The Panpsycast Philosophy Podcast

By Jack Symes | Andrew Horton, Olly Marley and Gregory Miller.

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Description

A weekly 'informal and informative' philosophy podcast inspiring and supporting students, teachers, academics and free-thinkers worldwide. All episodes are available at www.thepanpsycast.com.

Episode Date
Episode 40, 'Offensive Language' with Rebecca Roache
46:28

Rebecca Roache is a Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at Royal Holloway, University of London. Dr Roache specialises in practical ethics, logic, philosophy of mind, philosophy of psychiatry and early modern philosophy, but in this episode, we’ll be speaking to Rebecca specifically about the philosophy of language and swearing. 

In the words of Rebecca Roache:

"With a little imagination, we can find limitless and powerful ways to offend people if that’s what we want to do. We don’t need to give a f*ck about whether our favourite swear words are declining in their capacity to shock." (Ethics Centre,2015  - click for full article)

This interview is produced ‘in association with The Institute of Art and Ideas and the Philosophy for Our Times podcast’. A very special thank you to everybody at the Institute of Art and Ideas for making this interview possible.

*We apologise for the audio quality of this episode. We recorded the interview at How the Light Gets In Festival, and although the rain had stopped for us momentarily, you’ll be able to hear festival-goers celebrating the outbreak of sunshine in the background. We’ll be back in the studio after this episode. Thank you, we hope you enjoy the show!

Jun 17, 2018
Episode 39, 'The Philosophy of Perception' with Bence Nanay
27:40

Bence Nanay is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Antwerp and Research Associate in philosophy at the University of Cambridge. Nanay is also the principal investigator of the European Research Council project, Seeing Things You Don’t See: Unifying the Philosophy, Psychology and Neuroscience of Multimodal Mental Imagery

As well as publishing more than 100 peer-reviewed articles, Nanay is the author of Between Perception and Action (2013) and Aesthetics as Philosophy of Perception (2016).

It will, therefore, come as no surprise that our focus today will be Nanay’s work in the field of ‘philosophy of perception’. In a rare intersection between psychology, neuroscience and philosophy, ‘the philosophy of perception’ is concerned with the status of perceptual data, the nature of perceptual experience, and how this data and these experiences relate to beliefs about, or knowledge of, the world.

This interview is produced ‘in association with The Institute of Art and Ideas and the Philosophy for Our Times podcast’. A very special thank you to everybody at the Institute of Art and Ideas for making this interview possible.

To celebrate the release of this interview, we’re giving away three signed copies of Nanay’s Between Perception and Action– to be in with a chance of winning, just head over to our Twitter page.

*We apologise for the length and audio quality of this episode. We recorded the interview in-between Bence’s talks at How the Light Gets In Festival, where it was tipping it down with rain.

Jun 10, 2018
Episode 38, ‘Philosophy in Everyday Life’ with Philosophy Now's Rick Lewis (Part II)
24:03

Rick Lewis took his first degree in physics and philosophy of science at the University of Manchester, and later an MA in philosophy at the University of York. 

Making philosophy accessible and encouraging the person on the street to engage in philosophy in their everyday life was, and is, hugely important to Rick. That’s why in 1991 Rick founded the magazine Philosophy Now, of which, he has been the editor ever since. Soon after launching the magazine, Philosophy Now became the first philosophy title to appear on UK news-stands. 

This episode Jack, Andy, Olly and Rick will be discussing ‘the role of philosophy in everyday life’. For many, philosophy is something which can not only enrich our own lives but the lives of our fellow humans. For many others, philosophy is a waste of a life, something that diminishes, something which fails to enrich...

  • Part I. Philosophy in Everyday Life.
  • Part II. Philosophy Now, Further Analysis and Discussion.
Jun 03, 2018
Episode 38, ‘Philosophy in Everyday Life’ with Philosophy Now's Rick Lewis (Part I)
53:39

Rick Lewis took his first degree in physics and philosophy of science at the University of Manchester, and later an MA in philosophy at the University of York. 

Making philosophy accessible and encouraging the person on the street to engage in philosophy in their everyday life was, and is, hugely important to Rick. That’s why in 1991 Rick founded the magazine Philosophy Now, of which, he has been the editor ever since. Soon after launching the magazine, Philosophy Now became the first philosophy title to appear on UK news-stands. 

This episode Jack, Andy, Olly and Rick will be discussing ‘the role of philosophy in everyday life’. For many, philosophy is something which can not only enrich our own lives but the lives of our fellow humans. For many others, philosophy is a waste of a life, something that diminishes, something which fails to enrich...

  • Part I. Philosophy in Everyday Life.
  • Part II. Philosophy Now, Further Analysis and Discussion.
May 27, 2018
Episode 37, Religious Language (Part IV – Further Analysis and Discussion)
26:44

Get 20% How The Light Gets In Festival 2018 using the discount code “PANPSYCAST20” at the final checkout page! Visit: https://hay.htlgi.iai.tv/?utmsource=panpsycast. Our Patreon page: www.patreon.com/panpsycast. Everything you could need can be found at www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast.

Broadly speaking, the term 'religious language' refers to statements or claims made about God or gods. Many problems arise in the field of religious language, but our principal focus in this episode will be the problems that arise within the Abrahamic religions (that is, Judaism, Christianity and Islam). Simply put, it is unclear how one could use human-made language, to talk meaningfully about something infinitely powerful, infinitely knowledgeable and infinitely loving. This problem is worrisome to believers as it has the potential to undermine their traditions; if we cannot speak meaningfully about God, then the texts and teachings of Abrahamic faiths can only be deemed unintelligible (i.e. impossible to understand). In his Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion, the 18th Century Scottish philosopher David Hume alluded to the problem as follows: “But when we look beyond human affairs… when we carry our speculations into the two eternities, before and after the present state of things; into the creations and formulation of the universe; the existence and properties of spirits; the powers and operations of one universal Spirit existing without beginning and without end; omnipotent, omniscient, immutable, infinite and incomprehensible: We must be far removed from the smallest tendency to scepticism not to be apprehensive, that we have here got quite the reach of our faculties.” In Part I we’re discussing ‘the via negativa’, in Part II, Thomas Aquinas and Ludwig Wittgenstein, in Part III, the verification and falsification principles, and in Part IV we’ll be engaging in some further analysis and discussion.

May 20, 2018
Episode 37, Religious Language (Part III - The Verification and Falsification Principles)
57:43

Get 20% How The Light Gets In Festival 2018 using the discount code “PANPSYCAST20” at the final checkout page! Visit: https://hay.htlgi.iai.tv/?utmsource=panpsycast. Our Patreon page: www.patreon.com/panpsycast. Everything you could need can be found at www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast.

Broadly speaking, the term 'religious language' refers to statements or claims made about God or gods. Many problems arise in the field of religious language, but our principal focus in this episode will be the problems that arise within the Abrahamic religions (that is, Judaism, Christianity and Islam). Simply put, it is unclear how one could use human-made language, to talk meaningfully about something infinitely powerful, infinitely knowledgeable and infinitely loving. This problem is worrisome to believers as it has the potential to undermine their traditions; if we cannot speak meaningfully about God, then the texts and teachings of Abrahamic faiths can only be deemed unintelligible (i.e. impossible to understand). In his Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion, the 18th Century Scottish philosopher David Hume alluded to the problem as follows: “But when we look beyond human affairs… when we carry our speculations into the two eternities, before and after the present state of things; into the creations and formulation of the universe; the existence and properties of spirits; the powers and operations of one universal Spirit existing without beginning and without end; omnipotent, omniscient, immutable, infinite and incomprehensible: We must be far removed from the smallest tendency to scepticism not to be apprehensive, that we have here got quite the reach of our faculties.” In Part I we’re discussing ‘the via negativa’, in Part II, Thomas Aquinas and Ludwig Wittgenstein, in Part III, the verification and falsification principles, and in Part IV we’ll be engaging in some further analysis and discussion.

May 13, 2018
Episode 37, Religious Language (Part II – Thomas Aquinas and Ludwig Wittgenstein)
01:14:17

Get 20% How The Light Gets In Festival 2018 using the discount code “PANPSYCAST20” at the final checkout page! Visit: https://hay.htlgi.iai.tv/?utmsource=panpsycast. Our Patreon page: www.patreon.com/panpsycast. Everything you could need can be found at www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast.

Broadly speaking, the term 'religious language' refers to statements or claims made about God or gods. Many problems arise in the field of religious language, but our principal focus in this episode will be the problems that arise within the Abrahamic religions (that is, Judaism, Christianity and Islam). Simply put, it is unclear how one could use human-made language, to talk meaningfully about something infinitely powerful, infinitely knowledgeable and infinitely loving. This problem is worrisome to believers as it has the potential to undermine their traditions; if we cannot speak meaningfully about God, then the texts and teachings of Abrahamic faiths can only be deemed unintelligible (i.e. impossible to understand). In his Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion, the 18th Century Scottish philosopher David Hume alluded to the problem as follows: “But when we look beyond human affairs… when we carry our speculations into the two eternities, before and after the present state of things; into the creations and formulation of the universe; the existence and properties of spirits; the powers and operations of one universal Spirit existing without beginning and without end; omnipotent, omniscient, immutable, infinite and incomprehensible: We must be far removed from the smallest tendency to scepticism not to be apprehensive, that we have here got quite the reach of our faculties.” In Part I we’re discussing ‘the via negativa’, in Part II, Thomas Aquinas and Ludwig Wittgenstein, in Part III, the verification and falsification principles, and in Part IV we’ll be engaging in some further analysis and discussion.

May 06, 2018
Episode 37, Religious Language (Part I – The Via Negativa)
44:03

Get 20% How The Light Gets In Festival 2018 using the discount code “PANPSYCAST20” at the final checkout page! Visit: https://hay.htlgi.iai.tv/?utmsource=panpsycast. Our Patreon page: www.patreon.com/panpsycast. Everything you could need can be found at www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast.

Broadly speaking, the term 'religious language' refers to statements or claims made about God or gods. Many problems arise in the field of religious language, but our principal focus in this episode will be the problems that arise within the Abrahamic religions (that is, Judaism, Christianity and Islam). Simply put, it is unclear how one could use human-made language, to talk meaningfully about something infinitely powerful, infinitely knowledgeable and infinitely loving. This problem is worrisome to believers as it has the potential to undermine their traditions; if we cannot speak meaningfully about God, then the texts and teachings of Abrahamic faiths can only be deemed unintelligible (i.e. impossible to understand). In his Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion, the 18th Century Scottish philosopher David Hume alluded to the problem as follows: “But when we look beyond human affairs… when we carry our speculations into the two eternities, before and after the present state of things; into the creations and formulation of the universe; the existence and properties of spirits; the powers and operations of one universal Spirit existing without beginning and without end; omnipotent, omniscient, immutable, infinite and incomprehensible: We must be far removed from the smallest tendency to scepticism not to be apprehensive, that we have here got quite the reach of our faculties.” In Part I we’re discussing ‘the via negativa’, in Part II, Thomas Aquinas and Ludwig Wittgenstein, in Part III, the verification and falsification principles, and in Part IV we’ll be engaging in some further analysis and discussion.

Apr 29, 2018
Episode 36, The Daniel Dennett Interview (Part II - Philosophy of Mind)
45:41

Our Patreon page: www.patreon.com/panpsycast.

Everything you could need, including links to all of Daniel C. Dennett’s work, can be found at www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast.

In the words of A. C. Grayling, Professor "Daniel C. Dennett is perhaps the most distinguished philosopher in the world".

In a 2013 study by Gottlieb Duttweiler Institute, alongside philosophers Slavoj Zizek and Peter Singer, Daniel Dennett was ranked amongst the top 5 global thought leaders.

Currently the co-director of the Center for Cognitive Studies and the Austin B. Fletcher Professor of Philosophy at Tufts University, Daniel is best known for his contributions to cognitive science, philosophy of mind and philosophy of religion. His works Consciousness Explained, Darwin’s Dangerous Idea, Breaking the Spell and his latest work, From Bacteria to Bach and Back have had an immense impact in the worlds of philosophy and science. 

For many, Daniel Dennett, known as ‘one of the four horsemen of new atheism’, is a household name, celebrated as a man who has explained away the hard problem of consciousness, religion, and fundamental questions surrounding free-will.

Apr 22, 2018
Episode 36, The Daniel Dennett Interview (Part I - Philosophy of Religion)
01:11:28

Support us on Patreon: www.patreon.com/panpsycast.

Everything you could need, including links to all of Daniel C. Dennett’s work, can be found at www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast.

In the words of A. C. Grayling, Professor "Daniel C. Dennett is perhaps the most distinguished philosopher in the world".

In a 2013 study by Gottlieb Duttweiler Institute, alongside philosophers Slavoj Zizek and Peter Singer, Daniel Dennett was ranked amongst the top 5 global thought leaders.

Currently the co-director of the Center for Cognitive Studies and the Austin B. Fletcher Professor of Philosophy at Tufts University, Daniel is best known for his contributions to cognitive science, philosophy of mind and philosophy of religion. His works Consciousness Explained, Darwin’s Dangerous Idea, Breaking the Spell and his latest work, From Bacteria to Bach and Back have had an immense impact in the worlds of philosophy and science.

For many, Daniel Dennett, known as ‘one of the four horsemen of new atheism’, is a household name, celebrated as a man who has explained away the hard problem of consciousness, religion, and fundamental questions surrounding free-will.

We’re going to be discussing Daniel Dennett’s approach to philosophy of religion in Part I, before we dive into philosophy of mind in Part II.

Apr 15, 2018
Episode 35, Sexual Ethics (Part IV - Further Analysis and Discussion)
33:01

Our Patreon page: www.patreon.com/panpsycast. Email RecoverMe: michelle@recoverme.org.uk

Everything else you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast.

Sexual ethics is the study of human sexuality and sexual behaviour. In a word, it seeks to understand and evaluate the moral conduct of relationships and sexual activities from a philosophical perspective.

Sex is hugely important to us all. Sex is an expression of love. It forms the foundation of our family lives, our social lives and even our self-identities. For many, we should celebrate sex, for we owe it our very existence! On the other hand, sex can be the cause of great pain and suffering. While sex brings life, no doubt, it ruins the lives of many. Cases of exploitation, harassment, assault and rape, show the darkest side of humanity. 

Sex can both make and corrupt humans. For Christians, different sexual acts and preferences can lead them closer to, and further away from God. For many moral philosophers, sexual acts can lead them closer to and further away from what is right. Moral philosophers and theologians have long pondered questions surrounding this sensitive topic, and there is a lot more to be said that goes beyond the scope of this episode. In this episode, we will exclusively be tackling issues surrounding marriage and sexuality.

Apr 08, 2018
Episode 35, Sexual Ethics (Part III - Homosexuality)
45:44

Our Patreon page: www.patreon.com/panpsycast. Email RecoverMe: michelle@recoverme.org.uk

Everything else you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast.

Sexual ethics is the study of human sexuality and sexual behaviour. In a word, it seeks to understand and evaluate the moral conduct of relationships and sexual activities from a philosophical perspective.

Sex is hugely important to us all. Sex is an expression of love. It forms the foundation of our family lives, our social lives and even our self-identities. For many, we should celebrate sex, for we owe it our very existence! On the other hand, sex can be the cause of great pain and suffering. While sex brings life, no doubt, it ruins the lives of many. Cases of exploitation, harassment, assault and rape, show the darkest side of humanity. 

Sex can both make and corrupt humans. For Christians, different sexual acts and preferences can lead them closer to, and further away from God. For many moral philosophers, sexual acts can lead them closer to and further away from what is right. Moral philosophers and theologians have long pondered questions surrounding this sensitive topic, and there is a lot more to be said that goes beyond the scope of this episode. In this episode, we will exclusively be tackling issues surrounding marriage and sexuality.

Apr 01, 2018
Episode 35, Sexual Ethics (Part II - Extramarital Sex)
29:59

Our Patreon page: www.patreon.com/panpsycast. Email RecoverMe: michelle@recoverme.org.uk

Everything else you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast.

Sexual ethics is the study of human sexuality and sexual behaviour. In a word, it seeks to understand and evaluate the moral conduct of relationships and sexual activities from a philosophical perspective.

Sex is hugely important to us all. Sex is an expression of love. It forms the foundation of our family lives, our social lives and even our self-identities. For many, we should celebrate sex, for we owe it our very existence! On the other hand, sex can be the cause of great pain and suffering. While sex brings life, no doubt, it ruins the lives of many. Cases of exploitation, harassment, assault and rape, show the darkest side of humanity. 

Sex can both make and corrupt humans. For Christians, different sexual acts and preferences can lead them closer to, and further away from God. For many moral philosophers, sexual acts can lead them closer to and further away from what is right. Moral philosophers and theologians have long pondered questions surrounding this sensitive topic, and there is a lot more to be said that goes beyond the scope of this episode. In this episode, we will exclusively be tackling issues surrounding marriage and sexuality.

Mar 25, 2018
Episode 35, Sexual Ethics (Part I - Premarital Sex)
01:02:55

Our Patreon page: www.patreon.com/panpsycast. Email RecoverMe: michelle@recoverme.org.uk

Everything else you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast.

Sexual ethics is the study of human sexuality and sexual behaviour. In a word, it seeks to understand and evaluate the moral conduct of relationships and sexual activities from a philosophical perspective.

Sex is hugely important to us all. Sex is an expression of love. It forms the foundation of our family lives, our social lives and even our self-identities. For many, we should celebrate sex, for we owe it our very existence! On the other hand, sex can be the cause of great pain and suffering. While sex brings life, no doubt, it ruins the lives of many. Cases of exploitation, harassment, assault and rape, show the darkest side of humanity. 

Sex can both make and corrupt humans. For Christians, different sexual acts and preferences can lead them closer to, and further away from God. For many moral philosophers, sexual acts can lead them closer to and further away from what is right. Moral philosophers and theologians have long pondered questions surrounding this sensitive topic, and there is a lot more to be said that goes beyond the scope of this episode. In this episode, we will exclusively be tackling issues surrounding marriage and sexuality.

Mar 18, 2018
Episode 34, The Peter Singer Interview (Part II)
57:46

Please visit our Patreon page and show your support! That’s www.patreon.com/panpsycast. Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast.

Peter Singer is often described as the world's most influential philosopher. Professor Singer is currently the Ira W. DeCamp Professor of Bioethics in the University Center for Human Values at Princeton University and Laureate Professor at the University of Melbourne. His work has helped to launch the animal rights and effective altruism movements, as well as making significant contributions in bioethics.
 
Peter Singer is most famous for his developments to the normative ethical theory utilitarianism. Loosely stated, utilitarianism is the view that we should maximise happiness and pleasure, and reduce pain, suffering and unhappiness, for the greatest number of humans and/or non-human animals. He is known in particular for his book Animal Liberation, in which he argues in favour of vegetarianism, and his essay Famine, Affluence, and Morality, in which he argues in favour of donating to help the global poor. 
Practical Ethics, The Life You Can Save, The Most Good You Can Do, One World: The Ethics of Globalisation, Ethics in the Real World - Peter Singer's list of bestselling publications is extensive - but his work goes beyond the written page. Peter Singer is also the founder of the charity The Life You Can Save and co-founder of Animals Australia.

Mar 11, 2018
Episode 34, The Peter Singer Interview (Part I)
47:20

Please visit our Patreon page and show your support! That’s www.patreon.com/panpsycast. Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast.

Peter Singer is often described as the world's most influential philosopher. Professor Singer is currently the Ira W. DeCamp Professor of Bioethics in the University Center for Human Values at Princeton University and Laureate Professor at the University of Melbourne. His work has helped to launch the animal rights and effective altruism movements, as well as making significant contributions in bioethics.
 
Peter Singer is most famous for his developments to the normative ethical theory utilitarianism. Loosely stated, utilitarianism is the view that we should maximise happiness and pleasure, and reduce pain, suffering and unhappiness, for the greatest number of humans and/or non-human animals. He is known in particular for his book Animal Liberation, in which he argues in favour of vegetarianism, and his essay Famine, Affluence, and Morality, in which he argues in favour of donating to help the global poor. 
Practical Ethics, The Life You Can Save, The Most Good You Can Do, One World: The Ethics of Globalisation, Ethics in the Real World - Peter Singer's list of bestselling publications is extensive - but his work goes beyond the written page. Peter Singer is also the founder of the charity The Life You Can Save and co-founder of Animals Australia.

Mar 04, 2018
Episode 33, Yujin Nagasawa and 'The Problem of Evil for Atheists' (Part II)
45:36

Please visit our Patreon page and show your support - www.patreon.com/panpsycast! Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast.

For more Information on Yujin Nagasawa, please visit: www.yujinnagasawa.co.uk. Yujin’s latest book: Yujin Nagasawa, Miracles: A Very Short Introduction - https://www.amazon.co.uk/Miracles-Very-Short-Introduction-Introductions-ebook/dp/B07663TS81. The paper we are discussing this episode: Yujin Nagasawa, The Problem of Evil for Atheists - https://docs.wixstatic.com/ugd/6d4b8e_e2fede5338c949e29637ccd5b79b6609.pdf.

Yujin Nagasawa is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Birmingham, as well as President of the British Society for the Philosophy of Religion and Co-Director of the John Hick Centre for Philosophy of Religion. Obtaining his PhD from the Australian National University in 2004, Nagasawa’s work in philosophy is extensive, focusing on a range of topics from the problems surrounding consciousness to the nature and existence of God. Our focus for Episode 33, is Nagasawa’s ‘The Problem of Evil for Atheists’. The argument can be stated as follows; atheists believe that the world is generally good and they are happy and grateful to exist, i.e. they are existential optimists. However, our entire evolutionary biological system is based upon the painful, miserable suffering of the weak. So, why should we think that the world is overall good and that we should be grateful to exist, if our existence depends on a violent, cruel and unfair biological system which guarantees pain and suffering for unaccountably many sentient animals? Nagasawa argues that the theist is in a better position to answer this question than the atheist, suggesting that the problem of evil provides a good reason to abandon atheism and adopt theism. Part I. ‘The Problem of Evil for Atheists’. Part II. Further Analysis and Discussion.

Feb 25, 2018
Episode 33, Yujin Nagasawa and 'The Problem of Evil for Atheists' (Part I)
49:42

Please visit our Patreon page and show your support - www.patreon.com/panpsycast! Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast.

For more Information on Yujin Nagasawa, please visit: www.yujinnagasawa.co.uk. Yujin’s latest book: Yujin Nagasawa, Miracles: A Very Short Introduction - https://www.amazon.co.uk/Miracles-Very-Short-Introduction-Introductions-ebook/dp/B07663TS81. The paper we are discussing this episode: Yujin Nagasawa, The Problem of Evil for Atheists - https://docs.wixstatic.com/ugd/6d4b8e_e2fede5338c949e29637ccd5b79b6609.pdf.

Yujin Nagasawa is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Birmingham, as well as President of the British Society for the Philosophy of Religion and Co-Director of the John Hick Centre for Philosophy of Religion. Obtaining his PhD from the Australian National University in 2004, Nagasawa’s work in philosophy is extensive, focusing on a range of topics from the problems surrounding consciousness to the nature and existence of God. Our focus for Episode 33, is Nagasawa’s ‘The Problem of Evil for Atheists’. The argument can be stated as follows; atheists believe that the world is generally good and they are happy and grateful to exist, i.e. they are existential optimists. However, our entire evolutionary biological system is based upon the painful, miserable suffering of the weak. So, why should we think that the world is overall good and that we should be grateful to exist, if our existence depends on a violent, cruel and unfair biological system which guarantees pain and suffering for unaccountably many sentient animals? Nagasawa argues that the theist is in a better position to answer this question than the atheist, suggesting that the problem of evil provides a good reason to abandon atheism and adopt theism. Part I. ‘The Problem of Evil for Atheists’. Part II. Further Analysis and Discussion.

Feb 18, 2018
Episode 32, Meta-Ethics (Part IV - Further Analysis and Discussion)
40:17

Please visit our Patreon page and show your support! (www.patreon.com/panpsycast) This episode is proudly sponsored by The Partially Examined Life Philosophy Podcast. For information, please visit www.partiallyexaminedlife.com. Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Meta-ethics is the attempt to understand the metaphysical, semantic, epistemological and psychological presuppositions of moral thought. It investigates our ethical language, in search of the meaning that lies behind it. Meta-ethics is concerned with are a broad range of puzzles, for example: What do we mean we make moral claims? Do our preferences or feelings motivate moral assertions? Or are we stating facts when we make moral claims? Is morality more a matter of taste than truth - and if it is a matter of truth, how do we learn about the moral facts? This episode we’ll be introducing you to three meta-ethical views. In Part I, we’ll be discussing naturalism, in Part II, we’ll be looking at intuitionism, in Part III, we’re going to dive into emotivism, and finally, in Part IV, we’ll be engaging in some further analysis and discussion.

Feb 11, 2018
Episode 32, Meta-Ethics (Part III - Emotivism)
35:57

Please visit our Patreon page and show your support! (www.patreon.com/panpsycast) This episode is proudly sponsored by The Partially Examined Life Philosophy Podcast. For information, please visit www.partiallyexaminedlife.com. Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Meta-ethics is the attempt to understand the metaphysical, semantic, epistemological and psychological presuppositions of moral thought. It investigates our ethical language, in search of the meaning that lies behind it. Meta-ethics is concerned with are a broad range of puzzles, for example: What do we mean we make moral claims? Do our preferences or feelings motivate moral assertions? Or are we stating facts when we make moral claims? Is morality more a matter of taste than truth - and if it is a matter of truth, how do we learn about the moral facts? This episode we’ll be introducing you to three meta-ethical views. In Part I, we’ll be discussing naturalism, in Part II, we’ll be looking at intuitionism, in Part III, we’re going to dive into emotivism, and finally, in Part IV, we’ll be engaging in some further analysis and discussion.

Feb 04, 2018
Episode 32, Meta-Ethics (Part II - Intuitionism)
51:16

Please visit our Patreon page and show your support! (www.patreon.com/panpsycast) This episode is proudly sponsored by The Partially Examined Life Philosophy Podcast. For information, please visit www.partiallyexaminedlife.com. Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Meta-ethics is the attempt to understand the metaphysical, semantic, epistemological and psychological presuppositions of moral thought. It investigates our ethical language, in search of the meaning that lies behind it. Meta-ethics is concerned with are a broad range of puzzles, for example: What do we mean we make moral claims? Do our preferences or feelings motivate moral assertions? Or are we stating facts when we make moral claims? Is morality more a matter of taste than truth - and if it is a matter of truth, how do we learn about the moral facts? This episode we’ll be introducing you to three meta-ethical views. In Part I, we’ll be discussing naturalism, in Part II, we’ll be looking at intuitionism, in Part III, we’re going to dive into emotivism, and finally, in Part IV, we’ll be engaging in some further analysis and discussion.

Jan 28, 2018
Episode 32, Meta-Ethics (Part I - Naturalism)
52:00

Please visit our Patreon page and show your support! (www.patreon.com/panpsycast) This episode is proudly sponsored by The Partially Examined Life Philosophy Podcast. For information, please visit www.partiallyexaminedlife.com. Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Meta-ethics is the attempt to understand the metaphysical, semantic, epistemological and psychological presuppositions of moral thought. It investigates our ethical language, in search of the meaning that lies behind it. Meta-ethics is concerned with are a broad range of puzzles, for example: What do we mean we make moral claims? Do our preferences or feelings motivate moral assertions? Or are we stating facts when we make moral claims? Is morality more a matter of taste than truth - and if it is a matter of truth, how do we learn about the moral facts? This episode we’ll be introducing you to three meta-ethical views. In Part I, we’ll be discussing naturalism, in Part II, we’ll be looking at intuitionism, in Part III, we’re going to dive into emotivism, and finally, in Part IV, we’ll be engaging in some further analysis and discussion.

Jan 21, 2018
Episode 31, Ludwig Wittgenstein with Prof. Richard Gaskin (Part II - Philosophical Investigations)
01:01:50

This episode is proudly supported by the New College of the Humanities. To find out more about the college and their philosophy programmes, please visit www.nchlondon.ac.uk/panpsycast. Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Ludwig Wittgenstein was an Austrian-British philosopher whose work focused on the philosophy of mathematics, logic, the philosophy of mind, and most notably, the philosophy of language.
Wittgenstein’s influence on the world of philosophy has been phenomenal. The study of philosophy was immensely important to Wittgenstein, not only as an academic discipline but as a form of therapy. In Ludwig’s own words, he describes philosophy as, "the only work that gives me real satisfaction". Wittgenstein’s work can be divided into an early period, exemplified by the Tractatus (our focus for Part I), and a later period, articulated in the Philosophical Investigations (which is our focus for Part II). Early Wittgenstein was concerned with the logical relationship between propositions and the world. He thought that by providing an account of this relationship, he had solved every philosophical problem. The later Wittgenstein rejected many of the assumptions of the Tractatus, arguing that the meaning of words is best understood as their use within a given language-game. Wittgenstein’s life and work are astonishing. His mentor, Bertrand Russell, described him as "the most perfect example I have ever known of genius as traditionally conceived; passionate, profound, intense, and dominating". Part I. The Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus (08:00 in Part I), Part II. The Philosophical Investigations (start of Part II), Part III. Further Analysis and Discussion (45:45 in Part II).

Jan 14, 2018
Episode 31, Ludwig Wittgenstein with Prof. Richard Gaskin (Part I - Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus)
52:27

This episode is proudly supported by the New College of the Humanities. To find out more about the college and their philosophy programmes, please visit www.nchlondon.ac.uk/panpsycast. Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Ludwig Wittgenstein was an Austrian-British philosopher whose work focused on the philosophy of mathematics, logic, the philosophy of mind, and most notably, the philosophy of language.
Wittgenstein’s influence on the world of philosophy has been phenomenal. The study of philosophy was immensely important to Wittgenstein, not only as an academic discipline but as a form of therapy. In Ludwig’s own words, he describes philosophy as, "the only work that gives me real satisfaction". Wittgenstein’s work can be divided into an early period, exemplified by the Tractatus (our focus for Part I), and a later period, articulated in the Philosophical Investigations (which is our focus for Part II). Early Wittgenstein was concerned with the logical relationship between propositions and the world. He thought that by providing an account of this relationship, he had solved every philosophical problem. The later Wittgenstein rejected many of the assumptions of the Tractatus, arguing that the meaning of words is best understood as their use within a given language-game. Wittgenstein’s life and work are astonishing. His mentor, Bertrand Russell, described him as "the most perfect example I have ever known of genius as traditionally conceived; passionate, profound, intense, and dominating". Part I. The Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus (08:00 in Part I), Part II. The Philosophical Investigations (start of Part II), Part III. What can Nietzsche teach us? (45:45 in Part II).

Jan 07, 2018
Episode 30, Friedrich Nietzsche with Mark Linsenmayer and Gregory Sadler (Part II)
50:35

This episode is proudly supported by New College of the Humanities. To find out more about the college and their philosophy programmes, please visit www.nchlondon.ac.uk/panpsycast. Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. The Partially Examined Life: www.partiallyexaminedlife.com. Gregory B. Sadler on YouTube: www.youtube.com/gbisadler. Born in Rocken, in Prussia in 1844, Nietzsche set out his career in philology but later turned to writing idiosyncratic philosophical treatise and collections of aphorisms. He directed these against the pious dogmas of Christianity and traditional philosophy. He saw both as self-serving veils drawn over the harsher realities of life. He felt we needed not a high moral or theological ideals but a deeply critical form of cultural genealogy that would uncover the reasons why we humans are as we are and how we have come to be this way. He believed that every great philosopher actually a kind of involuntary and unconscious memoir rather than conducting an impersonal search for knowledge. Studying our own moral genealogy cannot help us escape or transcend ourselves but it can enable us to see our illusions more clearly and lead a more vital, assertive existence. There is no God in this picture. The human beings who created God have also killed him. It is now up to us alone. The way to live is not to throw ourselves into faith but into our own lives, conducting them in affirmation of every moment, exactly as it without wishing anything was different and without harbouring resentment for others or our fate (Sarah Bakewell, The Existentialist Cafe, p.19-20). Part I. What is the philosophical underpinning of Nietzsche? (36:40 in Part I), Part II. An Introduction to Nietzsche’s Thought (50:00 in Part I), Part III. What can Nietzsche teach us? (00:05 in Part II), Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion. (28:15 in Part II).

Dec 31, 2017
Episode 30, Friedrich Nietzsche with Mark Linsenmayer and Gregory Sadler (Part I)
01:05:56

This episode is proudly supported by New College of the Humanities. To find out more about the college and their philosophy programmes, please visit www.nchlondon.ac.uk/panpsycast. Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. The Partially Examined Life: www.partiallyexaminedlife.com. Gregory B. Sadler on YouTube: www.youtube.com/gbisadler. Born in Rocken, in Prussia in 1844, Nietzsche set out his career in philology but later turned to writing idiosyncratic philosophical treatise and collections of aphorisms. He directed these against the pious dogmas of Christianity and traditional philosophy. He saw both as self-serving veils drawn over the harsher realities of life. He felt we needed not a high moral or theological ideals but a deeply critical form of cultural genealogy that would uncover the reasons why we humans are as we are and how we have come to be this way. He believed that every great philosopher actually a kind of involuntary and unconscious memoir rather than conducting an impersonal search for knowledge. Studying our own moral genealogy cannot help us escape or transcend ourselves but it can enable us to see our illusions more clearly and lead a more vital, assertive existence. There is no God in this picture. The human beings who created God have also killed him. It is now up to us alone. The way to live is not to throw ourselves into faith but into our own lives, conducting them in affirmation of every moment, exactly as it without wishing anything was different and without harbouring resentment for others or our fate (Sarah Bakewell, The Existentialist Cafe, p.19-20). Part I. What is the philosophical underpinning of Nietzsche? (36:40 in Part I), Part II. An Introduction to Nietzsche’s Thought (50:00 in Part I), Part III. What can Nietzsche teach us? (00:05 in Part II), Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion. (28:15 in Part II).

Dec 24, 2017
Episode 29, Stephen Law and 'The Evil-God Challenge' (Part II)
58:04

This episode is proudly supported by New College of the Humanities. To find out more about the college and their philosophy programmes, please visit www.nchlondon.ac.uk/panpsycast. Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Dr Stephen Law is a Reader in philosophy at Heythrop College, University of London, and editor of the Royal Institute of Philosophy journal THINK. Amongst many other books, Stephen Law is the author of A Very Short Introduction to Humanism, The War for Children's Minds, The Philosophy Gym, and Believing Bullshit: How Not to Get Sucked into an Intellectual Black Hole. Stephen Law has debated many Christian philosophers, including William Lane Craig, John Lennox and Alvin Plantinga. Our central focus today is Law’s main argument against the existence of God – 'The Evil-God Challenge'. The evil-god challenge can be stated as follows: why should we consider the hypothesis that there exists a good-god, significantly more reasonable than the hypothesis that there exists an evil-god? Part I. The Evil-God Challenge (start of Part I), Part II. Further Analysis and Discussion (start of Part II).

Dec 17, 2017
Episode 29, Stephen Law and 'The Evil-God Challenge' (Part I)
01:11:28

This episode is proudly supported by New College of the Humanities. To find out more about the college and their philosophy programmes, please visit www.nchlondon.ac.uk/panpsycast. Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Dr Stephen Law is a Reader in philosophy at Heythrop College, University of London, and editor of the Royal Institute of Philosophy journal THINK. Amongst many other books, Stephen Law is the author of A Very Short Introduction to Humanism, The War for Children's Minds, The Philosophy Gym, and Believing Bullshit: How Not to Get Sucked into an Intellectual Black Hole. Stephen Law has debated many Christian philosophers, including William Lane Craig, John Lennox and Alvin Plantinga. Our central focus today is Law’s main argument against the existence of God – 'The Evil-God Challenge'. The evil-god challenge can be stated as follows: why should we consider the hypothesis that there exists a good-god, significantly more reasonable than the hypothesis that there exists an evil-god? Part I. The Evil-God Challenge (start of Part I), Part II. Further Analysis and Discussion (start of Part II).

Dec 10, 2017
Episode 28, Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics (Part IV)
56:02

Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. The Nicomachean Ethics is Aristotle’s (384 – 322 BC) best-known work on ethics. The work consists of ten books and is understood to be based on Aristotle’s lecture notes. These notes were never intended for publication. Sometimes his notes are merely cues to talk more generally about a subject, other times they are more representative of what Aristotle would have actually said to his students. The Nicomachean Ethics is amongst the most discussed texts in history and philosophers continue to debate its contents and intended purposes today.  One cannot deny, however, that Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics is concerned with key political and ethical questions – Questions like, How can we do what is best for citizens? and What is the good life and how do we achieve it? Part I. Aristotle’s Approach and Fundamental Arguments (start of Part I), Part II. Virtue as Excellence (start of Part II), Part III. Book X and Application (start of Part III), Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion (start of Part IV).

Dec 03, 2017
Episode 28, Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics (Part III)
30:12

Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. The Nicomachean Ethics is Aristotle’s (384 – 322 BC) best-known work on ethics. The work consists of ten books and is understood to be based on Aristotle’s lecture notes. These notes were never intended for publication. Sometimes his notes are merely cues to talk more generally about a subject, other times they are more representative of what Aristotle would have actually said to his students. The Nicomachean Ethics is amongst the most discussed texts in history and philosophers continue to debate its contents and intended purposes today.  One cannot deny, however, that Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics is concerned with key political and ethical questions – Questions like, How can we do what is best for citizens? and What is the good life and how do we achieve it? Part I. Aristotle’s Approach and Fundamental Arguments (start of Part I), Part II. Virtue as Excellence (start of Part II), Part III. Book X and Application (start of Part III), Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion (start of Part IV).

Nov 26, 2017
Episode 28, Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics (Part II)
26:31

Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. The Nicomachean Ethics is Aristotle’s (384 – 322 BC) best-known work on ethics. The work consists of ten books and is understood to be based on Aristotle’s lecture notes. These notes were never intended for publication. Sometimes his notes are merely cues to talk more generally about a subject, other times they are more representative of what Aristotle would have actually said to his students. The Nicomachean Ethics is amongst the most discussed texts in history and philosophers continue to debate its contents and intended purposes today.  One cannot deny, however, that Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics is concerned with key political and ethical questions – Questions like, How can we do what is best for citizens? and What is the good life and how do we achieve it? Part I. Aristotle’s Approach and Fundamental Arguments (start of Part I), Part II. Virtue as Excellence (start of Part II), Part III. Book X and Application (start of Part III), Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion (start of Part IV).

Nov 19, 2017
Episode 28, Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics (Part I)
41:13

Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. The Nicomachean Ethics is Aristotle’s (384 – 322 BC) best-known work on ethics. The work consists of ten books and is understood to be based on Aristotle’s lecture notes. These notes were never intended for publication. Sometimes his notes are merely cues to talk more generally about a subject, other times they are more representative of what Aristotle would have actually said to his students. The Nicomachean Ethics is amongst the most discussed texts in history and philosophers continue to debate its contents and intended purposes today.  One cannot deny, however, that Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics is concerned with key political and ethical questions – Questions like, How can we do what is best for citizens? and What is the good life and how do we achieve it? Part I. Aristotle’s Approach and Fundamental Arguments (start of Part I), Part II. Virtue as Excellence (start of Part II), Part III. Book X and Application (start of Part III), Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion (start of Part IV).

Nov 12, 2017
Episode 27, Conscience (Part IV)
45:16

Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Most people understand conscience as something which tells us right from wrong. The conscience is that little voice in your head that tells you to do your homework, go to bed on time and eat 5 a day. In fact, the Oxford Dictionary defines conscience as: “A person's moral sense of right and wrong, viewed as acting as a guide to one's behaviour.” We’re going to be questioning this definition extensively. What is conscience? Where does the conscience come from? Where does the word conscience come from? Is conscience fundamental in its own right, or is it acquired through our development? Does the conscience carry any moral authority, and if so, what should be the function of conscience in ethical decision-making? Is conscience just an illusion? To aid our exploration of these questions, we’re going to be consulting C. S. Lewis’ Studies in Words in Part I, Aquinas’ Summa Theologiae in Part II and Sigmund Freud’s The Ego and the Id in Part III. In Part IV we’ll wrap up the show with some further analysis and discussion and the return of philosophical ultimatum.

Nov 05, 2017
Episode 27, Conscience (Part III - Sigmund Freud)
56:26

Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Most people understand conscience as something which tells us right from wrong. The conscience is that little voice in your head that tells you to do your homework, go to bed on time and eat 5 a day. In fact, the Oxford Dictionary defines conscience as: “A person's moral sense of right and wrong, viewed as acting as a guide to one's behaviour.” We’re going to be questioning this definition extensively. What is conscience? Where does the conscience come from? Where does the word conscience come from? Is conscience fundamental in its own right, or is it acquired through our development? Does the conscience carry any moral authority, and if so, what should be the function of conscience in ethical decision-making? Is conscience just an illusion? To aid our exploration of these questions, we’re going to be consulting C. S. Lewis’ Studies in Words in Part I, Aquinas’ Summa Theologiae in Part II and Sigmund Freud’s The Ego and the Id in Part III. In Part IV we’ll wrap up the show with some further analysis and discussion and the return of philosophical ultimatum.

Oct 29, 2017
Episode 27, Conscience (Part II - Saint Thomas Aquinas)
57:27

Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Most people understand conscience as something which tells us right from wrong. The conscience is that little voice in your head that tells you to do your homework, go to bed on time and eat 5 a day. In fact, the Oxford Dictionary defines conscience as: “A person's moral sense of right and wrong, viewed as acting as a guide to one's behaviour.” We’re going to be questioning this definition extensively. What is conscience? Where does the conscience come from? Where does the word conscience come from? Is conscience fundamental in its own right, or is it acquired through our development? Does the conscience carry any moral authority, and if so, what should be the function of conscience in ethical decision-making? Is conscience just an illusion? To aid our exploration of these questions, we’re going to be consulting C. S. Lewis’ Studies in Words in Part I, Aquinas’ Summa Theologiae in Part II and Sigmund Freud’s The Ego and the Id in Part III. In Part IV we’ll wrap up the show with some further analysis and discussion and the return of philosophical ultimatum.

Oct 22, 2017
Episode 27, Conscience (Part I)
29:07

Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Most people understand conscience as something which tells us right from wrong. The conscience is that little voice in your head that tells you to do your homework, go to bed on time and eat 5 a day. In fact, the Oxford Dictionary defines conscience as: “A person's moral sense of right and wrong, viewed as acting as a guide to one's behaviour.” We’re going to be questioning this definition extensively. What is conscience? Where does the conscience come from? Where does the word conscience come from? Is conscience fundamental in its own right, or is it acquired through our development? Does the conscience carry any moral authority, and if so, what should be the function of conscience in ethical decision-making? Is conscience just an illusion? To aid our exploration of these questions, we’re going to be consulting C. S. Lewis’ Studies in Words in Part I, Aquinas’ Summa Theologiae in Part II and Sigmund Freud’s The Ego and the Id in Part III. In Part IV we’ll wrap up the show with some further analysis and discussion and the return of philosophical ultimatum.

Oct 15, 2017
Episode 26, Karl Marx's Political Philosophy (Part IV)
01:03:10

Website: www.thepanpsycast.com Twitter: www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast Karl Marx is one of the most influential figures in human history. The Prussian-born philosopher, economist, political theorist, sociologist, and revolutionary socialist, produced some of the most controversial and influential works in the past two-hundred years. A champion of human rights for many and a dangerous radical for many others; Karl Marx, the communist, is considered one of the principal architects of modern social science. Regardless of your own points of view, it is hard to deny that Marx's critique of capitalism is relevant today. In January 2017, Oxfam published An Economy for the 99%, which found that the richest 8 men in the world are worth more than the poorest 3.6 billion. In 1848, alongside Friedrich Engels, Marx produced the Manifesto of the Communist Party. In the concluding remarks, Marx writes, "The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win. Working men of all countries, unite!"

Oct 08, 2017
Episode 26, Karl Marx's Political Philosophy (Part III)
32:15

Website: www.thepanpsycast.com Twitter: www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast Karl Marx is one of the most influential figures in human history. The Prussian-born philosopher, economist, political theorist, sociologist, and revolutionary socialist, produced some of the most controversial and influential works in the past two-hundred years. A champion of human rights for many and a dangerous radical for many others; Karl Marx, the communist, is considered one of the principal architects of modern social science. Regardless of your own points of view, it is hard to deny that Marx's critique of capitalism is relevant today. In January 2017, Oxfam published An Economy for the 99%, which found that the richest 8 men in the world are worth more than the poorest 3.6 billion. In 1848, alongside Friedrich Engels, Marx produced the Manifesto of the Communist Party. In the concluding remarks, Marx writes, "The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win. Working men of all countries, unite!"

Oct 01, 2017
Episode 26, Karl Marx's Political Philosophy (Part II)
37:50

Website: www.thepanpsycast.com Twitter: www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast Karl Marx is one of the most influential figures in human history. The Prussian-born philosopher, economist, political theorist, sociologist, and revolutionary socialist, produced some of the most controversial and influential works in the past two-hundred years. A champion of human rights for many and a dangerous radical for many others; Karl Marx, the communist, is considered one of the principal architects of modern social science. Regardless of your own points of view, it is hard to deny that Marx's critique of capitalism is relevant today. In January 2017, Oxfam published An Economy for the 99%, which found that the richest 8 men in the world are worth more than the poorest 3.6 billion. In 1848, alongside Friedrich Engels, Marx produced the Manifesto of the Communist Party. In the concluding remarks, Marx writes, "The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win. Working men of all countries, unite!"

Sep 24, 2017
Episode 26, Karl Marx's Political Philosophy (Part I)
36:20

Website: www.thepanpsycast.com Twitter: www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast Karl Marx is one of the most influential figures in human history. The Prussian-born philosopher, economist, political theorist, sociologist, and revolutionary socialist, produced some of the most controversial and influential works in the past two-hundred years. A champion of human rights for many and a dangerous radical for many others; Karl Marx, the communist, is considered one of the principal architects of modern social science. Regardless of your own points of view, it is hard to deny that Marx's critique of capitalism is relevant today. In January 2017, Oxfam published An Economy for the 99%, which found that the richest 8 men in the world are worth more than the poorest 3.6 billion. In 1848, alongside Friedrich Engels, Marx produced the Manifesto of the Communist Party. In the concluding remarks, Marx writes, "The Communists disdain to conceal their views and aims. They openly declare that their ends can be attained only by the forcible overthrow of all existing social conditions. Let the ruling classes tremble at a Communistic revolution. The proletarians have nothing to lose but their chains. They have a world to win. Working men of all countries, unite!"

Sep 17, 2017
Episode 25, Philip Goff and David Papineau Debate 'Can Science Explain Consciousness?' (Part III)
36:21

Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. In the words of David Chalmers, “The hard problem of consciousness is the problem of experience. When we think and perceive, there is a whir of information-processing, but there is also a subjective aspect. As Nagel has put it, there is something it is like to be a conscious organism. This subjective aspect is experience. When we see, for example, we experience visual sensations: the felt quality of redness, the experience of dark and light, the quality of depth in a visual field. What unites all of these states is that there is something it is like to be in them. All of them are states of experience.” Debating the question, 'Does physicalism address the hard problem of consciousness?' are Philip Goff (www.philipgoffphilosophy.com) and David Papineau (www.DavidPapineau.com).

Sep 10, 2017
Episode 25, Philip Goff and David Papineau Debate 'Can Science Explain Consciousness?' (Part II)
38:31

Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. In the words of David Chalmers, “The hard problem of consciousness is the problem of experience. When we think and perceive, there is a whir of information-processing, but there is also a subjective aspect. As Nagel has put it, there is something it is like to be a conscious organism. This subjective aspect is experience. When we see, for example, we experience visual sensations: the felt quality of redness, the experience of dark and light, the quality of depth in a visual field. What unites all of these states is that there is something it is like to be in them. All of them are states of experience.” Debating the question, 'Does physicalism address the hard problem of consciousness?' are Philip Goff (www.philipgoffphilosophy.com) and David Papineau (www.DavidPapineau.com).

Sep 03, 2017
Episode 25, Philip Goff and David Papineau Debate 'Can Science Explain Consciousness?' (Part I)
01:02:36

Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. In the words of David Chalmers, "The hard problem of consciousness is the problem of experience. When we think and perceive, there is a whir of information-processing, but there is also a subjective aspect. As Nagel has put it, there is something it is like to be a conscious organism. This subjective aspect is experience. When we see, for example, we experience visual sensations: the felt quality of redness, the experience of dark and light, the quality of depth in a visual field. What unites all of these states is that there is something it is like to be in them. All of them are states of experience." Debating the question, 'Does physicalism address the hard problem of consciousness?' are Philip Goff (www.philipgoffphilosophy.com) and David Papineau (www.DavidPapineau.com).

Aug 27, 2017
Episode 24, The A. C. Grayling Interview (Part II)
49:57

Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Philosopher and master of the New College of the Humanities professor A. C. Grayling is considered by many to be amongst the greatest and most influential philosophers of our time. Professor Grayling has published around 40 books in philosophy, history of ideas, human rights and ethics. These include the Refutation of Scepticism, The Future of Moral Values, Wittgenstein, The Meaning of Things, The God Argument and The Age of Genius. Professor Grayling is an exceptional example of someone who has lived the examined life. In this fascinating interview, we ask Professor Grayling about a broad range of philosophical topics. This is a must listen for anyone interested in philosophy. Part I. The Examined Life, Part II. A. C. Grayling: The Philosopher.

Aug 20, 2017
Episode 24, The A. C. Grayling Interview (Part I)
31:04

Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Philosopher and master of the New College of the Humanities professor A. C. Grayling is considered by many to be amongst the greatest and most influential philosophers of our time. Professor Grayling has published around 40 books in philosophy, history of ideas, human rights and ethics. These include the Refutation of Scepticism, The Future of Moral Values, Wittgenstein, The Meaning of Things, The God Argument and The Age of Genius. Professor Grayling is an exceptional example of someone who has lived the examined life. In this fascinating interview, we ask Professor Grayling about a broad range of philosophical topics. This is a must listen for anyone interested in philosophy. Part I. The Examined Life, Part II. A. C. Grayling: The Philosopher.

Aug 13, 2017
Episode 23, John Stuart Mill's Political Philosophy (Part II)
41:40

Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. The following is a quotation from Colin Heydt: Writing of John Stuart Mill a few days after Mill’s death, Henry Sidgwick claimed, “I should say that from about 1860-65 or thereabouts he ruled England in the region of thought as very few men ever did: I do not expect to see anything like it again.” Mill established this rule over English thought through his writings in logic, epistemology, economics, social and political philosophy, ethics, metaphysics, religion, and current affairs. One can say with relative security, looking at the breadth and complexity of his work, that Mill was the greatest nineteenth-century British philosopher. Part I. Utilitarianism (7:30), Part II. On Liberty (17:00), Part III. Subjection of Women (00:05 in Part II), Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion (23:15 in Part II).

Aug 06, 2017
Episode 23, John Stuart Mill's Political Philosophy (Part I)
01:15:33

Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. The following is a quotation from Colin Heydt: Writing of John Stuart Mill a few days after Mill’s death, Henry Sidgwick claimed, “I should say that from about 1860-65 or thereabouts he ruled England in the region of thought as very few men ever did: I do not expect to see anything like it again.” Mill established this rule over English thought through his writings in logic, epistemology, economics, social and political philosophy, ethics, metaphysics, religion, and current affairs. One can say with relative security, looking at the breadth and complexity of his work, that Mill was the greatest nineteenth-century British philosopher. Part I. Utilitarianism (7:30), Part II. On Liberty (17:00), Part III. Subjection of Women (00:05 in Part II), Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion (23:15 in Part II).

Jul 30, 2017
Episode 22, John Locke's Political Philosophy (Part II)
51:41

Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Born in Somerset, England 1632 and died in Essex, at the age of 72 in 1704, John Locke was among the most famous philosophers and political theorists of the 17th century. Locke's main political work, Two Treatise of Government, was published in anonymously in 1689. The First Treatise is a sentence-by-sentence refutation of Robert Filmer's Divine Right of Kings, whilst the Second Treatise outlines Locke's ideas for civilized society based on natural rights and contract theory. Our main focus today is the second treatise of government. Locke begins by describing the state of nature, a picture much more stable than Thomas Hobbes' state of nature that recall, is "war of every man against every man,". Locke argues that all men are created equal in the state of nature by God. He proceeds by explaining the hypothetical rise of property and civilisation, in the process explaining that the only legitimate governments are those consented to by the people. Ultimately for Locke, a government that rules without the consent of the people can ultimately be overthrown. For many, the language of the second treatise of government echoes throughout the declaration of independence. In the words of Thomas Jefferson: "Bacon, Locke and Newton, I consider them as the three greatest men that have ever lived". Part I. State of Nature (19:15), Part II. Property (00:05 in Part II), Part III. Civil Society (15:50 in Part II), Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion (31:40 in Part II).

Jul 23, 2017
Episode 22, John Locke's Political Philosophy (Part I)
43:30

Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Born in Somerset, England 1632 and died in Essex, at the age of 72 in 1704, John Locke was among the most famous philosophers and political theorists of the 17th century. Locke's main political work, Two Treatise of Government, was published in anonymously in 1689. The First Treatise is a sentence-by-sentence refutation of Robert Filmer's Divine Right of Kings, whilst the Second Treatise outlines Locke's ideas for civilized society based on natural rights and contract theory. Our main focus today is the second treatise of government. Locke begins by describing the state of nature, a picture much more stable than Thomas Hobbes' state of nature that recall, is "war of every man against every man,". Locke argues that all men are created equal in the state of nature by God. He proceeds by explaining the hypothetical rise of property and civilisation, in the process explaining that the only legitimate governments are those consented to by the people. Ultimately for Locke, a government that rules without the consent of the people can ultimately be overthrown. For many, the language of the second treatise of government echoes throughout the declaration of independence. In the words of Thomas Jefferson: "Bacon, Locke and Newton, I consider them as the three greatest men that have ever lived". Part I. State of Nature (19:15), Part II. Property (00:05 in Part II), Part III. Civil Society (15:50 in Part II), Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion (31:40 in Part II).

Jul 16, 2017
Episode 21, Thomas Hobbes's Political Philosophy (Part II)
39:18

Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Few political thinkers can be considered as influential as Thomas Hobbes. Published in 1651, Hobbes’s most famous work, the Leviathan (or The Matter, Forme and Power of a Common Wealth Ecclesiasticall and Civil), argues that to leave a hypothetical state of nature, we must sign a social contract and submit ourselves to be ruled by an absolute sovereign. The state of nature is “a war of all against all”. The only rational way out for Hobbes is to establish a strong and undivided government. In this episode we’ll be asking questions like; Who was Hobbes and why is he important? What is human nature? Why do we need government? Part I. Life and Historical Context (03:00), Part II. The State of Nature (13:45), Part III. The Solution (00:10 - in Part II), Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion (18:15 - in Part II). Make sure you’ve subscribed to us on iTunes to get new episodes as and when they’re released! Thank you, we hope you enjoy the episode!

Jul 09, 2017
Episode 21, Thomas Hobbes's Political Philosophy (Part I)
37:13

Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Few political thinkers can be considered as influential as Thomas Hobbes. Published in 1651, Hobbes’s most famous work, the Leviathan (or The Matter, Forme and Power of a Common Wealth Ecclesiasticall and Civil), argues that to leave a hypothetical state of nature, we must sign a social contract and submit ourselves to be ruled by an absolute sovereign. The state of nature is “a war of all against all”. The only rational way out for Hobbes is to establish a strong and undivided government. In this episode we’ll be asking questions like; Who was Hobbes and why is he important? What is human nature? Why do we need government? Part I. Life and Historical Context (03:00), Part II. The State of Nature (13:45), Part III. The Solution (00:10 - in Part II), Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion (18:15 - in Part II). Make sure you’ve subscribed to us on iTunes to get new episodes as and when they’re released! Thank you, we hope you enjoy the episode!

Jul 02, 2017
Episode 20, Plato's Political Philosophy (Part II)
50:18

Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. This episode benchmarks the beginning of our mini-series on political philosophy. Plato provides a strong critique of democracy through his formulation of a utopian city-state. By attempting to find justice in the city, Plato prompts us to question whether or not democracy can promote the common good. In this episode we'll be asking questions like; What is justice? Is democracy worthless? and What can we learn from Plato today? Part I. Socratic Dialogues in Gorgias and The Republic (08:15), Part II. The Republic (31:35), Part III. Real World Application (00:10 - in Part II), Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion (22:40 - in Part II). Make sure you’ve subscribed to us on iTunes to get new episodes as and when they’re released! Thank you, we hope you enjoy the episode!

Jun 25, 2017
Episode 20, Plato's Political Philosophy (Part I)
57:01

Everything you could need is on www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. This episode benchmarks the beginning of our mini-series on political philosophy. Plato provides a strong critique of democracy through his formulation of a utopian city-state. By attempting to find justice in the city, Plato prompts us to question whether or not democracy can promote the common good. In this episode we'll be asking questions like; What is justice? Is democracy worthless? and What can we learn from Plato today? Part I. Socratic Dialogues in Gorgias and The Republic (08:15), Part II. The Republic (31:35), Part III. Real World Application (00:10 - in Part II), Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion (22:40 - in Part II). Make sure you’ve subscribed to us on iTunes to get new episodes as and when they’re released! Thank you, we hope you enjoy the episode!

Jun 18, 2017
Episode 19, Body, Mind and Consciousness (Part II)
38:37

All the reading can be found at www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. For Episode 19, I'm joined by Gregory Miller and Dr Thom Atkinson from the University of Liverpool. As well as introducing the questions and problems surrounding consciousness and mind; we'll be discussing substance dualism, materialism and panpsychism. Part I. Substance Dualism (09:20), Part II. Materialism (33:45), Part III. Panpsychism (00:10 in Part II), Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion (16:40 in Part II). Make sure you’ve subscribed to us on iTunes to get new episodes as and when they’re released! Thank you, we hope you enjoy the episode!

Jun 11, 2017
Episode 19, Body, Mind and Consciousness (Part I)
54:18

All the reading can be found at www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. For Episode 19, I'm joined by Gregory Miller and Dr Thom Atkinson from the University of Liverpool. As well as introducing the questions and problems surrounding consciousness and mind; we'll be discussing substance dualism, materialism and panpsychism. Part I. Substance Dualism (09:20), Part II. Materialism (33:45), Part III. Panpsychism (00:10 in Part II), Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion (16:40 in Part II). Make sure you’ve subscribed to us on iTunes to get new episodes as and when they’re released! Thank you, we hope you enjoy the episode!

Jun 05, 2017
Episode 18, Albert Camus (Part II)
48:48

All the reading can be found at www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Albert Camus (1913-1960) is perhaps the most read philosopher of the 20th century. Camus is generally considered to be the father of absurdism, the idea that life's meaning is beyond our reach and that we should embrace what he called the absurd. Given the extraordinary number of people that have read Camus' work, it is no surprise that he is one of the most romanticised philosophers to have lived. In this two-part special on Camus, we're going to be asking questions like; Who was Albert Camus? Is life worth living? What is the absurd? And How should we deal with the absurd? Part I. The Life of Camus (04:20), Part II. The Absurd (16:40), Part III. Camus' Response to the Absurd (00:10 in Part II), Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion (15:25 in Part II). Make sure you’ve subscribed to us on iTunes to get new episodes as and when they’re released! Thank you, we hope you enjoy the episode!

May 28, 2017
Episode 18, Albert Camus (Part I)
44:04

All the reading can be found at www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Albert Camus (1913-1960) is perhaps the most read philosopher of the 20th century. Camus is generally considered to be the father of absurdism, the idea that life's meaning is beyond our reach and that we should embrace what he called the absurd. Given the extraordinary number of people that have read Camus' work, it is no surprise that he is one of the most romanticised philosophers to have lived. In this two-part special on Camus, we're going to be asking questions like; Who was Albert Camus? Is life worth living? What is the absurd? And How should we deal with the absurd? Part I. The Life of Camus (04:20), Part II. The Absurd (16:40), Part III. Camus' Response to the Absurd (00:10 in Part II), Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion (15:25 in Part II). Make sure you’ve subscribed to us on iTunes to get new episodes as and when they’re released! Thank you, we hope you enjoy the episode!

May 21, 2017
Episode 17, Jean-Paul Sartre (Part II)
01:05:28

All the reading can be found at www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Jean-Paul Sartre (1905-1980) was arguably the most influential philosopher of the 20th century. The quintessential existentialist, Sartre encapsulates the very essence of existentialism through his various philosophical works and plays. Sartre still has much to teach us. Still, Sartre would argue too many people live in Bad faith. They ignore that they are "condemned to be free". Amongst other things, we'll be asking, Why did 50,000 people attend his funeral? Are we condemned to be free? And Are we living in bad faith? Part I. The Life of Sartre (03:35), Part II. "Man is condemned to be free" (18:15), Part III. Bad Faith (00:10 in Part II), Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion (31:40 in Part II). Make sure you’ve subscribed to us on iTunes to get new episodes as and when they’re released! Thank you, we hope you enjoy the episode!

May 14, 2017
Episode 17, Jean-Paul Sartre (Part I)
42:54

All the reading can be found at www.thepanpsycast.com! Please tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Jean-Paul Sartre (1905-1980) was arguably the most influential philosopher of the 20th century. The quintessential existentialist, Sartre encapsulates the very essence of existentialism through his various philosophical works and plays. Sartre still has much to teach us. Still, Sartre would argue too many people live in Bad faith. They ignore that they are "condemned to be free". Amongst other things, we'll be asking, Why did 50,000 people attend his funeral? Are we condemned to be free? And Are we living in bad faith? Part I. The Life of Sartre (03:35), Part II. "Man is condemned to be free" (18:15), Part III. Bad Faith (00:10 in Part II), Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion (31:40 in Part II). Make sure you’ve subscribed to us on iTunes to get new episodes as and when they’re released! Thank you, we hope you enjoy the episode!

May 08, 2017
Episode 16, Søren Kierkegaard (Part III)
31:29

Søren Kierkegaard (1813-1855) was a man who did not consider himself a philosopher but rather a poet. He showed disdain to the rigid academic systems that theology and philosophy were producing during his time, and his writings were often in complete opposition to their way of thinking. For Kierkegaard, the importance of philosophy lay with self-discovery; developing into a true, authentic self. Tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Part I. The Life of Kierkegaard (11:11), Part II. The Basis of Kierkegaard's Philosophy (32:35), Part III. The Three Spheres of Life (00:10 in Part II), Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion (00:10 in Part III). Make sure you’ve subscribed to us on iTunes to get new episodes as and when they’re released! Thank you, we hope you enjoy the episode!

Apr 30, 2017
Episode 16, Søren Kierkegaard (Part II)
58:20

Søren Kierkegaard (1813-1855) was a man who did not consider himself a philosopher but rather a poet. He showed disdain to the rigid academic systems that theology and philosophy were producing during his time, and his writings were often in complete opposition to their way of thinking. For Kierkegaard, the importance of philosophy lay with self-discovery; developing into a true, authentic self. Tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Part I. The Life of Kierkegaard (11:11), Part II. The Basis of Kierkegaard's Philosophy (32:35), Part III. The Three Spheres of Life (00:10 in Part II), Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion (00:10 in Part III). Make sure you’ve subscribed to us on iTunes to get new episodes as and when they’re released! Thank you, we hope you enjoy the episode!

Apr 23, 2017
Episode 16, Søren Kierkegaard (Part I)
01:03:29

Søren Kierkegaard (1813-1855) was a man who did not consider himself a philosopher but rather a poet. He showed disdain to the rigid academic systems that theology and philosophy were producing during his time, and his writings were often in complete opposition to their way of thinking. For Kierkegaard, the importance of philosophy lay with self-discovery; developing into a true, authentic self. Tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Part I. The Life of Kierkegaard (11:11), Part II. The Basis of Kierkegaard's Philosophy (32:35), Part III. The Three Spheres of Life (00:10 in Part II), Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion (00:10 in Part III). Make sure you’ve subscribed to us on iTunes to get new episodes as and when they’re released! Thank you, we hope you enjoy the episode!

Apr 17, 2017
Episode 15, Business Ethics (Part II)
01:04:50

Do corporations have ethical responsibilities? If so, what are they? Is whistleblowing ethical? When are we legally protected to do so? Not only do we have the questions, but this week we have some of the answers! Tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Part I. Corporate Social Responsibility (2:20), Part II. Whistleblowing (28:00), Part III. "Good Ethics Is Good Business" (00:10 in Part II), Part IV. Globalisation, Further Analysis and Discussion (16:45 in Part II). You can find links to all the reading at www.thepanpsycast.com. Make sure you’ve subscribed to us on iTunes to get new episodes as and when they’re released! Thank you, we hope you enjoy the episode! Thank you to Desaparecidos for allowing us to play Slacktivist from their new album Payola. To find out more about the band click here: www.desaparecidosband.com

Apr 09, 2017
Episode 15, Business Ethics (Part I)
52:43

Do corporations have ethical responsibilities? If so, what are they? Is whistleblowing ethical? When are we legally protected to do so? Not only do we have the questions, but this week we have some of the answers! Tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Part I. Corporate Social Responsibility (2:20), Part II. Whistleblowing (28:00), Part III. "Good Ethics Is Good Business" (00:10 in Part II), Part IV. Globalisation, Further Analysis and Discussion (16:45 in Part II). You can find links to all the reading at www.thepanpsycast.com. Make sure you’ve subscribed to us on iTunes to get new episodes as and when they’re released! Thank you, we hope you enjoy the episode!

Apr 01, 2017
Episode 14, Euthanasia (Part II)
47:09

Do we have a right to die? Is it ever okay to end the life of another? Is there a slippery slope? Tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Part I. Types Of Euthanasia (2:45), Part II. Relevant Concepts in Natural Law and Situation Ethics (11:45), Part III. Application in real life cases (00:05 in Part II), Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion (27:00 in Part II). You can find links to all the reading at www.thepanpsycast.com. Make sure you’ve subscribed to us on iTunes to get new episodes as and when they’re released! Thank you, we hope you enjoy the episode!

Mar 25, 2017
Episode 14, Euthanasia (Part I)
48:07

Do we have a right to die? Is it ever okay to end the life of another? Is there a slippery slope? Tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Part I. Types Of Euthanasia (2:45), Part II. Relevant Concepts in Natural Law and Situation Ethics (11:45), Part III. Application in real life cases (00:05 in Part II), Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion (27:00 in Part II). You can find links to all the reading at www.thepanpsycast.com. Make sure you’ve subscribed to us on iTunes to get new episodes as and when they’re released! Thank you, we hope you enjoy the episode!

Mar 19, 2017
Episode 13, Religious Experience (Part III)
43:35

You can find links to all the reading at www.thepanpsycast.com. Make sure you’ve subscribed to us on iTunes to get new episodes as and when they’re released! Thank you, we hope you enjoy the episode! Part I. Mystical Experience (in Part I, 10:35), Part II. Conversion Experience (in Part I, 39:40), Part III. Ways in which individual religious experience can be understood (in Part II, 25:40), Part IV. Criticisms, Analysis and Discussion (start of Part III).

Mar 12, 2017
Episode 13, Religious Experience (Part II)
59:18

You can find links to all the reading at www.thepanpsycast.com. Make sure you’ve subscribed to us on iTunes to get new episodes as and when they’re released! Thank you, we hope you enjoy the episode! Part I. Mystical Experience (in Part I, 10:35), Part II. Conversion Experience (in Part I, 39:40), Part III. Ways in which individual religious experience can be understood (in Part II, 25:40), Part IV. Criticisms, Analysis and Discussion (start of Part III).

Mar 05, 2017
Episode 13, Religious Experience (Part I)
01:03:10

Tweet us your thoughts at www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. You can find links to all the reading at www.thepanpsycast.com. Make sure you’ve subscribed to us on iTunes to get new episodes as and when they’re released! Thank you, we hope you enjoy the episode! Part I. Mystical Experience (in Part I, 10:35), Part II. Conversion Experience (in Part I, 39:40), Part III. Ways in which individual religious experience can be understood (in Part II, 25:40), Part IV. Criticisms, Analysis and Discussion (start of Part III).

Feb 27, 2017
Episode 12, Joseph Fletcher's Situation Ethics (Part II)
49:36

Tweet us your thoughts www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. You can find links to all the reading at www.thepanpsychist.com/panpsycast. Make sure you’ve subscribed to us on iTunes to get new episodes as and when they’re released! Thank you, we hope you enjoy the episode! Part I. Love, Agape and the Six Propositions (in Part I, 5:35), Part II. The Four Presuppositions (in Part I, 46:40), Part III. Application (in Part II), Part IV. Criticisms, Analysis and Discussion (in Part II, 16:35).

Feb 19, 2017
Episode 12, Joseph Fletcher's Situation Ethics (Part I)
01:03:45

Tweet us your thoughts www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. You can find links to all the reading at www.thepanpsychist.com/panpsycast. Make sure you’ve subscribed to us on iTunes to get new episodes as and when they’re released! Thank you, we hope you enjoy the episode! Part I. Love, Agape and the Six Propositions (in Part I, 5:35), Part II. The Four Presuppositions (in Part I, 46:40), Part III. Application (in Part II), Part IV. Criticisms, Analysis and Discussion (in Part II, 16:35).

Feb 13, 2017
Episode 11, Guest Daniel Hill on Plantinga's Reformed Epistemology (Part II)
01:21:45

You can find links to all the reading at www.thepanpsychist.com/panpsycast. Make sure you’ve subscribed to us on iTunes to get new episodes as and when they’re released! Thank you, we hope you enjoy the episode! Part I. Plantinga’s Reformed Epistemology (Episode 11, Part I). Part II. Analysis and discussion (Episode 11, Part II).

Feb 05, 2017
Episode 11, Guest Daniel Hill on Plantinga's Reformed Epistemology (Part I)
44:37

You can find links to all the reading at www.thepanpsychist.com/panpsycast. Make sure you’ve subscribed to us on iTunes to get new episodes as and when they’re released! Thank you, we hope you enjoy the episode! Part I. Plantinga’s Reformed Epistemology (Episode 11, Part I). Part II. Analysis and discussion (Episode 11, Part II).

Jan 30, 2017
Episode 10, the Problem of Evil (Part III)
47:20

You can find links to all the reading at www.thepanpsychist.com/panpsycast. Make sure you’ve subscribed to us on iTunes to get new episodes as and when they’re released! Thank you, we hope you enjoy the episode! Part I. The Problem of Evil (start of Episode 10, (Part I)), Part II. Theodicies (start of Episode 10, (Part II)), Part III. The Free Will Defence (34:00 in Episode 10, (Part II)), Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion (start of Episode 10, (Part III)).

Jan 22, 2017
Episode 10, The Problem of Evil (Part II)
01:11:59

You can find links to all the reading at www.thepanpsychist.com/panpsycast. Make sure you’ve subscribed to us on iTunes to get new episodes as and when they’re released! Thank you, we hope you enjoy the episode! Part I. The Problem of Evil (start of Episode 10, (Part I)), Part II. Theodicies (start of Episode 10, (Part II)), Part III. The Free Will Defence (34:00 in Episode 10, (Part II)), Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion (start of Episode 10, (Part III)).

Jan 15, 2017
Episode 10, The Problem of Evil (Part I)
01:06:20

In this first instalment, we focus on Mackie's logical problem and Rowe's evidential problem. You can find links to all the reading at www.thepanpsychist.com/panpsycast. Make sure you’ve subscribed to us on iTunes to get new episodes as and when they’re released! Thank you, we hope you enjoy the episode! Part I. The Problem of Evil (start of Episode 10, (Part I)), Part II. Theodicies (start of Episode 10, (Part II)), Part III. The Free Will Defence (34:00 in Episode 10, (Part II)), Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion (start of Episode 10, (Part III)).

Jan 08, 2017
Episode 9, The Cosmological Argument (Part II)
34:11

You best get prime moving! Moving house? Visiting a hotel? Returning a book to the library? This is the podcast for you! Tweet us your thoughts www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Part I. St. Thomas Aquinas 5:10, Part II. Leibniz 34:50, Part III. Criticisms of the Cosmological Argument 00:05 (in Part II), Part IV. Further Discussion and Analysis 11:34 (in Part II). You can find links to all the reading at www.thepanpsychist.com/panpsycast. Make sure you’ve subscribed to us on iTunes to get new episodes as and when they’re released! Thank you, we hope you enjoy the episode!

Jan 01, 2017
Episode 9, The Cosmological Argument (Part I)
59:12

You best get prime moving! Moving house? Visiting a hotel? Returning a book to the library? This is the podcast for you! Tweet us your thoughts www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Part I. St. Thomas Aquinas 5:10, Part II. Leibniz 34:50, Part III. Criticisms of the Cosmological Argument 00:05 (in Part II), Part IV. Further Discussion and Analysis 11:34 (in Part II). You can find links to all the reading at www.thepanpsychist.com/panpsycast. Make sure you’ve subscribed to us on iTunes to get new episodes as and when they’re released! Thank you, we hope you enjoy the episode!

Dec 27, 2016
Episode 8, The Teleological Argument (Part II)
45:23

Watch out! It’s Part II/II on the Teleological Argument! Are things that appear to be designed, actually designed? Is the world made for us? Who will win philosophical ultimatum? The file size is large, please be patient whilst the podcast buffers/downloads/proves the existence of God a posteriori. Tweet us your thoughts www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Part I. William Paley (4:45), Part II. St. Thomas Aquinas (51:50), Part III. Other Formulations (00:00 in Part II), Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion (12:06 in Part II). You can find links to all the reading at www.thepanpsychist.com/panpsycast. Make sure you’ve subscribed to us on iTunes to get new episodes as and when they’re released! Thank you, we hope you enjoy the episode!

Dec 19, 2016
Episode 8, The Teleological Argument (Part I)
01:06:19

Watch out! Time’s ticking as the boys go bowling in part one of our wicked awesome super mega two-part special on the teleological argument! The file size is large, please be patient whilst the podcast buffers/downloads/proves the existence of God a posteriori. Tweet us your thoughts www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Part I. William Paley (4:45), Part II. St. Thomas Aquinas (51:50), Part III. Other Formulations (00:00 in Part II), Part IV. Further Analysis and Discussion (12:06 in Part II). You can find links to all the reading at www.thepanpsychist.com/panpsycast. Make sure you’ve subscribed to us on iTunes to get new episodes as and when they’re released! Thank you, we hope you enjoy the episode!

Dec 11, 2016
Episode 7, The Ontological Argument (Part II)
01:10:28

Flying through space on a magic unicorn… eating ice-cream. The file size is large, please be patient whilst the podcast buffers/downloads/proves the existence of God a priori. In this two-part episode, we take an insightful and fun-filled look at St. Anselm of Canterbury and the ontological argument. Tweet us your thoughts www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Part I. Anselm and the Argument (12:00), Part II. Gaunilo and the island (28:15), Part III. General criticisms (00:30 in Part II), Part IV. Further analysis and discussion (28:10 in Part II). You can find links to all the reading at www.thepanpsychist.com/panpsycast. Make sure you’ve subscribed to us on iTunes to get new episodes as and when they’re released! Thank you, we hope you enjoy the episode!

Dec 04, 2016
Episode 7, The Ontological Argument (Part I)
45:02

Flying through space on a magic unicorn… eating ice-cream. The file size is large, please be patient whilst the podcast buffers/downloads/proves the existence of God a priori. In this two-part episode, we take an insightful and fun-filled look at St. Anselm of Canterbury and the ontological argument. Tweet us your thoughts www.twitter.com/thepanpsycast. Part I. Anselm and the Argument (12:00), Part II. Gaunilo and the island (28:15), Part III. General criticisms (00:30 in Part II), Part IV. Further analysis and discussion (28:10 in Part II). You can find links to all the reading at www.thepanpsychist.com/panpsycast. Make sure you’ve subscribed to us on iTunes to get new episodes as and when they’re released! Thank you, we hope you enjoy the episode!

Nov 28, 2016
Episode 6, Kantian Ethics (Part III)
51:21

Kant, Pirates and the fantastic institute that is ‘the Wimpy’… The file size is large, please be patient whilst the podcast buffers/downloads/uncovers a priori moral truths. In this three-part special, we take an insightful and fun-filled look at Kantian Ethics. Follow us on Twitter at www.twitter.com/thepanpsychist. Links to all the reading can be found at www.thepanpsychist.com/panpsycast. Part I.  Duty and the Hypothetical Imperative (in Part I): 11:18, Part II. The Categorical Imperative and its Three Formulations (in Part II): 00:16, Part III. The Three Postulates and Application (in Part II): 27:05, Part IV. Further Discussion and Analysis (in Part III): 00:05. Thank you again for all of your support.

Nov 20, 2016
Episode 6, Kantian Ethics (Part II)
48:11

Kant, Pirates and the fantastic institute that is ‘the Wimpy’… The file size is large, please be patient whilst the podcast buffers/downloads/uncovers a priori moral truths. In this three-part special, we take an insightful and fun-filled look at Kantian Ethics. Follow us on Twitter at www.twitter.com/thepanpsychist. Links to all the reading can be found at www.thepanpsychist.com/panpsycast. Part I.  Duty and the Hypothetical Imperative (in Part I): 11:18, Part II. The Categorical Imperative and its Three Formulations (in Part II): 00:16, Part III. The Three Postulates and Application (in Part II): 27:05, Part IV. Further Discussion and Analysis (in Part III): 00:05. Thank you again for all of your support.

Nov 13, 2016
Episode 6, Kantian Ethics (Part I)
47:34

Kant, Pirates and the fantastic institute that is ‘the Wimpy’… The file size is large, please be patient whilst the podcast buffers/downloads/uncovers a priori moral truths. In this three-part special, we take an insightful and fun-filled look at Kantian Ethics. Follow us on Twitter at www.twitter.com/thepanpsychist. Links to all the reading can be found at www.thepanpsychist.com/panpsycast. Part I.  Duty and the Hypothetical Imperative (in Part I): 11:18, Part II. The Categorical Imperative and its Three Formulations (in Part II): 00:16, Part III. The Three Postulates and Application (in Part II): 27:05, Part IV. Further Discussion and Analysis (in Part III): 00:05. Thank you again for all of your support.

Nov 06, 2016
Episode 5, Utilitarianism (Part III)
48:50

Bentham, Mill and banter… The file size is large, please be patient whilst the podcast buffers/downloads/measures the pleasure and pain it may cause. In this three-part special, we take an insightful and fun-filled look at Utilitarianism. Follow us on Twitter at www.twitter.com/thepanpsychist. Links to all the reading can be found at www.thepanpsychist.com/panpsycast. Part I. Bentham and Utilitarianism (start of EP1) Part II. John Stuart Mill and Utilitarianism (start of EP2), Part III. Preference Utilitarianism (EP2, 43:15), Part IV. Further discussion and analysis (start of EP3). The voices in this episode are owned by Jack Symes, Andrew Horton and Ollie Marley. Thank you again for all of your support.

Oct 29, 2016
Episode 5, Utilitarianism (Part II)
01:12:21

Bentham, Mill and banter… The file size is large, please be patient whilst the podcast buffers/downloads/measures the pleasure and pain it may cause. In this three-part special, we take an insightful and fun-filled look at Utilitarianism. Follow us on Twitter at www.twitter.com/thepanpsychist. Links to all the reading can be found at www.thepanpsychist.com/panpsycast. Part I. Bentham and Utilitarianism (start of EP1) Part II. John Stuart Mill and Utilitarianism (start of EP2), Part III. Preference Utilitarianism (EP2, 43:15), Part IV. Further discussion and analysis (start of EP3). The voices in this episode are owned by Jack Symes, Andrew Horton and Ollie Marley. Thank you again for all of your support.

Oct 23, 2016
Episode 5, Utilitarianism (Part I)
50:01

Bentham, Mill and banter… The file size is large, please be patient whilst the podcast buffers/downloads/measures the pleasure and pain it may cause. In this three-part special, we take an insightful and fun-filled look at Utilitarianism. Follow us on Twitter at www.twitter.com/thepanpsychist. Links to all the reading can be found at www.thepanpsychist.com/panpsycast. Part I. Bentham and Utilitarianism (start of EP1) Part II. John Stuart Mill and Utilitarianism (start of EP2), Part III. Preference Utilitarianism (EP2, 43:15), Part IV. Further discussion and analysis (start of EP3). The voices in this episode are owned by Jack Symes, Andrew Horton and Ollie Marley. Thank you again for all of your support.

Oct 17, 2016
Episode 4, Aquinas' Natural Law (Part II)
54:52

Part II: Masturbation, peasants and pineapples… The file size is large, please be patient whilst the podcast buffers/downloads/becomes one with God. In this two-part special, we take a look at St Thomas Aquinas and natural law. Links to all the reading can be found at www.thepanpsychist.com/panpsycast. Sections: I. Aquinas and Teleology (Part I: 8:55) II. Four Tiers of Law (Part I: 26:10), III. The Precepts (Part I: 43:35), IV. Further discussion and Analysis (Part II: 19:00). The voices in this episode are owned by Jack Symes, Andrew Horton and Ollie Marley. Apologies for the low quality of the audio in sections of this podcast; we had serious production issues with this one. Rather than rerecording the entire episode, we thought it would be best to fix it up to the best of our abilities and distribute it. Thank you again for all of your support.

Sep 21, 2016
Episode 4, Aquinas' Natural Law (Part I)
54:31

Part I: Masturbation, peasants and pineapples… The file size is large, please be patient whilst the podcast buffers/downloads/becomes one with God. In this two-part special, we take a look at St Thomas Aquinas and natural law. Links to all the reading can be found at www.thepanpsychist.com/panpsycast. Sections: I. Aquinas and Teleology (Part I: 8:55) II. Four Tiers of Law (Part I: 26:10), III. The Precepts (Part I: 43:35), IV. Further discussion and Analysis (Part II: 19:00). The voices in this episode are owned by Jack Symes, Andrew Horton and Ollie Marley. Apologies for the low quality of the audio in sections of this podcast; we has serious production issues with this one. Rather than rerecording the entire episode, we thought it would be best to fix it up to the best of our abilities and distribute it. Thank you again for all of your support.

Sep 21, 2016
Episode 3, Dualism and Materialism
01:02:28

Episode 3 - fifty shades of brain scientists. The file size is large, please be patient whilst the podcast buffers/downloads/interacts with physical properties. In this episode, we wrap up our discussion on Plato and Aristotle. We jump forward to some more contemporary philosophy, looking into materialism and dualism. Links to all the reading can be found at www.thepanpsychist.com/panpsycast. Part I. Aristotle and Plato on the Soul (1:22), Part II. Cartesian Dualism (17:40), Part III. Materialism (37:00), Part IV. Further Discussion (53:30).

Aug 24, 2016
Episode 2, Aristotle's Basic Philosophies
01:06:51

Episode 2 - science, plates of coffee and nipples. The file size is large, please be patient whilst the podcast buffers/downloads/fulfils its telos. This episode fulfils the function of tackling Aristotle's basic philosophies. Special thanks to the prime mover for your help in the production of this recording. Links to all the reading can be found at www.thepanpsychist.com/panpsycast. Part I. Aristotle and Teleology (3:30) Part II. The Four Causes (20:15) Part III. The Prime Mover (40:30) Part IV. Aristotle and Plato (54:15).

Aug 06, 2016
Episode 1, Plato's Cave
01:03:13

Episode 1 - caves, slaves and coffee cups. The file size is large, please be patient whilst the podcast buffers/downloads/escapes the cave. This episode has been rerecorded. The original now exists in the realm of the forms. Just kidding, it was terrible. Enjoy the new recording. Links to all the reading can be found at www.thepanpsycast.com. Part I. The Allegory of the Cave (2:00), Part II. The Doctrine of the Forms (17:00), Part III. The reasons and reasoning behind the Cave (28:35), Part IV. Criticisms and Analysis (50:35).

Aug 05, 2016