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Description

1A is home to the national conversation. Joshua Johnson hosts with great guests and frames the best debate in ways to make you think, share and engage.

Episode Date
Ask A Drag Queen
2525
In the last few decades, drag performance has gone from underground entertainment to mainstream television. But drag is not a monolith; performers vary in approach and intent — just watch "RuPaul's Drag Race."

We have a panel of drag queens and kings — Bianca Del Rio, Brigitte Bidet, Lena Lett and Pretty Rik E — to answer your questions.

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1a.
Jun 23, 2018
The News Roundup For June 22, 2018
5298
President Donald Trump signed an executive order to reverse his administration's highly-criticized practice of separating immigrant families at the border.

Trump's moves on immigration drew criticism from world leaders, ranging from Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to the Pope. But one of our panelists suggested that international blowback might have made President Trump more strident in his views, rather than convince him to retool the policy.

All this and more on the Friday News Roundup.
Jun 22, 2018
Finding The Lost World: Can Scientists Bring Back Dinosaurs?
2229
We were so busy thinking about whether we could do a show about dinosaurs, we didn't stop to think about whether we should. Wait ... We did think about it. And we decided we should.

Take a break from the news and spend a few minutes with fascinating scientists who are changing our understanding of these prehistoric animals.

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
Jun 21, 2018
Your Feelings On Family Separations At The Border
2561
One of our goals on 1A is to act as a kind of national mirror — to reflect what's happening and ask what it says about us.

That's a question many Americans have been asking themselves about the Trump Administration's decision to separate families who try to cross the border.

A children's pediatrician who assists with migrant children talked about the long-term effects of toxic stress. An 80-year-old caller from Maine said she was headed to a protest in front of a lawmaker's office.
Jun 20, 2018
The ACLU's Path Of Most Resistance
1853
Membership in the American Civil Liberties Union has quadrupled since the election of President Donald Trump. The organization has filed about 150 lawsuits against the president and his administration and a third of those have been about immigration policy, according to Susan Herman, the ACLU's president.

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
Jun 19, 2018
Is This America's Border Policy?
2176
Nearly 2,000 children have been separated from their parents along the southern border in the past few weeks.

This controversial immigration policy continues to cause outrage among parents, psychologists and concerned citizens.

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1a.
Jun 18, 2018
The News Roundup For June 15, 2018: Live From Salt Lake City
We have a special edition of the Friday News Roundup, live from KUER in Salt Lake City, Utah. We're joined by experts from the Mountain West to go through big questions from this week's news. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
Jun 15, 2018
Rodeo And The Future Of The American West
2016
There are around 650 professional rodeos held each year. It's a symbol of life in the West, but that life is changing with climate change and urbanization. According to the Wright family, a cross-generational rodeo powerhouse from Utah, rodeo is not an anachronism — it's the future of the West. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1a.
Jun 14, 2018
The World Cup: Intrigue, Statecraft And Sports
2081
The World Cup begins in Moscow this week and we found out the U.S. will co-host it in 2026 with Mexico and Canada. More people watch this tournament than any other sporting event.

But FIFA was the subject of a corruption scandal that became public in 2015. How could such a beloved sport involve so much wrongdoing?

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1a.
Jun 13, 2018
'Wait Wait' Host Peter Sagal Has The Most Interesting Life
1763
Peter Sagal has an interesting life. He ran in the Boston Marathon in 2013 and finished minutes before the bombing. He has a writing credit on "Dirty Dancing: Havana Nights" and the Sasquatch horror movie "Savage." And he had dinner with Stormy Daniels in 2005. But we know him as the host of "Wait Wait ... Don't Tell Me!"

We talked with Peter about his life, how Bob Garfield from "On the Media" came up with the name of his show and why "Wait Wait" hasn't made the leap to television, even though they've tried ... three times.
Jun 12, 2018
Bruce Lee: The Life Of An Icon
1964
Bruce Lee's body of work was relatively small, and he died before he experienced widespread fame or recognition. But films like "Enter The Dragon" left a legacy that changed American culture.

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
Jun 11, 2018
The News Roundup For June 8, 2018
5282
Trade news dominated the headlines this week, as world leaders prepared for what could be an "awkward" G-7 summit, as President Trump meets with the leaders of nations stung by U.S. tariffs.

The president had a busy few days of meetings. He talked with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe ahead of next week's summit in Singapore with North Korean leaders.

The week began, though, with primaries in several states as Democrats try to set themselves up to retake the House of Representatives in November.

These are only a few of the stories we got to in this week's News Roundup.

Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast.

Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
Jun 08, 2018
The Legacy Of Kate Spade
2077
Fashion designer Kate Spade set trends for generations of women. Her work was timeless, colorful and fun. Her designs were appropriate for work but never sacrificed a sense of personality.

Spade was also one of only a few prominent women to lead her own line in the male-dominated fashion industry.

Spade was found dead on Tuesday, prompting many fans to talk about their first time buying a Kate Spade design.

We talked about her life and legacy. What made her designs so successful? How will fans remember her? And what are the hurdles for women in the fashion industry?
Jun 07, 2018
Eric Holder On Political Boundaries
1802
Former Attorney General Eric Holder is thinking about boundaries. He's leading an effort to change the way legislative boundaries are drawn. And he's also thinking about the boundaries of his former department, as President Trump's frustrations with current Attorney General Jeff Sessions. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
Jun 06, 2018
Seymour Hersh Reports On A Life In Journalism
2020
In his new book "Reporter: A Memoir," journalist Seymour Hersh covers his life story, with analysis of his profession thrown in. On the latter, he's not very sunny. "Yes, it's a mess," he writes about today's media landscape. "And there is no magic bullet, no savior in sight for the serious media." | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
Jun 05, 2018
The President's Pardon Power And The Law
809
Can the president obstruct justice? Can he pardon himself? A memo and tweet have put new interest on old questions of presidential power. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
Jun 04, 2018
The News Roundup For June 1, 2018
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This week, we learned President Trump asked Attorney General Jeff Sessions to reverse his recusal from the Russian investigation. The president also issued a pardon for conservative commentator Dinesh D'Souza this week. And In trade news, President Trump put tariffs on Canada, Mexico and the European Union Thursday. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1a.
Jun 01, 2018
His Return To Prison Prompts Calls For Sentencing Reform
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Matthew Charles was released early from prison in 2016, after serving 21 years of a 35-year sentence. But on May 14, he was sent back to prison. Federal officials said that Charles shouldn't have qualified for early release, even though he's been incarcerated for almost half his life. Now his case has gone viral — will it make a difference? | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1a.
May 31, 2018
What You Need To Know About #Wherearethechildren In 13 Minutes
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Have you seen the statistic about 1500 missing children? There's a lot of confusion across social media about the status of unaccompanied child migrants, children being separated from their parents, and President Trump's "zero tolerance" policy at the border. We get clarity from Maria Sacchetti, who covers immigration for The Washington Post. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1a and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1a.
May 30, 2018
What Did Big Pharma Executives Know About The Opioid Crisis?
795
More than 115 Americans die every day from opioid overdoses in a drug crisis that's been going on for years. Journalist Barry Meier says it could have been thwarted early on. He alleges that top DOJ officials in the George W. Bush administration refused to support prosecutors who had built a case against the maker of OxyContin. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Find us on Twitter @1a.
May 29, 2018
Take Me On: The Art Of The Cover Song
2965
While taking on another artist's hit can seem like an easy way to please fans, it can also be a risk. When done right, it's a beautiful tribute that can become a hit all its own. When done wrong, it can be the pop equivalent of dancing on a grave. Enjoy this remix of one of our favorite shows. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
May 28, 2018
The News Roundup For May 25, 2018
5475
This week, President Trump canceled a planned summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, the NFL said all athletes and staff must stand for the national anthem if they are on the field and Ireland voted on the repeal of their Eighth Amendment, which bans almost all types of abortion. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
May 24, 2018
The Billion-Dollar Discount Chain: Dollar General And Rural America
1948
There are more than 13,000 Dollar General stores in the United States, which is roughly equal to Starbucks and almost double the number of Walmarts. The chain has found a profitable market outside of cities and in many of these places, Dollar General is the easiest and most affordable store for essential goods. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
May 23, 2018
James Clapper On Russia, North Korea And Life In Intelligence Operations
2074
"I would argue that [Russian meddling in 2016] had profound impact and probably turned the election," former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper said. We talked to him about current events and his new book, which reflects on five decades of his career in intelligence operations. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
May 23, 2018
What Are Those? How Sneakers Conquered America's Feet
2144
Whether you call them sneakers, joggers, or something else (sand shoes?), there's no denying the popularity of athletic footwear. With more than $30 billion in sales a year, it's clear not everyone who buys a fresh pair is playing sports. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
May 22, 2018
Comedy For Social Change
2140
Comedians Hari Kondabolu and Franchesca Ramsey want to make you laugh, but they also want to make you think and take action toward changing the world. Both have new projects: Kondabolu co-hosts a podcast called "Kondabolu Brothers" and Ramsey has a book out now called, "Well, That Escalated Quickly." | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
May 21, 2018
The News Roundup For May 18, 2018
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This week we learned how the crossfire hurricane was born. That's the codename given to the Russia investigation. At the UN, Ambassador Nikki Haley blamed Hamas for violence surrounding the relocation of a U.S. embassy to Jerusalem, before walking out of the meeting as a Palestinian envoy spoke. And Kim Jong Un may walk away from a planned meeting with President Trump. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
May 17, 2018
Paying Attention In The Postpartum Period
2167
When a new baby comes home, there's a lot to pay attention to. So much so that the mother's needs are often overlooked. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
May 16, 2018
Why More Women Are Going For The Big Freeze
2063
There are a lot of reasons a woman may want to delay having children. There are health risks, professional penalties, and many personal considerations. Many women who want to have children but who also want to wait are turning to oocyte cryopreservation, often called egg freezing. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
May 16, 2018
Why Working Motherhood (Still) Affects Wages
1819
America's workforce has more than seventy million women: most of whom have kids at home. And two-out-of-every-five households have working moms as the main or sole breadwinner. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
May 15, 2018
Jada Pinkett Smith Shares The Secrets Of Motherhood
1666
What does it mean to be a mother in the public eye? It means you have a platform and a lot of responsibility, should you choose to use it. Jada Pinkett Smith is using her platform to have a unique, intergenerational conversation with her daughter, Willow, and her mother, Adrienne Banfield-Norris.
May 15, 2018
The Push To Reverse America's Rising Maternal Mortality Rates
2386
A mother giving birth in the U.S. is three times as likely to die as a mother in Britain or Canada. That's largely because of the disproportionate toll on African-American moms. How can we reverse this devastating trend? This episode is part of our weeklong series "Beyond Mother's Day." | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
May 14, 2018
Tyra Banks Takes Her Mama's Advice
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Nobody's perfect. It's a lesson supermodel and entrepreneur Tyra Banks learned early on from her mother, Carolyn London. The pair co-authored a book called "Perfect Is Boring," based on London's advice. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
May 13, 2018
Beyond Mother's Day
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Today's the day we celebrate mothers and reflect on how they touch our lives every other day of the year. Moms are on our mind a lot at 1A, and we're paying homage all week long. Our series "Beyond Mother's Day" starts now, with you. We wanted to hear more about your moms. Here's what you told us.| Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
May 13, 2018
The News Roundup For May 11, 2018
5429
Michael Cohen is under scrutiny for his business endeavors, and three American hostages were released from North Korea. Around the world, America's allies stick with the Iran nuclear deal, and social media takes on Turkey's president with one word: "enough." | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
May 11, 2018
Has America Lost Touch With The Truth?
1255
Michael Hayden thinks America is in danger of losing something precious — our reliance on truth. That's what his new book, "The Assault on Intelligence: American National Security in an Age of Lies," is all about. The four-star general and former leader of both the C.I.A. and the N.S.A. says if we abandon facts, we abandon freedom. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
May 10, 2018
The Story Of The Last Slave ... In First Person
2140
One of the country's greatest writers has a new book out, and it took almost a century to get published. Zora Neale Hurston's "Barracoon" is based on her conversations with Oluale Kossola, the man believed to be one of the last people stolen, shipped and sold into slavery in the U.S. Written in dialect, the publishing world refused to touch the text — until now. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
May 09, 2018
Attitude Of Exactitude: How Precision Made The Modern World
2040
The device you're using to listen to this podcast contains many, many tiny parts, each engineered to a level of precision that is astounding, given that precision engineering is only a couple centuries old. Simon Winchester tracks the advancement of precision engineering, from cannons to computers, in his new book "The Perfectionists." Plus, learn why Rolls-Royce supplied Simon Winchester with cars for more than a decade. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
May 08, 2018
VR: Game Changer
2027
Virtual reality is having a moment, but today's VR is much more than fun and games — it's in the private and public sectors, in healthcare and in education. Jeremy Bailenson has been studying the technology for 20 years. He believes VR has the power to create empathy and change how we see the world. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
May 07, 2018
The News Roundup for May 4, 2018
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This week, the president's legal team changed — as did parts of his story about Stormy Daniels. Also, EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt faced several ethics investigations while his agency was sued by 17 states. Abroad, America's top team headed to China to discuss trade, and questions loomed about the deadline on the Iran nuclear deal. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
May 04, 2018
Meet The Teen Every Journalist Follows
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Gabe Fleisher is helping readers wake up on the right side of the news. The 16-year-old from St. Louis is the creator of "Wake Up To Politics," a daily political newsletter that reaches nearly 50,000 people each morning. His first subscriber? His mom. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
May 03, 2018
Jake Tapper Writes About Capitol Hill Corruption In His First Novel
2024
As host of "The Lead" on CNN, Jake Tapper spends his days bringing attention to some of the biggest political headlines. But Tapper has Washington intrigue on the brain, even when he's not on-air. Tapper talks to us about the inspiration for his foray into fiction — and what he thought about this year's White House Correspondents Dinner. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
May 02, 2018
Big Guns: Fighting Firearms With Funny
1949
What if Congress required all Americans to own a gun? Former Congressman Steve Israel explores the idea in his new dystopian novel, "Big Guns." | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
May 01, 2018
Won't You Be My Neighbor?: Kids' TV, Then And Now
2072
In the U.S., more than 70 percent of kids between two- and eight-years-old watch PBS — specifically PBS Kids. What's it like to run an organization trusted to nurture millions of young minds? We asked the woman in charge. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
Apr 30, 2018
The News Roundup for April 27, 2018
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It's been another week of big stories. Bill Cosby was found guilty on three counts of sexual assault, and allegations against Rear Admiral Ronny Jackson cost him his bid to lead the VA. President Trump hosted Emmanuel Macron in Washington and prepared for the arrival of Angela Merkel. And journalism proved to be an increasingly dangerous business abroad. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
Apr 27, 2018
Archer And Bob: Two Animated Characters, One Voice
1831
H. Jon Benjamin is a successful voice actor — you may know him better as Bob Belcher or Sterling Archer. But his new memoir doesn't celebrate his career wins; it champions his losses. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
Apr 26, 2018
Before You Dial 9-1-1...
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When you see something, you should say something ... Right? The National Emergency Number Association estimates that 240 million calls are made to 9-1-1 in the U.S. each year, for all kinds of reasons, but calling the police isn't a guarantee of a quick or effective response. And when police are dispatched, a situation can unexpectedly escalate. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
Apr 25, 2018
A New National Memorial To Victims Of Lynching
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In the century after the Civil War, more than 4,000 black Americans were lynched. Men, women and children were publicly tortured and killed in acts of mob violence meant to incite fear. This week America's first national lynching museum and memorial opens in Montgomery, Alabama. The Equal Justice Initiative mapped out known accounts of lynching here: lynchinginamerica.eji.org/explore. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
Apr 24, 2018
Ronan Farrow On #MeToo, Diplomacy, And The 'War On Peace'
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Ronan Farrow has been busy lately. His reporting on the Harvey Weinstein scandal last fall earned him a Pulitzer prize. While reporting those stories, he was also writing a book on the State Department. It's a political history, and a personal one. Farrow worked there before turning to journalism. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
Apr 23, 2018
1A Movie Club Sees 'Come Sunday'
1983
Based on a real story featured in This American Life, 'Come Sunday' is a new movie about an evangelical pastor whose struggle with his own faith costs him his ministry. Ira Glass joins the 1A Movie Club to review 'Come Sunday,' spoilers and all. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
Apr 22, 2018
The News Roundup For April 20, 2018
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This was a week that called for more than one News Roundup. Today we discuss a Southwest pilot's courageous emergency landing, and how Starbucks is now in the hot seat over racial profiling. Overseas, Cuba is now Castro-less and the British Prime Minister faces a storm of protest over the "Windrush" generation. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
Apr 20, 2018
Where To Start With End-Of-Life Decisions
Modern medicine can be good at keeping us alive longer, but what about improving the days we have left? Barbara Bush's decision to seek "comfort care" resonated with many who are dealing with end-of-life choices. We consider the limits of modern medicine with one passionate advocate — Diane Rehm. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
Apr 19, 2018
The Midweek News Roundup
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Keeping up with the headlines can feel like a decathlon. So far this week: James Comey called out the man who fired him, the President contradicted his U.N. Ambassador over new sanctions on Russia and a courtroom drama gave up new secrets and turned into a media circus. There's too much to leave until Friday, so today we bring you the first-ever midweek news roundup. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
Apr 18, 2018
The Letter Of The Day Is 'S': Sesame Street, An Avenue For Social Good
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It's been a year since Sesame Street introduced Julia, its first character with autism. She is just one way that Sesame Street is helping little kids identify with grown-up issues. Today, we ask what it takes to create children's programming that's socially conscious while still being entertaining. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
Apr 17, 2018
A Manifesto For A More Humane World
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Activists Jeremy Heimans and Henry Timms have noticed that as the world changes, the idea of power is shifting, especially with the proliferation of social media. Who is seizing this power, and what kind of leader is best to take on this new world? Their book "New Power" explains. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
Apr 16, 2018
Spring Special: The Birds
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One hundred years ago, Congress passed a law to protect migratory birds — but our feathered friends could be in danger after a Trump administration decision limited the law's effectiveness. We discuss why one of America's oldest environmental laws now faces a new legal battle, and what this could mean for the birds — and the environment. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
Apr 14, 2018
Spring Special: The Bees
2024
A taste of honey. A mouthful of fraud. Pure honey is getting harder to come by and nearly a third of the nation's bee colonies have disappeared since 2006. So how is the honey business as sweet as ever? | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
Apr 14, 2018
The News Roundup For April 13, 2018
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What a week for news. President Trump's personal attorney is under investigation, Mark Zuckerberg testifies in Washington, and Tammy Duckworth and her newborn daughter make history in the Senate. Abroad, the President has put Syria and Russia on notice after last week's chemical attack. The question now being asked around the world is — what happens next?
Apr 13, 2018
1A Spaces Out With The Crew Of The International Space Station
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The International Space Station is turning 20. It's a living monument to rocket science and global collaboration, so we wanted to ask what it's like to live in space. Who better than two astronauts on board the ISS right now? | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
Apr 12, 2018
On Syria: Madeleine Albright Responds
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After this weekend's suspected chemical attack near Damascus, much of the world expects a U.S. led military response in Syria. The President and his advisers are still figuring out their next move, but former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright has some ideas. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
Apr 11, 2018
Is A Middle Finger A Matter Of Free Speech?
964
You've probably seen the photo of Juli Briskman flipping off the president's motorcade from a bicycle. That stunt — and the viral photo it produced — got Juli fired last year. Now she's suing her former employer, arguing that whatever hand signals she makes when she's out cycling are her business. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
Apr 10, 2018
Beyond The Blue Fur With Frank Oz
1893
If you've heard Grover, Bert, Miss Piggy, Fozzie, Animal or Yoda, then you know Frank Oz's voice. He was the creative force behind many of The Muppets and he's in a new documentary about working with Jim Henson, the mastermind behind them and many more beloved characters. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
Apr 09, 2018
The News Roundup For April 6, 2018
5217
It was a turbulent week for tech companies. President Trump made Amazon his new target on Twitter and Mark Zuckerberg plans to testify before Congress. In Syria, should we stay? Or should we go? Also this week, China retaliates with threats of more tariffs and, in Brazil, a former — but popular —president loses his long battle to avoid jail. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
Apr 06, 2018
The Confidence Code For Girls
2123
Feeling confident is key to being happy and achieving success, but all too often as girls grow up, their self-esteem goes down. How do we empower young women to worry less about pleasing others? We'll put that question to two authors and two confident young women — a 17-year-old boxer and a fifth-grade Girl Scout. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
Apr 05, 2018
Who Is Continuing Dr. King's Fight Against Poverty?
2090
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. said equality was not just about race — it was also about poverty. Dr. King was in Memphis advocating for the poor when he was killed 50 years ago. Today we talk to four people who have taken up Dr. King's fight for equality. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org or find us on Twitter @1a.
Apr 04, 2018
Make America 'Normal' Again
1871
"Experts in authoritarianism advise to keep a list of things subtly changing around you, so you'll remember." That's at the top of every list activist Amy Siskind has published since the 2016 election. Her lists of cultural and political changes went viral, and we talked to her about tracking "normalcy" and her new book. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Apr 03, 2018
Excellence, Explained
2136
For decades Tom Peters has been telling anyone who'll listen to put people first — and millions have. He's written one of America's best-selling books on business called "In Search of Excellence." His newest book, "The Excellence Dividend," updates those recommendations for the 21st century. Spoiler alert: things aren't as different in 2018 as you might imagine. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org and find us on Twitter @1a.
Apr 02, 2018
The News Roundup For March 30, 2018
5401
President Trump is looking to fill vacancies — while creating more. He's in search of a lawyer and now a doctor after promoting Rear Adm. Ronny Jackson to lead the VA. Across the Pacific, a mystery train heads from Pyongyang to Beijing, Malala returns home to Pakistan and Brits count down the days to Brexit. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org
Mar 30, 2018
We Need To Talk About YouTube
1995
YouTube has come a long way from Charlie biting his brother's finger. Now, billions of people watch its content and the platform has the power to influence, amuse, astound and, at times, horrify. For more on this topic, you definitely want to click this link: wamu.fm/2E2uaL6. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Mar 29, 2018
Freestyling With August Greene
2664
August Greene is the new collaboration from Common, Robert Glasper and Karriem Riggins. Many great bands get their start in a garage — very few get theirs at the White House. The trio blends jazz and hip-hop — a mix of styles from rap star Common, jazz pianist Robert Glasper and drummer Karriem Riggins. Their first song won an Emmy. Now they're freestyling with Joshua Johnson. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Mar 28, 2018
A Former President, A Person Of Faith
2119
Jimmy Carter is 93 and still going strong. Three years ago, he faced a deadly diagnosis and started saying his goodbyes. After treatment, he announced he was cancer free — opening a new chapter for America's 39th president. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Mar 27, 2018
Missing From #MeToo — Sex Workers
2162
The #MeToo movement has upended a status quo that tolerated sexual assault and harassment at work. So how is #MeToo changing the sex worker industry? Sexual harassment is hard to fight in many workplaces ... especially where sex is part of the business. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Mar 26, 2018
Taking Down Confederate Statues Was The First Step
2144
In preparation for New Orleans' 300th anniversary, Mayor Mitch Landrieu is confronting the racism that has shaped our nation. In his new memoir, he chronicles his path toward removing Confederate monuments in his city — and implores the rest of America to reckon with its past, too. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Mar 24, 2018
The News Roundup
Take a deep breath ... and get caught up. At the White House, H. R. McMaster is out and John Bolton is in. Mark Zuckerberg has apologized and Marlon Bundo has topped the charts. Facebook's privacy scandal reaches across the Atlantic and despite an all-caps warning, President Trump congratulated Putin on his electoral win — while Britain's foreign minister compares the Russian president to Hitler at the Berlin Olympics. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Mar 23, 2018
Reduce, Reuse, Rethink: Remaking Recycling
2131
Two-thirds of Americans have recycling bins in their homes and according to the EPA, just over a third of Americans' trash is recycled. But is recycling the best option? | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Mar 22, 2018
How Do You Run The DNC?
2077
It's been a year since Tom Perez took charge of a party at its lowest point in decades. What's the mood like now? We ask him, and get the latest on superdelegates, Nancy Pelosi's future and why Dems are done with the "off year."
Mar 22, 2018
What's On Your Mind, Facebook User?
2120
Facebook data has been used in elections before, but never like this. Cambridge Analytica consulted for the Trump campaign, but now lawmakers in the U.S. and the U.K. want to know how it grabbed more than 50 million Facebook profiles — monitoring and manipulating millions of voters before the 2016 election. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Mar 20, 2018
President Trump Vs. The FBI
1802
The president spent the weekend attacking special counsel Robert Mueller, former FBI director James Comey and his former — now fired — deputy. Donald Trump and many of his supporters are convinced he's the victim of a witch hunt, but some are concerned he's seriously considering firing former FBI director Robert Mueller. Could the president be setting the stage for an end to the special counsel's probe? | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Mar 19, 2018
The News Roundup
5320
If you were sum up this week in a word? Try breathless. President Trump ousted another cabinet member — his Secretary of State, Rex Tillerson — and another Democrat claimed a special election victory in a heavily Republican district. Abroad, Russia is being blamed for releasing a deadly toxin that left two people in critical condition and for meddling in America's last presidential election. Angela Merkel was elected to a fourth term as Germany's chancellor and tributes poured in for theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking, who died at 76. | Want to support 1A? Give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A and subscribe to our podcast. Have questions? Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Mar 16, 2018
How Prepared Is The World For A Major Epidemic?
2061
The Ebola epidemic didn't cause the end of the world, but are we ready to stop whatever comes next? Journalist Reid Wilson says world health officials learned a lot from that crisis, though he doubts we're prepared for the next one. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Mar 15, 2018
The Liberal Case For Nationalism
2032
Around the world, democracies seem to be under threat from nationalist strongmen. Writer and political scientist Yascha Mounk has a theory about what's going on, and explains why he thinks liberal nationalism is the answer. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Mar 14, 2018
The Mogul President
1981
Donald Trump promised to run government like a business, but a year into his presidency, we're still not clear how his own business really works. Is the promise to separate the work of the Trump Organization and the Trump White House being kept? | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Mar 13, 2018
In Conversation: Ambassador Susan Rice
1778
Ambassador Susan Rice believes America is a global force for good, but she questions whether the Trump Administration agrees. Ambassador Rice's tenure has been historic, and it earned her no small amount of criticism from conservatives, including the president. She gives us her take on America First, the future of diplomacy, and what it takes to be a good ambassador. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Mar 12, 2018
'Leaving Liberal Bubble': Sarah Silverman On 1A
2052
Sarah Silverman's never been afraid of "going there." She's been a lightning rod for joking about taboos, but Silverman's changing course. Her new show seeks common ground with people of different backgrounds and viewpoints — at a time when it's easier than ever to stay in our bubbles.
Mar 10, 2018
The News Roundup
5221
It was a stormy week at the White House — Gary Cohn resigned, Stormy Daniels sued, and Kellyanne Conway violated the Hatch Act. In other domestic news, Florida lawmakers passed new gun restrictions and the West Virginia teachers strike ended after nearly two weeks of no school. Abroad, North Korea announced a plan to meet with the U.S. to achieve permanent denuclearization, an ex-Russian spy was poisoned with a nerve agent in the UK, and a Belgian criminal court convicted a man of "sexism in the public space."
Mar 09, 2018
Why Softball Isn't Baseball: Getting Girls In The Game
1749
For thousands of female athletes whose sport of choice is baseball, there are few professional options. A female player in Major League Baseball still remains the stuff of Hollywood fantasy. But women and girls are pushing back, saying softball just isn't good enough. We talk to the first girl to pitch a shut-out in a Little League World Series — she's also one of the youngest athletes ever on the cover of Sports Illustrated.
Mar 08, 2018
1A Movie Club Rewind: "Get Out"
1941
Producer and director Jordan Peele has a lot to say — but he admits it took him a while to say it. His movie "Get Out" is more than just an Oscar winner, it's a conversation-changer. The movie came out last year, but we really wanted to talk about it. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Mar 07, 2018
Where Does Hollywood Go From Here?
760
Actress Frances McDormand delivered a stirring speech at the 90th Academy Awards that ended in one surprising zinger: "I have two words to leave with you tonight, ladies and gentlemen — inclusion rider." But what is an inclusion rider? And can it help address gender inequity? | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Mar 06, 2018
U-God Pod
2027
The Wu-Tang Clan was more than a rap group, and it forever changed the life of Lamont Hawkins — aka U-God — one of its founding members. He reflects on what it's like to make it big when you haven't quite left your former life behind. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Mar 05, 2018
The News Roundup
5284
It's been another full week of news. As debates over gun legislation pressed on, Dick's Sporting Goods and Walmart made rules of their own. Another high-level White House staffer resigned, and another wanted to splurge on expensive office furniture. President Putin says Russia now has an invincible nuclear missile while the U.N's ceasefire in Syria proves nearly useless. | Have thoughts on the show? Give us feedback at npr.org/podcastsurvey. Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1A@wamu.org.
Mar 02, 2018
On Clearance: Must Kushner Go?
2160
Chief of Staff John Kelly has rolled back Jared Kushner's security clearance. What impact might that have on keeping America's secrets – secret? | Have thoughts on our show? Give us feedback at npr.org/podcastsurvey. Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1A@wamu.org.
Mar 01, 2018
All There Is, Is This ... Bill Murray
1439
Few actors are as funny or as versatile as Bill Murray, but what happens when you pair him with a world-renowned cellist? His latest project blends his comedy with something a little more ... classical. | Have thoughts on our show? Give us feedback at npr.org/podcastsurvey. Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1A@wamu.org.
Feb 28, 2018
The Republican Party's "Racism Problem"
1810
Michael Steele made history when he became the first African-American chair of the Republican National Convention in 2009. Now he's pushing back after one conservative spokesman said Steele got that job simply because he was black. Does the GOP have a racism problem? | Hear something you don't like? Something you love? Give us feedback at npr.org/podcastsurvey. Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1A@wamu.org.
Feb 27, 2018
The Lost Tapes: Malcolm X
1934
Malcolm X had a lot to say, but there's so much we never heard. New archives from the Smithsonian are teaching us more about the man who demanded freedom and equality by any means necessary. | Have thoughts on our show? Give us feedback at npr.org/podcastsurvey. Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1A@wamu.org.
Feb 26, 2018
The News Roundup
5358
In the U.S., we're still talking about the shooting at a Florida high school last week and the students fighting for policy change. The president took the stage at CPAC today, so what did he say? Around the world, humanitarian groups say they've simply run out of words to describe the horror being inflicted by the Syrian government on one rebel-held suburb and the White House announces new sanctions on North Korea. | Hear something you don't like? Something you love? Give us feedback at npr.org/podcastsurvey. Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1A@wamu.org
Feb 23, 2018
1A Live From CPAC
1907
Donald Trump flirted with the idea of running for office for decades, but he first made his intentions clear seven years ago at CPAC, the Conservative Political Action Conference. Now he's back as President, alongside the nation's top conservative leaders and speakers. This episode of 1A comes to you from the floor of the convention. | Hear something you don't like? Something you love? Give us feedback at npr.org/podcastsurvey. Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1A@wamu.org.
Feb 22, 2018
Remembering Reverend Billy Graham
785
From humble beginnings in North Carolina, Billy Graham became an ordained minister whose name is synonymous with American evangelical Christianity. Graham passed away Wednesday at 99 years old. We discussed his powerful and divisive legacy in religion and popular culture. | Want to help us improve? Give us feedback at npr.org/podcastsurvey. Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Feb 21, 2018
"The Future of Humanity" with Michio Kaku
2015
One of the world's most famous physicists, Michio Kaku, says the next 20 years are going to get really weird — from talking wallpaper to toilets that read our proteins. Is he right? | Want to help us improve? Share your thoughts at npr.org/podcastsurvey. Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Feb 20, 2018
How Do You Teach Slavery?
2079
Slavery played a major role in America's development, but a new study shows students don't know much about it. One recent textbook referred to enslaved people as 'workers' ... which suggests some schools still struggle to teach this topic. It's hard history, but is there an easy fix? And what's at stake if it's not figured out? | Want to help us improve? Share your thoughts at npr.org/podcastsurvey. Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Feb 19, 2018
Policing The Police
1883
Baltimore has a problem with cops and robbers — some of the cops are robbers, too. The latest scandal exposed officers acting like a gang, stealing hundreds of thousands of dollars from citizens and keeping the cash. Former Baltimore police officer Michael Wood joins the conversation to talk crime and corruption in Charm City. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Feb 17, 2018
The News Roundup
5204
It's infrastructure week ... remember? 1A wraps up this week's news with the latest from Florida. The discussion over DACA continues and Americans are winning — sometimes — at the Olympics. Across the Atlantic, South Africa's President Jacob Zuma resigned, Zimbabwe lost a man of conscience and courage and the future for Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu came under more scrutiny. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Feb 16, 2018
Приве́т, 2018: Protecting America's Next Elections
2195
U.S. intelligence leaders have warned that the Russians are already meddling in the upcoming midterms. Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats told a congressional committee that Russia and other foreign entities were likely to attack U.S. and European elections this year; adding Moscow believes similar efforts successfully undermined U.S. democracy two years ago. Securing elections will take work from the government, Silicon Valley and citizens. What does that work look like? | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Feb 15, 2018
Steven Pinker Looks At The Bright Side
2070
There are plenty of reasons to despair: increased partisanship, a warming planet, the Doomsday Clock's recent tick closer to midnight. But Steven Pinker is one person making the argument that not only are times not as bad as they appear, but we've in fact, never had it quite so good. He even says he has the data that prove it. His new book "Enlightenment Now" makes the case that the world is improving, and that it can improve further if we embrace the right principles. What principles does he mean? Is he on to something or will he be left hugging those principles on his own this Valentine's Day? | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Feb 14, 2018
#MeToo's Next Step
2052
Where is the #metoo movement headed? In just the last few months, untold numbers of women have spoken up about sexual harassment at work. This profound cultural shift is raising some concerns about keeping abusers accountable and maintaining due process. Does #metoo have further to go — or does it sometimes go too far? | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Feb 13, 2018
The Courts Draw The Line For Gerrymandering
2286
It's easy to see when a legislative map is gerrymandered. But what should an improved map look like? Lawmakers in Pennsylvania are under a court order to figure that out and two U.S. Supreme Court cases could answer this question nationwide. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Feb 12, 2018
The News Roundup
3948
It has been a week of ups and downs. Starting Monday, the Dow fell a lot, then rose a little, then fell a lot and generally could not make up its mind. Democrats agreed to a budget bill with no DACA deal — despite Nancy Pelosi's hours long speech in support of DACA ... and President Trump wants a military parade. Internationally, the Winter Olympics have begun, while things in Syria deteriorated even further, with allegations of Russian and Syrian forces using chlorine gas against Syrian civilians. And Poland's government makes it illegal to blame the Polish for any part of the Holocaust. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Feb 09, 2018
How Astrology Hangs On
2067
Astrology has been around for thousands of years, but it seems to be having a moment right now. Perhaps technology has a new generation looking to the sky charts. Whether it's a source of comfort, entertainment or enlightenment, astrology is still bringing meaning to millions. Join us as we meet two professional astrologers and a reporter who covers it. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Feb 08, 2018
Black Women's Political Power And The Savior Syndrome
2133
America loves its superheroes. But in real life, some say black women bear great power — and an unfair amount of responsibility. Black women have been showing up for generations to confront everything from systemic racism to the gender pay gap. So how is the nation showing up for them? | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Feb 07, 2018
Can We Trust Polls?
2141
Pollsters have gotten a lot wrong lately and, after the 2016 election, our trust in polling plummeted. So how does political polling work? And can you really trust any of it? We asked three professional poll-watchers and creators what they think. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Feb 06, 2018
Why You Don't Hear Much About Sickle Cell Anymore
2110
Sickle cell disease affects about 100,000 Americans — most of whom are black. Patients and their families say the search for treatments is slow, underfunded and ineffective. For the first time in decades, the FDA approved a new sickle cell drug, so why aren't things getting better? | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Feb 05, 2018
The News Roundup
5140
The state of the union is ... busy. Why would President Trump release classified information over the objections of the Justice Department and the FBI? (Of course the memo was released just AFTER we taped this episode...) Kenyans watch their TVs go blank as confusion grows over who is president. And who will inherit the flatpack fortune? IKEA's founder leaves behind a huge legacy — and a few confusing instructions. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Feb 02, 2018
Melania Trump, Trailblazer
1647
Being First Lady is a job with no pay, no clear description and massive expectations. First Lady Melania Trump's silence, compared with her predecessors, speaks volumes. But is anyone getting the right message? | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Feb 01, 2018
Are Supplements Nutritional Nonsense?
2157
Vitamins and dietary supplements are a $37 billion business. Joshua Johnson takes them ... maybe you do, too. How do you know what's actually in that bottle? Does it even work? We hear from a skeptic, a lobbyist and a cancer researcher. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Jan 31, 2018
The Way We Work
2041
One in every five jobs in America is held by a contract or freelance worker. Within a decade, those positions could easily make up more than half of the U.S. workforce. We look at how the gig economy has grown and what the decline of full-time work means for Americans. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Jan 30, 2018
A Crisis In Community Health
1830
Roughly 27 million low-income Americans rely on Community Health Centers. The deal that ended the government shutdown did not include more funding for these centers — and many are already running out of money. Where else can people go for care? | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Jan 29, 2018
Black Lightning Brings The Thunder
1660
Jefferson Pierce had left his life as Black Lightning behind, but when his family finds themselves targeted by the 100 Gang he's forced back into his crime-fighting superhero role. So begins this new iteration of Black Lightning, and we speak with the show's co-creator Salim Akil to learn what it's like to create a culturally specific character with crossover appeal while doing "black on purpose."
Jan 27, 2018
The News Roundup
4302
This week has certainly given us news cycle whiplash. Domestically, we learned of President Trump's desire to fire Robert Mueller, witnessed a government shutdown and near immediate reopening, and heard the powerful testimony of many U.S. Olympic gymnasts as they detailed the sexual abuses they suffered at the hands of Dr. Larry Nassar. On the international front, Syria found itself on the defensive after Turkish troops invaded the north as Damascus called America's plan for an open-ended military presence in Syria "a devastating mistake." Catch up on all of this and more on The News Roundup. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Jan 26, 2018
'I Am Not A Tractor!' Inside Farmworkers' Fight For Fair Treatment
1536
Think of the fast food you've eaten in your life. How many tomatoes have you had? If the answer is "more than one" it's likely your meal was influenced by the Coalition of Immokalee Workers. Over the last 25 years, they've fought against unfair wages and dangerous and abusive working conditions. And while they've had some surprising successes — convincing a handful of fast food chains and grocers to rethink their tomato buying — they're still protesting today. And they're bringing the fight to the Wendy's restaurant chain, and to a plate near you.
Jan 25, 2018
Grammys Preview: How 'God's Calling' Led Jimmy Carter To Grammy Greatness
1261
When Blind Boys of Alabama member Jimmy Carter was a kid, he would pray to God for one thing. Sight. Instead, Mr. Carter found himself at an Alabama school for blind children in the Jim Crow south. But light would find a way into his life through the power of his voice — he's a founding member of the multiple Grammy Award-winning gospel group The Blind Boys of Alabama. Mr. Carter, now in his 80s, is up for yet another Grammy on Sunday, for the song "Let My Mother Live," off the album "Almost Home."
Jan 24, 2018
Have We Ever Had It So Good? Kai Ryssdal Weighs In
705
These are good times for the American economy. Unemployment is down, the stock market is up and more new homes are being built. But how does this affect you? Well, that depends on who you are. Marketplace's Kai Ryssdal breaks down what makes a healthy economy. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Jan 23, 2018
What You Need To Know To Run For Office
2125
They say decisions are made by those who show up, and this year, more Americans are deciding to do just that by running for office. This episode brings you a nonpartisan primer on how to run, and maybe even win. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Jan 22, 2018
Take Me On: The Art Of The Cover Song
2877
What makes a great cover song? We talked to Ray Padgett and Amanda Petrusich about the greatest covers, what makes them work, and why some should have just never been made. Get ready to hear many of your favorite covers in this episode and if you want more, check out our Spotify playlist at the1a.org. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Jan 20, 2018
The News Roundup
5241
Congress is dealing with a host of issues — sometimes at odds with the president, sometimes at odds with itself. And what about that plan to avoid a government shutdown? Overseas, two rivals are uniting under one flag. The Pope gets a warm reception in Chile and it looks like American troops will stay in Syria for a while longer. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Jan 19, 2018
A Bizarre Truth Triangle: The President, The Public And The Press
2046
The Founding Fathers considered a free press so important they protected it in the Constitution, but some in President Trump's own party think his attacks have gone too far. As he continues to denounce news outlets as "Fake News," the American people's faith in the media keeps dropping. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Jan 18, 2018
A Sign Of Change Coming To The Korean Peninsula?
782
When athletes march out at the opening ceremony of next month's Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, North and South Koreans will do so under a single flag. Many hope this signals a thaw in tensions between the two nations — and with the U.S. But others are not so optimistic. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Jan 17, 2018
Elegies And Effigies
2065
Who speaks for Appalachia? It's been called Trump Country, coal country and backcountry. But it's our country. We look at what it means to be Appalachian and why a region of more than 25 million people across 13 states and hundreds of counties can't have one spokesperson — like, for instance, J.D. Vance, author of "Hillbilly Elegy." | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Jan 16, 2018
The Personal Toll Of Civil Rights Activism
2139
The fight for civil rights has always been hard work, taking a toll on the mind and the body. The struggle continues today, 50 years on from the death of Dr. Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. Hear from some of these new activists — and the losses they endured in the course of their fight. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Jan 16, 2018
The News Roundup
5095
This is the week many news organizations — us included — said s***hole. But other things happened, too. There may be a deal on DACA and mudslides became California's latest natural disaster. North Korea met with South Korea and the French President has a plan for #fakenews. Catch up on all of it with the Friday News Roundup. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Jan 13, 2018
The Flu Goes Viral
2105
America's emergency rooms are filling up. The CDC says flu hospitalizations have doubled in just one week and this season's strain has already killed dozens. It's bad, but are we prepared for it to get worse? | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Jan 11, 2018
Who's Looking Out For America's Poorest Children?
1707
For kids born into poverty, getting out of it isn't easy. So what can be done? We talk to an economist behind a new proposal for so-called baby bonds — giving money to all kids when they're born that's held in escrow until they turn 18. It's a radical proposal for the United States, but it's been tried in other countries. Would it work here? And what is happening with a program already in place to help low-income kids? Funding for CHIP, the Children's Health Insurance Program, is rapidly running dry. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Jan 10, 2018
Octopod: Inside The Amazing World Of The Octopus
2000
Some facts about octopuses: they're venomous, they taste with their skin, they use tools, they can solve puzzles, Aristotle thought they were dumb, Jacques Costeau thought they were smart, they can leave water for minutes at a time and they're good hunters, in or out of water. We dive into the mind of an octopus with writers and researchers. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Jan 10, 2018
How The Super-Rich Stay Rich
1868
As journalists dug through the Panama Papers, they uncovered a major secret for how the super-rich hide their money ... art. More than half of all art sales are private. Many of them are secret. We hear how tax-free warehouses around the world are used to hide billions.| Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Jan 08, 2018
The News Roundup
5154
We're one week into 2018 and already had too much to discuss in the Friday News Roundup. In the capital, there were presidential tweets on Pakistan, Iran and North Korea and a new tell-all book on the White House. In Utah, a longtime senator is retiring and in Virginia, they picked a new representative from ... a bowl. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Jan 05, 2018
So ... About Socialism
2079
The democratic socialist movement is growing fast, fueled by people in their 20s and 30s and due in part to Senator Bernie Sanders' 2016 presidential bid. But what exactly is socialism? This is the last in a series of listener-requested topics. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Jan 05, 2018
More People, More Problems?
2036
Fifty years ago, the bestselling book "The Population Bomb" inspired governments to consider population controls. The book's dire predictions thankfully have not yet happened, but are we still on the brink of disaster? Or maybe the Earth can handle more than we think. This is the second in a series of listener-requested topics. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Jan 03, 2018
Rated PG: The Profoundly Gifted
2160
Are profoundly gifted people a rarity? Or do many of them just fly under the radar? Stories about geniuses seem to fascinate us, but what is life really like if you are exceptionally smart? This is the first in a series of listener-requested topics. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Jan 02, 2018
What's On Tap For 2018?
5393
It's 2018 and we know there are some stories sure to shape the year. From the midterm elections to the next chapter of the Russia probe to what's next for big tech companies, we discuss what stories we'll be watching in the new year. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Jan 02, 2018
The 2017 News Roundup
5537
We like to call it the year of the news alert. From the start of the Trump presidency to the "Me Too" movement and new tax reform, our phones never stopped buzzing ... even internationally. There was a war of words between the U.S. and North Korea, America's exit from the Paris climate accord, and pretty much everything Russia did, big and small. We recapped all of it. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Dec 29, 2017
The Psychological Effects Of Signing Off Social Media
1817
The internet is an open space to express your opinions, but things can get ugly, fast. Some people dislike the bickering and the trolling on social media so much that they just... quit. What happens when you ditch social media? Some say better mental health. Others say you'll miss out on too much. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Dec 28, 2017
The New Tax Law And Your Financial Future
2746
Forget the politics behind the new tax law, we looked at what will it mean for your personal finances. A panel of experts tackled listener questions about how the new law affects families and small businesses, college students and property owners — and everyone in between. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Dec 27, 2017
Months After María
2122
When the skies cleared in Puerto Rico after Hurricane María, the island was left devastated and in near-complete darkness. As the news cycle has largely moved on from the plight of Puerto Rico, Americans on the island find themselves in increasingly dire straits as they struggle to survive and rebuild their communities. How bad are things in Puerto Rico and what is the federal government doing to help? | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Dec 26, 2017
Josh Ritter's Journey From Small Town To Folk Hero
1223
You can still hear Josh Ritter's rural roots in the stories his lyrics weave. His newest album, "Gathering," continues a tradition of creating Americana for a rapidly changing America. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Dec 25, 2017
The News Roundup
5346
This was a week of sharp words and legislative celebrations. In the U.S., President Trump signed the $1.5 trillion tax overhaul, and after a recount, a Virginia election could come down to a coin toss. U.S. Ambassador Nikki Haley says the US is taking note of countries criticizing America's policies on Israel, and North Korea is accused of one of the biggest cyber attacks in history. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Dec 23, 2017
The 1A Movie Club Sees Star Wars
2044
The saga continues. Star Wars: Episode Eight did well opening weekend, but some critics say it left a bit to be desired. The 1A Movie Club reviews Star Wars, Episode Eight: The Last Jedi — SPOILERS INCLUDED. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Dec 23, 2017
The Best Podcasts For Holiday Travel
1175
Listening to podcasts doesn't have to be a solo activity, and these days, with more podcasts than we know what to do with, choosing what to listen to can be a chore. Lauren Ober, the host of NPR's "The Big Listen," shares some of the shows she thinks are perfect for the whole family. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Dec 21, 2017
Blocks, Bans And Blame: Social Media Reckons With Itself
2091
Is 2017 the year of reckoning for social media? With rising concerns over the effect these platforms have on our culture, social media companies are removing more content and banning more users. We talked about what the social networks — and governments around the world — plan to do about it. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Dec 20, 2017
Inside America's Chemical Arms Race
2057
At the height of World War I, the U.S. scrambled to build a chemical weapons program to match Germany's. The Army developed (and tested) these weapons in the nation's capital, and some drums remain buried beneath the city's neighborhoods. Check out candid photos from the chemical weapons facilities in Washington and a video of our guest Erik Olson discussing some of his favorites on our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/the1ashow. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Dec 19, 2017
Get Out: Nurturing A Bond Between Black People And Nature
2169
Is nature a white people thing? It can certainly seem so. A 2011 National Park Service survey found that just 7 percent of all park system visitors were black. But there is a growing effort to change that. For more on this topic go to the1a.org. | Want to support 1A? Subscribe to our podcast and give to your local public radio station at donate.npr.org/1A. Email the show at 1a@wamu.org.
Dec 18, 2017
70 Years And Counting
1685
"Meet The Press" has hosted 12 presidents, 82 heads of state, and nearly every major journalist of the last seven decades. Host Chuck Todd and Executive Producer John Reiss talk about what has changed over the last 70 years, and where "Meet The Press" is going next. For more on this topic, visit the1a.org.
Dec 17, 2017
The News Roundup
4319
It's been another week of big stories —now, it's time to catch up. Roy Moore was set to ride all the way to Washington this week, but his horse only got him so far, pressure grows on special counsel Robert Mueller and more women speak out about President Trump's past behavior. Plus, the fallout over President Trump's decision to officially recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, and a look at the next chapter of leadership in South Africa.
Dec 16, 2017
The Fox And The Mouse
804
A big media merger is coming: Disney announced a deal to buy much of 21st Century Fox for $52.4 billion. The deal will give Disney command over Fox's regional sports channels as well as its cable entertainment brands FX and National Geographic. So what does this mean for you (and your streaming habits)? For more on this topic, visit the1a.org.
Dec 14, 2017
Don't Invite These Guys To Your Holiday Party
1670
Rico Gagliano and Brendan Francis Newnam want you to know that dinner parties are NOT a thing of the past. And they have a lot of thoughts on brunch. Newnam and Gagliano co-hosted "The Dinner Party Download" radio show and wrote a new book called "Brunch Is Hell: How To Save The World By Throwing A Dinner Party." They share a few dinner party guidelines for hosts and guests and reminisce about some favorite moments from their long-running show.
Dec 13, 2017
Yes, And... How Improv Remade Comedy
2084
Author Sam Wasson says improv is one of the most important creations of American culture, and it has overtaken jazz as America's most popular original art form. How did improv make the leap from comedy clubs to a cultural milestone, and where is it headed next? We get the story — and plenty of laughs.
Dec 12, 2017
WWJD? Evangelicals In Alabama
1991
What happens when personal faith becomes public policy? The politics of evangelical Christians are front and center in Alabama as voters prepare to go to the polls this week. The Roy Moore campaign is just one of many issues that have evangelical Christians split — sometimes along lines of age and race. We asked a few evangelicals what happens when you mix religion and politics. One guest's answer? Politics.
Dec 12, 2017
The News Roundup
5225
There's a lot to catch up on this week. Republicans have turned up the heat on special counsel Robert Mueller and the #MeToo movement continues to blaze on. But there's a real fire threatening thousands living near Los Angeles. Also, hear the latest from the Middle East as the fallout continues over President Trump's decision to officially recognize Jerusalem as Israel's capital. Elsewhere in the world Russia is preparing for an election and Brexit negotiations are making headlines.
Dec 08, 2017
Where Are We In The Russia Investigation?
883
Today we catch up on the Russia investigation as new allegations swirl around Former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn. A whistleblower claims Flynn was exchanging text messages about a deal with Russia minutes after President Trump's inauguration. And for more Russia news — and why the Winter Olympics might be a little less competitive next year — go to the1a.org and check back for the Friday News Roundup, in your podcast feed tomorrow.
Dec 07, 2017
How Addressing Dyslexia Helps All Students
2263
In the U.S., one out of every five kids has trouble reading. This is often because of dyslexia. Federal law says public schools have to provide help, but too many schools deny students proper treatment. One solution seems simple: improve the way all children learn to read.
Dec 06, 2017
An FCC Commissioner Makes The Case For Net Neutrality
1963
Here's what we did. We sat down with a current Federal Communications Commission commissioner as well as a critic of the FCC's move to repeal net neutrality. Then we opened our phone lines and let listeners ask the questions. The FCC has been reversing and revising many regulations, and the national conversation about net neutrality is heating up. While some argue repealing net neutrality gives internet service providers too much power over consumer content, others say it's not only good for consumers, but good for business.
Dec 05, 2017
A State Department In Disarray?
2111
While U.S. Secretary of State, Rex Tillerson, downplays rumors that the White House plans to replace him, the idea of a potential shake-up at the U.S. Department of State has raised concerns. With many positions remaining unfilled, and those with experience leaving, we get a read on the strength of the State Department under Trump's administration and consider if the department is equipped to handle today's global conflicts – most importantly, the escalating crisis with North Korea.
Dec 04, 2017
The 1A Movie Club Sees Coco
1969
Some call Pixar's latest animated feature Coco "a love letter to Mexico." The movie is a commercial and cultural hit. Get the 1A Movie Club's take on this story about Mexico's Day of the Dead and hear from the film's co-director Adrian Molina.
Dec 02, 2017
The News Roundup
5071
This week, some of President Trump's tweets made headlines, time is running out for Congress to pass legislation before the end of the year, and America's Ambassador to the United Nations says North Korea's latest missile launch brings the world closer to war. And it's been a mixed week for relations between the United States and the United Kingdom.
Dec 01, 2017
College And Bust: Why So Many Students Don't Stay The Course
786
College completion rates vary widely, but one thing sticks out: they're nowhere near as high as they should be. In 2009, President Obama set a goal of having the United States be the nation with the highest proportion of college graduates in the world. Today, the U.S. hasn't even cracked the top ten of countries with 25-34 year-olds that hold an associate degree or higher. We discuss why this is the case and what can be done to fix it.
Nov 30, 2017
Statehouses And Sexual Harassment
1996
The nation is focusing on sexual harassment as it never has before, and how we respond to these allegations is undergoing a change in almost every profession. But what about in your state capital? Every state has different requirements for sexual harassment training, and each legislature handles accusations differently. Some have used tax payer dollars to pay settlements to victims of sexual harassment experienced in the halls of the legislature. We'll look at what it will take to make statehouses safer work environments and get more women into politics.
Nov 29, 2017
#distracted: Phones In Class
2265
Prying a smartphone out of a teenager's hands can be nearly impossible, even in school. For many teachers, this tech addiction is a constant fight. And often, it's the parents who make it harder to keep order. Should classrooms be cellphone-free? Is that even possible?
Nov 28, 2017
The Congressional Countdown
Lawmakers' end-of-year wish lists are packed with a new tax plan, repeal and replace, the DREAM Act and more. But with just a few weeks of 2017 left, what will Congress focus on, and what might actually pass?
Nov 28, 2017
Can You Guess? 50 Things That Made The Modern Economy
1862
Whether it's the barcode or IKEA's Billy bookcase, new ideas have shaped our modern economy for better and worse. An ordinary idea can have extraordinary consequences. Economist Tim Harford explains a few of the inventions that shaped today's economy.
Nov 24, 2017
Capitalism: From The Mayflower To Tesla (Rebroadcast)
1995
To know where our economy might be going, it pays to know where it's been. From the days of telegraphs and railroads to the 21st-century tech revolution, U.S. businesses have often been at the forefront of innovation. Entrepreneur Bhu Srinivasan documents some of these stories in his book "Americana: A 400-Year History of American Capitalism."
Nov 23, 2017
Postcard From Puerto Rico
1172
As most Americans sit down to Thanksgiving dinner this year, millions of their fellow citizens in Puerto Rico will still be in the dark. Power has yet to reach more than half the population after Hurricane Maria wiped out the electric grid months ago. And a CNN investigation casts doubt on the storm's official death toll — could it be nine times what the government has reported? And how is recovery progressing three months after the devastating storm?
Nov 22, 2017
Protecting Elephants: Trophy Kills, Sport Hunting And The Trump Administration
1865
The African elephant is a threatened species, a status that motivated President Obama to ban sport-hunted elephant trophies from entering the U.S. Under the Trump administration, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife service has moved to rescind the ban, citing the benefits of hunting to conservation. Some 80,000 elephants live in Zimbabwe, and the country's elephant management program has been a success. But the ensuing public outcry at the announcement led President Trump to halt the move and ask for further review. While there are still many restrictions on legal game hunting, the conversation among sport hunters, conservationists, and those who fall in the middle continues.
Nov 21, 2017
It's So Hard To Be Grateful
1918
This has been a tumultuous, chaotic and emotional year. Between politics and natural disasters, many Americans are struggling to remember reasons to be grateful. But hopefully the year hasn't been all bad. As many of us prepare to sit around dinner tables with our families and express thankfulness, we discuss gratitude — what it means, how it benefits us and how complaining can actually make you more thankful.
Nov 20, 2017
A Museum Of The Bible
1802
Where can you learn about the Bible — without going to church? A new museum opened Friday near Washington's National Mall. Its founders say they want the world to see the Bible in a new light but others question the authenticity and origin of some of the artifacts on display. The 1A team got a preview of the exhibits.
Nov 17, 2017
The News Roundup
5408
More women came forward this week with allegations of sexual misconduct against Senate candidate Roy Moore. The reputation of Republicans rides on their ability to pass a new tax reform bill that looks more like a takedown of the Affordable Care Act. Zimbabwe's military has placed President Robert Mugabe under house arrest. A huge far-right nationalist march disrupted an annual independence celebration in Poland. And Australia voted to legalize same-sex marriage. Joining us to discuss the week's domestic news is Ron Elving, senior editor and correspondent for NPR; Eliana Johnson, White House reporter for Politico; and Jonathan Capehart, Pulitzer Prize-winning opinion writer at The Washington Post. Our guests for the international hour are Demetri Sevastopulo, Washington bureau chief for the Financial Times; Indira Lakshmanan, Washington columnist for The Boston Globe; and Scott Tong, a correspondent for Marketplace.
Nov 17, 2017
Beyond the Lens: An Intimate Portrait of President Obama
2064
Pete Souza spent eight years photographing President Barack Obama during his most public and intimately private moments. He captured many of the most iconic moments of President Obama's White House, and Souza joins us to offer a glimpse of the man he came to know beyond the camera's lens.
Nov 16, 2017
Can We Stop Hazing?
2391
Greek life at American colleges is under scrutiny again. Ten more fraternity brothers have been charged in a hazing-related death at Penn State. Meanwhile, Florida State University has suspended all fraternities and sororities after a 20-year-old pledge was found dead. But can anything stop these traditions?
Nov 15, 2017
We've Been Had: How Fake News, Hoaxes And Bunk Became Embedded In American Life
1989
Kevin Young – writer, professor and poetry editor of The New Yorker – discusses his latest book, "Bunk: The Rise of Hoaxes, Humbug, Plagiarists, Phonies, Post-Facts and Fake News". From spiritualism to Rachel Dolezal, forged manuscripts to fake news, Young takes us on a deep dive into the mistruths and sleights of hand that have shaped our national identity.
Nov 14, 2017
On Roy Moore, From Alabama
836
As more women have emerged accusing Roy Moore of sexual misconduct on minors, one as young as 14 years old, more GOP establishment leaders are speaking up. Moore calls the story "fake news." But what do the Alabama voters think of the allegations? How is the controversy affecting the election, set for Dec. 12?
Nov 13, 2017
A Tom Hanks Type
2426
The sound of a typewriter evokes a feeling of nostalgia, just as the name Tom Hanks evokes the highest level of Hollywood celebrity. The two-time Academy Award winner collects vintage writing machines and pays homage to this passion in his first book, "Uncommon Type." The collection of short fiction has elements of Hanks' life peppered throughout, including being a child of divorce and his experience living next to a difficult neighbor.
Nov 11, 2017
The News Roundup
5369
This week, Democrats made political gains across the country with a slate of diverse candidates elected into office, the country mourned those murdered in Sutherland, Texas, and new sexual harassment revelations against Louis C.K. and Roy Moore rocked the entertainment industry and the political landscape. Also, President Trump in Asia, Saudi Arabian princes in prison, and offshore tax shelters in light of the Paradise Papers.
Nov 11, 2017
We Woke Up Like This: 366 Days Later
2558
Last year, many awoke to a staggering surprise. Despite the polls, Donald Trump had won the presidential election. While not everyone agrees on what propelled him to victory, most agree that things have not been the same since he won. This isn't a replay of the election or a questioning of the results. Rather, with a year of hindsight, we look at what drove the Trump campaign to victory, and what's changed in the year since we woke up to the results.
Nov 09, 2017
A History Of Domestic Violence
2165
A personal dispute can quickly become a public nightmare, especially when guns are involved. The man who killed 26 people in a church in Texas had been convicted of domestic abuse and statistically, more than half of America's mass shootings involve a perpetrator who was violent toward a partner or relative. What is the link between domestic violence and mass shootings? If you are in a violent relationship and need help, the domestic violence hotline is 1−800−799−7233 or go to thehotline.org.
Nov 08, 2017
Mass Shootings – The Price Of Living In America?
2194
It's become an all-too familiar scenario: a mass shooting leaves several people dead, thoughts and prayers are requested and given, debates over gun control and mental health bubble up then ... nothing changes, and the cycle repeats. Are mass shootings the price we pay to live in the United States? If so, how do we protect ourselves? If not, how do we change it?
Nov 07, 2017
Why Do We Struggle With Money?
1989
It can be tough to make clear-headed choices when it comes to spending our cool hard cash. Whether it's a credit card or the money we spend on vacation, how we think about dollars and cents is often wrong — and it costs us more than we know. Why is that, and what can you do to fix it?
Nov 06, 2017
National Parks ... For A Price
1853
America's national parks are treasured territory, to say the least. But how much are you willing to pay? Entry fees at some of the most visited parks could go up during the 2018 peak season — as high as $70 per car. National parks are popular places, with some breaking attendance records in 2016. So what's behind the proposed increase? And who could be left out?
Nov 05, 2017
The News Roundup
4859
This week on the News Roundup: terror in New York, chaos on Capitol Hill and more allegations of sexual harassment - in Hollywood, New York and the NPR newsroom. Also, we'll consider President Trump's impending trip to Asia and look at a newly released cache of Osama Bin Laden's files (which included porn, audiobooks and the video game Final Fantasy VII). Discussing domestic news is Shane Harris of the Wall Street Journal, Gail Delaughter of Houston Public Media, Mary Louise Kelly of NPR and Ben Reiter of Sports Illustrated. Discussing international news is Shawn Donnan of the Financial Times, Nancy Youssef of the Wall Street Journal and Peter Bergen, CNN national security analyst.
Nov 03, 2017
Did Social Media Swing The Election?
2385
Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg once said it was a "pretty crazy idea" that the social network he created might have influenced the 2016 presidential election. The idea suddenly doesn't seem that crazy, considering the scope of Russian activity online around the election. Facebook, Google and Twitter representatives were called before Congress to explain how their technology may have been misused. What answers did the tech giants provide? And must Congress act to protect Americans from liking, tweeting and searching themselves into uncharted territory?
Nov 02, 2017
Plastics, Plastics, Everywhere ... Even In Your Drink
1610
Plastic is unavoidable. It's in the device you're reading this on and possibly even sewn into the clothes you're wearing. Plastic is also in most of world's drinking water, which means it's also in you, according to a new study. So what can you do?
Nov 01, 2017
Jewish Comedy: A Serious History
2017
What makes a joke Jewish? Each line tells a much bigger story. And whether we're reading the Book of Esther or binge-watching Larry David — we've been laughing for centuries. Jeremy Dauber on his new book "Jewish Comedy: a Serious History."
Oct 31, 2017
Who's Watching Wall Street?
2098
You know that fine print on your cell phone bill or credit card statement? After the 2008 financial crash, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau was created to rein in bad practices. Critics say it does more harm than good and now Congress has thrown out a rule allowing customers to band together to take on the big banks. So what does that mean for accountability?
Oct 30, 2017
The News Roundup
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GOP infighting ramps up, as outgoing Senators Bob Corker and Jeff Flake took aim at President Trump. Reports confirmed that Democratic operatives had helped pay for the now-infamous dossier on President Trump. Xi Jinping officially began his second five-year term as China's president. And in Kenya, boycotts and deadly violence erupt over a controversial "do-over" election. Joining us to discuss domestic news are Eugene Scott, political reporter for The Washington Post; Lauren Fox, Congressional reporter for CNN, and Olivier Knox, chief Washington correspondent for Yahoo! News. And for international news we have Yochi Dreazen, foreign editor for Vox; Susan Glasser, chief international affairs columnist for Politico; and Edward Luce, chief U.S. columnist and commentator for the Financial Times.
Oct 27, 2017
OMG, GOP
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Some moments in American politics take a while to understand. But the fight within the Republican party is changing things right now. For many, this battle is more about character than it is about values. Republican Senators Jeff Flake, John McCain, Bob Corker and former President George W. Bush have all been outspoken about the shift in their party's tone and style under President Donald Trump. Is the GOP in the midst of a civil war, or a forgettable skirmish?
Oct 26, 2017
Store No More: A Retail Reality Check
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Malls are emptying out. Since 2001, department stores have lost 18 times more workers than coal mines have. Some of the biggest names are selling their prime real estate. Others are reinventing their consumer strategies to stay competitive with online sellers. Can brick-and-mortar retail return?
Oct 25, 2017
The Democratic Playbook
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Have the Democrats figured out how to do more than resist? The party has had almost a year to heal from last year's election, and critics say voters still need to know what the party is for — not just who it's against. Meanwhile, important battles lie ahead in Minnesota, Alabama, Virginia and elsewhere.
Oct 24, 2017
The Purple Podcast
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Prince shaped the music world, especially in his home base of Minneapolis. But how did Minneapolis shape Prince? This time, we come to you from the studios of Minnesota Public Radio, where we talked to artists who were close to Prince — and even rocked out with him — and we explore what makes "The Minneapolis Sound."
Oct 23, 2017
The News Roundup
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In this edition of the News Roundup we'll ask what President Trump said – or didn't say – to the widow of a veteran killed in Niger. Plus the president's travel ban hits another road block. Also, ISIS is driven out of its de facto capital in Syria, Iraq takes back territory lost to the Kurds and Malta is in turmoil after a car bomb killed a reporter who helped expose corruption. Two panels of journalists join Joshua Johnson for analysis of the week's top news stories. Discussing domestic news is conservative commentator Charlie Sykes, Ruth Marcus of the Washington Post and Greg Ip of the Wall Street Journal. Discussing international news is Ann Applebaum of the Washington Post, Tom Bowman of NPR and Rosiland Jordan of Al Jazeera English.
Oct 20, 2017
Gloria Anzaldúa And The Book That Changed The Borders
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What is it like to live on the border, literally and culturally? The US-Mexico border has always been political. Thirty years ago, Chicana feminist Gloria Anzaldúa, helped make it cultural...even mythological, with the publication of her book "Borderlands La Frontera: The New Mestiza". It opened the eyes of many within the United States to cultures the nation barely recognized. The legacy of Gloria Anzaldúa is discussed on 1A.
Oct 19, 2017
The Human Story Of Our Genes
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We now know more about where we come from than ever before. Rapid advances in the science of genetics have unraveled our genes to show our collective human history. Our DNA can only tell us so much about who we are as individuals. It has much more to say about us as a species: who we are, where we've been, and even where we're headed in the future. Geneticist Adam Rutherford joins 1A to discuss his book, "A Brief History of Everyone Who Ever Lived: The Human Story Retold Through Our Genes."
Oct 18, 2017
Fighting Poverty And Fixing Capitalism
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In this episode, we get two perspectives on poverty. We talk to the CEO of the World Bank about her outlook for the world's poorest people. Then, the professor who won the Nobel Peace Prize for inventing a system that gave small amounts of money to poor people, has a plan to fix capitalism.
Oct 17, 2017
Breaking Cultures Of Silence On Sexual Harassment
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From being a bystander to taking a stand. As the Harvey Weinstein scandal continues to unfold, is too much of the conversation about women need to do? What can men do to improve the workplace for everyone? We discussed this topic last week, too. You can find that conversation by searching "harassment" at the1a.org.
Oct 16, 2017
The News Roundup
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The biggest news stories this week included two executive orders from President Trump that take a bite out of the Affordable Care Act. Congress is moving forward on spending $36.5 billion on disaster relief following severe hurricanes and wildfires. And the clock is ticking on President Trump's decision on the Iran nuclear deal. Joining us to discuss national news are Reid Wilson, national correspondent for The Hill; Abby Phillip, national political reporter for The Washington Post; and David Rennie, Washington bureau chief for The Economist. And for the international hour we have James Kitfield, senior fellow at the Center for the Study of the Presidency and Congress; Jennifer Williams, deputy foreign editor for Vox; and Simon Marks, president and chief correspondent of Feature Story News.
Oct 13, 2017
CNN's Jake Tapper
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Reporters don't have to dig that much to know what the president thinks of them — just look at his Twitter account. CNN host and chief Washington correspondent Jake Tapper hasn't been shy about firing back. There's no shortage of criticism of CNN's near-constant coverage of the president. So how does Tapper balance being in the middle, with the president saying his work is fake, others saying it's excessive and millions relying on it every day?
Oct 13, 2017
How A Superpower Sets Its Agenda
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Every five years, China chooses its new leaders behind closed doors. Next week, the ruling Chinese Communist party holds its 19th congress. It, rather than the Chinese people, determines who gets to lead the party and the country. How does that work? Who will emerge as the person to run the world's second biggest economy? And what does that mean for us?
Oct 13, 2017
A Russian In Exile Continues Opposing President Putin
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While President Putin was celebrating his 65th birthday, Russian investigators raided the homes of at least five people working for Mikhail Khodorkovsky, an exiled oligarch who ran the country's Yukos oil empire before being jailed on charges most observers believe were politically motivated. Now freed and living in exile — Khordorkovsky discusses Russia's relationship with the U.S. Then, a view of Russia today from Pulitzer Prize-winning author William Taubman.
Oct 11, 2017
The Politics Of Periods
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At any given time, about 800 million people around the world are menstruating. For many of them, that's a problem. Activists and entrepreneurs are working to make sure all women have easy access to sanitary products, which is likely to affect everything from education to career opportunities, and of course, women's overall health. We discuss with Jennifer Weiss-Wolf, a lawyer and author of "Periods Gone Public: Taking a Stand for Menstrual Equity," Marni Sommer, an associate professor of Sociomedical Sciences at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and executive director of Grow and Know, a non-profit that develops puberty books for girls and boys in poor countries, and with New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker, who co-sponsored a bill to increase access to menstrual products for incarcerated woman.
Oct 10, 2017
Do Guns Make Us Safer?
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Sales are up at some gun stores after the mass shooting in Las Vegas. But does being armed make you safer? The NRA says crime is less likely around armed citizens. Critics say more guns means more gun violence. So are gun owners buying a reliable means of defense — or a false sense of security? Joining us to discuss it are John Donohue, a law professor at Stanford, Kris Brown, co-president of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, John Lott, president of the Crime Prevention Research Center, Porochista Khakpour, author of "Why Did Nancy Lanza Love Guns?" for Slate and Suzanna Hupp, author of the book "From Luby's to the Legislature: One Women's Fight Against Gun Control."
Oct 09, 2017
The News Roundup
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Congress and the NRA are putting more scrutiny on a gun enhancer used by the shooter in Las Vegas, the Cabinet remains in focus regarding who is keeping order and who might be calling whom names and Facebook opens up on aiding the investigation into Russian meddling with the election. Also, the US prepares to make some major foreign policy moves, a Kurdish icon dies as Iraq tries to prevent its Kurds from seceding and Spain also continues fighting a secession effort by Catalonian separatists. Discussing the week's top news stories are Sheryl Gay Stolberg, Washington correspondent at The New York Times, Jeff Mason, White House correspondent with Reuters, Kimberly Adams, reporter for Marketplace, Yeganeh Torbati, immigration reporter with Reuters, Nick Schifrin Special correspondent at PBS NewsHour and Eli Lake, a columnist with Bloomberg View.
Oct 06, 2017
1A Movie Club Sees 'Battle Of The Sexes'
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It was a sporting event that brought gender inequality ... to the tennis court. Billie Jean King versus Bobby Riggs — a 1973 tennis match that was nothing short of a spectacle. You could say the same about the new movie. Today we review "Battle of the Sexes" with John Horn, host of "The Frame" on KPCC public radio, Rosie Casals, Billie Jean King's doubles partner and winner of multiple Grand Slam titles, Rachel Simon, movies editor at Bustle and Steve Fink, lead columnist at TennisChannel.com You'll find all our movie reviews online at the1a.org Search "1A Movie Club."
Oct 05, 2017
The Living Wounded
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Mass shootings like the one in Las Vegas make history for the number of dead, but what about the hundreds of injured survivors? You will probably never know their names, but they'll literally be the walking wounded — perhaps for life. Today we talk through the mental, physical and financial costs of surviving gun violence with AP reporter Sally Ho, gunshot survivor and trauma surgeon Dr. Joseph Sakran, trauma psychologist Priscilla Dass-Brailsford, reporter Elizabeth Van Brocklin and trauma outreach coordinator Scott Charles.
Oct 05, 2017
Ta-Nehisi Coates On The History That Continues To Haunt America
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How did Barack Obama pave the way for Donald Trump? The Atlantic's national correspondent Ta-Nehisi Coates' new book reflects on the historic presidency of America's first black president - and what's happened since. Coates talks race, politics, white supremacy and the White House.
Oct 03, 2017
The Cardi B Conundrum
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If you don't know who Cardi B is, you'd better catch up quick. The rapper's hit single "Bodak Yellow" recently peaked at number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart — and made history. Cardi B is the first female hip-hop artist to top the chart since 1998. There have only been four other female rappers to do so. Women in hip-hop have a strong legacy, but why has their success in popular music been limited of late?
Oct 03, 2017
'Big Chicken' With Investigative Journalist Maryn McKenna
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It's one of our favorite foods. But how much do you know (or care to know) about the chicken in your diet? To feed American demand, we raise and slaughter nine billion birds every year. In her new book, "Big Chicken: The Incredible Story of How Antibiotics Created Modern Agriculture and Changed the Way the World Eats," science writer Maryn McKenna charts chicken's relatively recent rise from a rare treat to a super-sized culinary colossus — and the concerns many have about it. | Then, we're looking for your input on the podcast. What do you like? What could we do better? Let us know. Text "podcast" to 63735. You'll get some updates from us from time to time, but you can always text STOP to stop getting them. Thanks.
Sep 30, 2017
The News Roundup
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After another unsuccessful attempt at repealing and replacing the Affordable Care Act, the GOP is pushing a drastic overhaul of the tax code as healthcare legislative success won't come easy - if at all. Meanwhile, people seeking to travel to the U.S. face new hurdles and the president is planning to visit Puerto Rico, where millions of Americans are recovering from devastation brought by Hurricane Maria. Internationally, the airport in Kabul, Afghanistan was the target of a rocket attack this week and ISIS has left the Syrian city of Raqqa devastated, with efforts to reclaim the city from the terror group resulting in countless fatalities of civilians. Discussing the week's top news stories are Fernando Pizarro, Washington correspondent at Univision, Shawna Thomas, Washington bureau chief at Vice News, Ed O'Keefe, congressional correspondent at The Washington Post, Peter Bergen, national security analyst at CNN, Gillian Turner, Fox News contributor and Clemens Wergin, Washington bureau chief at Die Welt, a moderately conservative German newspaper.
Sep 29, 2017
Capitalism: From The Mayflower To Tesla
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To know where our economy might be going, it pays to know where it's been. From the early days of the telegraph and the railroad to suburbia, sneakers and the twenty-first-century tech revolution, it's been a unique journey. Our guest is entrepreneur Bhu Srinivasan, who documented that story in his new book "Americana: A 400-Year History of American Capitalism."
Sep 28, 2017
A Fresh Take On Rotten Tomatoes
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Critics agree this summer's movies sucked. Hollywood has blamed poor sales on the movie review website Rotten Tomatoes. Can online movie reviews actually hurt the box office, or should the industry just focus on making better movies? Our guests are Daniel Loria, executive director and chief strategist at the trade publication Box Office Media, Brooks Barnes, who covers Hollywood and the film industry for the New York Times and Ann Hornaday, movie critic for The Washington Post.
Sep 27, 2017
Flag. Football. Who Gets To Decide What's Patriotic?
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What started out as a protest of police brutality has morphed into a clash of cultures. The president wants people to make a choice: cops vs. criminals, hard hats against the hippies. But it should be possible to rally around the national anthem and exercise our First Amendment rights. So, who gets to define patriotism and what it means to be patriotic?
Sep 26, 2017
The Importance Of Speaking Out
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The author Salman Rushdie has a lot in common with President Trump. Both have picked fights with world leaders, both have played themselves on screen and both are prolific authors, although their politics differ. Rushdie's books span the globe. His latest, "The Golden House," is set in New York — the city he now calls home — and its themes are deeply American.
Sep 25, 2017
Band Of Brothers: X Ambassadors On Pushing An Agenda Through Music
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X Ambassadors have had a promising start as a band. Their catchy single "Renegades" was used in a Jeep commercial after getting national airplay and attention from music critics. But one of their songs, "Hoping," was written in direct response to the election of President Donald Trump. The band is donating proceeds from that song to the American Civil Liberties Union in an artistic protest to the current administration. Two members of X Ambassadors, brothers Sam and Casey Harris, join us to talk about getting political in their music and the importance of putting your money where your mouth is. You'll also hear a 1A exclusive — a song written by musician Haile Supreme, inspired by the First Amendment and his life experiences.
Sep 23, 2017
The News Roundup
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A new push to replace the Affordable Care Act is afoot. Former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort is feeling even more heat in the Russia investigation. Hurricane Maria continues to move northwest, and many Mexicans are devastated after an earthquake kills hundreds. President Trump made a speech to the U.N. General Assembly, and has also reportedly made a decision about the future of the Iran nuclear deal. Plus, Germany heads to the polls. Our guests for the domestic roundup are Norman Ornstein, resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute; E.J. Dionne Jr., senior fellow at the Brookings Institution; and Lisa Desjardins, correspondent for the PBS NewsHour. For the international hour, we're joined by Jon Sopel, North America editor for BBC; Carrie Kahn, NPR international correspondent based in Mexico City; Susan Glasser, chief international affairs columnist for Politico; and Demetri Sevastopulo, Washington bureau chief for the Financial Times.
Sep 22, 2017
Manafort In The Middle
Paul Manafort is in trouble. Reports now say the President's former campaign chairman was under an FBI wiretap before and after the election — surveillance Mr. Manafort claims was politically motivated. Now an indictment is in the works. So who exactly is Paul Manafort? And why does this controversy matter? We ask Jason Maloni, a spokesman for Paul Manafort, Mark Mazzetti, Washington investigations editor for The New York Times, Susan Hennessey, a former National Security Administration attorney, Jan Baran, head of the election law group at Wiley Rein LLP and Asha Rangappa, associate dean at Yale Law School and a former FBI agent.
Sep 21, 2017
Dope Game Hard: Gucci Mane On The Gift And Curse Of Fame
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Born in rural Alabama, Radric Davis reinvented himself in East Atlanta as Gucci Mane. He made his name first as a drug dealer, then as a platinum selling rap artist who helped pioneer the sound of trap music. Now Gucci Mane gets to tell his own story — an autobiography that details his time behind bars, a murder charge, career highs and career lows.
Sep 20, 2017
Could Your Conversations Be Better?
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It's not easy to hold a great conversation. But longtime public radio journalist Celeste Headlee has some helpful hints — and a few horror stories. Her new book, "We Need to Talk," explains the science behind why conversations are so difficult: listening, focusing, empathizing, even knowing when not to speak. Celeste Headlee is our guest. You'll find her show "On Second Thought" from Georgia Public Broadcasting at gpbnews.org/programs/second-thought
Sep 19, 2017
From Russia ... With News
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Russian media have a lot to say about the U.S. and they're saying it right where Americans can hear it. Critics — including the FBI — say the cable network RT America and the radio network Sputnik are mouthpieces for the Kremlin. The networks say they're unfairly targeted by naysayers, compounded by concerns over Russian interference in the 2016 election. To discuss it we're joined by Jim Rutenberg, media columnist for The New York Times and author of its recent magazine cover story "RT, Sputnik and Russia's New Theory of War," Garland Nixon, co-host of the show "Fault Lines" on Sputnik Radio, Alexey Kuznetsov, deputy head of news at RT International, Kimberly Marten, a professor at Barnard College and Columbia University specializing in Russia and international relations and Andrew Feinberg, former White House correspondent for Sputnik International.
Sep 18, 2017
Brené Brown: Braving The Wilderness
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In this age of increased polarization, maybe our ideas about belonging need to be reexamined. Social scientist and storyteller Brené Brown argues in her new book "Braving The Wilderness" that "we can find sacredness both in being a part of something and in standing alone when necessary." Brown, whose TED talk on the power of vulnerability has been viewed more than 30 million times, joins Joshua to explain why "believing in and belonging to ourselves is the only way back to each other."
Sep 16, 2017
The News Roundup
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President Trump and Democratic leaders Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi are close to a deal that would continue DACA and in the Senate, many Democrats sign on to Bernie Sanders' "Medicare for All" plan. Internationally, more than 12,000 troops from Russia and Belarus are engaged in war games that have prompted Kiev to ramp up border security, rebuilding has begun in the Caribbean after Hurricane Irma and we'll have an update on the Rohingya crisis in Myanmar. Discussing the week's top domestic news stories are Karen Tumulty, national political reporter for The Washington Post, Caitriona Perry, Washington correspondent and bureau chief for RTE, Melissa Ross, host and producer of WJCT's First Coast Connect and Jessica Gardetto of the National Interagency Fire Center. Discussing international news is Christian Caryl, editor of DemocracyPost at The Washington Post, Jennifer Williams, deputy foreign editor for Vox and Uri Friedman, staff writer for The Atlantic.
Sep 15, 2017
Crashing Cassini
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It's the end of an era in space exploration: the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft's 20-year mission to Saturn is about to end with a bang — and a ball of fire. You may not know that some of Saturn's moons are very Earth-like, and Cassini even discovered that one moon might have the building blocks of life. Tomorrow we'll say goodbye to the spacecraft as it ends its mission by intentionally burning up in Saturn's atmosphere. We are joined by Morgan Cable, a technologist at NASA and member of the Cassini team, Sarah Hörst, assistant professor of planetary science at Johns Hopkins, Michelle Thaller, an astronomer and deputy director for science communications at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and Nadia Drake, a contributing writer at National Geographic.
Sep 14, 2017
Facts And Friction | Senator Jeff Flake's Reality Check For Republicans
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Whether with Truth-O-Meters or Pinocchios —which the president says he doesn't like— news organizations have become ever-vigilant in monitoring for any sign of fire around political pants. Even Snopes, a website that once mostly dealt in debunking urban legends and bizarre internet claims, is now a player in serious journalism. How do fact checkers tell truth from fiction, and who fact-checks the fact checkers? We ask Glenn Kessler, writer of "The Fact Checker" column for The Washington Post, David Mikkelson, founder and CEO of Snopes.com, Yvonne Rolzhausen, head of The Atlantic's fact-checking department and Michelle Ciulla Lipkin, executive director of the National Association for Media Literacy Education. Then we're one-on-one with Senator Jeff Flake about his new book, "Conscience of a Conservative." The Arizona Republican thinks "the conservative movement and the Republican Party is being compromised by populism" and says conservatives need to find their roots — roots that don't go near President Trump.
Sep 13, 2017
Credit Check: Equifax And Your Financial Future
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Ever bought a car? Applied for a job? Checked your credit score? Then you're probably in the system. The U.S. credit system. Three of the biggest credit bureaus — TransUnion, Experian and Equifax — have data on millions of Americans. And some of that data, including addresses, Social Security numbers and driver's license numbers, has been compromised in a cyberattack on Equifax. An estimated 143 million people could be affected by the breach. Who's minding the credit bureaus? And is there anything consumers can do to protect personal data from future hacks? We ask Michelle Singletary, syndicated columnist of "The Color of Money" for The Washington Post, Nela Richardson, chief economist for Redfin, Joseph Rubin, senior vice president of government affairs and public relations at MWW and Senator Tammy Baldwin, Democrat of Wisconsin.
Sep 12, 2017
Must-See Political TV
Two major players are done with government, but they say they're not done with politics. What's next for Hillary Clinton and Steve Bannon? CBS aired interviews with each of them on Sunday. Former White House chief strategist Steve Bannon's talking points on "60 Minutes" included the removal of Confederate monuments, his continued support of President Trump's agenda and the president's "enemies." One of those enemies, Trump's former opponent Hillary Clinton, gave the first interview about her new book, "What Happened," to CBS News' Sunday Morning. We get reaction from Bob Garfield, co-host of WNYC's long-running program "On the Media." Garfield's been thinking a lot about American identity in preparation for his one-man show, "Ruggedly Jewish," opening this weekend in Philadelphia. Also today, we asked Floridians what they're seeing and feeling after Irma swept across the state, leaving 60% of homes and businesses without power. That conversation is online at www.the1a.org
Sep 11, 2017
The News Roundup
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Hurricane Irma plowed through the Caribbean, the DOJ announced that DACA would end next year and President Trump makes a deal with Democratic Congressional leaders to pass hurricane relief funding. Also, North Korea seemed to up the ante this week with a supposed hydrogen bomb test that prompted an urgent response from the U.N. as well as conflicting messages from President Trump. Covering domestic news is Alexis Simendinger, White House correspondent for RealClearPolitics, Byron Tau, congressional reporter for The Wall Street Journal and Priscilla Alvarez, assistant editor for The Atlantic. Discussing international news is Courtney Kube, national security and military reporter for NBC News, Julia Ioffe, staff writer for The Atlantic and Ambassador Derek Mitchell, senior adviser to the Asia Program at the U.S. Institute of Peace, who also served as U.S. ambassador to the Republic of the Union of Myanmar from 2012 to 2016.
Sep 08, 2017
Fashion Gets Real
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Super-skinny supermodels still own the runway, but that's starting to change. Why are some fashion companies going for a healthier look? Two conglomerates say they will no longer employ models smaller than a size zero, or models younger than 16. It's a big announcement at the start of New York Fashion Week, in an industry that's used to concerns over anorexia and working conditions. What's driving these changes: morality, or money? And how is fashion reaching out to women of different body types? We're discussing it with Vanessa Friedman, fashion director and chief fashion critic for The New York Times, Sara Ziff, a former model and founding director of the Model Alliance, Cindy Gallop, an advertising consultant and CEO of IfWeRanTheWorld and Katie Sturino, founder of the12ishstyle.com. For the latest on Hurricane Irma — with reports from Puerto Rico and Miami —visit www.the1a.org
Sep 07, 2017
America The Gullible?
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Kurt Andersen, host of the public radio program Studio 360, had an epiphany when he saw the first episode of "The Colbert Report" on Comedy Central more than ten years ago. As he writes in his new book, Fantasyland, "America had changed since I was young, when 'truthiness' and reality-based community wouldn't have made any sense as jokes." In the age of alternative facts, #fakenews and conspiracy theories, we talk to Andersen about what he calls a 500-year history of how America went haywire. Also today, we talked about the human side of DACA, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. What will happen to these young "Dreamers" when the program ends? And what might a better policy look like? That conversation is at www.the1a.org.
Sep 06, 2017
Welcome Back, Congress
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Congress returns from summer vacation with a lot of homework. What does it need to get done and what might go undone? Some major items on President Trump's agenda are in focus this term, including tax reform, military spending, the federal budget and the immigration policy known as DACA. The Trump administration announced today that it's ending DACA in six months — enough time for Congress to find a fix. We answer your questions about what Congress is facing, the options on the table and the politics behind doing its job with Major Garrett, chief White House correspondent for CBS News, Susan Davis, congressional correspondent for NPR and Lauren Fox, congressional reporter for CNN.
Sep 05, 2017
Zillionaire To Other Zillionaires: 'Pay Up'
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You probably don't know our guest Nick Hanauer, but he has more money than you. As a self-proclaimed "unapologetic capitalist," he deals in millions the way many Americans deal in hundreds ... or tens. A few years ago, Hanauer called on his fellow one percenters to address America's growing income inequality, in an article for Politico. "If we don't do something to fix the glaring inequalities in this economy, the pitchforks are going to come for us," he writes. "You show me a highly unequal society, and I will show you a police state. Or an uprising. There are no counterexamples. None." His advice hasn't exactly been heeded. And now he's telling the super-wealthy to pay workers more to avoid an uprising. Thing is, is anyone listening?
Sep 04, 2017
The Smartphone Generation: Less Sex, Fewer Drinks, More Depression
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Parents love to complain that smartphones will rot their kids' brains and kill their social skills. But research shows those parents ... could be right. In this weekend bonus podcast: saving the smartphone generation. Today's youth have never known life without the Internet. A new book by psychologist Jean Twenge focuses on the hard data behind how technology affects teenagers, and some of those effects are pretty bad. How are young people struggling emotionally, spiritually, socially and professionally? Where are they doing better than their parents did? And what can adults do to help them thrive? We're joined by Jean Twenge, author of "iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy — and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood" and Adam Pletter, a child psychologist who specializes in the healthy use of digital technology. Then, how iGen are you? Find our interactive quiz at www.the1a.org
Sep 02, 2017
The News Roundup
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Harvey was the big story this week: too big to follow completely, sometimes. Let's fill in what you might have missed, and look ahead. Joining us for a special edition of the domestic news roundup are Manu Raju, senior political reporter for CNN, Gail Delaughter, a reporter for Houston Public Media, Sue Lincoln, news director of 89.3 WRKF in Baton Rouge, Louisiana and Julián Aguilar, politics and border affairs reporter for the Texas Tribune. Then, we discuss the top international stories of the week with Michael Goldfarb, host of the podcast First Rough Draft of History, P.J. Crowley, former assistant secretary of state and author of "Red Line: American Foreign Policy in a Time of Fractured Politics and Failing States," and Simon Marks, president and chief correspondent of Feature Story News, an independent broadcast agency with bureaus in the Americas, Europe and Africa.
Sep 01, 2017
Helping After Harvey | Meet The iGen
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A crisis can bring out the best in people ... and the worst. No one wants their good intentions to make them a victim of scam artists or wasteful charities. Today we're getting tips on how to donate, what to give and how to vet potential recipients. And, we'll hear from the American Red Cross about its disaster assistance in light of concerns over how it spends donations. We're joined by Michelle Singletary, syndicated columnist of "The Color of Money" for The Washington Post, Jacob Harold, president and CEO of GuideStar, Mari Kuraishi, co-founder and president of GlobalGiving, Suzy DeFrancis, chief public affairs officer of the American Red Cross and Jonathan Katz, author of "The Big Truck That Went By: How the World Came to Save Haiti and Left Behind a Disaster." Then, need a break from disaster coverage? Take our quiz on the smartphone generation ... precisely how iGen are you? It's at www.the1a.org Click on "The Smartphone Generation: Less Sex, Fewer Drinks, More Depression."
Aug 31, 2017
Japan On High Alert | The Agony Of Evacuation
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A hurricane is terrifying, but evacuating one can be just as scary — and as deadly. How do we know when it's time to go? We make sense of how evacuations work with Bill King, a former columnist for the Houston Chronicle who served on a gubernatorial task force after Hurricane Rita's deadly evacuations, Brian Wolshon, director of the Gulf Coast Center for Evacuation and Transportation Resiliency and Melvin "Kip" Holden, mayor of Baton Rouge, Louisiana from 2005 to 2016. First, we get an update on rescue efforts in Houston from Gail Delaughter, a reporter for Houston Public Media and talk to Philip Yun, executive director of the anti-nuclear group Ploughshares, about Japan's response to a new threat from North Korea. Yun is a former presidential appointee at the Department of State.
Aug 30, 2017
Fighting The Floods: For Many Cities, It's 'When,' Not 'If'
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Many parts of the U.S. face dual watery threats. First, giant storms like Harvey, which has dropped nine trillion gallons of water on Texas (enough to cover the lower 48 states with a puddle as deep as the height of three pennies). Then, there's the issue of rising sea levels, which, according to the Union of Concerned Scientists, would make routine, chronic flooding a fact of life in hundreds more communities across the country in just a few decades. With these threats working in tandem, many cities — and not just those on the coasts — are already seeing more regular flooding and more severe occasional floods. Are they ready? To discuss it we're joined by Astrid Caldas, senior climate scientist at the Union of Concerned Scientists, Nancy Solomon, managing editor of New Jersey Public Radio, Hope Kirwan, a reporter for Wisconsin Public Radio, Jessica Rosgaard, flood recovery editor at WWNO, New Orleans Public Radio, and Kate Stein, a reporter at WLRN, South Florida's NPR station.
Aug 30, 2017
Harvey Hits Hard | The News And Your Newsfeed
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A monster storm like Hurricane Harvey hasn't hit the Gulf Coast in almost a decade. At least eight people have died in the storm and more than 2,000 people have had to be rescued in Houston alone. We hear more about the storm with Ayan Mittra, editor of The Texas Tribune, Gail Delaughter, reporter at KUHF Houston Public Media, Barry Scanlon, former FEMA advisor and Steve Ellis of Taxpayers for Common Sense. Then we hear a conversation from the Aspen Ideas Festival between 1A host Joshua Johnson and former network news anchor Campbell Brown. Brown discusses her new role at Facebook and the social network's role as a news source.
Aug 28, 2017
Weekend Special: Behind The Scenes Of Broadway Blockbusters
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Jeffrey Seller produced the Broadway hits "Avenue 'Q'," "Rent," "In The Heights" and "Hamilton." How did he do it? He credits his success partly to frustration with shows that never spoke to him. In this 1A bonus podcast, Seller weighs in on what makes a hit, the future of American musicals and the role of live theater in the digital age.
Aug 26, 2017
The News Roundup
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After a televised national address on military strategy in Afghanistan, a controversial rally in Arizona and a speech to veterans in Nevada, the president's appearances eclipsed all else - including the eclipse. Also, White House senior adviser Jared Kushner travels to the Middle East to talk democracy with the Egyptian president and peace between Israel and Palestine. Two panels of journalists join Joshua Johnson to discuss the week's top news stories. Discussing domestic news is Domenico Montanaro, lead political editor for NPR, Salena Zito, Pittsburgh-based reporter for the Washington Examiner, Jeff Mason, White House correspondent for Reuters and Tyler Tynes, staff writer for SB Nation. Discussing international news is Paul Danahar, Washington bureau chief of the BBC, Nancy Youssef, national security reporter for The Wall Street Journal, Nick Schifrin, special correspondent for PBS NewsHour and Mike Finnerty, host of CBC Radio Montreal's "Daybreak."
Aug 25, 2017
Keeping House At HUD | Preparing For The 'Big One'
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Millions of Americans rely on the Department of Housing and Urban Development as a lifeline. What's happening at HUD under Secretary Ben Carson? He was a controversial pick and there are new concerns over his tenure. To learn more, we're joined by HUD's acting deputy secretary, David Eagles, Alec MacGillis, a reporter at ProPublica, Diane Yentel, president and CEO of the National Low Income Housing Coalition, Nela Richardson, chief economist at Redfin and Jimmy Kemp, a member of the Trump administration "landing team" that evaluated the agency. Then, the risk of earthquakes across America. Chances are your home sits on a fault line — one that might be overdue for movement. We're joined by Kathryn Miles, author of "Quakeland: On the Road to America's Next Devastating Earthquake," Lucy Jones, a researcher at Caltech's Seismological Laboratory, Tom Pratt, a geophysicist at the U.S. Geological Survey and Richard Allen, director of the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory.
Aug 24, 2017
For Those In Peril On The Sea | Showing 'Sheriff Joe' Some Mercy
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Today on 1A, the state of the Navy. The massive Seventh Fleet is under scrutiny after a pair of fatal collisions and the fleet's commander has been relieved of duty, one month before he was due to retire. We'll look at why these accidents might be happening, get a clearer picture of what the Navy's doing around the world these days and consider what it may take to keep sailors safe. We're joined by David Larter, a Navy veteran and reporter for Defense News and the Navy Times, Bryan McGrath, former commander of the USS Bulkeley and assistant director of the Hudson Institute's Center for American Seapower, Terry McKnight, retired rear admiral and a consultant with the U.S. Naval Institute and John Schindler, a security expert and former professor at the U.S. Naval War College. First, we talk to Jude Joffe-Block, a reporter based in Phoenix, about President Trump's rally there last night, where he hinted at pardoning Joe Arpaio, the former sheriff convicted over racial profiling.
Aug 23, 2017
The Sugar Story: A Spoonful Of Addiction Makes The Profits Go Up?
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Is sugar about to have its tobacco moment? The answer is ... complicated. In the '60s, the industry paid scientists to play down the link between sugar and heart disease. Fifty years later, new evidence suggests the amount we still consume is more dangerous than anyone imagined. It's been linked to common cancers — even Alzheimer's disease — but remains our sweetest habit. Sugar is on trial, but does it deserve the bad rap? Guest host Stephen Henderson of the Detroit Free Press is joined by Gary Taubes, author of "The Case Against Sugar," Michael Moss, author of "Salt Sugar Fat: How the Food Giants Hooked Us," and Courtney Gaine, president and CEO of The Sugar Association. Joshua Johnson returns tomorrow.
Aug 22, 2017
The Antifa Handbook
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After the violent white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, condemnations of the marchers' cause came quickly — except from the White House. President Trump made references to "many sides" and violent responses from counter-protesters. Conservative critics were more explicit, pinning blame for some violence on antifa, short for antifascist. So what is antifa, and who participates? Guest host Stephen Henderson, Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist for the Detroit Free Press, is joined by Mark Bray, author of the new book "Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook." It traces antifa's history and tactics, from its origins fighting the wave of European fascism in the early 20th century to protests in Berkeley, California, and Charlottesville today. You'll also hear from Maria Stephan, director of the program on nonviolent action at the U.S. Institute of Peace and co-author of "Why Civil Resistance Works: The Strategic Logic of Non-Violent Conflict."
Aug 21, 2017
Weekend Special: Sex, Race And Pop Music
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Can you complete this song lyric?: A-wop-bop-alu-bop-a-wop-bam-boom, Tutti Frutti, ______. "Aw rooty" is on the record of Little Richard's seminal hit, but the original rhyme was "good booty." And that's where NPR music critic Ann Powers gets the title of her new book, "Good Booty: Love and Sex, Black and White, Body and Soul in American Music." It's a decades-old cliche that parents complain their kids' music is far more sexual than what they grew up with, but history teaches us that's not true. After a long week, sit back, relax and enjoy our conversation on hip-shaking music history. Click here for our Spotify playlist of songs mentioned in the book. As you may expect, not all the lyrics may be suitable for all listeners. http://the1a.org/shows/2017-08-15/good-booty
Aug 19, 2017
The News Roundup
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A single story dominated the news cycle this week: the tragedy that took the life of a young woman in Charlottesville, Virginia and the president's controversial responses to the events that led to her death. We discuss the White House, white supremacy and where the president's agenda goes from here. Then, the high-tension verbal sparring between North Korea and the U.S., Vice President Mike Pence's trip to Latin America and the world sends condolences to Spain after a van attack killed at least 13 people and injured about 80 others. Discussing domestic news is Geoff Bennett, White House reporter for NPR, Sheryl Gay Stolberg, domestic affairs correspondent for The New York Times and Fernando Pizarro, Washington correspondent for Univision. Discussing international news is James Kitfield, senior fellow at the Center for the Study of the Presidency and Congress, Nadia Bilbassy, Washington bureau chief of Al Arabiya and Mark Lander, White House correspondent for The New York Times. After we held this conversation, the White House announced chief strategist Steve Bannon is leaving his job, effective today. We'll have more on the post-Bannon White House next week on 1A.
Aug 18, 2017
The Next Chapter For Dystopian Literature
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Today's book lovers are hungry for stories of dark, dystopian futures. Novels like "1984," "The Handmaid's Tale" and "Parable of the Sower" are hard to keep in stock these days. But what's inspiring the next generation of dystopian narratives? Our panel of authors talks about how current events, national politics and international relations inspire their new work and appeal to an audience with an affinity for apocalyptic endings. We're joined by Cory Doctorow, science fiction author and co-editor of the blog Boing Boing, N.K. Jemisin, bestselling author of the "Inheritance" series and the "Broken Earth" trilogy, Paola Bacigalupi, bestselling author of more than a half-dozen books including "The Wind-Up Girl" and "The Water Knife," and Omar el Akkad, award-winning journalist and author of "American War." Join us tomorrow for the Friday News Roundup. More at www.the1a.org
Aug 17, 2017
A Monumental Problem
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The debate over Confederate monuments and memorials often boils down to history versus hate...and it's heating up again. This week, a group of activists in Durham, North Carolina toppled a statue of a rebel soldier in a scene reminiscent of Baghdad in April of 2003. It was part of a nationwide response to the violence that unfolded at a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia last week where many Confederate flags flew alongside swastikas and racist signs carried by white nationalists, neo-Nazis and other hate groups. Is there a way to deal with Confederate imagery without forgetting the lessons of the past? Our guests are Jillian Johnson, at-large member of the Durham, N.C. City Council; Jonathan Horn, author of "The Man Who Would Not Be Washington"; Derek Alderman, professor of cultural geography at the University of Tennessee; Phil Wilayto, editor of the Virginia Defender; and Thomas Strain, Jr., commander-in-chief of Sons of Confederate Veterans.
Aug 16, 2017
What Can I Do To Stop Hate Groups?
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The violent racism we saw in Charlottesville, Virginia is not new. But after last weekend's attack, many people are looking for new ideas about how to stop extremists. Is there an effective way to stop hate, stay safe and still preserve everyone's First Amendment rights? To discuss it we're joined by Peter Bergen, national security analyst for CNN and author of "United States of Jihad: Investigating America's Homegrown Terrorists," Don Harmon, a state senator in Illinois, Zeynep Tufekci, assistant professor in the School of Information at UNC-Chapel Hill, Sammy Rangel, executive director and co-founder of Life After Hate and Lecia Brooks, outreach director at the Southern Poverty Law Center. This afternoon — after we held this conversation — President Trump defended some who attended the "Unite The Right" rally in Charlottesville, saying "I've condemned many different groups, but not all of those people were neo-Nazis, believe me. Not all of those people were white supremacists by any stretch." We'll have reaction to President Trump's comments, and ask where the national conversation goes from here, this week on 1A.
Aug 15, 2017
Charlottesville And The White Supremacists
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What started as a rally by white supremacists in Virginia this weekend ended in terror Saturday as a car slammed into a group that was protesting the rally, killing at least one person and injuring 19 others. The tension had been high since Friday, when a group of torch-bearing white nationalists — some giving a Nazi salute — descended on the University of Virginia campus to protest the potential removal of a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee. After Saturday's deadly violence, President Donald Trump said, "we condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides ... on many sides." The president's initial response was met with criticism, with members of his own party labeling it too vague. President Trump spoke again today, saying "racism is evil." Joining us to discuss what happened in Charlottesville are NPR reporter Sarah McCammon, Rich Benjamin, author of "Searching for Whitopia: An Improbable Journey to the Heart of White America," Meredith Clark, a media studies professor at UVA and Jameta Barlow, a Charlottesville native and assistant professor of women's and gender studies at Towson University.
Aug 14, 2017
The News Roundup
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This week, the News Roundup comes to you from WWNO New Orleans Public Radio. We'll talk about increasing tensions with North Korea, a predawn raid of the home of former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort, a declaration that the opioid crisis is a national emergency and we'll hear from a local reporter about severe floods in New Orleans. In international news, tensions are running high in Kenya after another contested election and South Africa's president has survived another no-confidence vote. Discussing domestic news is Ron Elving, senior editor and correspondent for NPR, Shawna Thomas, Washington bureau chief for Vice News and Abby Phillip, national political reporter for the Washington Post. Discussing international news is Ron Nixon, Washington correspondent for The New York Times, Noel King, correspondent for NPR's Planet Money podcast and Hannah Allam, national reporter covering U.S. Muslim life for BuzzFeed News.
Aug 11, 2017
Figuring Out North Korea | What It's Like To Report On Race Today
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Some of the first journalists to specialize in reporting on race were ... white men. They doggedly covered the civil rights movement for local and national outlets, bringing needed attention to the ways America's social and political systems were stacked against the nation's black citizens. These days, the race beat still exists, but it's occupied by a more diverse group of journalists. Today we're asking some of the beat's most prominent reporters how they approach their assignments. We're joined by Tanzina Vega, national race and inequality reporter for CNN, Errin Haines Whack, race and ethnicity reporter for The Associated Press, Julia Craven, race and civil rights reporter for The Huffington Post and Hank Klibanoff, director of the journalism program at Emory University. First, we'll discuss the escalating tension between the U.S. and North Korea — and how we got here —with Thomas Hubbard, former U.S. ambassador to South Korea and Sheila Smith, senior fellow for Japan studies at The Council on Foreign Relations. After we held this conversation, President Trump doubled down on his tough talk on North Korea. We'll have those comments and reaction tomorrow on The News Roundup.
Aug 10, 2017
What You Say Will Be Held Against You
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Does Google need a new motto? Instead of "Don't Be Evil" how about "Don't Go There"? Google fired an employee this week for a memo suggesting that innate differences between men and women explain why women lag behind in the tech sector. Google says he crossed a line, but some think the company went too far. Joining guest host John Donvan to discuss it are Nitasha Tiku, senior writer at Wired, David Scher, a partner at the Employment Law Group, Bruce Barry, professor of management at Vanderbilt University and Simma Lieberman, a diversity and inclusion consultant based in Palo Alto. We'll end the show talking about vacation from work ... and why so many don't take it. We discuss our "no-vacation" nation with Lee Burbage, chief people officer at The Motley Fool. Then, a remembrance of musician Glen Campbell with singer/songwriter Kristian Bush, one half of the group Sugarland.
Aug 09, 2017
When People With Autism Encounter Police | Collusion in the NFL?
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People with autism shouldn't get mistaken as criminals. But they do. Evidence suggests people with autism experience seven times the number of encounters with police that most of us do — and almost never in a good way. How do we fix that? Guest host John Donvan is joined by Emily Iland, an autism advocate and educator, Barry Prizant, author of "Uniquely Human: A Different Way of Seeing Autism," Michael John Carley, who has Asperger syndrome and founded GRASP, the Global and Regional Asperger Syndrome Partnership, and Carolyn Gammicchia, a former police officer who founded L.E.A.N On Us, a law enforcement awareness network. First, let's talk about Colin Kaepernick. The NFL pre-season is halfway over and the quarterback still hasn't been signed to a team. Kaepernick gained attention outside sports circles last year when he declined to stand during the pre-game national anthem. Are NFL teams too afraid to take on an activist athlete? We're joined by William Rhoden, writer-at-large for ESPN's The Undefeated.
Aug 08, 2017
Sanctuary Cities Fight Back | How An $89 Hoodie Could Change American Manufacturing
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Business is about the bottom line. And to make money from fashion, that means you have to make your clothes overseas, right? Wrong. Today on 1A, American Giant. The firm is based in California, makes all of its clothes in the Carolinas and has upended the argument that you can't make money by selling clothes made and sourced in the U.S. We're one-on-one with founder and CEO Bayard Winthrop. But first, Chicago's mayor says he's going to sue the DOJ over a plan to withhold grant money from so-called "sanctuary cities." We know Rahm Emmanuel likes a fight, but does he have the law on his side? 1A guest host John Donvan, of Intelligence Sqaured U.S., speaks with Muzaffar Chishti of the Migration Policy Institute, a think tank that studies migration and refugees.
Aug 07, 2017
The News Roundup
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It was another hot week in Washington. The White House backs a proposal to curb legal immigration, the DOJ takes on affirmative action in college admissions and, after some doubt and a little silence, the president signed new sanctions on Russia. In international news, accusations of fraud in Venezuela's national election are flying, Russia expels hundreds of American diplomats and is the U.S. willing to go to war or willing to talk it out with North Korea? Two panels of journalists join Joshua Johnson to discuss the week's top news stories. Covering domestic news is Michael Schmidt, Washington correspondent for The New York Times, Shawna Thomas, Washington bureau chief for Vice News and Salena Zito, reporter for the Washington Examiner. Discussing international news is Moises Naim, chief international columnist for El Pais, Mary Louise Kelly, national security correspondent for NPR and Barbara Plett Usher, State Department correspondent for the BBC.
Aug 04, 2017
Cutting Legal Immigration | The Bachelorette Vs. Reality
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Reality TV has very little "reality" in it. But when issues like race factor in, things can get very real, very fast. This season of "The Bachelorette" ends on Monday, with the show's first black star making her big gamble on love. Reality shows have dealt with social issues like race, class and gender before. The shows do very well making money, but how are they at making a statement? Joining us to discuss it are Amy Kaufman, a film writer for the Los Angeles Times, Allison P. Davis, senior writer for The Cut, Jennifer Pozner, author of Reality Bites Back: The Troubling Truth About Guilty Pleasure TV and Eric Deggans, TV critic for NPR. First, we'll consider President Trump's new policy on legal immigration with Jeremy Robbins, executive director of New American Economy, a group of business leaders and mayors focused on immigration reform and Eric Schurenberg, president and editor-in-chief of Inc., a media company that covers entrepreneurs.
Aug 03, 2017
Reporting The Saga of R. Kelly | The Best Albums By Women
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Women rock! Female artists have made some of the greatest albums ever. And it's about time they get the credit they deserve. NPR Music compiled a list of 150 albums, which may include some of your favorites. We're playing a few of the hits and considering what the list missed with Ann Powers, music critic and correspondent for NPR, Jim DeRogatis, co-host of Sound Opinions and a music critic at WBEZ Chicago and Keanna Faircloth, host of Evening Jazz on WPFW 89.3 in Washington, D.C. First, we focus on R&B legend R. Kelly. He's canceling tour dates amid more accusations that he controls young women, for sex. Jim DeRogatis has been following the story for years and gives us the latest. More — including Jim's story for BuzzFeed News and NPR's list of the 150 best albums by women — at the1a.org
Aug 02, 2017
Could Crisis Lead To Civil War In Venezuela?
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Venezuela was once South America's richest country and a beacon of democracy and stability. Now, it's in crisis. President Nicolás Maduro is celebrating a national election on Sunday that supports the creation of a new Constituent Assembly. It replaces the country's legislative body with 545 representatives — all nominated by the Maduro administration — and has the power to rewrite Venezuela's constitution. Maduro's critics are calling the election a sham. Nikki Haley, U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, called the election "another step toward dictatorship." For the latest from Caracas, we're joined by Stephen Gibbs, who reports on Latin American for The Times of London and The Economist. Then, we hear from John Walsh, senior associate with the Washington Office on Latin America, an advocacy group for human rights, Daniel Lansberg-Rodriguez, a geopolitical-risk analyst based in Chicago and Katrina Kozarek, a filmmaker in Venezuela who supports President Maduro.
Aug 01, 2017
Hey America, We're Listening
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If you could change how the media covers who you are, where you live and what you believe, how would you do it? We opened our phone lines and listened to you in a special show that goes beyond labels and identity politics, and pays close attention to what's on the minds of Americans today. We'll also hear a conversation Joshua Johnson had at the Aspen Ideas Festival with news media veterans James Fallows, national correspondent for The Atlantic magazine, Melissa Block, host for NPR News and Charlie Sykes, a conservative commentator. Those three guests spent the last year traveling the nation, listening to Americans. What they heard and what they learned has shaped the way they cover the country's communities.
Jul 31, 2017
The News Roundup
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President Trump tweets a ban on transgender troops, the Senate votes to repeal Obamacare now and replace it later but the bill narrowly fails and new White House Communications Director Anthony Scaramucci has jumped in to attack leakers and the Russia investigation. Also, the U.S. slaps sanctions on Venezuela and Russia, tensions ease in a standoff over one the world's holiest sites and the latest on Qatar's PR offensive to counter a regional feud. Two panels of journalists join Joshua Johnson to discuss the week's top news stories. Covering domestic news is Josh Kraushaar, political editor for National Journal, Eliana Johnson, national political reporter for Politico, Sam Baker, deputy health care editor for Axios and Diana Tourjee, staff writer for Broadly, VICE Media's women and culture site. Discussing international news is Moises Naim, chief international columnist for El Pais, Courtney Kube, national security producer for NBC News and Yochi Dreazen, foreign editor for Vox.
Jul 28, 2017
Is It Time To Sack Football As We Know It?
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We're learning more about the risks that come with playing football. A new study of 111 brains of former NFL players revealed that 110 of them had a degenerative brain disease called chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE. A year ago, the league revised its protocol on concussions — an issue that plagues players at every level of the game. But with more connections being made between football and brain injuries, is it time to have a serious conversation about re-inventing a beloved sport that many Americans don't want to change? Discussing brain injuries in the NFL is Gregg Easterbrook, contributing editor at The Atlantic, Patrick Hruby, former contributing editor at VICE Sports, Cyndy Feasel, author of "After the Cheering Stops: An NFL Wife's Story of Concussions, Loss, and the Faith that Saw Her Through" and Dr. Bennet Omalu, physician and forensic pathologist.
Jul 27, 2017
Do The President's Attacks Hurt His Party More Than His Foes?
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President Trump won the election eight months ago. So why is he still on the attack — not only against the person he defeated, but against his own appointees? On Tuesday, President Trump said he was "very disappointed" in Attorney General Jeff Sessions for recusing himself from the Russia probe and that "time will tell" his fate. This wasn't the first criticism of the AG. Between healthcare, tax reform and infrastructure, the president has a lot to do. Why is he spending his time on attacks instead of policy? And can the GOP move forward if the president won't move on? Joining Joshua Johnson to discuss the president's attacks are Ron Elving, senior editor and correspondent at NPR, Matt Lewis, senior columnist at The Daily Beast and political commentator at CNN and Daniel Schneider, executive director at American Conservative Union and former chief of staff of former Congressman Jim Ryun, (R-KS).
Jul 26, 2017
Two Views on Russia
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You're about to hear two distinct perspectives on Russia: One man says Vladimir Putin is not the problem. The other says Putin is worse than you might think. We begin with the view from Moscow. Edward Lozansky, a Russian-American university president there says concerns are overblown about Putin's intentions toward the U.S. We get his perspective on the Kremlin's potential dealings with President Trump. Then, we hear from Bill Browder, an American businessman kicked out of Moscow who's testifying before the Senate tomorrow. If you've heard of the Magnitsky Act, Browder made it happen. Browder's lawyer and friend Sergei Magnitsky died helping uncover corruption in Russia. Today we also talked to actor Wesley Snipes about his debut novel, "Talon of God." It's a supernatural thriller that explores damnation ... and salvation. You'll find that conversation at the1a.org
Jul 25, 2017
Before An Officer Pulls The Trigger ...
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When police officers pull the trigger, what are they thinking ... literally? Australians are outraged after Justine Damond was shot and killed by a police officer in Minneapolis. It's the latest in a series of high profile shootings of unarmed civilians. For the latest from Minneapolis, we're joined by Minnesota Public Radio reporter Brandt Williams. Then, what are police taught about using deadly force? We hear from Lou Hayes Jr., a police sergeant and training supervisor in a Chicago-area police department, and David Klinger, author of "Into The Kill Zone: A Cop's Eye View Of Deadly Force." Earlier today, we also discussed sex ed. We're way past the birds and the bees — young people have access to tons of information about sex. But are they learning the right things? The Trump administration is cutting funding to comprehensive sex-ed initiatives. So what would an ideal sex ed program look like? And what works to prepare young people for happy, healthy lives? Find that conversation at the1a.org
Jul 24, 2017
The News Roundup
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If the news this week has left you with questions, you're not alone: "How do you take a job and then recuse yourself?" President Donald Trump asked about Attorney General Jeff Sessions in a revealing interview in the New York Times. Outside of the White House, Senator John McCain shared his brain cancer diagnosis with the public. Looking abroad, Syria's rebels can expect much less help from the CIA, the White House threatens new sanctions against Iran & Venezuela and Australia reacts to the fatal police shooting of a woman in Minneapolis. Two panels of journalists join Joshua Johnson to discuss the week's top news stories. Discussing domestic news is Greg Ip, chief economics commentator at The Wall Street Journal, Lisa Desjardins, correspondent for PBS NewsHour and Byron York, chief political correspondent at The Washington Examiner. Discussing international news is Simon Marks, president and chief correspondent at Feature Story News, Susan Glasser, chief international affairs columnist at Politico, Abderrahim Foukara, Washington bureau chief at Al Jazeera and Ben Knight, correspondent for Australian Broadcasting Corporation.
Jul 21, 2017
All Eyes On O.J.
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The state of Nevada on Thursday granted parole to former pro football player O.J. Simpson. He'll go free later this year after serving nine years of a 33-year sentence for felony armed robbery and kidnapping. But the case Simpson was convicted for isn't the case that comes to mind when you hear his name. More than 20 years after Simpson was acquitted for the murders of his ex-wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ronald Goldman, America still struggles with the intersection of race, fame and justice. How far have we come since then? And where are we headed? Joining us to discuss it are Roger Cossack, visiting professor at Pepperdine Law School and a former analyst for ESPN, Paul Butler, professor at Georgetown University Law Center, former federal prosecutor and author of the book "Chokehold: Policing Black Men," and Karen Grigsby Bates, correspondent for NPR's Code Switch team that covers race and identity.
Jul 20, 2017
Guardians Of The Gridlock
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The legislative logjam known as the GOP health care bill is stunning, considering Republicans are in power in the House, Senate and White House. If lawmakers can't work together to move ahead on health care, what can they do? Perhaps they can take notes on how major federal legislation of Washington past — like the Voting Rights Act of 1965 or the Affordable Care Act — made it through controversy and Congress and landed on the President's desk. Joining us to discuss it are Tom Davis, director of federal government affairs at Deloitte and a former congressman from Virginia's 11th district, Mack McLarty, chairman of McLarty Associates and former chief of staff to President Clinton, Barbara Perry, director of presidential studies at the University of Virginia's Miller Center and Jonathan Rauch, senior fellow of governance studies at the Brookings Institution and a contributing editor of The Atlantic. Tomorrow, we'll review the new romantic comedy The Big Sick. Find that show and add your review at the1a.org
Jul 20, 2017
Oyez! Originalists, Open Minds And The Supreme Court
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Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia was a celebrated conservative and an "originalist." He believed the Constitution isn't that open to interpretation. But Scalia, who died last year, did believe in having his ideas challenged and hired several law clerks with liberal politics. The play "The Originalist" examines Scalia's relationship with one such "counter clerk," and it's taken on new life following his death. Scalia was replaced on the court with another originalist — Justice Neil Gorsuch, who's projected to continue a legacy of conservative decisions and dissents. Joining us to discuss Scalia and his views are Adam Liptak, legal correspondent for The New York Times, Edward Gero, the actor who plays Scalia in "The Originalist," Joan Biskupic, Supreme Court biographer for CNN and Ian Samuel, a former "counter clerk" for Scalia and a fellow at Harvard Law School. We begin the conversation —in light of last night's collapse of the Senate healthcare bill —with a look back at the Supreme Court decision in 2012 that upheld the Affordable Care Act.
Jul 18, 2017
MAGAnomics And The Quest For Three Percent
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MAGAnomics: It's a term coined by White House budget director Mick Mulvaney to describe a plan designed to guarantee three percent economic growth every year. How? Through tax cuts, spending cuts and a combination of other strategies. The Congressional Budget Office predicts the plan will only give the economy a one-tenth of one percent boost, keeping overall growth below two percent. The White House has previously said it doesn't have much faith in the CBO's math skills, but whose calculations can we trust? And what would it take to get to three percent growth? Joining us to discuss it are Heather Long, an economics reporter for The Washington Post, James Pethokoukis, a columnist at the American Enterprise Institute, Bryan DeHenau, president of BCD Construction LLC, a building company near Detroit and Bayard Winthrop, founder and CEO of American Giant, an apparel company that manufactures clothes in the U.S.
Jul 17, 2017
The News Roundup
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It's been a week with a high Russian character count, "nothing burgers," an iceberg the size of Delaware and whether Venus Williams can reign supreme again at Wimbledon. Also, Iraq marks a major moment, Brazil sends its former president to prison, President Trump has a high-profile visit to Paris and the Vatican declares the body of Christ cannot be gluten-free. Two panels of journalists join Joshua Johnson for analysis of the week's top news stories. Discussing domestic news is Stephen Dinan, political editor at The Washington Times, Amy Walter, national editor for Cook Political Report and Fernando Pizarro, Washington correspondent at Univision. Discussing international news is Shane Harris, senior writer at The Wall Street Journal, Yeganeh Torbati, foreign policy reporter at Reuters and Nick Schifrin, special correspondent at PBS NewsHour.
Jul 14, 2017
Why Can't We Talk About Guns?
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An NRA video making the rounds online has been called everything from an open call to violence to protect white supremacy to a condemnation of violence. "The only way we save our country and our freedom is to fight this violence of lies with the clenched fist of truth," says NRA spokeswoman Dana Loesch in the ad. The debate over guns in America has never been easy, but is it getting harder to keep it civil and useful? Joining us to discuss it are Tamika Mallory, co-president of the Women's March Board and a protestor the NRA has criticized by name; Adam Winkler, a law professor at UCLA and author of "Gunfight: The Battle Over the Right to Bear Arms in America"; Philip Smith, president of the National African-American Gun Association; and Dan Gross, president of the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence. We asked the NRA and its spokeswoman Dana Loesch to appear on the show, but did not hear back. Let us know what you think of today's conversation. Write a review at wamu.fm/1apodcast
Jul 13, 2017
Why The Internet Fast Lane Has Bypassed Rural America
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Broadband access for more than 23 million rural Americans is lousy. Microsoft says it wants to change that. The tech giant calls it an effort to serve communities who feel left behind. But what's behind this latest push? Politics or economics? Joining us to discuss it are Christopher Mitchell, director of the Community Broadband Networks Initiative at the Institute for Local Self-Reliance, Jennifer Levitz, a reporter for The Wall Street Journal and Matt Larsen, founder and CEO of Vistabeam, a rural internet service provider. Today, we also discussed a little-known story from World War I, when U.S. General John Pershing recruited more than 200 women for a dangerous and crucial assignment. They were sent through submarine-infested waters to the front lines and placed in charge of one of the U.S. military's most effective tools — the telephone. We talk to Elizabeth Cobbs, author of "The Hello Girls: America's First Women Soldiers." Find that story and all our shows at the1a.org
Jul 12, 2017
Eric And Donald Trump Junior: The Sons Also Rise
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Donald Trump Jr. — the eldest of President Trump's five children — is center stage today over a meeting he held more than a year ago with a Kremlin-connected attorney apparently offering damaging information on Hillary Clinton. As the story develops, we take a closer look at President Trump's sons, Don Jr. and Eric. They're ardent supporters of their father who've agreed to lead the family business while he's in the White House. Unlike their sister, Ivanka, they don't have official White House roles, but that doesn't mean their paths don't intersect with the administration's. Joining us to discuss it are Mary Jordan, a Washington Post reporter who worked on the book, "Trump Revealed"; William Cohan, special correspondent for Vanity Fair; Adam Liptak, legal correspondent for The New York Times; and David Greenberg, a history professor at Rutgers and author of "Republic of Spin" and "Nixon's Shadow."
Jul 11, 2017
The Rebellion Against The Voter Fraud Commission And A New Look at Bob Marley
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President Trump still loses sleep over his second place finish in the popular vote — and he blames widespread voter fraud. Now, a commission he established to review elections wants states to share personal data on voters, including party affiliation and Social Security numbers. Most states can't or won't comply. How far will the investigation go and how much will it cost taxpayers? You'll hear from two members of the commission – Hans von Spakovsky, manager of the Heritage Foundation's Election Law Reform Initiative and Matthew Dunlap, a Democrat and Maine's secretary of state – and from Jason Kander, president of Let America Vote and Missouri's former secretary of state; Kim Wyman, a Republican and Washington's secretary of state; and Justin Levitt, a law professor and former official in the Justice Department's civil rights division. Then, the whole world knows Bob Marley's name and his music, but who was he before he was a global superstar? We're joined by reggae historian Roger Steffens to discuss his new book, "So Much Things to Say: The Oral History of Bob Marley."
Jul 10, 2017
The News Roundup
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The governor of New Jersey gets grief for going to the beach. More than 40 states say they will not or cannot turn over all the data President Trump's voting commission wants. In a speech in Poland before a two-day "Group of 20" summit in Europe, President Trump makes the case for defending Western civilization against challenges posed by terrorism. And the world responds to North Korea after Pyongyang tests an intercontinental ballistic missile. Noel King of NPR's Planet Money podcast guest hosts 1A's Friday News Roundup and discusses the week's national news with Ed O'Keefe, congressional correspondent for The Washington Post, Juana Summers, senior writer for CNN Politics and Michael Scherer, Washington bureau chief for Time magazine. Discussing international news are Mark Landler, White House correspondent for The New York Times, Susan Glasser, chief international affairs columnist for Politico and Matthew Lee, diplomatic writer for The Associated Press.
Jul 07, 2017
James Blake's Journey To Becoming An Activist Athlete
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Great athletes have the potential to change the game they play...and change the world we live in. From Muhammad Ali and Arthur Ashe to Billie Jean King and Colin Kaepernick, sports heroes throughout history have used their platforms to effect social change and speak out about injustice. Tennis star James Blake has written about this history and how he has been inspired by athletes willing to raise a fist, take a stand or take a knee. His new book is called "Ways of Grace: Stories of Activism, Adversity, and How Sports Can Bring Us Together" and he joins 1A guest host Noel King to discuss athletes and activism.
Jul 06, 2017
The Fight Over The Dakota Access Pipeline Continues
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Last month, a federal judge ordered the Trump administration to conduct further environmental reviews of the Dakota Access pipeline. Opponents of the pipeline called this a victory, saying it underscores their calls to relocate the pipeline away from waterways and sacred tribal land. But oil is still pumping through the pipeline. How can the U.S. government balance its energy priorities with environmental concerns and native tribal land rights? And what's the best way forward? Join us to hear from Amy Sisk, a reporter for Inside Energy and Prairie Public Broadcasting in Bismark, North Dakota; Dave Archambault II, chairman of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Council; Craig Stevens, spokesman for Grow America's Infrastructure Now (GAIN), a pro-pipeline association; and Kent Blansett, assistant professor of history and Native American studies at University of Nebraska at Omaha. Noel King of NPR's Planet Money guest hosts. Joshua Johnson is back next week.
Jul 05, 2017
United By The Sun: A Solar Event For All Americans To Share
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On August 21st, 2017, the U.S. will experience its first coast-to-coast solar eclipse in 99 years. The eclipse will travel from Oregon to South Carolina, darkening skies and dropping temperatures along the way. Astronomers are already calling it a jaw-dropping, mind-blowing, once-in-a-lifetime event. Why do eclipses tend to cast a spell on the humans who watch them? And what do you need to know about this upcoming event? Discussing the upcoming solar eclipse with Joshua Johnson is David Boboltz, program director at National Science Foundation's Division of Astronomical Sciences, Carrie Black, associate program director at National Science Foundation's Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences Division, Alex Young, associate director for science in the Heliophysics Science Division at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and Ernie Wright, visualizer at the Scientific Visualization Studio at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center.
Jul 04, 2017
Meeting In The Mountains: 1A At The Aspen Ideas Festival
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Big, brave, innovative thinking is what the annual Aspen Ideas Festival encourages. This year, 1A joined the event in Aspen, Colorado, for conversations about current events, politics, law, economics and social trends. Today, we take you back to our June 26 conversation with Jeffrey Goldberg, editor-in-chief of The Atlantic, about the government's role in healthcare, and Kitty Boone, executive director of the Aspen Ideas Festival, about why she continues to bring people together outside the Beltway. Then, in our midweek conversation with Ambassador Wendy Sherman, chief U.S. negotiator in the 2015 Iran nuclear agreement, we ask how her past as a social worker and community organizer helped prepare her for diplomacy. She talks us through the Iran nuclear deal, the state of relations with Iran and Syria, and what to do about North Korea.
Jul 03, 2017
The News Roundup
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The Supreme Court announced it will hear arguments over the travel ban, political gerrymandering and a controversial cake shop. GOP lawmakers continue to quibble over proposed health care legislation, and President Trump makes a personal attack on members of the media. The White House issues a curious warning to Syria about further use of chemical weapons. Brazil and Venezuela face crises of government. China's Xi Jinping pays a first visit to Hong Kong as president. Discussing domestic news with 1A guest host Indira Lakshmanan is Domenico Montanaro, lead political editor for NPR, Sheryl Gay Stolberg, domestic affairs correspondent for The New York Times and Naftali Bendavid, editor and reporter for The Wall Street Journal. Guests for the international news roundup include James Kitfield, senior fellow at the Center for the Study of the Presidency and Congress, Nancy Youssef, national security correspondent for BuzzFeed and Brian Winter, editor-in-chief of Americas Quarterly.
Jun 30, 2017
Feeling Targeted By The Travel Ban & A Conversation With Governor John Hickenlooper
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The Supreme Court has agreed to hear arguments for and against President Donald Trump's proposed travel ban in October. Until then, parts of the ban are in effect, affecting travelers to the U.S. from six majority-Muslim countries. Writer Wajahat Ali and attorney Rabia Chaudry are Muslim-Americans who have thought deeply on what this moment signals for the nation, both legally and morally. They weigh in on national security concerns, religious extremism and the rise in hate crimes against Muslims in the U.S. Then, we switch gears for a conversation with Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper. A former geologist and beer brewer, he's now a leading voice on reviving local economies. We'll talk to him about the pros and cons of Colorado's strong economic growth and why he's teaming up with Republican Governor John Kasich of Ohio to fight against the GOP's health care plan.
Jun 30, 2017
The Fight For $15, And John Grisham's Latest Thriller: 1A At The Aspen Ideas Festival
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Three years ago, Seattle agreed to raise its minimum wage to $15 an hour. One new study says that's been a disaster ... but another says it's been a success. Which is it? And will either study affect other cities that are under pressure to follow Seattle's lead? We're joined by Jacob Vigdor, director of the Seattle Minimum Wage Study; Ben Zipperer, an economist and co-author of an article critical of the Seattle Minimum Wage Study; Veronique de Rugy, senior research fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University; David Hyde, a reporter at KUOW – Puget Sound Public Radio; and David Meinert, a restaurant owner in Seattle. Then, we talk to best-selling author John Grisham about his new novel, "Camino Island." Grisham's latest thriller stars a struggling young writer.
Jun 28, 2017
VC Beyond The Valley, Smart(er) Cars And The Supreme Court: 1A At The Aspen Ideas Festival
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What grows in Silicon Valley? Ideas. But why can't we grow high-tech ideas where we grow everything else? Today we meet two tech leaders who are pushing to expand the industry. AOL co-founder Steve Case wants more startups to take root in the nation's heartland. Toyota's Zack Hicks is pushing to make cars smarter by putting your data to work on the road. Then, we focus on the Supreme Court: What big cases were decided before the term ended, and what might we see this fall? NPR's Nina Totenberg and SCOTUSblog contributor Eric Citron join us to review and preview the court's big decisions.
Jun 27, 2017
The President And Poverty: 1A At The Aspen Ideas Festival
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When President Donald Trump told an audience in Iowa he didn't want poor people in Cabinet positions, his remark was met with ... applause. An estimated 40 million Americans live in poverty and appealing to their plight was once par for the course in politics. But who in Washington is looking out for poor communities today? And are the wealthy best-suited to design policies and programs to help people rise out of poverty? Our guests are Terrence McCoy, a reporter for The Washington Post; Joan Maya Mazelis, author of "Surviving Poverty: Creating Sustainable Ties Among The Poor;" Michele Gilman, director of the Saul Ewing Civil Advocacy Clinic at University of Baltimore School of Law; and Robert Doar, a fellow in poverty studies at The American Enterprise Institute and former administrator of public assistance programs in New York City under Mayor Michael Bloomberg.
Jun 26, 2017
Friday News Roundup
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Health care is just one item Congress has to resolve before the summer recess—if the recess happens at all. Two more police officers in the Midwest are acquitted of charges related to killing black suspects. Tensions with North Korea rise after a recently released American prisoner dies. Plans to send more U-S troops to Afghanistan are taking shape. And, does anyone in the royal family even want that crown? Joining us to discuss the week's national news are Maria Hinojosa, anchor and executive producer of NPR's Latino USA; Laura Meckler, staff writer for the The Wall Street Journal; and Shawna Thomas, Washington bureau chief for Vice News. Joining us to discuss international news for the week are Tom Bowman, Pentagon correspondent for NPR; Michael Goldfarb, host of the podcast "First Rough Draft of History;" and Joyce Karam, Washington Bureau Chief for Al-Hayat Newspaper.
Jun 23, 2017
Is Big Tech Getting Too Big?
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Uber founder Travis Kalanick just resigned as CEO after a controversial run, but he leaves behind a very powerful company — one worth an estimated $70 billion. Silicon Valley leaders like Kalanick have unprecedented power. Uber, Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Google have huge bank accounts and tremendous influence, culturally and politically. Where does that leave the rest of us, who are dependent on their tech and how it drives the economy? Is it time for people to push back against these multi-billion dollar companies? Joining Joshua Johnson to discuss the power of big tech companies is Cecilia Kang, technology reporter for The New York Times, Jonathan Taplin, director emeritus at University of Southern California's Annenberg Innovation Lab, Jeffrey Eisenach, director of the Center for Internet, Communications and Technology Policy at American Enterprise Institute and Jeffrey Rayport, senior lecturer at Harvard Business School.
Jun 22, 2017
What's Washington Got To Hide?
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For all the talk of a new era of transparency, it seems like more and more of the U.S. government's business is taking place behind closed doors. That's cause for concern on both sides of the aisle. "I was very frustrated the Obama administration held things so close to the vest . . . but I quite frankly haven't seen any change with the Trump administration," outgoing Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah) told the Washington Post. "In some ways I find it worse," he said. Senator Martin Heinrich (D-N.M.) described to the Post "an overall pattern of fear of any level of transparency." How much should we know about what our government is doing? How much detail do we deserve? Our panelists are Brian Stelter, senior media correspondent for CNN Worldwide; Margaret Talev, senior White House correspondent for Bloomberg News; Philip Rucker, White House bureau chief for The Washington Post; and Nicole Hemmer, assistant professor in presidential studies at the University of Virginia's Miller Center.
Jun 21, 2017
Opioid Overdoses: Mass Casualty Zones In America
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Last year alone, more Americans died from a drug overdose than were lost fighting the war in Vietnam. Opioids, including pain medicines, are turning some cities into mass casualty zones. President Trump promised to "dramatically expand access to treatment." So what's been done? And what should we do? Joining us to discuss are Lenny Bernstein, health and medicine reporter for The Washington Post; Dr. Leana Wen, Baltimore City Health Commissioner and emergency physician; and Phil Plummer, Sheriff of Montgomery County, Ohio.
Jun 20, 2017
So... How's The Resistance?
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After the inauguration of President Donald Trump, many Democrats adopted a new mantra: "Resist." The word appeared on signs waved in massive marches in cities across the country, Greenpeace put it on a giant banner outside the White House, Congressional phone lines were jammed with those carrying the message, and thousands of people put #Resist in their social media profiles. But then the Cabinet was confirmed. Neal Gorsuch was seated on the Supreme Court. A Democratic candidate lost a special election in Montana, and Jon Ossoff, the Democratic hopeful in Georgia is moving toward the center. Five months after the fanfare, how is #Resist working out? Joining us are Rep. Keith Ellison (D-Minnesota), deputy chair of the Democratic National Committee; Amy Walter, national editor of Cook Political Report; Bhaskar Sunkara, editor and publisher of Jacobin magazine; Ezra Levin, co-founder of Indivisible; and Brendan Steinhauser, former director of federal and state campaigns for FreedomWorks.
Jun 19, 2017
Friday News Roundup
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President Trump lashes out on Twitter, calling the DOJ's Russia probe "the single greatest WITCH HUNT in American political history." Lawmakers decide to play ball, vowing not to let a gunman's attack on Republicans at a practice stop the bipartisan charity game. North Korea releases an imprisoned American college student and sends him home - in a coma. And President Trump gives Defense Secretary Mattis the authority to send more troops to Afghanistan. Two panels of journalists join Joshua Johnson to discuss the week's top news stories. Covering domestic news is Jeff Mason, White House correspondent for Reuters, Molly Ball, staff writer for The Atlantic and Stephen Henderson, editorial page editor of the Detroit Free Press. Guests in the international hour include Moises Naim, chief international columnist for El Pais, Courtney Kube, national security producer for NBC News and and Yochi Dreazen, foreign editor for Vox.
Jun 16, 2017
It's A Conspiracy! The Ever More Paranoid Style Of American Politics
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On Sunday night, NBC host Megyn Kelly promoted an upcoming interview with Alex Jones. It only took a few minutes for outrage to build. Through his radio show, YouTube page, social media accounts and the website InfoWars, Jones has helped spread false or unproven theories. But how fringe is a host whose reputation the President of the United States has called "amazing"? And how should mainstream media react when theories that appear on Jones' website inspire an armed gunman to walk into a family pizza parlor? American politics have always slouched toward paranoia, wrote historian Richard Hofstadter. But when today's lawmakers cite "stuff circulating on the internet", have we slouched too far? Our guests were Joseph Uscinski, professor of political science at the University of Miami, Anna Merlan, senior reporter for the Gizmodo Special Projects Desk and Margaret Sullivan, media columnist for The Washington Post.
Jun 15, 2017
Attorney General Jeff Sessions Testifies on Russian Inquiry
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Attorney General Jeff Sessions started his testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee by calling any suggestion that he colluded with Russians during the election a "detestable" lie. But Democrats challenged Sessions' denials and some accused him of impeding the Senate investigation by not answering questions about his direct conversations with President Trump. Did the AG's answers shed any light, or just add heat? Our guests are Carrie Johnson, justice correspondent for NPR; Josh Gerstein, senior reporter for Politico; John Dean, legal counsel to President Nixon during Watergate and a political analyst for CNN; and Walter Dellinger, a partner at the law firm O'Melveny and former solicitor general, assistant attorney general and head of the Office of Legal Counsel during the Clinton administration.
Jun 14, 2017
The Unkindest Cut: Theater, President Trump And The Politics Of Performing Arts
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Conservative critics are attacking a production of William Shakespeare's "Julius Caesar" that's running in New York. The basics of the play are the same as they've been since 1599 — the title character is deemed "ambitious" and is murdered in the Roman Senate on the Ides of March. But in the Shakespeare in the Park version, Caesar is a blond president in a long necktie who is more than just reminiscent of President Donald Trump. And in this production, the conspirators who brutally murder the leader are played by women and people of color. Facing complaints, advertisers have dropped their support of the play. Have artists in a polarized nation let loose the dogs of war? Is mischief afoot? Or are there no tricks in plain and simple art? Joining Joshua Johnson to discuss politics in the arts is Kyle Smith, critic-at-large for National Review, Jesse Green, theater critic at The New York Times, Mike Wiley, actor and playwright and Jacqueline E. Lawton, professor at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. But first, news broke Monday that Senate Republicans were apparently working on a repeal to the Affordable Care Act without plans to share drafts of it with other lawmakers or the public. The secrecy and fast-tracking has angered many Democrats, who want more say and sunlight in the process. NPR's senior correspondent Ron Elving catches us up.
Jun 13, 2017
How To Earn Six Figures Without A Four-Year Degree
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By 2025, two million jobs will be unfilled because U.S. companies won't be able to find the skilled labor they need. Many of these jobs provide a middle-class salary — some pay six figures annually — and don't require a four-year degree. How to get one of these jobs? Apprenticeships. Economists and corporate leaders say they can lead to interesting and stable careers, ranging from robotics and mechanical design to medical sciences and high-end gourmet cuisine. Today, we explore finding an apprenticeship and the pros and cons. Our guests are Nicholas Wyman, author of "Job U: How To Find Wealth And Success By Developing The Skills Companies Actually Need;" Christine Scullion, director of human resources policy for the National Association of Manufacturing; Robert Lerman, founder, American Institute for Innovative Apprenticeship; Ken Hitchcock, director, Pickens County Career and Technology Center, Liberty, S.C.; and Cory McCray, electrician and member of the Maryland House of Delegates.
Jun 12, 2017
Weekend Special: 1A Movie Club Sees 'Wonder Woman'
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There had been concerns about the new Wonder Woman movie. Apart from the usual grumbles about casting from corners of the internet, critics and fans saw little to look forward to in the latest film in a series that included "Batman v. Superman" and "Suicide Squad," which reviewers declared "tiresome, ill-tempered...dismal" and "by no means good," respectively. But then the movie came out, and suffering Sappho did it surprise. Critics were nearly unanimous with praise and moviegoers were just as generous, sending "Wonder Woman" to the biggest opening weekend for a movie directed by a woman. So, what makes "Wonder Woman" a box office smash? We try to answer that question in this month's meeting of the 1A Movie Club, with guests Ann Hornaday of The Washington Post; John Horn of "The Frame" on KPCC; Laura Boyes, a film curator with the North Carolina Museum of Art; and Greg Rucka, a long-time writer for the Wonder Woman comics.
Jun 10, 2017
Friday News Roundup: Live On Stage in Chapel Hill
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Former FBI director James Comey's testimony to the Senate Intelligence Committee dominated the news this week, even before it happened. The Islamic State says it was behind attacks in Iran after claiming responsibility for an attack in London. President Trump picked a fight with London's mayor just before Britain's snap election. And Qatar's neighbors in the Gulf turn unexpectedly hostile. Joining us to discuss domestic news are Mary-Rose Papandrea, professor of law at University of North Carolina; Jeff Tiberii, Capitol bureau chief for WUNC North Carolina Public Radio, and Mandy Locke, investigative reporter for The News & Observer. Our guests for the international hour are Andrew Taylor, professor of political science at North Carolina State University; Bruce Lawrence, author of "The Koran in English: A Biography;" Miriam Cooke, professor of Arab cultures at Duke University, and — live from Moscow — Mary Louise Kelly, NPR's national security correspondent.
Jun 09, 2017
How Schools, Parents And Organizations Are Trying To Close The Achievement Gap
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College graduation rates are up for Americans in nearly every racial and ethnic group. But the so-called achievement gap is still pretty big. As of 2016, according to the Pew Research Center, 55 percent of white 25- to 34-year-olds had attained at least an associate degree. African-American students? 35 percent. There's work underway throughout the country to do something about this achievement gap. It's happening in the classroom, in the community, and at home. Our guests are Rinaldo Murray, executive director of College Tribe; Adrian Miller, a 6th grader at Center City Charter School in Washington, D.C.; Sean Beach, an 8th grader at Friendship Tech Prep Middle School in Washington, D.C.; William Darity, professor of public policy and director of the Samuel DuBois Cook Center on Social Equity at Duke University; Joseph Neff, investigative reporter at The News & Observer; Pastor Kirby Jones, founder and executive director of The Daniel Center for Math and Science; and Anya Kamenetz, education reporter for NPR.
Jun 08, 2017
Election Protection: Can The Nation's Voting System Be Trusted?
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New evidence suggests the Russians hacked further into our voting system than we thought. Now, voters are asking how we can best protect a system that delivers the peaceful transfer of power. We take a look at the electoral process and how vulnerable it is to an outside attack. Our guests are Susan Greenhalgh, elections specialist for Verified Voting's initiative to protect elections in the era of cyber attacks; Trey Grayson, former secretary of state, Kentucky; Denise Merrill, secretary of state of Connecticut and president, National Association of Secretaries of State; and Matthew Masterson, chairman of the U.S. Election Assistance Commission.
Jun 07, 2017
Making Sense of Solar Power
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Last week, President Donald Trump announced that the United States will pull out of the Paris climate accord. The move comes as a blow to alternative energy advocates who see green power as the most sustainable and environmentally responsible way forward. But by many accounts, solar power is already growing — and fast. According to one report, solar jobs have grown about 17 times faster than America's overall economy. Given this, is solar power here to stay, no matter what steps the president may take? Our guests are Robert Bryce, author of "Power Hungry: The Myths of 'Green' Energy and the Real Fuels of the Future," Allison Clements, founder of the consulting firm "goodgrid", Dan Reicher, executive director of the Steyer-Taylor Center for Energy Policy and Finance at Stanford University and Dan Conant, founder of Solar Holler in West Virginia.
Jun 06, 2017