <a href="http://www.lambdalegal.org/in-court/cases/lawrence-v-texas">Lambda Legal documentary</a> on the story of Lawrence v. Texas</p> <p><strong>The key voices:</strong></p> <p>- Edward Blum, director of the <a href="https://www.projectonfairrepresentation.org/">Project on Fair Representation</a><br>- Susan Carle, professor of law at the <a href="https://www.wcl.american.edu/faculty/carle/">American University Washington College of Law</a><br>- Dale Carpenter, p<span>rofessor of Law at the <a href="http://www.law.smu.edu/professor-profiles/carpenter-(1)">SMU Dedman School of Law</a></span><br><span>- Mitchell Katine, lawyer at <a href="http://lawkn.com/attorneys/mitchell-katine">Katine &amp; Nechman L.L.P. <br></a>- Lane Lewis, chair of the <a href="http://www.harrisdemocrats.com/" target="_blank">Harris County Democratic Party</a></span><br><span>- Sheila Jackson Lee, Congresswoman for the <a href="https://jacksonlee.house.gov/">18th district of Texas</a></span></p> <p><strong>The key cases</strong>:</p> <p>- 1896: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1850-1900/163us537">Plessy v. Ferguson</a><br>- 1917: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1900-1940/245us60">Buchanan v. Warley</a><br>- 1962: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1962/5">National Association for the Advancement of Colored People v. Button</a><br>- 1986: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1985/85-140">Bowers v. Hardwick</a><br>- 1996: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1995/94-805">Bush v. Vera</a><br>- 2003: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2002/02-102">Lawrence v. Texas</a><br>- 2009: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2008/08-322">Northwest Austin Municipal Utility District Number One v. Holder</a><br>- 2013: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2012/12-96">Shelby County v. Holder</a><br>- 2013: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2012/11-345">Fisher v. University of Texas (1)</a><br>- 2016: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2015/14-940">Evenwel v. Abbott</a><br>- 2016: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2015/14-981">Fisher v. University of Texas (2)</a></p> <p><em>Special thanks to Ari Berman. His book <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Give-Us-Ballot-Struggle-America/dp/0374158274/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&amp;ie=UTF8&amp;qid=1466106368&amp;sr=1-1&amp;keywords=ari+berman">Give Us the Ballot</a>, and his reporting for <a href="https://www.thenation.com/article/conservatives-who-gutted-voting-rights-act-are-now-challenging-one-person-one-vote/">The Nation</a>, were hugely helpful in reporting this episode.  </em></p> <p><em>More Perfect is funded in part by The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, The Charles Evans Hughes Memorial Foundation, and the Joyce Foundation.</em></p> <p><em>Supreme Court archival audio comes from <a href="https://www.oyez.org/">Oyez®</a>, a free law project in collaboration with the Legal Information Institute at Cornell.</em></p>
Jun 28, 2016
More Perfect presents: Adoptive Couple v. Baby Girl
42:21
<p>This is the story of a three-year-old girl and the highest court in the land. The Supreme Court case Adoptive Couple v. Baby Girl<em> </em>was a legal battle that entangled a biological father, a heart-broken couple, and the tragic history of Native American children taken from their families.</p> <div class="article-description"> <p>When producer <a href="http://www.radiolab.org/people/tim-howard/">Tim Howard</a> first read about this case, it struck him as a sad, but seemingly straightforward custody dispute. But as he started talking to lawyers, historians, and the families involved in the case, it became clear that it was much more than that. Because Adoptive Couple v. Baby Girl<em> </em>challenges parts of the 1978 Indian Child Welfare Act, this case puts one little girl at the center of a storm of legal intricacies, Native American tribal culture, and heart-wrenching personal stakes.</p> <p><strong>A note from Jad:</strong></p> <p>"As you guys may know, our new podcast <em>More Perfect</em> is <em>Radiolab</em>’s first ever spin-off show. But I want to share something special with you: THE <em>Radiolab</em> episode that inspired us to launch this whole series about the Supreme Court. After we put out this episode we got hooked on the court and the kinds of stories we could tell about it. So we made <em>More Perfect</em>.</p> <p>We reported this <em>Radiolab</em> story about three years ago. It’s about a little girl...but really it’s about so much more than that, too. Stay tuned to the end for an update about what has happened since."</p> <p><strong>The key links:</strong></p> <p>- An <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/baby-veronicas-birth-mother-girl-belongs-with-adoptive-parents/2013/07/12/40d38a12-e995-11e2-a301-ea5a8116d211_story.html">op-ed by Veronica's birth mom</a>, Christy Maldonado, in the <em>Washington Post</em><br><em>- </em>Marcia Zug's <a href="http://www.slate.com/articles/double_x/doublex/2012/08/baby_veronica_returns_to_her_biological_father_affirming_icwa_south_carolina_s_supreme_court_made_the_right_decision_.html">article for Slate</a> on the original case that went to the South Carolina Supreme Court<br>- Marcia Zug's <a href="http://www.slate.com/articles/double_x/doublex/2013/06/baby_veronica_indian_adoption_case_the_supreme_court_got_it_wrong.html">article for Slate</a> criticizing the Supreme Court ruling<br>- An <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/16/opinion/a-wrenching-adoption-under-the-indian-child-welfare-act.html">op-ed by the New York Times Editorial Board</a> urging action from the Supreme Court<br>- The official site for <a href="http://www.nicwa.org/Indian_Child_Welfare_Act/">ICWA, the <span>Indian Child Welfare Act</span></a></p> </div> <p><strong>The key voices:</strong></p> <p>- Matt and Melanie Capobianco, Veronica's adoptive parents<br>- Dusten Brown, Veronica's biological father<br>- Christy Maldonado, Veronica's biological mother<br>- Mark Fiddler, attorney for the Capobiancos<br>- Marcia Zug, associate professor of law at the <a href="http://law.sc.edu/faculty/zug/">University of South Carolina School of Law</a><br>- Bert Hirsch, attorney formerly of the <span>Association on American Indian Affairs</span><br><span>- Chrissi Nimmo, Assistant Attorney General for Cherokee Nation</span><br><span>- Terry Cross, executive director of the National Indian Child Welfare Association</span><br><span>- Lori Alvino McGill, attorney for Christy Maldonado</span></p> <p><strong>The key cases</strong>:</p> <p>- 2013: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2012/12-399">Adoptive Couple v. Baby Girl</a></p>
Jun 17, 2016
The Political Thicket
42:22
<p>When Chief Justice Earl Warren was asked at the end of his career, “What was the most important case of your tenure?”, there were a lot of answers he could have given. After all, he had presided over some of the most important decisions in the court’s history <span>—</span> cases that dealt with segregation in schools, the right to an attorney, the right to remain silent, just to name a few. But his answer was a surprise: He said, “Baker v. Carr,” a 1962 redistricting case. </p> <p>On this episode of <em>More Perfect</em>, we talk about why this case was so important; important enough, in fact, that it pushed one Supreme Court justice to a nervous breakdown, brought a boiling feud to a head, put one justice in the hospital, and changed the course of the Supreme Court — and the nation — forever.</p> <div class="embedded-image"><img class="mcePuppyImage" src="https://media2.wnyc.org/i/800/800/l/80/1/pjimage_b6uICRg.jpg" alt=""> <div class="image-metadata"> <div class="image-caption">Associate Justice William O. Douglas (L) and Associate Justice Felix Frankfurter (R)</div> <div class="image-credit">(Harris &amp; Ewing Photography/Library of Congress)</div> </div> </div> <div class="embedded-image"><img class="mcePuppyImage" src="https://media2.wnyc.org/i/600/383/l/80/1/warrencourt.jpg.jpeg" alt=""> <div class="image-metadata"> <div class="image-caption"><span>Top Row (left-right): </span>Charles E. Whittaker<span>, </span>John M. Harlan<span>,</span>William J. Brennan, Jr.<span>, </span>Potter Stewart<span>. Bottom Row (left-right): </span>William O. Douglas<span>, </span>Hugo L. Black<span>, </span>Earl Warren<span>, </span>Felix Frankfurter<span>, </span>Tom C. Clark<span>.</span></div> <div class="image-credit">(Library of Congress)</div> </div> </div> <p>  </p> <div class="embedded-image"><img class="mcePuppyImage" src="https://media2.wnyc.org/i/800/515/l/80/1/whittaker.jpeg" alt=""> <div class="image-metadata"> <div class="image-caption">Associate Supreme Court Justice Charles Evans Whittaker at his desk in his chambers.</div> <div class="image-credit">(Heywood Davis)</div> </div> </div> <p> <strong>The key links:</strong></p> <p>- Biographies of <a href="https://www.oyez.org/justices/charles_e_whittaker" target="_blank">Charles Evans Whittaker</a>, <a href="https://www.oyez.org/justices/felix_frankfurter" target="_blank">Felix Frankfurter</a>, and <a href="https://www.oyez.org/justices/william_o_douglas" target="_blank">William O. Douglas</a> from Oyez<br>- A <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Failing-Justice-Charles-Whittaker-Supreme/dp/0786421975?ie=UTF8&amp;*Version*=1&amp;*entries*=0">biography of Charles Evans Whittaker</a> written by Craig Alan Smith<br>- A <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Enigma-Felix-Frankfurter-H-Hirsch/dp/046501979X?ie=UTF8&amp;*Version*=1&amp;*entries*=0">biography of Felix Frankfurter</a> written by H.N. Hirsch<br>- A <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Wild-Bill-Legend-William-Douglas/dp/0394576284?ie=UTF8&amp;*Version*=1&amp;*entries*=0">biography of William O. Douglas</a> written by Bruce Allen Murphy<br>- A <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Democracys-Doorstep-Inside-Supreme-Brought/dp/0809074249?ie=UTF8&amp;*Version*=1&amp;*entries*=0">book about the history of "one person, one vote"</a> written by J. Douglas Smith<br>- A <a href="http://landmarkcases.c-span.org/Case/10/Baker-V-Carr">roundtable discussion on C-SPAN</a> about <em>Baker v. Carr</em></p> <p><strong>The key voices:</strong></p> <p>- <a href="http://www.calu.edu/academics/faculty/Craig-Smith.aspx" target="_blank">Craig Smith</a>, Charles Whittaker's biographer and Professor of History and Political Science at California University of Pennsylvania <br>- <a href="http://law2.wm.edu/faculty/bios/fulltime/tlgrove.php">Tara Grove</a>, Professor of Law and Robert and Elizabeth Scott Research Professor at William &amp; Mary Law School<br>- <a href="https://www.law.georgetown.edu/faculty/seidman-louis-michael.cfm" target="_blank">Louis Michael Seidman</a>, Carmack Waterhouse Professor of Constitutional Law at Georgetown Law<br>- <a href="https://law.duke.edu/fac/charles/" target="_blank">Guy-Uriel Charles</a>, Charles S. Rhyne Professor of Law at Duke Law<br>- <a href="https://its.law.nyu.edu/facultyprofiles/index.cfm?fuseaction=profile.overview&amp;personid=23845" target="_blank">Samuel Issacharoff</a>, Bonnie and Richard Reiss Professor of Constitutional Law, NYU Law<br>- <a href="http://us.macmillan.com/author/jdouglassmith" target="_blank">J. Douglas Smith</a>, author of "<a href="http://www.amazon.com/Democracys-Doorstep-Inside-Supreme-Brought/dp/0809074249" target="_blank">On Democracy's Doorstep</a>"<br>- <a href="http://scwstl.com/attorneys/alan-c-kohn/" target="_blank">Alan Kohn</a>, former Supreme Court clerk for Charles Whittaker, 1957 Term<br>- Kent Whittaker, Charles Whittaker's son<br>- Kate Whittaker, Charles Whittaker's granddaughter</p> <p><strong>The key cases:</strong></p> <p>- 1962: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1960/6">Baker v. Carr<br></a>- 2000: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2000/00-949">Bush v. Gore<br></a>- 2016: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2015/14-940" target="_blank">Evenwel v. Abbott</a></p> <p><strong>Music in this episode by <a href="http://gyanriley.com/" target="_blank">Gyan Riley</a>, <a href="http://www.wqxr.org/people/alexander-overington/" target="_blank">Alex Overington</a>, <a href="http://www.squirrelthing.com/" target="_blank">David Herman</a>, <a href="http://www.wnyc.org/people/tobin-low/" target="_blank">Tobin Low</a> and <a href="http://www.jadabumrad.com/music.html" target="_blank">Jad Abumrad</a>. </strong></p> <p><em>More Perfect is funded in part by The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, The Charles Evans Hughes Memorial Foundation, and the Joyce Foundation.</em></p> <p><em>Supreme Court archival audio comes from <a href="https://www.oyez.org/">Oyez®</a>, a free law project in collaboration with the Legal Information Institute at Cornell.</em></p> <p><em><span>Archival interviews with Justice William O. Douglas come from the Department of Rare Books and Special Collections at Princeton University Library.</span></em></p> <p><em>Special thanks to Whittaker's clerks: Heywood Davis, Jerry Libin and James Adler. Also big thanks to Jerry Goldman at Oyez.</em></p>
Jun 10, 2016
Cruel and Unusual
40:11
<p>On the inaugural episode of <em>More Perfect</em>, we explore three little words embedded in the 8th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution: “cruel and unusual.” America has long wrestled with this concept in the context of our strongest punishment, the death penalty. A majority of “we the people” (<a href="http://www.gallup.com/poll/1606/death-penalty.aspx">61 percent</a>, to be exact) are in favor of having it, but inside the Supreme Court, opinions have evolved over time in surprising ways.</p> <p>And outside of the court, the debate drove one woman in the UK to take on the U.S. death penalty system from Europe. It also caused states to resuscitate old methods used for executing prisoners on death row. And perhaps more than anything, it forced a conversation on what constitutes cruel and unusual punishment.</p> <p>After you listen to the episode:</p> <p><strong>The key links:</strong></p> <p>- <a href="https://media.wnyc.org/media/resources/2016/Jun/01/Invoice_from_Dream_Pharma_to_AZ.jpg">The invoice</a> that revealed the identity of Dream Pharma<br> - <a href="https://media.wnyc.org/media/resources/2016/Jun/01/13_From_Maya_AZ_-Lifesaver-_email_1.pdf">The email exchanges</a> between Arizona and California officials regarding lethal injection drugs<br>- <a href="https://media.wnyc.org/media/resources/2016/Jun/01/ArkansasExecutionProtocolCalculations.jpg">Handwritten lethal injection protocols</a> from Arkansas<br>- <a href="http://www.newson6.com/story/25406037/oklahoma-man-who-developed-lethal-injection-recipe-lived-with-regret">An interview with Bill Wiseman</a>, the Oklahoma state legislator who invented lethal injection in America, conducted by Scott Thompson of KOTV.</p> <p><strong>The key voices:</strong></p> <p>- Maya Foa, <span>Director of <a href="http://www.reprieve.org.uk/">Reprieve</a>'s Death Penalty team</span><br>- Paul Ray, <a href="http://le.utah.gov/house2/detail.jsp?i=RAYP">State Representative</a>, House District 13, Utah<br>- Robert Blecker, Professor at New York Law School, and author of, "<a href="https://www.amazon.com/Death-Punishment-Searching-Justice-among/dp/1137278560?ie=UTF8&amp;*Version*=1&amp;*entries*=0">The Death of Punishment</a>"</p> <p><strong>The key cases</strong>:</p> <p>- 1879: <a href="https://supreme.justia.com/cases/federal/us/99/130/case.html">Wilkerson v. Utah</a><br>- 1972: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1971/69-5030">Furman v. Georgia</a><br>- 1976: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/1975/74-6257">Gregg v. Georgia</a><br>- 2008: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2007/07-5439">Baze v. Rees</a><br>- 2014: <a href="https://www.oyez.org/cases/2014/14-7955">Glossip v. Gross</a></p> <p><em>More Perfect is funded in part by The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, The Charles Evans Hughes Memorial Foundation, and the Joyce Foundation.</em></p> <p><em>Supreme Court archival audio comes from <a href="https://www.oyez.org/">Oyez®</a>, a free law project in collaboration with the Legal Information Institute at Cornell.</em></p> <p><em>Special thanks to Claire Phillips, Nina Perry, Stephanie Jenkins, Ralph Dellapiana, Byrd Pinkerton, Elisabeth Semel, Christina Spaulding, and The Marshall Project</em></p>
Jun 02, 2016
Coming Soon: More Perfect
1:02
<p>How does an elite group of nine people shape everything from marriage and money, to safety and sex for an entire nation? From the producers of Radiolab, More Perfect dives into the rarefied world of the Supreme Court to explain how cases deliberated inside hallowed halls affect lives far away from the bench.</p>
May 24, 2016