Afropop Worldwide

By Afropop Worldwide

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Description

Afropop Worldwide is an internationally syndicated weekly radio series, online guide to African and world music, and an international music archive, that has introduced American listeners to the music cultures of Africa, Latin America and the Caribbean since 1988. Our radio program is hosted by Georges Collinet from Cameroon, the radio series is distributed by Public Radio International to 110 stations in the U.S., via XM satellite radio, in Africa via and Europe via Radio Multikulti.

Episode Date
The Nature of Trance
00:59:00
In many communities throughout Africa and the diaspora, music and spiritual life are deeply connected through the experience of trance: ritual possession by ancestors, spirits, deities, or simply the trance of communal dancing—usually accompanied by hypnotic melodies and rhythms. In this program, we explore the phenomenon of trance through a survey of musical and spiritual traditions. We'll discover how different cultural and spiritual ideas are expressed musically, how the mathematical complexity of mbira dzavuzimu music may lead to Shona spirit possession, and how experiments in neural imaging give us insight into how the brain works in a state of trance. Produced by Brenden Baker [APWW #702]<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/VgXhmSXOCCY" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 14, 2018
African Music at the Crossroads
00:59:00
Afropop producer Banning Eyre takes us on a surprise-filled tour of his 30-some years of covering African music. Through conversations with Georges Collinet and producer/agent/DJ Rab Bakari, the program reflects on how the world, the music, the culture and the media have changed and keep on changing throughout Africa and the diaspora. Along the way we hear some of the tunes that have most inspired Banning and Georges, sample the latest Afrobeats and Naija pop, and speculate on where African music is heading next. Great music, provocative thinking! [APWW #740]<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/zzROr9qvgbU" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 07, 2018
Carnival Goes Digital
00:11:13
Afropop Closeup Season 3 - Episode 2 Produced by Ian Coss<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/N0D1WuYTO4E" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 05, 2018
All That Brass
00:59:00
DO YOU LOVE BRASS? WELL, WE HAVE A SHOW FOR YOU… GANGBE BRASS BAND, REBIRTH BRASS BAND, FELA, FRANCO AND T.P.O.K. JAZZ. JOIN GEORGES COLLINET FOR “ALL THAT BRASS” - PART OF AFROPOP’S CELEBRATION OF OUR 30TH ANNIVERSARY! [APWW #780]<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/zmGa3lPlSuo" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 31, 2018
Cape Verde Sounds Heard And Unheard
00:59:00
Show#779 Producers: Banning Eyre and Sebastian Bouknight Airdate: May 24th 2018 In this program we meet Fatou Diakite, descended from a Malian family, but raised in Cape Verde and Guinea Bissau, and a master of styles from morna to Gumbe. We also meet Lucibela, now based in Lisbon, and one of the most talked about Cape Verdean singers today. We also hear new work from Nancy Viera, Jenifer Solidade and Elida Almeida. We’ll also catch up with a few male artists, and visit instrument builder and virtuoso of the cavaquinho, Luis Baptista. And we’ll hear dip in to the islands’ alternative scene. In this pro<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/PxTMSfgpqbU" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 24, 2018
Tobago's #MeToo Trailblazer: Calypso Rose
00:20:39
For six decades Calypso Rose has been one of the Caribbean’s leading feminists and human rights advocates. Now, at the age of 78, she's touring the world with songs about sexual assault, workplace discrimination, and some thoughts on Donald Trump. In this report, Afropop correspondent Dan Rosenberg talks with Calypso Rose about using music as a weapon for social change, and how Rose collaborated with fashion designer Anya Ayoung Chee to transform "Leave Me Alone" into a political movement. We will also go behind-the-scenes with her producer, Ivan Duran, bandleader Drew Gonsalves of Kobo Town, and filmmaker Pascale Obolo. S3:E1<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/k2lIjNUKgO8" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 22, 2018
Afropop Divas - Live
00:59:00
In honor of Afropop's 30th anniversary on public radio, we are proud to present "Afropop Divas - Live." These are artists of extraordinary artistic talent and larger than life personalities - recorded by Afropop Worldwide. Featured artists include Oumou Sangare from Mali, Cesaria Evora from Cabo Verde, Uum Kulthum from Egypt, and Marie Daulne born in Congo. Produced by Sean Barlow. [APWW #778]<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/1oh6c-W1kBM" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 17, 2018
Lagos and the Rise of Nigerian Afrobeats
01:07:42
Lagos and the Rise of Nigerian Afrobeats Heavy, percussive club beats with irresistible hooks and street-wise raps in Yoruba, Igbo or pidgin English—Nigerian pop music, increasingly known by the much-debated term Afrobeats, is the sound that moves Lagos and the sound of Lagos that moves the world. But it wasn’t always this way! Starting in the early 1990s, a new musical movement was born in Nigeria. Ten years into a series of military dictatorships that almost completely destroyed the Nigerian music industry, artists including Junior & Pretty, the Remedies and Plantashun Boiz brought a new, youth-centric style drawing heavily on r&b, hip-hop and reggae, with plenty of local style. Twenty years later, this music has exploded from the margins to the Nigerian mainstream and grown into an international pop music phenomenon, spreading across the African continent and influencing U.S. and U.K. tastes. Musical, political, cultural, technological and economic developments have turned the sound of Lagos pop music into a massive industry of artists, labels, radio and television stations, video directors, PR firms and more. We’ll hear the story of the birth and development of this scene straight from the influential and foundational figures who lived it, including 2Face Idibia (2Baba), DJ Jimmy Jatt, Sound Sultan, Eedris Abdulkareem, and Kenny Ogungbe of the legendary Kennis Music label and Ray Power FM. We will also hear from current stars including Iyanya, Yemi Alade, Adekunle Gold and Flavour, visit Clarence Peter’s music video studio, and hear from the producers who define the sound, including Young John, Ikon and Cobhams Asuquo. Produced by Morgan Greenstreet. Hosted by Siji Awoyinka. Photo by Kazeem Akinpelu APWW #765<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/lY9mboNKI9I" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 10, 2018
Lagos Roots: Fuji, Juju and Apala
00:59:00
Beneath the gloss of Nigeria’s contemporary pop, older roots styles, mostly derived from Yoruba tradition, still thrive. In this program, we meet four top stars of fuji music, the percussion-driven, message-heavy, and occasionally profane trance music that animates weddings and parties on a daily basis in hidden corners of Lagos. Rival “kings” K1 da Ultimate and Saheed Osupa, and a rare woman of fuji, Salawa Abeni, take us inside the rough and tumble of an exciting musical subculture little known outside Nigeria. We also meet juju legend Shina Peters and meet up-and-comers on the Lagos roots scene. This program fills out our Hip Deep portrait of a vibrant African city where music holds the keys to a tumultuous collision of cultures and peoples. Produced by Banning Eyre and Sean Barlow APWW #763<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/djVAsMPrcps" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 03, 2018
Congolese Music - The Fifth Generation
00:59:00
In the early 2000s, Afropop told the story of “Four Generations” in Congolese music—from rumba and rumba-rock to soukous and ndombolo. Now time has marched on, and once again, thrilling new sounds are emerging from Kinshasa and its global diaspora. We’ll hear hyperkinetic roots-rock from Jupiter and Okwess, Fally Ipupa’s embrace of the current Afrobeats trend, experimental innovations from Pierre Kwenders in Montreal, and more. We’ll also speak with Congolese music connoisseur Lubangi Muniania for insights into the latest trends from one of Africa’s greatest musical powerhouses. Produced by Banning Eyre APWW PGM #777<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/Br6abnLluqM" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Apr 26, 2018
Cooking with Georges Revisited
00:59:00
One of the glories of Afropop’s 30-year run has been joining our host Georges Collinet in the kitchen as he creates delicious concoctions, while grooving to his favorite tunes. This episode looks back on two classic “Cooking with Georges” episodes: Yassa Chicken from Senegal, and Yoruba soul food with guest chef Baba John Mason—all accompanied music to make you move, from wherever George’s insatiable culinary curiosity takes him. Get your apron and your dancing shoes ready! Produced by Banning Eyre APWW #776<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/V6fp9McjMLU" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Apr 19, 2018
Barbados at 50: From Soca to Spouge
00:59:00
Barbados recently celebrated its 50th anniversary of independence. We look into the rise and mysterious fall of the funky Bajan spouge beat which ruled the island in the ’70s, and discover a few underground musicians who are trying to keep it alive. Calypsonians Mighty Grynner and Red Plastic Bag detail their contributions to the lyrically potent kaiso scene. Soca stars Alison Hinds and Edwin Yearwood talk about the pros and cons of the island's competition circuit, and we learn about the hot new "soca bashment" scene. Produced by Saxon Baird and Noah Schaffer in 2017. APWW #746<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/3L1YeHNmlV8" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Apr 12, 2018
Crabs with Brains
00:59:00
Crabs with Brains In the early 1990s, mangueboys and manguegirls stimulated fertility in the veins of Recife, Brazil. They were interested in hip-hop, the collapse of modernity, chaos and marine predator attacks (mainly sharks). Armed with boundless creativity, they turned one of the world’s most poverty-stricken cities into one of Brazil’s greatest centers of culture. Mangue artists mixed hip-hop, Jamaican raggamuffin and punk rock with traditions from Brazil’s northeast like maracatu and embolada. In this program, we explore the legacy of the mangue bit movement and its biggest star, Chico Science of Nação Zumbi. We also take a look at a new generation of adventurous musicians in Recife. Join us as we connect the good vibrations of the mangue with the world network of pop! Produced by: Jesse Brent April 5, 2018: Crabs With Brains APWW PGM #704<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/sjqbDRMMTZw" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Apr 05, 2018
Reissued: African Vinyl in the 21st Century
00:59:00
The golden age of vinyl records is long past in Africa, but the market for rare and reissued African vinyl outside the continent has been growing steadily since the early 2000s. DJs and collectors have turned an obsession with rare records and forgotten gems from Cape Town to Tangiers into an international reissue and compilation industry, led by record labels such as Soundway, Strut and Analog Africa. This program explores some of the complex and shifting dynamics of neocolonialism, cultural ownership and audience in the African vinyl market. We’ll hear stories from label owners, DJs and artists, touching on controversies around Nigerian disco funk reissues, new career opportunities for sometimes-obscure African artists, the unique vinyl culture in South Africa, and much more. Produced by Morgan Greenstreet and Alejandro Van Zandt-Escobar, with Nenim Iwebuke. APWW PGM #749<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/-J7fwIp4r1Y" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Mar 29, 2018
Roots and Future: A History of UK Dance
00:59:00
Look around today’s musical mainstream, and you’ll quickly realize that dance styles are everywhere, filling stadiums, topping charts, and gathering tens of thousands in festivals around the country. Yet few know their full history. Building on prior Hip Deep explorations of the origins of house and techno in the American Midwest, “Roots and Future” explores how a community of (primarily) black British musicians, fans, DJs and radio pirates recreated dance music in the United Kingdom during the 1990s and 2000s. Connected to the musical mainstream during 1989’s drug and rave-fueled “second summer of love,” these once-segregated musicians learned to combine American hip-hop, dancehall toasting, dub bass, and techno euphoria to create style after chart-topping style, from drum-twisting jungle to the slick sounds of garage, the ferocious rhythms of grime, and the all-encompassing low end of dubstep. In this episode we’ll speak to legendary pirate radio DJs, underground label owners, and groundbreaking producers. We’ll check young MCs spitting their bars on illegal frequencies, and hear veterans playing to their beloved audiences. And most importantly? We’ll rave. See you on the dance floor. Produced by Sam Backer. APWW PGM #733<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/E1qAJ6VXvyE" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Mar 15, 2018
Plenty Bacchanal: Carnival in Flux
00:59:00
​Trinidadians call their annual Carnival festivities "the greatest show on earth" and with good reason. The Carnival season is overflowing with art and music: steelpan, calypso, soca and extravagant masquerade costumes. On this Afropop program, we take a look at how the Carnival arts are kept alive in today's Trinidad, in an untidy, evolving cultural, economic and political landscape at home and abroad. Open your ears to some life-giving music and conversations about Trinidad and its brilliant bacchanal. Produced by Sebastian Bouknight. APWW PGM #774​​<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/5UrcLgmmNDM" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Mar 08, 2018
Jamaica - Big A Yard, Big Abroad
00:59:00
Since the 1960s in Jamaica, iconic figures such as Bob Marley have gathered in backyards to write reggae anthems that conquered world charts. The yard remains a cornerstone in Jamaican culture. Musicians withdraw from the violence of the city to create and play songs in their yards. In Jamaican patois, “mi yard” means “my home,” and many songs, proverbs and colloquialisms hinge on the word “yard.” More even than the music itself, the yard evokes a state of mind and a physical space wherein artists create amid the warmth of acoustic sound, raw emotion of voices and a collective energy. In this program, we move yard to yard in Jamaica, listening to acoustic music being written and recorded, smelling trees and flowers, and meeting legendary artists like Ken Boothe, Winston McAnuff, Cedric Myton of the Congos, Kiddus I, Robbie Lyn, Viceroys, or Nambo Robinson, as well as a number of young and emerging reggae artists like JAH9, Var, and Derajah, who grew up and found their artistic voices in ghetto yards. You've never heard Jamaica sound like this before! Produced by Elodie Maillot and Banning Eyre. APWW PGM #753<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/_a-HHg2svYE" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Mar 01, 2018
Highlights From Afropop Closeup: Season Two
00:59:00
Since the launch of the second Afropop Closeup season in the summer of 2017, we’ve taken you through the stories of producers, lovers, activists, poets and musicians from Africa and the diaspora finding their respective ways in the world and connecting through music. Since this series is only available online, we are bringing you highlights of some of the most captivating stories in this season. You will hear the voices of our regular Afropop producers and some newcomers narrating these stories from around the world. Produced by Akornefa Akyea. APWW PGM #772<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/RT1vQsn6DH4" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Feb 22, 2018
Africa and the Blues
00:59:00
When this episode first aired, the recent death of Malian guitar legend Ali Farka Touré inspired a new round of speculation about the roots of the blues in Africa. Touré famously argued that the beloved American genre was "nothing but African", a bold assertion. Among scholars, Gerhard Kubik's book Africa and the Blues has gained recognition as the most serious and penetrating examination of the subject. This program in our Hip Deep series will be produced in collaboration with Kubik, allowing a rare opportunity to delve into his vast collection of recordings. We will listen to Ali Farka Touré and John Lee Hooker through Kubik's ears, and hear from many lesser known artists on both sides of the Atlantic. Even though the blues is a central component of American music, it is one of the most mysterious, and least understood aspects of our popular music culture. This program will give us new insight. Produced by Banning Eyre. (originally aired 2007)<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/LctkSqPCDFc" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Feb 15, 2018
What's in a Nigerian Name?
00:25:54
Musicians everywhere adapt stage names. They can be profound, grandiose or simply humorous, but they always represent a way of distinguishing the artist from the person. In Nigeria, there’s something special going on with stage names. For one thing, they are nearly universal. They can also change over the course of an artist’s career. And they reflect the realities of Nigeria’s complex history, under British colonialism, military rule and the recent democratic period. Stage names riff on the domains of business, religion, politics, the military and the far reaches of the unique Nigerian imagination. This podcast offers a whimsical tour of contemporary artist names in this diverse musical nation. Produced by Banning Eyre.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/XT_jcFcApR4" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Feb 06, 2018
Reimagining Jazz in Africa: Cape Town Cosmopolitans and Beyond
00:59:00
In recognition of the recent death of South African maestro Hugh Masekela, we revisit a program that touches on one of his earliest musical landmarks, The Jazz Epistles. It’s no secret that the distant roots of American jazz lay in Africa. But how did Afro-America’s revolutionary sound reshape African music? On this Hip Deep edition, we examine how African artists found a modern, global voice using jazz as inspiration. Author Carol Muller tells the story of Abdullah Ibrahim, whose prolific career was launched with “Duke Ellington Presents the Dollar Brand Trio” followed by “Anatomy of a South African Village Suite.” We dig into the political significance of the U.S. State Department tours of Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington, and how their visit to Africa underscored the greater fight for social justice for blacks around the world. Senegalese music scholar Timothy Mangin explains West Africa's attraction to American big band music. Finally, jazz and African music scholar Ingrid Monson tells the story of jazz in Ethiopia and Nigeria, and how this American tradition sculpted the sounds of such luminaries as Mulatu Astatke and Fela Kuti.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/ZrOJCtj8atA" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Feb 01, 2018
Afropop at 30: Live in the '90s
00:59:00
As we begin our year of celebrating Afropop Worldwide's 30th anniversary on the air, we take a special look back at some highlights of our long run on public radio. We return to our past visits to South Africa, Congo, Senegal, Mali, Cuba, and check in with the hippest hip-hop artists we caught performing at Nuits d'Afrique and Mawazine. Produced by Sean Barlow and Banning Eyre. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW PGM #771 Distributed 1/25/2018<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/G7uuhEDNC6Y" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jan 25, 2018
The Voice of Protest: Betsayda Machado Sings Against Hunger in Venezuela
00:23:50
The songs of Betsayda Machado, the leading voice of Afro-Venezuelan music, address many of the most painful topics of daily life of her country: hunger, poverty, shortages of basic medicine, and deadly street riots – stemming from the current economic and political crisis in Venezuela. They talk about its consequences on a gut level: empty store shelves, and the devastation of parents unable to feed their children. Some in Venezuela who have spoken out have faced retribution, but that hasn’t deterred Betsayda Machado. Produced by Dan Rosenberg. About the producer: Dan Rosenberg is a journalist and music producer based in Toronto, Canada. He reports and music and culture for The Huffington Post, The Times (UK), The Rough Guides and various public radio programs including “Afropop Worldwide” and “Café International”. He also has produced over 60 albums including Yiddish Glory and dozens of releases for the Rough Guide to World Music series. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ S2:E11 Afropop Closeup Distributed 1/23/2018<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/T7xnXt6e9Pw" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jan 23, 2018
Time Travel Through Afro-Paris
00:59:00
Since at least the 1980s, when this program first aired, Paris has been one of the most important incubators of African music on the planet. That’s why we’ve visited there to take the pulse so often. On this program, we look back on 30 years of adventures with African music in Paris. We’ll hear studio sessions with Congolese guitar ace Diblo Dibala and zouk stars Kassav, interviews, live concerts, and that special ambiance that only Paris can provide. Produced by Banning Eyre and Sean Barlow. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW PGM #770 Distributed 1/18/2018<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/mLJ_J_Zm7Yo" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jan 18, 2018
“For My Ayeeyo:” Learning Somali Poetry From a Distance
00:24:00
Amal Hussein and Hamdi Mohamed have a lot in common. Both were born in Kenya, where their parents fled as refugees during the Somali Civil War, and both came to Boston when they were just a few years old. They’re both poets — and equally important for this story — both their grandmothers are poets. But there’s one crucial difference in the two women's stories. Hamdi grew up with her grandmother ("ayeeyo" in Somali") in the house, whispering poems in her ears. Amal has only known her grandmother on the phone — she stayed behind when the rest of the family fled. Nevertheless, it is the distant words and stories of her grandmother that inspire Amal to take on the challenge of writing her first Somali poem. Produced by Ian Coss. This program was produced in partnership with The New American Songbook podcast from The GroundTruth Project. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ S2:E10 Afropop Closeup Distributed 1/09/2018<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/8ZT1ya4-uUg" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jan 12, 2018
Hip Deep in Mali: Growing Into Music in 21st Century Bamako
00:59:00
This program presents a musical portrait of Bamako in the wake of crisis. In 2012-13, Islamists occupied the north and a coup d’etat threatened a recent history of functioning democracy. With borders restored and a new elected government in place, we find musical life returning with festivals, nightclub shows and street weddings. But that picture hides darker realities. Ethnomusicologist Lucy Durán has been studying the oral transmission of music in various countries, notably among griot families in Mali. With her guidance, we explore the precarious lives of griots in today’s Bamako, focusing on the upbringing and education of children in these hereditary families of historian-entertainers. Elders and traditionalists say the griot tradition has been corrupted beyond hope, and even advise their young to pursue different professions. Others persist, within an environment where growing religious conservatism puts increasing pressure on the lives and careers of all musicians. We meet three extraordinarily talented griot children, and hear music and reflections from kora master Toumani Diabaté and his massively popular songwriter son, Sidiki. And we get a fascinating historical perspective from Gregory Mann, professor of history at Columbia University. Produced by Banning Eyre. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW #731 Distributed 1/11/2018<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/VUsHc-6TkKo" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jan 11, 2018
Santo Domingo Blues: The Story of Bachata
00:59:00
Bachata is a music of the people. Recalling the American blues, bachata was infamous as the anthem of the hard-drinking, womanizing, down-on-his-luck man, vilified as the entertainment of the brothels and the cabarets, and worshipped by the down-trodden poor as the deepest expression of their feelings. Today it is an international sensation. Alex Wolfe, director of the film "Santo Domingo Blues: The Story of Bachata" brings us live ambience and stories of bachata stars Luis Vargas, Antony Santos, Luis Segura, Adridia Ventura. Originally produced in 2002 by Alex Wolfe. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW #388 Distributed 1/4/2018<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/ejsqXBP6ass" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jan 04, 2018
Ghana: Celebration Sounds
00:59:00
In hard times and boom times, people in Ghana know how to party. In this program, we hear the regional pop and neotraditional music that animates festivals, funerals and community celebrations across the county. We travel to the lush Volta region in the east to hear Ewe borborbor, agbadza and brass band music. In the northern city of Tamale, we hear Dagbani traditional music, hip-hop and pop, and visit the vibrant Damba chieftaincy festival in nearby Yendi. Back in the bustling metropolis, Accra, we get down to the latest pop hits and underground styles moving hips in the capital city. Produced by Morgan Greenstreet. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW PGM #745 Distributed 12/28/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/wWlcspVBiow" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Dec 28, 2017
Underground
00:16:05
Underneath the streets of New York City, in the tunnels and stations of the busiest subway system in the country, there is a thriving music scene. Amidst the noise of passing trains, we meet Papa Fara, a Cameroonian xylophonist and singer, who plays for tips and captures the love of strangers and makes friends with his quick, warm smile. But, behind the smile and beautiful melodies, something is troubling Papa Fara. There’s a reason he’d rather be underground. Produced by Morgan Greenstreet. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ S2:E9 Afropop Closeup Distributed 12/26/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/oiJQUn6wpeA" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Dec 26, 2017
The (New) Sound Of Afro Paris
00:59:00
Paris has been a thriving capital for African music for decades. Since the 1980s, many major musicians such as Mory Kanté, Khaled and Amadou and Mariam launched their international careers there. Today, as migration patterns evolve, borders tighten and the world becomes increasingly connected via the Internet, Paris remains more than ever a city of encounters and innovations for artists of African origin. With new generations experimenting and new audiences emerging, the term “world music” has lost relevance as artists explore outside geographic and industry-dictated boundaries. In this program, we explore the new "Afropolitan" sounds of Paris, from concert halls to studios, from the heart of the city to immigrant neighborhoods in the banlieues. We hear from Mauritanian singer Noura Mint Seymali, and instrumentalists Ballake Sissoko and Lansiné Kouyaté exploring alongside classically trained French musicians. We catch up with Nigerian Afrobeat pioneer Tony Allen to hear about his life in Paris and his new jazz project, drop in on a recording session with young Algerian raï singer Sofiane Saidi, and meet Sudanese flautist Ghandi Adam, who provides a musical platform for migrants and refugees with his Lamma Orchestra. The sounds of tomorrow are in the making in Paris today! Produced by Elodie Maillot and Alejandro Van Zandt-Escobar Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW #769 Distributed 12/21/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/0iZIkE0kAcI" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Dec 21, 2017
Thomas Mapfumo 2: The Mugabe Years
00:59:00
In recognition of the end of Robert Mugabe's 37-year rule in Zimbabwe, we are rebroadcasting our program on the career of Thomas Mapfumo during the Mugabe years. Part two of the story of Zimbabwe’s most consequential singer and bandleader picks up at the dawn of the country’s independence in 1980. The program focuses on key songs from Thomas Mapfumo’s vast post-independence catalogue, beginning with his celebration of victory, and his warnings about “dissidents” out to destabilize a young nation struggling for unity. The 1988 song “Corruption” officially opens Mapfumo’s rift with the regime of Robert Mugabe, turning a government financial scandal into a pop culture sensation. 1999’s “Mamvemve” accuses leaders of betraying the promises of the liberation struggle and reducing a rich country to tatters, and 2003’s “Marima Nzara” takes on the government over Zimbabwe’s most prolonged and vexing challenge—reclaiming land stolen from Africans by Rhodesian settlers over a century of colonial rule. In all, this is an amazing saga of a popular singer’s evolution from enthusiastic booster to caustic critic of a young African government. Zimbabwean historian Mhoze Chikowero contextualizes all these songs with vivid descriptions of the issues and events that Mapfumo’s work both responded to and shaped. At the time this program was recorded, Afropop producer Banning Eyre had been researching a biography of Mapfumo for more than 15 years, and the broadcast draws upon his, and Afropop’s, wealth of archival interviews and rare musical recordings, resulting in a persuasive portrait of a brilliant musical innovator and an under-recognized titan of African post-colonial cultural politics. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ Produced by Banning Eyre. APWW #657 Distributed 12/14/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/CSDi_MP0PF0" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Dec 14, 2017
Biafra at 50: A Wound That Does Not Heal
00:31:22
During the 2016 U.S. presidential election, some foreign observers were puzzled by groups of Nigerians who showed support for Donald Trump’s campaign. The most prominent supporters were the IPOB (Indigenous People of Biafra), a controversial, fervently Christian, mostly Igbo, nationalist organization that is still fighting for independence from Nigeria. On Jan. 20, 2017 a rally in Port Harcourt celebrating the inauguration of Donald Trump turned violent, and a number of people were shot dead by Nigerian security forces. In order to understand Trump’s appeal to the IPOB, we hear from current Biafra activists and dissenting voices in the Port Harcourt community, and examine how the unresolved issues that triggered the devastating Biafran War in the 1960s still resonate and persist in the Niger Delta today. Produced by Banning Eyre. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ S2:E8 Afropop Closeup Distributed 12/12/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/ovBPMYRqKKI" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Dec 12, 2017
Stocking Stuffers 2017
00:59:00
It's time once again for Georges Collinet and Banning Eyre to spin through our favorite African and African diaspora releases of the year. 2017 has been a knockout, with spectacular new albums, including a collaboration between Mali's Trio da Kali and Kronos Quartet (Ladilikan), the debut of Madagascar's super trio Toko Telo (Toy Raha Toy), Oumou Sangare's comeback (Mogoya), a killer live set of Garifuna pop from Aurelio (Darandi) and the long-awaited second album from Zimbabwe's hottest young band Mokoomba (Luyando.) Plus we sample new recordings by legendary African big bands--Afrisa, Baobab, Les Mangelepa—Afro-Americana from Ranky Tanky to the Preservation Hall Jazz Band, Latin roots music from Cuba, Colombia and Venezuela, and of course lots of kicking Afrobeats tunes from the bustling cities of West Africa. Female artists dominate the stage in our 2017 year-end roundup. More disciplined media outlets might give you a Top 10. Not us. We're doing our best to give the nod to some 50 great releases! A whirlwind feast for the ears, and a wide range of gift suggestions for the holiday season. Produced by Banning Eyre. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW #768 Distributed 12/7/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/kuqAhv-ah0Y" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Dec 07, 2017
Cuts from the Crypt III
00:59:00
Back in the day, host Georges Collinet and producer Sean Barlow (A.K.A. Prince Segue Segue) dragged stacks of vinyl all over the country to deejay for station-produced Afropop Dance Parties. We'll dig into the past to retrieve some of our favorite gems from the Congo, Zimbabwe, Colombia, Brazil and Cote d'Ivoire. Produced by Sean Barlow. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW #767 Distributed 11/30/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/c0JWsRfab5U" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Nov 30, 2017
Kizito Mihigo and the Politics of Music in Post-Genocide Rwanda
00:19:57
Kizito Mihigo is one of Rwanda’s most beloved singers, yet he is currently imprisoned, serving a 10-year sentence for treason. In 2014, Mihigo released a song which criticized the wartime actions of Rwanda’s governing political party. The song went viral, sparking a nationwide dialogue around the genocide, and weeks later, Mihigo was arrested on charges of conspiracy to assassinate the president of Rwanda, Paul Kagame. Is Mihigo truly guilty of conspiracy, or only of speaking (and singing) truth to power? Produced by Charulata Sinha. About the producer: Charulata Sinha is a writer and radio producer based in New York City. She has worked with WNYC’s Radiolab and Vice’s Radio Motherboard. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ S2:E7 Afropop Closeup Distributed 11/28/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/7264Ret8ir8" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Nov 28, 2017
A Brief History of Funk
00:59:00
Funk is a perennial favorite. In this panoramic history of the grooviest of genres, we hear track after track of absolute boogie-down classics. Everything from Sly and the Family Stone to James Brown, with a few stops to hear legends like the Meters, Kool and the Gang, and Parliament. We’ll also hear the great Bobby Byrd explain the rhythmic motor behind the JB’s, and Georges Clinton talk about the roots of his funk. Produced by Ned Sublette. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW #124<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/AbsQ3QFM60Y" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Nov 23, 2017
Afropop Live! 2017
00:59:00
Here’s Afropop’s annual roundup of great live recordings we’ve captured over the past year but haven't found time to air. We'll hear live tracks from our recent fieldwork in Nigeria, highlights from the Nuits d’Afrique festival in Montreal, the Sacred Music Festival in Fes, Morocco, and the Africa Now! festival at New York’s Apollo Theater, as well as intimate recordings of the kora/cello duo Ballake Sissoko and Vincent Segal. From a Hausa traditional jam in northern Nigeria to rowdy Congolese rock from Mbongwana Star in New York City, expect a rich platter of sounds. Less talk, more music! Produced by Banning Eyre and Ben Richmond. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW #766<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/9C8ivGRzKUA" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Nov 16, 2017
Night at the Clash
00:24:32
Sound clashes have been a mainstay of reggae culture for decades. Mobile sound system teams face off to see who can best move the crowd with their selections of records and exclusive "dub plate" jingles. On a recent late night in Queens, seven sounds competed for the U.S. champion title, and many were surprised by the winner. We meet the sound-system operators and talk to fans about why they love the clash scene. About the producer: Noah Schaffer is an award-winning music journalist based in Boston. He produced the 2017 Afropop Worldwide episode "Barbados at 50: Spouge to Soca" and is the roots and world music columnist for ArtsFuse.org. He is currently working on a story about southern soul for Living Blues magazine and a full-length oral history project with gospel legend Spencer Taylor Jr. and his group, the Highway QCs. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ S2:E6 Distributed 11/14/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/HXEx35JgJ68" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Nov 15, 2017
Hip Deep Angola Part 2: Kuduro and Beyond
00:59:00
Join producer Ned Sublette on the streets of Angola’s big, smoggy, oil-booming capital city of Luanda. Peace came to Angola in 2002 after 42 years of war, and now everything is different, with construction under way everywhere. The post-war generation of the last 10 years communicates via text messaging and electronic music: The biggest of which is the techno-meets-rap-meets-African-dance style known as kuduro (literally, “hard-ass”). But there’s also the zouk-like couple dance of kizomba, a phenomenon that began in the ‘80s and still packs in dancers to Luanda clubs and, on amore underground level, the computer-driven style called Afro-house. We’ll talk to kuduro stars Titica, Cabo Snoop, and the charismatic comic duo of President Gasoline and Prince Black Gold, and ride to the bairro of Marçal to visit the studio of Afro-house beatmaker DJ Satelite. Produced by Ned Sublette. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW #648 Distributed 11/9/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/sIvJequjtaA" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Nov 09, 2017
Hip Deep Angola part 1: Music and Nation in Luanda
00:59:00
We explore the role music played in the creation of a uniquely Angolan consciousness as the country struggled toward independence in the 1960s and ‘70s after centuries of colonialism. Our guides will be producer Ned Sublette, on the ground in Angola, and Dr. Marissa Moorman, historian of southern Africa, and author of Intonations: A Social History of Music in Luanda, Angola from 1945 to Recent Times. We’ll hear the pathbreaking group Ngola Ritmos, who dared sing songs in Kimbundu publicly when it was prohibited by the Portuguese. We’ll hear immortal voices from the age when the guitar-driven style called semba ruled, as well as some snazzy ‘60s guitar instrumentals. Produced by Ned Sublette. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW # 647<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/0YjC2_p1OH8" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Nov 02, 2017
Shackled Love: LGBT Asylum Seekers in the U.K.
00:21:57
Sibo Dube and Maureen Nabisere met inside the U.K.’s most notorious immigrant detention centre, Yarl’s Wood. In the midst of captivity and uncertainty, the two women bonded in the detention center choir group; they had come to the U.K. seeking liberation from the emotional imprisonment they had faced in Zimbabwe and Uganda respectively, where their sexuality is illegal. Their relationship would be their emotional salvation, and potentially, their ticket to freedom in the U.K., which places a heavy burden of proof on LGBT asylum seekers to show they’ve had same-sex relationships. Produced by Hannah Harris Green and David Waters. About the producers: Hannah Harris Green is an independent writer, reporter and radio producer interested in gender and globalization. Her work has appeared in How We Get to Next, Quartz, The Guardian and VICE News and has aired on KPCC, WHYY, Pacifica and KUNC. David Waters, who produced the interviews for this piece, is a journalist and radio producer based in London, U.K.. David produces the Voices podcast coming soon on Audible. More on Sibo’s story will be featured in an upcoming episode this fall. Collaboration: The Voices podcast, forthcoming on Audible Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ S2:E5 Distributed 10/31/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/KkNvWBxrJsI" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Oct 31, 2017
Lagos and the Rise of Nigerian Afrobeats
01:07:42
Heavy, percussive club beats with irresistible hooks and street-wise raps in Yoruba, Igbo or pidgin English—Nigerian pop music, increasingly known by the much-debated term Afrobeats, is the sound that moves Lagos and the sound of Lagos that moves the world. But it wasn’t always this way! Starting in the early 1990s, a new musical movement was born in Nigeria. Ten years into a series of military dictatorships that almost completely destroyed the Nigerian music industry, artists including Junior & Pretty, the Remedies and Plantashun Boiz brought a new, youth-centric style drawing heavily on r&b, hip-hop and reggae, with plenty of local style. Twenty years later, this music has exploded from the margins to the Nigerian mainstream and grown into an international pop music phenomenon, spreading across the African continent and influencing U.S. and U.K. tastes. Musical, political, cultural, technological and economic developments have turned the sound of Lagos pop music into a massive industry of artists, labels, radio and television stations, video directors, PR firms and more. We’ll hear the story of the birth and development of this scene straight from the influential and foundational figures who lived it, including 2Face Idibia (2Baba), DJ Jimmy Jatt, Sound Sultan, Eedris Abdulkareem, and Kenny Ogungbe of the legendary Kennis Music label and Ray Power FM. We will also hear from current stars including Iyanya, Yemi Alade, Adekunle Gold and Flavour, visit Clarence Peter’s music video studio, and hear from the producers who define the sound, including Young John, Ikon and Cobhams Asuquo. Produced by Morgan Greenstreet. Hosted by Siji Awoyinka. Photo by Kazeem Akinpelu Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW #765 Distributed 10/26/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/cGPKKCe0Re8" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Oct 26, 2017
Riqueza del Barrio: Puerto Rican Music in the United States
00:59:00
For almost a month, the fate of Puerto Rico and its inhabitants has remained unknown due to the devastating effects of Hurricane Maria during the unusually active hurricane season of 2017. There are still many people on the island living without electricity or potable water and in desperate need of assistance. This week we are airing a special Hip Deep encore presentation of “Riqueza del Barrio: Puerto Rican Music in the United States” produced by Ned Sublette to help raise awareness and celebrate the vibrant music and culture of Puerto Rico. To find out how you can help, please visit http://www.afropop.org/39658/hurricane-relief/. Once Puerto Ricans became U.S. citizens in 1917, El Barrio sprang up in New York. By the 1930s, they were the dominant Latin group in the city. Tito Puente, born on 110th St. in 1923, was the first important Latin star who was a native speaker of English. Puerto Ricans’ distinctive way of playing popular Cuban styles became, almost paradoxically, an expression of Puerto Rican national identity, even as traditional Puerto Rican bomba and plena became a familiar sound in New York, and as Ricans invented a unique jazz style. In the last few years, reggaetón has dominated Latin radio internationally. “Riqueza del Barrio” will explore Puerto Rico’s distinctive cultural identity as expressed through flavorful music. Produced by Hip Deep cofounder Ned Sublette, author of Cuba and Its Music, with guest scholar Juan Flores, author of From Bomba to Hip Hop. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW #509 Distributed 10/19/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/4tVvPkeRRF4" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Oct 19, 2017
Black, Greek and Proud: Negros Tou Moria
00:17:39
As Europe closes Greece’s borders in an attempt to stem the seemingly never-ending flow of refugees, immigrant artists are finding it tough to survive in an increasingly xenophobic environment. Ghanaian-Greek rapper Negros Tou Moria is carving out new territory and challenging stereotypes with rap music that is deeply rooted in Greek language and culture. Produced by Heidi Fuller-love. About the producer: Heidi Fuller-love is an award-winning freelance travel writer and radio producer based in Spain and Greece. She travels for five months of the year and regularly contributes to radio outlets including BBC and Deutsche Welle. She also writes for dozens of print outlets worldwide, and she produces and hosts “British Airways City Guides” to the airline’s short haul destinations. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ S2:E4 Distributed 10/17/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/NZS_6keYn5U" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Oct 17, 2017
Remembering Fela
00:59:00
Fela Anikulapo-Kuti would be 79 years old this month, had he not died from complications of AIDS in 1997. By the time of his death, Fela was the inventor of the enduring and influential Afrobeat music style, the composer of an enormous body of music, and one of the bravest political voices in 20th century African music. It is fair to say that no African musician before or since has sacrificed more for the principles he believed in. Nigerian history and music have barreled forth during the two decades since Fela left us. A powerful new generation of Nigerian musicians have emerged in that time, and the music they now champion has been dubbed “Afrobeats,” an appropriation of the name Fela gave his original sound during its heyday. The youngest artists on the scene today have no direct memory of Fela, though his legacy is impossible to escape. In this program, we hear from current day Nigerians from multiple generations and genres—fuji, juju, hip-hop (Afrobeats) and highlife—on how they remember this musical giant, and how they reckon with his complex and challenging legacy. Produced by Banning Eyre and Morgan Greenstreet. Hosted by Sahr Ngaujah. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW #764 Distributed 10/12/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/kYrAQJkg46E" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Oct 12, 2017
Accounting for Taste: Dire Straits, Jim Reeves and Death Metal in Africa
00:59:00
When we talk about the influence of American performers on African music, we usually think about a few obvious examples, legends like Michael Jackson, Jimi Hendrix or James Brown. In this episode, we go beyond these stars to explore the legacy of some lesser-known inspirations. We’ll learn how the fluid guitar playing of ’70s rock band Dire Straits became massively popular in the Sahel, influencing Tuareg rockers like Tinariwen and Tamikrest. We’ll hear about the American country superstar Jim Reeves’ African career, and the unlikely story of how the pedal steel made it from Hawaii to Lagos. Finally, we’ll travel to Angola with the help of director Jeremy Xido, to explore that nation’s death metal scene. And along the way, we will try to understand just how to account for taste. Produced by Sam Backer with help from Jesse Brent. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW #703 Distributed 10/5/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/I9LJG2KUEX4" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Oct 05, 2017
Afro-Symphonic Folk: From the Coasts of Africa to the San Francisco Bay
00:17:35
The San Francisco Bay Area is a unique cultural space that has given birth to some of the most iconic countercultural American music. It is a place where identities can be fluid and hyphenated, where new voices emerge to speak to their times. Two very different Bay Area artists, Meklit Hadero and Zena Carlota, use their music to explore what it means to live on two sides of a hyphen: African-American, black-artist, Ethiopian-American, female-musician, to name a few. Produced by Lisa Bartfai About the producer: Lisa Bartfai is a freelance radio journalist, writer and translator based in Brunswick, ME. As a senior producer at award-winning Blunt Youth Radio, Lisa shares her love of radio with the next generation of noisemakers. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ S2:E3 Distributed 10/3/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/EFVPi4z_2PA" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Oct 03, 2017
Lagos Roots: Fuji, Juju and Apala
00:59:00
Beneath the gloss of Nigeria’s contemporary pop, older roots styles, mostly derived from Yoruba tradition, still thrive. In this program, we meet four top stars of fuji music, the percussion-driven, message-heavy, and occasionally profane trance music that animates weddings and parties on a daily basis in hidden corners of Lagos. Rival “kings” K1 da Ultimate and Saheed Osupa, and a rare woman of fuji, Salawa Abeni, take us inside the rough and tumble of an exciting musical subculture little known outside Nigeria. We also meet juju legend Shina Peters and meet up-and-comers on the Lagos roots scene. This program fills out our Hip Deep portrait of a vibrant African city where music holds the keys to a tumultuous collision of cultures and peoples. Produced by Banning Eyre. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW #763 Distributed 9/28/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/0G-VvjkvWWk" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Sep 28, 2017
San Francisco: Afropop by the Bay
00:59:00
It turns out that the first American city to host a roster of local African bands was not New York, Miami or Chicago, but the San Francisco Bay Area of northern California. Hugh Masekela brought Hedzoleh Soundz from Ghana, and they settled in Santa Cruz. Nigerian maestros O.J. Ekemode and Joni Haastrup lived in Oakland in the 1970s. South African musicians from the touring stage show Ipitombi also settled in the Bay Area and started the band Zulu Spear. By the early ‘80s, the Bay Area “worldbeat” scene was in full swing, and along with it came Kotoja, Mapenzi, Big City, the Nigerian Allstars and more. Join us for a tour through the sounds and stories of the Bay Area’s catalytic African music scene. Produced by Banning Eyre. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW #713 Distributed 9/21/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/EY7-uJwqzv8" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Sep 21, 2017
Rushin’ to Bacchanal: When Caribbean Festivals Collide
00:20:23
Junkanoo, an annual communal parade held in the Bahamas, is a labor of love for the Bahamian people that dates back centuries. The parade, which has Akan cultural roots, emerged in the time of slavery, but it has since moved from the margins to the very center of society, becoming the bedrock of national culture. When the government wanted to invest millions into the development of a major cultural festival designed to attract tourists, Junkanoo seemed like the obvious choice. In this podcast, we hear what happened when the government chose to use Trinidad Carnival as the model instead.  Produced by Gabrielle Misiewicz Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ Distributed 9/19/2017 Afropop Closeup S2:E2<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/k2QRi4cN6FQ" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Sep 19, 2017
Fania Records at 50
00:59:00
New York City is home to the earthshaking Latin dance music known as salsa. From the mid-1960s through the 1980s, Fania Records released many of the landmark albums of the era, creating a salsa boom that reverberated around the world. In 2014, Fania celebrated 50 years in the business; and to celebrate, we dug into the label’s history. We’ll hear from some of the principal players, including Aurora Flores, Nicky Marrero and Larry “El Judio Maravilloso” Harlow, and tell a few Afropop-centric stories along the way. Produced by Morgan Greenstreet. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW #696 Distributed 9/14/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/8sr79_gtDPQ" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Sep 14, 2017
Podcast Special: Closeup #1
00:59:00
To celebrate the launch of the second season of the Afropop Closeup podcast, this special radio program features some of the stories from the inaugural season. We’ll hear about the plight of Haitian radio stations in New York; the story of Mabiisi, a unique transnational collaboration be-tween a Burkinabe rapper and a Ghanaian roots musician; and the surprising popular resurgence of U.K. grime music. Subscribe to our podcast and follow the second season of the Afropop Closeup podcast to hear intimate stories of the struggles and triumphs of human life in Rwanda, Nigeria, Haiti, the Bahamas and the African diasporas of Greece, the U.K., Paris, New York and San Francisco. Produced by Morgan Greenstreet, Ian Coss and Sam Backer. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ [APWW #762] Distributed 9/7/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/isQCjfitKng" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Sep 07, 2017
Haiti's Fight for Copyright
00:33:13
Life in the music business has its ups and downs—especially in Haiti—and Serge Turnier (A.K.A. Powersurge) has lived both extremes. As a producer he makes his living from recorded music, not from concerts, and so many of those ups and downs have revolved around the question of copyright: a legal system for controlling who can copy, record and perform a piece of music. The concept can seem abstract, but in Ternier’s story it makes all the difference as he decides whether to give up on the Haitian music industry entirely. Produced by Ian Coss. This program was produced in partnership with Life of the Law. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ Distributed 9/5/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/OPf4EuGYV08" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Sep 05, 2017
Shake It Fo Ya Hood: Bounce, New Orleans Hip-Hop
00:59:00
*Music in this show contains some explicit language* New Orleans, Louisiana is home to some of America's greatest musical traditions, and plays an outsized influence on the evolution of everything from jazz through to r&b, rock and funk. Today, the city is still legendary for its second line brass bands and brightly costumed Mardi Gras Indians. But if you've rolled through New Orleans on pretty much any night in the last 30 years, you've probably heard another sound—the clattering, booming, hip-shaking, chant-heavy roll of bounce, a form of hip-hop music, dance and culture unique to the Crescent City. Pulling from the national mainstream but remaking it the way that only New Orleans can, bounce has become a sonic touchstone for an entire generation of residents. For this Hip Deep edition, Afropop digs into the close-knit scene, talking to dancers, producers, MCs, and managers from over 30 years of bounce, all to explore the beat that drives New Orleans—and to find out what it means to the people who bring it to life. Produced by Jessi Olsen and Sam Backer. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ [APWW #761] Distributed 8/31/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/wIKxcJXwyAU" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Aug 31, 2017
An Island, Divided
00:59:00
The island of Hispaniola, located in the western Caribbean, is divided in two by an invisible line that snakes down its central mountain range. On one side is Haiti, the other the Dominican Republic: one colonized by the French, the other by Spain. The island was the first place in the Americas colonized by Europeans, and was the place where trans-Atlantic slavery was first implemented. It was also home to the first--and only--successful slave revolt when Haiti rebelled against France in 1791. Yet there has frequently been a tremendous amount of tension between the two countries. For decades, Eurocentric elites in the Dominican Republic have painted Haitians as inferior and threatening. Today, there is an uproar around the issues of Haitian immigration to the D.R., and politicians who are lobbying to build a wall between the two countries. Despite the conflicts, Dominicans and Haitians are linked by deeply interwoven histories, economies and cultures. In this episode of Afropop Worldwide, we tell the story of the relationship between Haiti and the Dominican Republic through music, from the Haitian Revolution to the 1937 massacre perpetrated by Dominican dictator Rafael Trujillo. We also visit a batey community in the sugarcane fields, where residents play Haitian-Dominican gagá music, explore the relationship between race and music on the island, and meet young people using music to bring the people of Hispaniola closer together. Produced by Marlon Bishop. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ [APWW #760] Distributed 8/24/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/QREVBoq1Wnc" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Aug 24, 2017
Sahel Sounds: Modern Music from Mali
00:59:00
Working closely with Christopher Kirkley, the writer and recordist behind the Sahel Sounds blog and label, we will meet the newest generation of musicians from Mali. With their possibilities transformed by technology and their musical tastes reshaped by an exposure to sounds drawn from across the world, these young musicians are radically rethinking centuries-old traditions. Get ready for the fast-paced guitar bands of the north; the MP3 markets in which digital music passes from cellphone to cellphone; and the Balani Show music of Bamako. Produced by Sam Backer. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ [APWW #666] Distributed 8/17/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/V_2KSTxs24U" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Aug 17, 2017
Afro-Dominicana: The Other Dominican Republic
00:59:00
In the 1930s, infamous Dominican dictator Rafael Truillo ordered the burning of the country’s palos drums, hoping to erase the powerful vestiges of African culture in the Dominican Republic. Luckily for us, the breakneck, trance-inducing sound of palos still reverberates at Afro-syncretic religious parties across the Caribbean nation almost a century later. This week, Afropop revisits the home of styles such as merengue and bachata, but this time we’ll be looking towards the most deeply African side of Dominican music—little known outside of the island. Afro-Dominican music is a secret treasure, filled with virtuosic drumming styles, heart-stopping grooves, and mystic dance parties. We’ll listen to traditional genres like palos, salve, and gaga, a uniquely Dominican take on rara music from neighboring Haiti. Throughout, we’ll be looking at artists who have drawn on Afro-Dominican styles to make infectious pop music, from wizened veterans of the folklore movement such as Luis Dias, to a host of hip young bands who use Afro-inspired rock, reggae and hip-hop to redefine what it means to be Dominican. We’ll also check out the Afro-Dominican scene in New York City—home to more than a half-million Dominicans—where we’ll find a Dominican gaga group in Brooklyn that is mending cultural fences at a weekly Haitian celebration. Produced by Marlon Bishop. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ [APWW #579] Distributed 8/10/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/DjZyZ45qjV8" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Aug 10, 2017
Off the Beaten Track: Burkina Faso, Malawi, and Beyond
00:59:00
This program ventures into corners of Africa we rarely hear from, guided by adventurous field recordists and crate diggers. The Zomba Prison Project is a set of recordings by inmates at a maximum security prison in Malawi, currently the poorest nation on earth. The project’s debut CD was nominated for a Grammy Award. Here, we speak with the producer, Ian Brennan, and hear tracks from a new volume of soulful, even heartbreaking, songs from the prison. We then go back to the 1960s and ‘70s in the city of Bobo-Dioulasso in Burkina Faso (then Upper Volta) to sample a gorgeous set of newly revealed recordings by Volta Jazz, Dafra Star, Les Imbattables Leopards and more. We hear from Florent Mazzoleni, the author and intrepid vinyl collector behind the new box set, Bobo Yéyé: Belle Époque in Upper Volta. Produced by Banning Eyre. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ [APWW #738] Distributed 8/03/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/6Z_UhuudCq8" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Aug 03, 2017
The Festival In Fes: World Sacred Music Festival, Revisited
00:59:00
This spring, Afropop returned to Fes, Morocco, for the 23rd annual World Sacred Music Festival, a sumptuous spread of music from across the globe that blurs the boundaries of what is sacred. Interwoven with Morocco’s ornate history and fertile fabric of daily life is a mosaic of many musics: Gnawa, Arabic pop, Amazigh ahwach, classical Andalusian, Issaoua, raï, rap, chaabi, jazz, metal and so much more. At the World Sacred Music Festival, we heard many of these sounds, as well as those of international artists from China to Mali to Kuwait. Join us as we revisit these concerts—the late night music of Sufi brotherhoods, Moroccan fusion with Taziri and Inouraz, traditional Kuwaiti pearl diving music with Salman El Ammari, a stunning bit of Mali-Spain fusion with Toumani Diabate and Ketana, and more. Beyond the festival, we sit in with a respected Gnawa mâalem in Rabat and sample the array of tunes heard in cars, shops and CD stores around Fes. Produced by Sebastian Bouknight. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ [APWW #759] Distributed 7/27/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/T_ZO9NYhIUQ" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jul 27, 2017
Proving the Bubu Myth: Janka Nabay, War and Witchcraft in Sierra Leone
00:59:00
Every year on Sierra Leone’s Independence Day in late April, musicians and revelers descend upon Freetown from throughout the country. Parades and celebrations traverse the city, joining diverse neighborhoods with processional music, including one particular local style called bubu, a trance-inducing sound played by groups of young men blowing interlocking hocketed breath patterns into bamboo tubes. Bubu resonates with other African diasporic horn traditions, rara and gaga especially. It has long been a part of the cultural fabric of Sierra Leone, yet its deeper story has so far eluded scholarly examination. This program, supported by original fieldwork and by interviews with scholars Connie Nuxoll, David Skinner, Michael Gallope and John Nunley, begins a serious exposition and investigation of the intriguing mythology and history that surrounds this unique, hypnotic music, through a focus on musician Ahmed Janka Nabay, widely recognized in Sierra Leone and beyond as “the Bubu King.” Georges Collinet is away on assignment: Our guest host is Sahr Ngajuah, the musician and actor who starred in the Broadway show, Fela!. Produced by Wills Glasspiegel and Drew Alt. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ [APWW #690] Distributed 6/20/2017 [Originally aired in July 2014]<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/7tjOVJ_RMSE" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jul 20, 2017
Seize the Dance: The BaAka of Central Africa
00:59:00
Louis Sarno, an American original who lived for 30 years among Bayaka Pygmies in the Central African rainforest and recorded their polyphonic music more completely than any audio adventurer or ethnomusicologist could dream of, died where he was born, in New Jersey, on April 1, 2017. In his memory, we bring you this encore Hip Deep program. Read more of Banning Eyre's tribute to Louis Sarno at http://www.afropop.org/37016/remembering-louis-sarno/ A new season of Hip Deep kicks off with a remarkable journey among the forest people of the Central African Republic. The polyphonic, hocketing vocal style of this region's forest peoples ("pygmies") is one of the most singularly beautiful musical expressions in Africa, one that has entranced outsiders since the time of the pharaohs. Ethnomusicologist Michelle Kisliuk has spent nearly 25 years immersing herself in this music, and wrote a landmark book about the lives and music of the BaAka people in the Central African Republic. Kisliuk believes deeply in the performance experience--learning by doing--and this program will initiate listeners into one of the most enchanting and mysterious musical practices in Africa. The program also deals with the BaAka's problematic encounters with neighboring ethnic groups, Christian missionaries, and modernity in general. Produced by Banning Eyre. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ [APWW #603] Distributed 7/13/2017 [Originally aired in 2010]<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/Rq9SdrSBZ1E" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jul 13, 2017
Afro-Tech: Stories of Synths in African Music
00:59:00
Technology is one of the great drivers of musical change, and often one of its least understood. In this episode, we explore the synthesizer, looking closely at the history of this ubiquitous (and often debated) piece of musical technology, and investigating how and why it was first used in a variety African musics. Enabled by groundbreaking record reissues by synth pioneers like William Onyeabor (Nigeria) and Hailu Mergia (Ethiopia), disco stars like Kris Okotie, and South African superstar Brenda Fassie, we take you back to the ’70s and ’80s, listening to the birth of a distinctly African electronic sound. Produced by Sam Backer. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ Distributed 7-6-2017. Originally aired in 2013. [APWW #676]<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/POPIR-ku2E8" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jul 06, 2017
Ring The Alarm: A History Of Sound System Culture
00:59:00
In Jamaica, sound systems are more than just a stack of speakers blasting the latest tunes to an eager crowd. Over the last 70 years, they have touched all levels of society in Jamaica, determining the island’s popular taste and profoundly influencing the daily lives of its citizenry. This program explores the evolution of sound system culture, from the Jamaican genesis of the 1940s to its gradual impact on diaspora communities, and ultimately, its undeniable influence on the popular culture of nations overseas. Produced by David Katz and Saxon Baird. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ [APWW #758] Distributed 6/29/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/cN2j6xnGdz0" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 29, 2017
Bugalú
00:59:00
We honor the late Joe Cuba with this encore portrait of "Bugalú," produced for Afropop Worldwide by Ned Sublette. Bugalú is the Spanish spelling of boogaloo, and was also known as “Latin soul.” It hit the scene in 1966 with the original and organic concept of combining black and Puerto Rican music. The dance club crowd went crazy and then the fad quickly faded. But what a ride along the way! Joe Cuba was one of bugalú’s most popular artists, best known for the major hit “Bang Bang” that his band created on the spot one night at a club. Joe was a mesmerizing storyteller, and we’ll hear some of the major bugalú stars tell their stories, including Johnny Colon (“Boogaloo Blues”) and Tony Pabón (lead singer with Pete Rodriguez of “I Like It Like That” fame), and of course Joe Cuba himself. Produced by Ned Sublette in 1993. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW #93<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/mqkN0QVAE4Q" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 22, 2017
African Music at the Crossroads
00:59:00
Afropop producer Banning Eyre takes us on a surprise-filled tour of his 30-some years of covering African music. Through conversations with Georges Collinet and producer/agent/DJ Rab Bakari, the program reflects on how the world, the music, the culture and the media have changed and keep on changing throughout Africa and the diaspora. Along the way we hear some of the tunes that have most inspired Banning and Georges, sample the latest Afrobeats and Naija pop, and speculate on where African music is heading next. Great music, provocative thinking! Produced by Banning Eyre. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ [APWW #740] Distributed 6/15/2017 [Originally aired in 2016]<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/aeYwQ8a29Bs" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 15, 2017
Cuts From The Crypt, Part II
00:59:00
As work continues on the vast Afropop archive, producer Banning Eyre takes a deep dive and comes up with some gems. On the vinyl front, the focus is on South Africa and Zimbabwe, where the Afropop team collected a good deal of rare vinyl in the 1980s. Then Banning samples some his favorite field recordings from Zanzibar to Mali. In the age of YouTube, Pandora and Spotify, you might have the impression that all the music ever recorded is there at your finger tips. Here's proof that's not so. You'll hear music on this program you can't find anywhere else. Produced by Banning Eyre. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW PGM #714 Distributed 6/8/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/LaO7IBUBOfs" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 08, 2017
Hip Deep in Northern Nigeria
01:04:14
[Extended Online Version] Kano State in northwest Nigeria is a land of paradox. The ancient home of the Hausa people, it has ties back to the oldest civilizations in West Africa. Muslim since at least the 12th century, the region remained largely self-administered during the era of British colonialism, and never significantly adapted Christianity or Western culture and values as in other parts of Nigeria. In 1999, Kano instituted Sharia law. But by that time, the city of Kano was also the center of a large and active film industry, dubbed Kannywood. It was also nurturing a nascent coterie of hip-hop artists. There have been a series of high-profile conflicts and crises between these forces of religion, politics and art in the years since. But as the Afropop crew discovered, Kano has achieved a delicate balance that allows film and music to continue apace under the watchful eye of clerics and a censorship board. We visit studios producing local nanaye music, with its echoes of Hausa tradition and Indian film music. We also meet young Hausa hip-hop artists striving to develop careers under uniquely challenging circumstances. Produced by Banning Eyre. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ [APWW #757] Distributed 6/1/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/zpjEufujza4" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 01, 2017
Summer 2017 Concert Preview
00:59:00
Summer is always the most active season for African and diaspora touring artists. We’ll clue you in to what we think are the best. So wherever you are, enjoy the fun fun fun free open-air concerts at Central Park SummerStage, Celebrate Brooklyn, Nuits d’Afrique in Montreal, Concert of Colors in Detroit, Grand Performances in L.A. and more. Artists we’re looking forward to seeing perform in New York City this summer include Youssou N’Dour, Toto La Momposina, Seun Kuti and Mulatu Astake. Check their websites to see if they’re coming to your town. Produced by Sean Barlow. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW PGM #756 Distributed 5/25/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/PTS4QDYxxkA" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 25, 2017
"We Are All Creole": The Atlantic Sound of Cape Verde
00:59:00
Cape Verde, land of the the playful coladeira, the entrancing batuque, the high-energy funaná, and of course the sensual morna that Cesaria Évora helped bring to the world. At the intersection of Africa, Europe, and the Americas, Cape Verde's creole identity is reflected in the richness of its musical output, one which continues to uphold traditions while maintaining a youthful energy and demonstrating an open-mindedness fitting for an archipelago whose diaspora outnumbers its inhabitants. In this program, we travel to Cape Verde’s capital, Praia, for the Atlantic Music Expo, a yearly gathering of music professionals and local and international artists. As the city center bursts with live music, we check in on some of the most exciting sounds coming out of Cape Verde right now, hearing from talented young singer-songwriters such as Elida Almeida and Lucibela; rappers Helio Batalha, Kiddye Bonz, and BigZ Patronato; traditional batuque ensemble Tradison di Terra; and many more. Produced by Alejandro Van Zandt-Escobar. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW PGM #755 Distributed 5/18/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/wGxFbsLnkBk" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 18, 2017
La Bamba: The Afro-Mexican Story
00:59:00
Much has been made of Mexico’s rich Spanish and indigenous heritage, but until recently, there’s been little talk of Mexico’s so-called “third root”: Africa. Africans came to Mexico with the Spanish as soldiers and slaves – so many that by 1810, the black population of Mexico was equal to that of the United States. Today, African heritage persists throughout Mexico, yet for a variety of reasons, black history has long been silenced. In this Hip Deep episode, we use music to explore that history as we take a road trip across the country in search of sonic traces of Afro-Mexico. We visit the state of Veracruz to learn the history of the Afro-Mexican son jarocho sound, made famous by Ritchie Valens’ 1958 hit cover of "La Bamba," a traditional jarocho tune. Then, we visit the Costa Chica of Guerrero, where Afro-Mexican communities are fighting for government recognition to help preserve faltering musical traditions. And we’ll stop by the Golden Age halls of Mexico City, where the Afro-Cuban danzón thrives far from its ancestral home in Havana. Along the way, we hear from top scholars in the field such as Ben Vinson III and Alejandro Madrid, as well as Afro-Mexican music stars past and present, from Los Cojolites to Las Cafeteras. ¡Que padre! Produced by Marlon Bishop. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW PGM #658 Originally Aired 8/25/2013 Distributed 5/11/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/NbF-RkK4-P8" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 11, 2017
Hip Deep in the Niger Delta
01:06:31
The massive Niger River Delta is a fantastically rich cultural region and ecosystem. Unfortunately, it has been laid low by the brutal Biafran War (1967-70) and by decades of destructive and mismanaged oil exploration. This program offers a portrait of the region in two stories. First, we chronicle the Biafran War through the timeless highlife music of Cardinal Rex Jim Lawson, perhaps the most popular musician in Nigeria at the time. Then we spend time with contemporary musical activists in Port Harcourt’s waterfront communities and in oil-ravaged Ogoniland to hear how music is providing hope for these profoundly challenged communities. The program features new and classic music, the words of Nigerian scholars, musicians, activists and veterans of the Biafran War, concluding with an inspiring live highlife concert on the Port Harcourt waterfront in which rappers and highlife graybeards come together to imagine a better road ahead. Produced by Banning Eyre. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW PGM #754 Distributed 5/4/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/7d5bnhjoRQ4" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 04, 2017
Jamaica: Big A Yard, Big Abroad
00:59:00
Since the 1960s in Jamaica, iconic figures such as Bob Marley have gathered in backyards to write reggae anthems that conquered world charts. The yard remains a cornerstone in Jamaican culture. Musicians withdraw from the violence of the city to create and play songs in their yards. In Jamaican patois, “my yard” means “my home,” and many songs, proverbs and colloquialisms hinge on the word “yard.” More even than the music itself, the yard evokes a state of mind and a physical space wherein artists create amid the warmth of acoustic sound, raw emotion of voices and a collective energy. In this program, we move yard to yard in Jamaica, listening to acoustic music being written and recorded, smelling trees and flowers, and meeting legendary artists like Ken Boothe, Winston McAnuff, Cedric Myton of the Congos, Kiddus I, Robbie Lyn, Viceroys, or Nambo Robinson, as well as a number of young and emerging reggae artists like JAH9, Var, and Derajah, who grew up and found their artistic voices in ghetto yards. You've never heard Jamaica sound like this before! Produced by Elodie Maillot and Banning Eyre. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW #753 Distributed 4/27/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/KgO0TQDWTOY" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Apr 27, 2017
The Live Pop-Up Radio Experience
00:59:00
Live from Brooklyn, it’s Afropop Worldwide! In collaboration with Brooklyn Internet radio station Stewart Avenue, Afropop invited New York-based artists from Africa and the diaspora to our office for a unique live broadcast on Sat., Feb. 11. In case you missed it, we have highlights from the six-hour broadcast which featured interviews with singer and keyboardist Jean Gnonlonfoun of Beninois band Jomion and the Uklos; urban dancer, teacher and choreographer Kim D. Holmes from New York; bandleader and percussionist Courtnee Roze from New York; and bandleader, singer and composer Nkumu Katalay from Congo. In the first half of the show, Alejandro Van Zandt-Escobar, Afropop writer, producer and DJ from duo Eko’ fo Show, set the tone with music from Afropop’s in-house record collection and producer Morgan Greenstreet interviewed our director of new media, Akornefa Akyea, for a throwback discussion on Ghanaian hiplife music. Enjoy music and voices from Brooklyn, the place Afropop has called home for over 20 years. Produced by Akornefa Akyea. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW #752 Distributed 4/20/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/39kVl_uVjJA" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Apr 20, 2017
The Ring and the Shout
00:59:00
This Hip Deep episode presents the stunning radio premiere of “Oh, David,” the traditional song of the annual Easter Rock in Winnsboro, Louisiana. The Easter Rock is in fact a surviving ringshout—the oldest known form of African American music—but it’s about 600 miles west of the ringshout’s heartland in Georgia. It’s located across the Mississippi River from Vicksburg in the Louisiana Delta, where they don’t call it a “ringshout,” but a “rock.” And it totally rocks. Producer Ned Sublette attends the Easter Rock ceremony and talks with Dr. Joyce Marie Jackson, a scholar and Louisiana native, who has been working with the Rockers for almost 20 years and confirms their tradition as a direct musical link to slavery days. In Athens, Georgia, Sublette visits Art Rosenbaum, producer of recordings by Georgia’s McIntosh County Shouters, and more. Produced by Ned Sublette. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW PGM #734 Distributed 4/13/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/186xjvvs2ag" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Apr 13, 2017
A History of Puerto Rican Salsa
00:59:01
The music being made in Puerto Rico before and during the salsa years had its own sabor, even while the salsa boom was exploding out of New York. We talk to three of Puerto Rico’s all-time most important bandleaders: Rafael Ithier, founder of El Gran Combo; Quique Lucca, founder of Sonora Ponceña; and Willie Rosario, and hear key tracks from the island. Produced by Ned Sublette with José Mandry. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW PGM #207 Distributed 4/6/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/qQMfZMSVjos" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Apr 06, 2017
Edo Highlife: Culture, Politics and Progressive Traditionalism
00:59:00
Highlife—West Africa’s pioneer popular music of the late colonial and independence periods—has mostly faded from popularity in 21st century Nigeria. However, highlife is alive and well in Edo State, 300 kilometers east of Lagos, and the center of the former Benin Empire. Edo highlife musicians fill the role of traditional musicians by animating community ceremonies such as weddings and funerals, and praising prominent members of the community, in exchange for “financial love.” This traditionalism is also progressive: Edo highlife music draws on traditional genres like asonogun, ojeke, agbi, ivbiagogo, and ekassa, and musicians continue to incorporate instruments and styles from neighboring Yoruba communities and Western popular music. In this Hip Deep program, we'll hear how Edo highlife musicians have found sustainable careers by simultaneously rooting their music in their local communities and appealing to diasporic enclaves in Europe and the United States. Their local support has even allowed certain musicians to broach political themes, singing in support or in critique of specific politicians, a rare occurrence in contemporary Nigeria. We’ll hear from legends and innovators including Sir Victor Uwaifo, Ambassador Osayomore Joseph, and Alhaji Waziri Oshomah as well as current stars including Dr. Afile, Akobeghian and Johnbull Obakpolor. Produced by Morgan Greenstreet and Austin ‘Maro Emielu. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW PGM #751 Distributed 3/30/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/OF0xE93vB1s" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Mar 30, 2017
A Visit to Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
00:59:00
In our visit to Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, we go beyond the handful of artists who have achieved international careers and dive into the local scene. We visit azmaribets, down-home music clubs featuring vivacious women artists and their ensembles of traditional players. We catch Mimi and Besat live. Competition between the leading music producers in Addis is fierce: We visit the recording studio of Abegasu Shiote, who breaks down the Ethiopian pop sound track by track, and for the finale, we attend a performance by the revered elder singer of the classic Addis sound--Mamoud Ahmed. Produced by Sean Barlow. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW PGM #532 Distributed 3/23/2017 [Originally aired in 2007]<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/bGj2bMA8N_8" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Mar 23, 2017
Hip Deep in Nigeria Preview
00:59:00
In recent months, three Afropop Worldwide producers--Sean Barlow, Banning Eyre and Morgan Greenstreet--have been working in four different regions of Nigeria to gather material for the upcoming five-part Hip Deep in Nigeria series. In this program, the producers sit down to talk about their experiences, share favorite stories and tracks, and preview Afropop Worldwide’s most ambitious field project in our 30-year history. We’ll hear Naija pop, fuji, nanaye film songs and Hausa hip-hop from the north, and highlife from Edo and Rivers States. Produced by Banning Eyre, Morgan Greenstreet & Sean Barlow. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW PGM #750 Distributed 3/16/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/PqNAPF3z3R8" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Mar 16, 2017
The Music of Black Peru: Cultural Identity in the Black Pacific
00:59:00
The “Black Pacific” is a term coined by our guide, ethnomusicologist Heidi Carolyn Feldman. She describes the circumstance of African descendants displaced not only from their ancestral homes in Africa, but also from the Atlantic coast nations where their enslaved ancestors were originally brought. This Hip Deep edition explores the sonically vibrant realm of Afro-Peruvian music, a young genre identification that has flourished since the 1950s and has now produced artists of international renown, such as singer Susana Baca, and the black folkloric company Peru Negro. The music is sensuous and deeply beautiful, and represents a fascinating and little-understood history. We will hear from Juan Morillo, who represents Peru Negro, from Susana Baca, and from other artists and community scholars Feldman has worked with during her extensive research of this topic. Produced by Simon Rentner and Wills Glasspiegel. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW PGM #558 Distributed 3/9/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/hcdZ4SO7sCg" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Mar 09, 2017
Getting Down in the Guyanas
00:59:00
We visit one of the world's last untamed natural and musical wildernesses: The Guyanas. Riding along bumpy jungle roads and in dugout canoes, Afropop producer Marlon Bishop travels from Suriname to French Guiana for the Transamazoniennes Festival, located in the remote border town of Saint-Laurent-Du-Maroni. We enjoy the region's fascinating cultural stew, where French Creole, Maroon, Amerindian, Hindu, Javanese, and Dutch elements all mingle together on the outer fringes of the Amazon and hear styles like kaseko, bigi pokoe, aleke and kawina. We'll speak with local stars Prince Koloni, Little Guerrier and Chris Combete, as well as visiting acts such as self-proclaimed "African gypsy" Wanlov the Kubolor and polyglot rap crew Nomadic Massive. Originally aired March 2012. Produced by Marlon Bishop. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW PGM #630 [Distributed 3/2/2017]<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/hm7yeoq-gAk" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Mar 02, 2017
Reissued: African Vinyl in the 21st Century
00:59:00
The golden age of vinyl records is long past in Africa, but the market for rare and reissued African vinyl outside the continent has been growing steadily since the early 2000s. DJs and collectors have turned an obsession with rare records and forgotten gems from Capetown to Tangiers into an international reissue and compilation industry, led by record labels such as Soundway, Strut and Analog Africa. This program explores some of the complex and shifting dynamics of neocolonialism, cultural ownership, and audience in the African vinyl market. We’ll hear stories from label owners, DJs and artists, touching on controversies around Nigerian disco funk reissues, new career opportunities for sometimes-obscure African artists, the unique vinyl culture in South Africa, and much more. Produced by Morgan Greenstreet and Alejandro Van Zandt-Escobar, with Nenim Iwebuke. Links: Full playlist: http://www.afropop.org/34804/reissued-african-vinyl-playlists/ Interview with Temi Kogbe: http://www.afropop.org/34821/temi-kogbe-bringing-it-to-the-masses/ Interview with Matt Temple: http://www.afropop.org/34890/matsuli-music-interview/ Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW PGM #749 Distributed 2/23/2017<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/67ihDG2u9kU" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Feb 23, 2017
Carnival In Brooklyn
00:59:00
Every September, millions of people celebrate Carnival in Brooklyn. From the pre-dawn J’ouvert bacchanal in the streets, to the intense Panorama steel pan competition, to the massive Labor Day Parade on Eastern Parkway, central Brooklyn is transformed into a Caribbean cultural haven. But before the fun comes months of preparation and centuries of history. We follow Caribbean steel pan groups, masquerade bands and Haitian rara groups through their preparations and celebrations and we hear how members of these Caribbean communities keep their cultural activities alive and thriving despite considerable challenges: violence and political backlash associated with Carnival, and soaring rents and cultural changes in Brooklyn due to gentrification. Produced by Morgan Greenstreet, Saxon Baird and Sebastian Bouknight. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW PGM #739 [Distributed 2/16/2017]<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/KneVFGvhsBM" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Feb 16, 2017
New York City's globalFEST 2017
00:59:00
Every January, New York's Webster Hall jams to the music of 12 bands on three stages in one wild night. globalFEST has become an annual kick-off ritual for music-minded New Yorkers. This program samples the 2017 lineup with dynamic live recordings from Cuba (Septeto Santiguero), Congo (L'Orchestre Afrisa International), Ghana (Jojo Abot), Sudan (Alsarah and the Nubatones), Morocco (Hoba Hoba Spirit), and more. We also speak with Modero Mekanisi about the revival of Afrisa International, and with Reda Allali about Hoba Hoba Spirit's Moroccan roll. Produced by Banning Eyre and Sebastian Bouknight. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW PGM #748 [Distributed 2/09/2017]<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/WmM5UFfW0PQ" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Feb 09, 2017
Two Lions: Bunny Wailer and Hakim
00:59:00
On this program we survey the careers of two giants within their genres. Bunny Wailer is the last surviving member of the original Bob Marley and the Wailers trio. Right up to his 2016 tour, where we met him, this architect of reggae music has continued to carry the banner with new concerts and recordings. And he tells his story with bracing poetic candor. Meanwhile in Egypt, Hakim, the lion of shaabi music, remains a superstar and a player in that country’s turbulent pop scene. On a rare visit to New York, Hakim gives us a tour through his post-revolution songs, and offers personal insights into Egypt’s equally turbulent politics. Produced by Banning Eyre. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW PGM #737 [Distributed 2/02/2017]<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/wRXtJZd7_ZU" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Feb 02, 2017
Cuban Counterpoint of Tobacco and Sugar: Sacred Musical Spaces in Western Cuba
00:59:00
Borrowing the title from Cuban polymath Fernando Ortiz, producer Ned Sublette takes a group of travelers, including you, to multiple sites in western Cuba to analyze the musical impact of what Ortiz called the "Cuban counterpoint" of tobacco and sugar. We'll hear endangered species of drums in mountain farms and sugar towns, drilling down into the deep culture of the Afro-Cuban world. We'll hear sacred drumming as handed down from Kongo sources, from Yorubaland, from Dahomey, and more, in sites that are indelibly stamped with the imprints of Africa, above all in music. We'll hear an incredible poetic improviser, go to a block party in Matanzas, and talk to our guest scholar, Latin Grammy-winning record producer Caridad Diez, about the power of rumba and its meaning in Cuban society in the wake of UNESCO's designation of rumba as world heritage. Update: Ned Sublette's group was in Cuba at the time of Fidel Castro's death. Ned, who covered the story for Billboard, tells us what he experienced as Cuba went for nine days without live music. Produced by Ned Sublette. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW PGM #747 [Distributed 1/26/2017]<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/chErnyjA4WE" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jan 26, 2017
Barbados at 50: Spouge to Soca
00:59:00
Barbados recently celebrated its 50th anniversary of independence. We look into the rise and mysterious fall of the funky Bajan spouge beat which ruled the island in the ’70s, and discover a few underground musicians who are trying to keep it alive. Calypsonians Mighty Grynner and Red Plastic Bag detail their contributions to the lyrically potent kaiso scene. Soca stars Alison Hinds and Edwin Yearwood talk about the pros and cons of the island's competition circuit, and we learn about the hot new "soca bashment" scene. Produced by Saxon Baird and Noah Schaffer. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW PGM #746 [Distributed 1/19/2017]<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/FfTQ2utf7mA" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jan 19, 2017
Colombia in NYC
00:59:00
New York City is home to a diverse community of Colombian musicians and groups who create in a wide range of traditional, popular and experimental music styles for diasporic communities and beyond. Our “Colombia in NYC” program takes us from independence day celebrations in a chic Manhattan club with accordion virtuoso Gregorio Uribe, to vallenato parties and outdoor festivals. We’ll hear from experimental groups Combo Chimbita and Delsonido; traditional Afro-Colombian bullerengue group Bulla en El Barrio; salsero, folklorist and educator Pablo Mayor; innovative dance bands MAKU Soundsystem and Grupo Rebolú; harp virtuoso Edmar Castañeda, and many more amazing performers. Along the way, musicians weave in stories about nationalism, identity, place and diaspora, and discuss the challenges and opportunities New York offers for Colombian musicians. Produced by Morgan Greenstreet. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW PGM #736 [Distributed 1/12/2017]<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/Wv8CXgkiOmU" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jan 12, 2017
Hip Deep in Mali: The Tuareg Predicament
00:59:00
The confederations and clans collectively known as the Tuareg descend from the oldest inhabitants of North Africa. They lead a mostly nomadic existence across the Sahara Desert, in the lands we now know as Algeria, Libya, Niger and Mali. Tuareg communities have long felt neglected by independent African governments, especially in Mali, which has endured a succession of rebellions. In 2012, a Tuareg uprising led to a year-long crisis in which the Malian north separated from the country and fell under harsh control by Islamic extremists. Ironically, these extremists banned music, which in the hands of modern bands like Tinariwen had been a crucial means for expressing Tuareg aspirations. This broadcast unravels the complex history and provides a vivid portrait of the Tuareg predicament in Mali today. The program samples a rich variety of Tuareg music and includes conversations with Tuareg musicians and cultural authorities in the wake of Mali’s crisis, along with University of Houston anthropologist Susan Rasmussen, who has been researching and writing about Tuareg culture for over 30 years, and veteran journalist and author Andy Morgan. Produced by Banning Eyre and Sean Barlow. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW PGM #727 [Distributed 1/05/2017]<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/GzVjIND0ueE" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jan 05, 2017
Ethiopia Part I: Empire and Revolution
00:59:00
Ethiopia was the first Christian nation in Africa, and the only African country never to be colonized. With ethnomusicologist Kay Kaufman Shelemay and Ethiopian music scholar and compiler Francis Falceto as guests, this Hip Deep program explores the role of the Ethiopian church and monarchy in building the country's unique brassy pop music. We sample the hot sounds of "swinging Addis" on the eve of the 1974 revolution. Produced by Banning Eyre. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW PGM #512 [Distributed 12/29/2016]<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/IbuhF0qi-uI" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Dec 29, 2016
Ghana: Celebration Sounds
00:59:00
In hard times and boom times, people in Ghana know how to party. In this program, we hear the regional pop and neotraditional music that animates festivals, funerals and community celebrations across the county. We travel to the lush Volta region in the east to hear Ewe borborbor, agbadza and brass band music. In the northern city of Tamale, we hear Dagbani traditional music, hip-hop and pop, and visit the vibrant Damba chieftaincy festival in nearby Yendi. Back in the bustling metropolis, Accra, we get down to the latest pop hits and underground styles moving hips in the capital city. Produced by Morgan Greenstreet. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW PGM #745 [Distributed 12/22/2016]<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/ox8_xyRrFFA" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Dec 22, 2016
Political Fiction: Music and Partisan Violence in Jamaica
00:17:33
An Afropop Closeup Encore. Originally distributed on 11/08/2016. The Caribbean island of Jamaica has long been blighted by unacceptably high levels of politically motivated violence, a nightmarish by-product of its firmly entrenched two-party political system. This podcast reveals the early beginnings of Jamaica’s dramatic partisan divisions, and highlights the role that the island’s music has played in commenting on and challenging such divides. Produced and hosted by David Katz and Saxon Baird. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ [Distributed 12/20/2016]<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/WtiLRGC5p-Q" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Dec 20, 2016
Africa Now! 2016
00:59:00
Every year, the world-famous Apollo Theater and New York’s World Music Institute pack the house for a stellar lineup of established and emerging artists from the African continent. This year was especially impressive. We bring you concert highlights and interviews with artists from Ghana, Sudan, Niger and Zimbabwe. You’ll hear Alsarah and the Nubatones, inspired by the rich cultures of Nubia, Jojo Abot’s arty, dancehall-meets-Afrobeat grooves, Bombino’s joyous Tuareg rock, and the discovery of the night for many Afropop fans: Mokoomba from Zimbabwe, featuring phenomenal lead singer Mathias Muzaza, who spanned nods to Salif Keita, Ladysmith Black Mambazo, as well as a Congolese soukous animation that had the crowd up and dancing. Special bonus: a taste of the acoustic “traditional” set Mokoomba performed the next day up the Hudson. Produced by Sean Barlow. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW PGM #728 [Distributed 12/15/2016]<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/CaO-MXe0U08" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Dec 15, 2016
Stocking Stuffers 2016
00:59:00
Georges Collinet and Banning Eyre survey the best African and African diaspora music of 2016: from desert blues to Afrobeats and neo-cumbia, vintage reissues, and groundbreaking experiments. This fast-moving conversation interweaves juicy clips from over two dozen albums. Lots of musical ideas for your holiday shopping list. Produced by Banning Eyre. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW PGM #744 [Distributed 12/08/2016]<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/v-d4nwDhRyQ" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Dec 08, 2016
Soundin' Like Weself - The Trinidadian Raspo Tradition
00:30:01
Producer Jake Hochberger brings us to the southernmost island in the Caribbean, Trinidad. Trinidad is the birthplace of the steel drum, calypso and soca music, and is home to the largest Carnival celebration in the world. Here we encounter the musical and philosophical movement called rapso--an infectiously danceable rhythmic oration style that comes with a philosophy championing a Trinidadian identity in the face of a colonial history and a globalized present. We meet three generations of artists, from the founding King of Rapso, Brother Resistance, to the emerging musicians behind the American hip-hop influenced trapso sound. Brother Resistance shares stories of how local rhythms and participation in Trinidad’s Black Power movement influenced him to define his music as the most recent manifestation of an ancient oral tradition, as passed down from the West African griot. Omari Ashby of Kindred, Wendell Manwarren of 3Canal, and Ataklan bring us into the Trinidadian cultural matrix, where speed-rapping Carnival masquerade characters come to life through this music of rebellion and social uplift. Producer: Jake Hochberger Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ Afropop Closeup [Distributed 12/06/2016]<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/VeLnS4E94h4" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Dec 06, 2016
The Money Show
00:59:00
Every day, money changes hands in Ghanaian cedi, South African rand, and Brazilian reals as music is created, traded, performed, purchased, and pirated. In this episode we look at the business side of African music, through a series of vignettes from around the continent and diaspora that illuminate the deep connections between musical creation and the economies that sustain it. We start with the story of how cell phones are transforming Africa's music industries. Then, we see how economic competition drove the creation of Colombian champeta music. We take a look at the role of copyright in Jamaican dancehall, and follow the legal struggle over royalties from "The Lion Sleeps Tonight" in South Africa. Producer: Marlon Bishop Assistant Producers: Briana Duggan, Joe Dobkin, Ryan Kailath Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW PGM #685 [Distributed 12/01/2016]<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/j8k5ptdvuLs" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Dec 01, 2016
Afrobeats Comes To America
00:59:00
Afrobeats is the new urban music of Africa. Not to be confused with the funky sound of the ‘70s in Nigeria (Afrobeat), Afrobeats (with an "s") is 21st century dance pop, with a wide variety of programmed beats, rapping and singing, stylistic use of autotuned vocals, and catchy pop hooks. The music is part of a brave new media world where Nigeria is listening to South Africa, Kenya is listening to Angola, Ghana is listening to Tanzania, and Africans in the diaspora are listening to all of it. In 2016, large scale Afrobeats concerts were staged in Brooklyn and Houston, and greeted by large young, rapturous crowds. In this program we hear the new sounds of Lagos, Nairobi, Angola and beyond and talk with artists and others about the thrilling rise and unfolding future of the newest African pop. Produced by Sean Barlow. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW PGM #743 [Distributed 11/24/2016]<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/juqJ3c_aL0c" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Nov 24, 2016
Salaam, Amani, Peace: Festivals in Goma, DR Congo
00:27:56
In a context of ongoing violence and N.G.O. intervention in Eastern Congo, a festival culture is emerging based on the concept of “peace-building” through the arts. With the guidance of professor Chérie Ndaliko and local artists, we explore the ways in which these festivals can negatively or positively affect the local arts community. (Note: Salaam Kivu International Film Festival is now Congo International Film Festival.) Produced and hosted by Morgan Greenstreet. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ [Distributed 11/22/2016]<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/zT5S9v_LA7I" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Nov 22, 2016
Afropop Live! 2016
00:59:00
The crowd grows restless until finally the lights go down and the artist takes the stage, and that's when things come alive. It's “Afropop Live! 2016”--an anthology of some of the best performances we had the honor to see and record this year. From our home base in New York to the Festival on the Niger in Mali, this show goes global, bringing you music from across Africa and the diaspora: Kenyan pop, traditional Colombian bullerengue, Haitian compas and more. We'll get intimate performances by NYC-based Colombian-rooted groups Bulla en el Barrio and Combo Chimbita, a festival set from Abdoulaye Diabate, and music from Sauti Sol, Tabou Combo and Mokoomba in New York concert halls. For more live music from this year visit www.afropop.org to see our programs on Colombia in NYC, globalFEST, Africa Now!, MASA, Hakim and Bunny Wailer, and Carnival in BK. Produced by Ben Richmond and Sebastian Bouknight. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop, on Instagram @afropopworldwide and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW PGM #742 [Distributed 11/17/2016]<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/guciHBflZzY" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Nov 17, 2016
The Cumbia Diaspora: From Colombia to the World
00:59:00
Move over salsa and merengue–cumbia is the most popular music in Latin America. Today, cumbia is played from the borderlands of Texas down the spine of the Andes to the tip of Tierra del Fuego. In this Hip Deep edition, we find out how cumbia left Colombia in the ‘60s and ‘70s and traveled to other countries. Everywhere it went, it transformed itself, adapting to its new environment. In Peru, it mixed with psychedelic guitar effects and Andean sounds to become chicha. In Argentina, it became the expression of a new generation of restless youth in the burgeoning slums of Buenos Aires. And in Mexico, it became so instilled in the local culture that some have forgotten that it came from Colombia in the first place. Through extensive interviews with experts and musicians, we discover how cumbia and its many transformations tell us the story of Latin America in the late 20th century. Produced by Marlon Bishop. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW PGM #606 11-10-2016<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/NHPFFxUOCVQ" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Nov 10, 2016
Political Fiction: Music and Partisan Violence in Jamaica
00:17:33
The Caribbean island of Jamaica has long been blighted by unacceptably high levels of politically motivated violence, a nightmarish by-product of its firmly entrenched two-party political system. This podcast reveals the early beginnings of Jamaica’s dramatic partisan divisions, and highlights the role that the island’s music has played in commenting on and challenging such divides. Produced and hosted by David Katz and Saxon Baird. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at www.afropop.org/newsletter/ [Distributed 11/08/2016]<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/76xcKTzMQZI" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Nov 08, 2016
Growing Into Music in 21st Century Bamako
00:59:00
This program presents a musical portrait of Bamako in the wake of crisis. In 2012-13, Islamists occupied the north and a coup d’etat threatened a recent history of functioning democracy. With borders restored and a new elected government in place, we find musical life returning with festivals, nightclub shows and street weddings. But that picture hides darker realities. Ethnomusicologist Lucy Duràn has been studying the oral transmission of music in various countries, notably among griot families in Mali. With her guidance, we explore the precarious lives of griots in today’s Bamako, focusing on the upbringing and education of children in these hereditary families of historian-entertainers. Elders and traditionalists say the griot tradition has been corrupted beyond hope, and even advise their young to pursue different professions. Others persist, within an environment where growing religious conservatism puts increasing pressure on the lives and careers of all musicians. We meet three extraordinarily talented griot children, and hear music and reflections from kora master Toumani Diabaté and his massively popular songwriter son, Sidiki. And we get a fascinating historical perspective from Gregory Mann, professor of history at Columbia University. Produced by Banning Eyre. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at http://www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW PGM #731 11-3-2016<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/mBtIheghV9o" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Nov 03, 2016
Moroccan Music Today: Re-Examined Past, Innovative Future
00:59:00
In Morocco today, artists draw from a huge variety of styles and traditions, creating music that takes from previously neglected history in order to create new and innovative sounds. In Agadir and Casablanca, two of Morocco's most vibrantly musical cities, musicians have embraced Morocco's Amazigh and sub-Saharan roots. On this program, we explore how artists are preserving styles like Gnawa, brought to Morocco by slaves from West Africa, and rwayes, Amazigh troubadour music of southern Morocco. We will also hear everything from Amazigh black metal to a band covering Bob Marley songs with Moroccan instruments, along with some female artists who are powerfully staking out their place in male-dominated genres. Produced by Jesse Brent. Follow Afropop Worldwide on Facebook at www.facebook.com/afropop and on Twitter @afropopww. Subscribe to the Afropop Worldwide newsletter at http://www.afropop.org/newsletter/ APWW #741 10-27-2016<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/CAXZeojPeWU" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Oct 27, 2016
A Beginner’s Guide to Lusophone Atlantic Music
00:21:34
While the musical networks that connect English, French and Spanish-speaking nations together are well known, far less attention is paid to the links between the Afro-Lusophone world—from Cape Verde to Angola to Brazil. This podcast offers a lightning tour of some of the most important groups that helped pull together this often-overlooked sonic universe. Produced and hosted by Sam Backer. [Distributed 10/25/2016]<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/CfEJHPNIsFM" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Oct 25, 2016
African Music at the Crossroads
00:59:00
African Music at the Crossroads: Afropop producer Banning Eyre takes us on a surprise filled tour of his 30-some years of covering African music. Through conversations with Georges Collinet and producer/agent/DJ Rab Bakari, the program reflects on how the world, the music, the culture and the media have changed and keep on changing throughout Africa and the diaspora. Along the way we hear some of the tunes that have most inspired Banning and Georges, sample the latest Afrobeats and Naija pop, and speculate on where African music is heading next. Great music, provocative thinking! 10/20/2016 Show #740 Producer: Banning Eyre<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/f13qrd2tta0" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Oct 20, 2016
Africa in Matanzas, Cuba: El Almacen is Walking
00:59:00
Africa in Matanzas, Cuba: El Almacén is Walking Matanzas, Cuba has long been regarded as the source (la fuente) of many rich Afro-Cuban folkloric traditions. These ceremonial and secular Afro-Cuban musics are, for the most part, alive and well, and being documented for the first time by Matanceros themselves, rather than exclusively by Havana-based or non-Cuban imprints. The Matanzas record label and artist collective, Sendero Music/El Almacén, faces several challenges: oversight from the state, limited access to resources, curating which groups to record while paradoxically convincing the folkloric community of the value of their endeavors, and the conundrum of establishing meaningful connections outside of Cuba to disseminate the city’s music to the world. #726 Airdate: 10/13/2016 Producer: Harris Eisenstadt<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/ELpLJ0qB9Qk" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Oct 13, 2016
Mali: Politics Behind The Music
00:21:37
The music of Mali is a powerful force in the international music market. It has been critically shaped by the changing role of the griot class in Malian society and Mali's politics in general. Columbia University historian Gregory Mann shares insights into Malian politics—from the French colonial era to the present— providing fascinating context for musical developments from traditional griot songs to the latest hip-hop. Produced and hosted by Banning Eyre. [Distributed 10/11/2016]<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/4xu40kABu8k" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Oct 11, 2016
State of Emergency: Reggae Reflections of Jamaica’s Partisan Politics
00:59:00
Show # 723 Airdate: 10/06/2016 Produced by Saxon Baird and David Katz Music is a powerful means of expression in Jamaica--a platform for fierce commentary, and a bellwether for the social and political climate on the island. In Jamaica, when local newspapers, broadcast media and elected representatives don’t tell the whole story, you've got to listen to the music! With the help of scholars and artists like Max Romeo and King Jammy, this program delves into the way that Jamaican popular music has always sharply commented on partisan politics in Jamaica while also revealing that Jamaican politicians have often attempted to co-opt and subvert reggae’s liberating messages for their own purposes. Particular attention is paid to the turbulent Cold War era of the mid-1970s, when foreign influence led to what was basically an undeclared civil war and reggae’s popularity was at its highest.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/jIBw9TCGFEc" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Oct 06, 2016
Carnival In Brooklyn
00:59:00
Every September, millions of people celebrate Carnival in Brooklyn. From the pre-dawn J'ouvert bacchanal in the streets, to the intense Panorama steel pan competition, to the massive Labor Day Parade on Eastern Parkway, Central Brooklyn is transformed into a Caribbean cultural haven. But before the fun comes months of preparation and centuries of history. We follow Caribbean steel pan groups, masquerade bands and Haitian rara groups through their preparations and celebrations and we hear how members of these Caribbean communities keep their cultural activities alive and thriving despite facing considerable challenges: violence and political backlash associated with Carnival, and soaring rents and cultural changes in Brooklyn due to gentrification. Produced by Morgan Greenstreet, Saxon Baird, & Sebastian Bouknight [APWW #739] [Air date: 9/29/2016]<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/C-vZaOdEGeQ" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Sep 29, 2016
Congolese Rumba: Surviving the Pop Apocalypse
00:23:44
All over the world, the music business as we know it is crumbling. But in the Democratic Republic of Congo, musicians have found a new (and very old) method of survival. Through a system of shout-outs called libanga, Congolese pop musicians call on rich people to sponsor their music. Singers use the metaphoric language of love to discuss power, politics and money in one of the world's poorest countries. Produced and hosted by Morgan Greenstreet in conversation with John Nimis, linguist and scholar of Congolese popular music.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/9YgrjZbgIpQ" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Sep 27, 2016
Off the Beaten Track in Malawi and Burkina Faso
00:59:00
[APWW #738] [Airs Sept. 22 2016] This program ventures into corners of Africa we hear from rarely, guided by adventurous field recordists and crate diggers. The Zomba Prison Project is a set of recordings by inmates at a maximum security prison in Malawi, currently the poorest nation on earth. The project’s debut CD was nominated for a 2016 Grammy Award. Here, we speak with the producer, Ian Brennan, and hear tracks from a brand new volume of soulful, even heartbreaking, songs from the prison. Then, we go back to the 1970s in the city of Bobo-Dioulasso in Burkina Faso (then Upper Volta) to sample a gorgeous set of newly revealed recordings by Volta Jazz, Dafra Star, Les Imbattables Leopards and more. The program ends with wild cards from Mozambique and Ethiopia. Produced by Banning Eyre<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/9dc5uomCphs" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Sep 22, 2016
Hip Deep: The French Caribbean–Cosmopolitan, Colonial, Complicated
00:59:00
[APWW #570] [Originally aired 2009] In the music of the French Antilles—the islands of Martinique and Guadeloupe—you can hear influences that range from the traditional béle and gwo ka drumming of the islands’ rural communities, to European additions like polka and French chanson. But when these islands produced a pop genre that took much of the Caribbean and African world by storm—the smooth and sexy dance music known as zouk, which exploded in the 1980s—it was an entirely new blend that uniquely reflected the complex layers of identity in these Caribbean communities that are, administratively, a full-fledged part of France. Still colonies? Many think so. Either way the Antilles have long produced artists and thinkers with deep sensitivity to the gradations of race, class, migration, and relationship to a powerful, distant metropolis. Now, musicians in Guadeloupe and Martinique are re-exploring their roots, celebrating rhythms that go back to slavery days without pulling back from the cosmopolitanism of recent years. Our guide to this music—and the rich history and ongoing debates that it reflects—is Brenda Berrian of the University of Pittsburgh, whose book, Awakening Spaces: French Caribbean Popular Songs, Music and Culture, is a definitive—and enthusiastic—treatment of the subject.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/WvsZafQGlAU" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Sep 15, 2016
A Conversation with Pedrito Martínez: Part Two
00:24:29
Cuban master musician Pedrito Martínez talks about his career playing jazz, pop, original music and sacred Regla De Ocha ceremonies in New York City. Produced and hosted by Ned Sublette with Kenneth Schweitzer [Distributed 9/13/2016] Listen to Part One here: http://bit.ly/2bQXRFT<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/WuR9bl_5J-k" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Sep 13, 2016
Hip Deep: Afro-Lisbon and the Lusophone Atlantic: Dancing Toward The Future
00:59:00
Show #722 Producer: Sam Backer Distributed Sept. 8 2016: Hip Deep: Afro-Lisbon and the Lusophone Atlantic: Dancing Toward The Future In the last few years, a small network of DJs in the suburbs of Lisbon, Portugal has been consistently producing some of the world’s best dance music. The children of African immigrants, these young musicians have combined a hemisphere of musical influences and distilled them down into a single astonishing style. But how did Lisbon start to make such great African music? And what does that say about the identity of the city, or the country, or the continent? On this special Hip Deep edition, we take a journey to Lisbon, a city facing both the sea and 600 years of its own history. We’ll go to African club nights, hang out with obsessive record collectors, learn how to dance kizomba, and visit the projects that have produced a musical revolution. And through it all, we will try to answer a seemingly simple question: Just where did this music come from?<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/4hI_bT257dQ" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Sep 08, 2016
A Conversation with Pedrito Martínez: Part One
00:21:26
Martínez, the superstar New York-based percussionist and vocalist, talks with Ned Sublette and drum scholar Kenneth Schweitzer about how he got started in sacred and popular music in Havana, Cuba. Produced and hosted by Ned Sublette [Distributed 9/06/2016] Listen to Part Two here: http://bit.ly/2cTjtma (photo by Petra Richterova)<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/FK5VrYZdP4g" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Sep 06, 2016
Sounds Like Brooklyn
00:59:00
[APWW #712] [Originally aired in 2015] At Afropop, we have gone far and wide, from Brazil to England to Madagascar to Egypt, tracking down incredible music to bring back home to our headquarters in Brooklyn. For this program, “Sounds Like Brooklyn,” we stay closer to home, tracing a hidden music economy of CD vendors in bodegas, copy shops and food markets around the five New York boroughs. Accompanying us on our travels is poet and “Bodega Pop” WFMU radio host Gary Sullivan. Along the way, we check out a Caribbean gospel rap performance in Bed-Stuy’s Restoration Plaza, dust off some cassettes at VP Records in Jamaica, and chat with DJ Wow at his African CD store in Harlem. New York is a city of immigrants and we salute the creativity they bring with them from all corners of the world!<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/1Er7KHJDz30" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Sep 01, 2016
Two Lions: Bunny Wailer and Hakim
00:59:00
[APWW # 737] Two Lions: Bunny Wailer and Hakim On this program we survey the careers of two legends and giants within their genres. Bunny Wailer is the last surviving member of the original Bob Marley and the Wailers. Right up to his 2016 tour, where we met him, this architect of reggae music has continued to carry the banner with new concerts and recordings. And he tells his story with bracing poetic candor. Meanwhile in Egypt, the lion of shaabi music, Hakim, remains a superstar and a player in that country’s turbulent pop scene. On a rare visit to New York, Hakim gives us a tour through his post-revolution songs, and offers personal insights into Egypt’s equally turbulent politics.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/VP3W4c76DWs" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Aug 25, 2016
Grimewave
00:18:12
Grime, the hard-edged, M.C.-led U.K. dance style that flourished in the early 2000s, seemed long gone. Its best rappers had moved on, and its fans increasingly abandoned hope. But then… something astounding happened: 2016 became grime’s biggest year ever. Produced and hosted by Sam Backer. [Distributed 8/23/2016]<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/-60T6AFbJWA" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Aug 23, 2016
Colombia in NYC
00:59:00
New York City is home to a diverse community of Colombian musicians and groups who create in a wide range of traditional, popular and experimental music styles for diasporic communities and beyond. Colombia in NYC takes us from independence day celebrations in a chic Manhattan club with accordion virtuoso Gregorio Uribe, to vallenato parties and outdoor festivals. We'll hear from experimental groups Combo Chimbita and Delsonido; traditional Afro-Colombian bullerengue group Bulla En El Barrio; salsero, folklorist and educator Pablo Mayor; innovative dance bands MAKU Soundsystem and Grupo Rebolú, harp virtuoso Edmar Castañeda and many more amazing musicians. Along the way, musicians weave in stories about nationalism, identity, place and diaspora, and discuss the challenges and opportunities New York City offers for Colombian musicians. Producer: Morgan Greenstreet APWW #736 Air Date 08/17/2016<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/DaPePugHSX0" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Aug 18, 2016
Tropical Soul Of Jorge Ben Jor
00:58:17
Jorge Ben Jor first began to experiment with fusions of samba, bossa nova, rhythm ‘n’ blues and soul in the early 1960s. Together with Caetano Veloso and Gilberto Gil, he participated in the watershed cultural movement, Tropicália, in the late 1960s. In the 1970s, he further explored Afro-Brazilian history and culture in a series of popular albums that have since become key points of reference for a contemporary neo-soul movement. Jorge Benjor continues to be an active presence in Brazilian popular music. He grants us a rare interview to tell his story. The program is produced by Sean Barlow and co-produced with Christopher Dunn, author of Brutality Garden: Tropicália and the Emergence of a Brazilian Counterculture (University of North Carolina Press, 2001) as part of Afropop Worldwide’s “Hip Deep” series<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/F2DXNFlsoWo" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Aug 11, 2016
Haitian Radio On American Airwaves
00:15:33
On one stretch of Nostrand Avenue in Flatbush, Brooklyn, there’s a Haitian radio station on every block—Radio Soleil, Radyo Panou, Radio Triomphe—each broadcasting the sounds of Kreyol conversations and konpa music. Haitian immigrants have brought a deep love of radio from their native land, where a strong oral culture, high illiteracy rates, and poor infrastructure have made radio the media of the masses—even in diaspora. Produced and hosted by Ian Coss. [Distributed 8/9/2016]<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/it7XOUlOi-M" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Aug 09, 2016
Hip Deep Rio #1: Samba at the Dawn of Modern Brazil
00:59:00
In part one of our 2012 Hip Deep Brazil series, we travel back in time to Rio de Janeiro in the early 20th century to explore the birth of Brazil’s most iconic sound: samba. Beginning with the arrival of poor nordestinos in the city after the end of slavery in 1888, we follow the exploits of the early sambistas as they forged the genre that would come to represent the nation. Brazilian scholar Carlos Sandroni shows us how Afro-Brazilian religious music and popular styles like modinha transformed into the syncopated samba beat. Then, media scholar Bryan McCann guides us through the glamor and political intrigue of 1930s Rio as samba explodes as the popular music of choice throughout the country. We speak with samba greats from the old guard to the young bloods, including Dona Yvone Lara, Heitorzinho dos Prazeres, Paulão 7-Cordas and Luciana Rabelo. In closing, we find out how samba, an ambitious radio station and a populist dictatorship worked together to shape Brazilians’ ideas about race, society and the Brazilian nation itself<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/FT8XybA1JNE" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Aug 04, 2016
Fees Must Fall: A Voice of Change in South Africa
00:15:40
We meet 21-year-old Gigi Lamayne of South Africa, a singer/rapper who finds herself at the center of her country’s most important debate and social movement in decades: the #FeesMustFall movement. The day she graduated from university, Gigi dropped a protest song about rising education costs that effectively bar the majority of black South Africans from access to higher education: A new cause for a new time. Produced by Simon Rentner and hosted by Sarah Geledi.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/Yg4IWY0Zl7w" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Aug 02, 2016
Festivals Around The World
00:59:00
show number #438 Airdate: July 18th 2016 We travel to Zanzibar to enjoy highlights from the Sauti za Busara Festival, focused on Swahili sounds from coastal East Africa, then north to the Fes Festival of Sacred World Music in Morocco, where we hear the ecstatic sounds of Sufi artists performing late into the night. We go to Dakar, Senegal for the Coca-Cola Ebony Festival to enjoy Afropop headliners, and wind up in Mali for rousing performances at the Festival Sur le Niger this past winter.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/4zVKeE8Wzx0" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jul 28, 2016
Fees Must Fall: A Voice of Change in South Africa
00:15:40
We meet 21-year-old Gigi Lamayne of South Africa, a singer/rapper who finds herself at the center of her country’s most important debate and social movement in decades: the #FeesMustFall movement. The day she graduated from university, Gigi dropped a protest song about rising education costs that effectively bar the majority of black South Africans from access to higher education: A new cause for a new time. Produced by Simon Rentner and hosted by Sarah Geledi.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/A2GXfuHJrY8" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jul 26, 2016
Bamako Sounds
00:59:00
Airdate: 7/21/2016 Producer: Banning Eyre Show # 735 Our recent Hip Deep in Mali series explored fascinating stories of art and life in post-crisis Mali. On this program, it's just the music. We hear new sounds from veteran maestros Djelimady Tounkara and Cheikh Tidiane Seck, Wassoulou music star Nahawa Doumbia, mesmerizing Songhai songs from Baba Salah and Samba Toure, and balafon pyrotechnics from Bassidi Kone. We also meet some new ensembles: the Afrojazz of Mamadou Barry, and the bracing roots-pop of Bamba Wassoulou Groove, and sample the latest in Malian rap.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/0Z4cYjmm2ko" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jul 21, 2016
Escaping The Delta
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #452] [Originally broadcast in 2005] "Escaping the Delta" is the title of a provocative book by award-winning author Elijah Wald that explores how a mythology of the blues grew around the figure of Robert Johnson. On this Hip Deep episode, Wald talks with producer Ned Sublette, and plays lesser-known recordings by Peetie Wheatstraw, Lonnie Johnson, Leroy Carr and others, who provided source material for some of Johnson’s classic tunes.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/7HWdbmHIXzE" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jul 14, 2016
Mabiisi: Accra Sessions
00:17:36
The story of a boundary-breaking collaboration between rapper Art Melody from Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso, and kologo player Stevo Atambire from the north of Ghana. United by common languages and cultural traditions, but divided by national borders and colonial heritage, the two artists meet in Accra to find the space between traditional roots music and cutting-edge urban music. Produced by Morgan Greenstreet [Distributed 7/12/2016]<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/Tqez4m4GH0U" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jul 12, 2016
Hip Deep: Congo-Goma: Music, Conflict and NGOs
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #720] [Originally broadcast in 2015] In the city of Goma, in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, far from the rumba-soaked nightlife of the capital, Kinshasa, an artistic renaissance is going on. After two decades of devastating factional wars, ongoing mineral profiteering, a volcanic eruption, and other extreme circumstances, internationally minded youth are expressing themselves through diverse, socio-politically engaged music, film and dance. Artists must also navigate the influence and patronage of international NGOs and humanitarian organizations that use local music and musicians as mouthpieces for their projects and campaigns. This Hip Deep edition examines how musicians approach topics of politics, peace and war, collaboration with NGOs and cultural centers, and artistic autonomy.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/H-pSlNupupc" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jul 07, 2016
The Ring and the Shout
00:59:00
#734 airdate 6/30/2016 Producer: Ned Sublette The Ring and the Shout. At one time thought to have died out, the ring shout is the oldest known form of African American music. Producer Ned Sublette travels to Winnsboro, Louisiana, to record the Easter Rock, an annual ritual with a direct connection to antebellum slavery days, in an endangered plantation church with a wooden floor that serves as a drum when the Rockers are in charge. And we visit Athens, Georgia, to speak with Art Rosenbaum, co-producer of the McIntosh County Shouters' forthcoming album.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/C-zc1y5JhJU" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 30, 2016
Roots and Future: A History of U.K. Dance
00:59:00
Look around today’s musical mainstream, and you’ll quickly realized that dance styles are everywhere, filling stadiums, topping charts, and gathering tens of thousands in festivals around the country. Yet few know their full history. “Roots and Future” explores how a community of (primarily) black British musicians, fans, D.J.s, and radio pirates recreated dance music in the United Kingdom during the 1990s and 2000s. Connected to the musical mainstream during 1989’s drug and rave fueled “second summer of love,” these musicians learned to combine American hip-hop, dancehall toasting, dub bass, and techno euphoria to create style after chart-topping style, from drum-twisting jungle to the slick sounds of garage, the ferocious rhythms of grime, and the all-encompassing low-end of dubstep. We’ll speak to legendary pirate radio D.J.s, underground label owners, and groundbreaking producers. We’ll check young M.C.s spitting their bars on illegal frequencies, and hear veterans playing to their beloved audiences. And most importantly? We’ll rave. See you on the dance floor. #733 Roots and Future: A History of U.K. Dance Producer: Sam Backer Airdate: June 23rd 2016<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/F_7NEBJpRDY" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 23, 2016
Talking Peace In Mali
00:18:36
In the wake of the 2012-13 political crisis in Mali, the nation is working to repair its celebrated tradition of multiethnic harmony. The promise and pitfalls of this process play out dramatically in a public discussion during the Festival on the Niger in Segou. Artists, music professionals, and public figures weigh in with passion! Produced and hosted by Banning Eyre.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/cAgkXsuD28c" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 22, 2016
The Panama Beat
00:59:00
Central America, a narrow, mountainous, and largely impoverished stretch of land spanning seven countries, is a surprising and under-exposed Latin American musical hot zone. The region’s bizarre and tumultuous history has led to a fascinating mix of cultural influences – Spanish conquistadors, British pirates, and American banana companies have at one time or another vied for power. Add to this mix presence of large indigenous enclaves, Anglo-Caribbean migrants, the Afro-Arawak Garifuna and Mosquito peoples, and the many musical influences of the Caribbean, and you have the makings of a very interesting musical tapestry. Salsa and merengue, soca and calypso, reggae and reggaeton – it all comes together in Central America. In our program, we visit Panama, a little known musical treasure trove. Here on the ithmus, music from around the Americas mixed together in a unique stew: American, Cuban, Colombian,Jamaican influences combine to form a highly complex and unique musical culture. We’ll hear interviews from Spanish reggae star Kafu Banton, Afro-Spanish linguist John Lipski, traditional Afro-Latino princess Marcia Rodriguez, dancehall youngbloods Los Rakas, and many more.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/f16sMNW-d1k" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 16, 2016
Voodoo To Go Festival
00:59:00
APWW #717 Voodoo To Go Festival Producer Morgan Greenstreet follows the trail of West African Vaudou spiritual music to a very unlikely place–Utrecht, Netherlands–for the first edition of the Voodoo To Go Festival. The three-day festival, pioneered by Togolese entrepreneur Leopold Ekué Messan, set out to demystify Vaudou/Vodun/Voodoo spiritual practices by featuring music and dance from Togo, Benin, Haiti, Cuba and Suriname and bringing people together for films, food and a panel discussion about “Good and Evil in Voodoo.” From the opening ceremony, to the climactic final moments of the festival, the music at Voodoo To Go was filled with the spirit: Trance-inducing traditional music from Togolese/Beninois diaspora group Djogbé; heavy, retro Vaudou funk from Togolese musician Peter Solo and Vaudou Game, based in Lyon, France; Surinamese Kawina music from Rotterdam-based dance band Dray-ston; Late-night Haitian Vaudou-jazz from Erol Josué; and, finally an intense collaboration between Cuban jazz maestro Omar Sosa and Togolese musician and dancer Ayaovi Kokoussé. Alongside the excellent music, we hear from various participants in the festival discussing what Voodoo means to them: a Winti priestess; fascinated Dutch music fans; and, of course, the musicians who make music inspired by the spirit.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/qWhhfOz4qW4" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 09, 2016
Three Survivors: Paulo Flores, Emmanuel Jal, Lágbájá
00:59:00
[APWW #716] We profile three African musicians who have created significant careers in the face of daunting challenges in their countries. Paulo Flores, champion of semba and kizomba in Angola, came of age in the midst of that country's long post-independence civil war. He's probably done more for Angola's spiritual health during these difficult decades than anyone alive. Emmanuel Jal faced still worse as a child soldier who escaped Sudan under horrific circumstances to become an internationally acclaimed singer and rapper. Today, he must watch as his homeland--now called South Sudan--descends into another brutal, senseless war. The masked man of Nigerian pop, Lágbájá, has created diverse, socially conscious music through a series of military regimes in his homeland, and has new advice for his countrymen in a fragile democracy. We'll meet all three artists and hear an awesome variety of music. Produced by Banning Eyre.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/ClrBujIvio8" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 02, 2016
Born-Free South Africa: A Kaleidoscope of Colors
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Born-Free South Africa: A Kaleidoscope of Colors Produced by Sarah Geledi and Simon Rentner Airdate May 26th 2016 Join us on a modern-day musical adventure into Africa's Rainbow Nation. Now, 20-plus years removed from apartheid, South Africa is a nation deep in transition. And, it's reflected in its music—brimming with enthusiasm and creativity, yet also suffering from the growing pains of a new democracy. On the ground at the 2016 Cape Town International Jazz Festival, we celebrate the country's amazing diversity and discover its hottest local talent: Mafikozolo, the sizzling fashionista Zulu pop duo; Tribute “Birdie” Mboweni, a soulful and socially conscious songbird from the rural north; Gigi Lamayne, a fresh voice from hip-hop’s "born-free" generation; Bokani Dyer, a worldly jazz-cat on 88 keys; and Derek Gripper, a Capetonian guitarist virtuoso making us rethink African classical music as a whole.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/yYhQB_43THM" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 26, 2016
Hip Deep in Mali: Growing Into Music in 21st Century Bamako
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Hip Deep in Mali: Growing Into Music in 21st Century Bamako Airdate: 5/19/2016 #731 Produced by Banning Eyre This program presents a musical portrait of Bamako in the wake of crisis. In 2012-13, Islamists occupied the north and a coup d’etat threatened a recent history of functioning democracy. With borders restored and a new elected government in place, we find musical life returning with festivals, nightclub shows and street weddings. But that picture hides darker realities. Ethnomusicologist Lucy Duràn has been studying the oral transmission of music in various countries, notably among griot families in Mali. With her guidance, we explore the precarious lives of griots in today’s Bamako, focusing on the upbringing and education of children in these hereditary families of historian-entertainers. Elders and traditionalists say the griot tradition has been corrupted beyond hope, and even advise their young to pursue different professions. Others persist, within an environment where growing religious conservatism puts increasing pressure on the lives and careers of all musicians. We meet three extraordinarily talented griot children. We hear music and reflections from kora master Toumani Diabaté and his massively popular songwriting son, Sidiki. And we get a fascinating historical perspective from Gregory Mann, professor of history at Columbia University.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/CD3NtqcaMqE" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 19, 2016
The Cuban Connection, Part 2
00:58:52
We follow a carnival comparsa through the streets of Santiago de Cuba and hear the Haitian-descended Tumba Francesa. Son 14: Fue el Rey de la Rumba. NG La Banda: La Expresiva. Orq. Original de Manzanillo: Comenzó la Fiesta. Revé y su Charangón, live at the amphitheater of Guanabacoa: “Te confundieron con león . . . ¡gallina!” Dan Den: No Me Carezcas. We talk to Carlos Alfonso of Síntesis. Síntesis: Oyá. Mezcla: Ikiri Addá. Los Van Van live: Que Domingo. 1990 Photo via Telemundo<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/EFJx0_-uAhI" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 13, 2016
The Cuban Connection, Part 1
00:58:57
Features Ned Sublette’s exclusive live recording of Los Van Van in February 1990 in Havana, with “Titimanía” and an extended version of “Aquí Él Que Baila Gana.” We talk to Van Van founder Juan Formell and to Elio Revé of Revé y su Charangón, and visit a rehearsal by Los Muñequitos de Matanzas. We talk to Juan Formell. Revé y Su Charangón: Changüí Clave. Revé y Su Charangón: Más Viejo Que Ayer, Más Joven Que Mañana. Son 14: Tal Vez Vuelvas a Llamarme. Grupo Sierra Maestra: El Dulcerito. Los Muñequitos de Matanzas: Congo Yambumba. 1990 Photo by Adalberto Roque via AFP<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/XR4P3TfAuqI" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 13, 2016
Afropop Live Highlights
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#730 Afropop Live Highlights Airdate May 12th 2016 Afropop is proud to present live recordings of some of the most glorious moments in musical history–the New York debut of South Africa's Mahotella Queens in 1987; Thomas Mapfumo with his mbira-heavy Blacks Unlimited in New York in 1991; Youssou N'Dour performing his international hit "Set"; the king of rai, Khaled, in a blistering set at Central Park SummerStage; the gorgeous classic Khartoum sound of Abdel Gadir Salim in London; the stadium-filling soukous party singer Kanda Bongo Man; Afro-jazz sax maestro Gyedu Blay Ambolley live in Accra, and the awesome Kenyan dance band Simba Wanyika. Produced by Sean Barlow.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/cvcC49o_AF8" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 12, 2016
AFROPOP VISITS ABIDJAN, COTE D’IVOIRE FOR MASA 2016
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#729 AFROPOP VISITS ABIDJAN, COTE D’IVOIRE FOR MASA 2016 AIRDATE: 5/5/2016 PRODUCER: SEAN BARLOW Georges and Sean head to Abidjan, the commercial and artistic center of Cote d'Ivoire, to cover the 2016 edition of MASA, perhaps the biggest arts festival of its kind on the continent. Over the course of a week, six acts performed on each of three stages every night. And we knew hardly any of them: That's exactly the point! Many of these emerging artists have not toured outside the continent yet. You'll hear concert highlights from Zeynab (Benin), Bella Mondo (Cote d'Ivoire), BANTU (Nigeria), Ile Aiye (Brazil), Charlotte Dipanda, Mingus Group (Mozambique), Ray Lema (Congo), Paco Séry (Cote d'Ivoire), Soum Bill (Cote d'Ivoire). And we'll take a break from the action onstage to visit African reggae megastar Alpha Blondy at his radio station, Alpha Blondy FM. This man is quite a storyteller!<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/ZmzDBRd5uIA" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 05, 2016
Crabs With Brains
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#704 Crabs With Brains Produced by: Jesse Brent Airdate: 4/28/16 In the early 1990s, mangueboys and manguegirls stimulated fertility in the veins of Recife, Brazil. They were interested in hip-hop, the collapse of modernity, chaos and marine predator attacks (mainly sharks). Armed with boundless creativity, they turned one of the world’s most poverty-stricken cities into one of Brazil’s greatest centers of culture. Mangue artists mixed hip-hop, Jamaican raggamuffin and punk rock with traditions from Brazil’s northeast like maracatu and embolada. In this program, we explore the legacy of the mangue bit movement and its biggest star, Chico Science of Nação Zumbi. We also take a look at a new generation of adventurous musicians in Recife. Join us as we connect the good vibrations of the mangue with the world network of pop!<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/Z48WeNGDnJg" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Apr 28, 2016
Africa Now!
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#728 Distributed April 21 Africa Now! 2016 Rocks the Apollo Theater in Harlem Every year, the world-famous Apollo Theater and New York's World Music Institute pack the house for a stellar lineup of established and emerging artists from the African continent. This year was especially impressive. We bring you concert highlights and interviews with the artists--from Ghana, Sudan, Niger and Zimbabwe. You'll hear Alsarah and the Nubatones, inspired by the rich cultures of Nubia, Jojo Abot's arty, dancehall-meets-Afrobeat grooves, Bombino's joyous Tuareg rock, and the discovery of the night for many Afropop fans: Mokoomba from Zimbabwe, featuring phenomenal lead singer Mathias Muzaza, who spanned nods to Salif Keita, Ladysmith Black Mambazo, as well as a Congolese soukous animation that had the crowd up and dancing. Special bonus: a taste of the acoustic "traditional" set Mokoomba performed the next day up the Hudson.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/GfZasV0ZAnM" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Apr 21, 2016
Inside The Nile Project
00:59:02
Inside the Nile Project 4/14/2016 [APWW #719] The Nile Project is an ambitious and imaginative attempt to bring about better stewardship of one of the world’s longest rivers by fostering collaboration among artists from the 11 countries the river traverses. It’s an endeavor that spans the Muslim north and the Christian south, as well as the diverse languages, cultures, and music styles in between. This program takes listeners inside the Nile Project’s creative process, letting us hear how artists find common ground and create songs–from first encounters through rehearsal and refinement, all the way to the concert stage. Produced by Ian Coss and Banning Eyre.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/sgnuY3S1WFM" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Apr 14, 2016
Afropop By The Bay
00:59:00
April 7th 2016 #713 Afropop By The Bay Produced by Banning Eyre Original Airdate 7/30/2015 San Francisco: Afropop by the Bay It turns out that the first American city to host a roster of local African bands was not New York, Miami or Chicago, but the San Francisco Bay Area of northern California. Hugh Masekela brought Hedzoleh Soundz from Ghana, and they settled in Santa Cruz. Nigerian maestros O.J. Ekemode and Joni Haastrup lived in Oakland in the 1970s. South African musicians from the touring stage show Ipitombi also settled in the Bay Area and started the band Zulu Spear. By the early ‘80s, the Bay Area “worldbeat” scene was in full swing, and along with it came Kotoja, Mapenzi, Big City, the Nigerian Allstars and more. Join us for a tour through the sounds and stories of the Bay Area’s catalytic African music scene.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/i-au5HF31h0" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Apr 07, 2016
Hip Deep In Mali: The Tuareg Predicament
00:59:00
Hip Deep In Mali: The Tuareg Predicament #727 Airdate 3/31/2016 Producer: Banning Eyre The confederations and clans collectively known as the Tuareg descend from the oldest inhabitants of North Africa. They lead a mostly nomadic existence across the Sahara Desert, in the lands we now know as Algeria, Libya, Niger and Mali. Tuareg communities have long felt neglected by independent African governments, especially in Mali, which has endured a succession of rebellions. In 2012, a Tuareg uprising led to a year-long crisis in which the Malian north separated from the country and fell under harsh control by Islamic extremists. Ironically, these extremists banned music, which in the hands of modern bands like Tinariwen had been a crucial means for expressing Tuareg aspirations. This broadcast unravels this complex history and provides a vivid portrait of the Tuareg predicament in Mali today. The program samples a rich variety of Tuareg music and includes conversations with Tuareg musicians and cultural authorities in the wake of Mali’s crisis, as well as with University of Houston anthropologist Susan Rasmussen, who has been researching and writing about Tuareg culture for over 30 years, and veteran journalist and author Andy Morgan.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/K44UzoCUGy8" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Mar 31, 2016
Africa in Matanzas, Cuba: El Almacén is Walking
00:59:00
Africa in Matanzas, Cuba: El Almacén is Walking #726 Airdate: 3/24/2016 Producer: Harris Matanzas, Cuba has long been regarded as the source (la fuente) of many rich Afro-Cuban folkloric traditions. These ceremonial and secular Afro-Cuban musics are, for the most part, alive and well, and being documented for the first time by Matanceros themselves, rather than exclusively by Havana-based or non-Cuban imprints. The Matanzas record label and artist collective, Sendero Music/El Almacén, faces several challenges: oversight from the state, limited access to resources, curating which groups to record while paradoxically convincing the folkloric community of the value of their endeavors, and the conundrum of establishing meaningful connections outside of Cuba to disseminate the city’s music to the world.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/DwDjT4_SbYY" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Mar 24, 2016
Music In A Changing Cuba 2016
00:59:00
[APWW #707 - updated for 2016] News bulletins from Havana are appearing daily as Obama’s initiative to defang the U.S. embargo moves forward. Ned Sublette, who frequently travels to Cuba, talks with Sean Barlow about the present moment and recent developments. The program features timba from Havana d’Primera and Pupy y Los Que Son, Son; a master mix of reguetón by Chacal y Yakarta; El Micha, and the timeless music of the late Papo Angarica and Haydée Milanés.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/DB0s574qUdM" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Mar 17, 2016
Dance Floor Dynamite: Future Grooves Today
00:59:00
[APWW #709] [Originally broadcast in 2015] Sometimes it’s hard to sit still in the Afropop office. The funkiest, most leg-shakingly infectious music blasts from our speakers on a regular basis. Impromptu dance demonstrations have been known to take place. It’s our mission to share this wealth of musical excitement with our audience. Today, we bring you everything from the latest Chilean electro-pop, to the reggae revival that’s heating up Jamaica, to the psychedelic frontiers of South Africa. Get down with what the future’s dance floors sound like. You’re hearing it here first.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/JqentG_r71o" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Mar 10, 2016
Treasures Of Benin
00:59:00
[APWW #594] [Originally broadcast in 2010] Nestled between Togo, Burkina Faso, Niger and Nigeria, Benin is a culturally rich sliver of West Africa too often overlooked. This program focuses Afropop’s spotlight on Benin, starting with the country’s favorite daughter:international star Angelique Kidjo. She looks back on her musical education in the Benin capital, Cotonou, as she walks us through the songs on her album Oyo, which spans covers of songs by James Brown, Aretha Franklin, Miriam Makeba and Benin’s own Bella Bellow. We meet the ’70s vodoun funk band Orchestre Poly-Rythmo, who are still going strong, and recently made their belated U.S. debut. We move forward to present a chat with Lionel Loueke, a Beninois guitarist who has moved on to become one of the most original voices in contemporary American jazz. The program ends with a remembrance of the brilliant Malian guitarist and singer Lobi Traore.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/MfDkKh_Qfhg" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Mar 03, 2016
globalFEST 2016
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #725] globalFEST is New York's annual January multi-genre musical kickoff--12 bands on three stages in one wild night at Webster Hall. We hear highlights from the 2016 edition including new roots sounds from Haiti (Lakou Mizik), Colombian champeta (Tribu Baharu), suave Afro-jazz from Somi, Lebanese music maverick Simon Shaheen with his new ensemble Zafir, and lots more. The artists speak, but mostly, we give you a front-row seat for one of New York's most exciting musical happenings.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/ahyqzj9BQHk" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Feb 25, 2016
Music Of The Harlem Renaissance
00:59:00
[APWW #226] [Originally broadcast in 1996] The Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s was an astounding explosion of African-American cultural innovation, producing art, literature, poetry, and of course, fantastic music. In honor of Black History month, we are encoring our tribute to this magnificent period. We’ll hear from stars like Mamie Smith, Fats Waller, Louis Armstrong and Duke Ellington, as we use their music to explore the often-fraught history of Manhattan’s heights.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/dwLmpzK99gU" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Feb 18, 2016
Ancient Text Messages: Batá Drums in a Changing World
00:59:00
#724 Produced by Ned Sublette air date 2/11/2016 In Africa, drums don't only play rhythms, they send messages. “Ancient Text Messages: Batá Drums in a Changing World” explores an endangered tradition of drum speech in Nigeria, and how that tradition changed and thrived in Cuba, where large numbers of enslaved Yoruba arrived in the 19th century. Producer Ned Sublette speaks with ethnomusicologist Amanda Villepastour, language technician Tunde Adegbola, and drummer Kenneth Schweitzer about how language and music overlap.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/o1KVH3jq41Q" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Feb 11, 2016
Carnival Jump Around
00:59:00
[APWW #632] [Originally aired in 2012] It’s Carnival week again! Which means party time in Trinidad, Haiti, Brazil, Louisiana and much of South America. Below, find links to sites about Carnival, stream it live and/or check it for the road-march contenders. Also be sure to check out past programming on Carnival.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/z_uMldRmeYk" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Feb 04, 2016
Africa in America: Ladies Edition
00:59:00
#705 Africa in America: Ladies Edition uplink: 1/28/2016 APWW focuses on 3 remarkable women: Marie Daulne, founder of the genre-bending vocal group Zap Mama, collaborating with Antibalas, and we hear them live in concert. Madagascar-born Razia introduces her new tri-continental CD, Akory. And Somi tells her story from her days as a Midwestern girl with African ancestry, to her musical career in New York, to her adventurous 18-month stay in Lagos, Nigeria, and her new album, The Lagos Music Salon. These stories and more in a music-packed hour of Afro-femininity!<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/_1FfO2IkFu4" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jan 28, 2016
State Of Emergency: Reggae Reflections on Jamaica's Partisan Politics
00:59:00
Music is a powerful means of expression in Jamaica--a platform for fierce commentary, and a bellwether for the social and political climate on the island. In Jamaica, when local newspapers, broadcast media and elected representatives don’t tell the whole story, you've got to listen to the music! With the help of scholars and artists like Max Romeo and King Jammy, this program delves into the way that Jamaican popular music has always sharply commented on partisan politics in Jamaica while also revealing that Jamaican politicians have often attempted to co-opt and subvert reggae’s liberating messages for their own purposes. Particular attention is paid to the turbulent Cold War era of the mid-1970s, when foreign influence led to what was basically an undeclared civil war and reggae’s popularity was at its highest. Produced by Saxon Baird and David Katz. {APWW #723}<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/FvajbHkfRhE" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jan 21, 2016
Africa Now!
00:59:00
[APWW #715] [Originally aired in 2015] Join us for a whirlwind tour to hear the hottest artists in Lagos, Accra, Nairobi, Kinshasa, Jo’burg and Cairo. We’ll check out the hits shaking the dance floors for today’s youth. And we’ll get the inside stories and scandals. Produced by Sean Barlow with assistance from Jesse Brent, Morgan Greenstreet, Ferida Jawad, Atane Ofiaja, Ben Richmond and Biranne Sahr.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/gBSHxXat25Y" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jan 14, 2016
Beneath The Music: An African History of Bass
00:59:00
[APWW #586] [Originally aired in 2010] This week, Afropop celebrates one of the true unsung heroes of African music: the bass. Join us as we slap, pop and thump our way across the African diaspora with our ears tuned to those fat sounds beneath the music and the funky men who make them. Our tour of the global low end will begin with an exploration of virtuosic bass wizardry in Cameroon. Then, we’ll go to Cuba to find out how bassist Israel “Cachao” Lopez invented mambo with the well-placed pluck of a finger. After that, we’ll stop by Detroit and hear how the innovations of funk bass playing got the whole world dancing. Special guests include Cameroon native Richard Bona, thought by some to be the best bassist alive today, and Bakithi Kumalo, one of Africa’s premier bassists and the man behind the groove on Paul Simon’s Graceland. Produced by Marlon Bishop.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/4xdYmV7vwEs" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jan 07, 2016
An Atlantic Journey: From Cape Town to Cape Verde
00:59:00
[APWW #710] [Originally aired 6/11/2015] Join us on a freewheeling musical excursion. We start in Cape Town, South Africa listening to jazz, rock, and even classical music inspired by the city’s signature sound: goema. Veteran rocker and now-composer Mac McKenzie is our charismatic guide. Then on to Namibia where we meet one of the country’s most innovative and soulful singer/songwriter/bandleaders, Elemotho Galelekwe. We end in Cape Verde to hear old and new sounds from the first Portuguese settlement in Africa—from the vintage crooning of Ze Luis to the new sounds of cola-zouk.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/0qO6HQDFf7A" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Dec 31, 2015
World Sacred Music Festival In Fes
00:59:00
World Sacred Music Festival In Fes #447 12/24/2015 The World Sacred Music festival in Fes, Morocco fully delivers on its promise of bringing together profound, spiritual music from around the globe. In one edition of the festival, Youssou N’Dour debuted his Egypt project, backed by an orchestra from Cairo; whirling dervishes from Turkey and qawwali singers Meher Ali and Sheher Ali from Pakistan revealed contrasting faces of Sufi music and dance; the Orchestra of Fes showcased Andalusian and Jewish traditions and the art of Arab maqam; and Sufi Nights showcased many varieties of Morocco’s rich Islamic folklore. This program brings you all that and more, including a behind-the-scenes glimpse of spiritual life in the medieval city of Fes.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/dXtWlZqPZPk" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Dec 24, 2015
Afro-Lisbon And The Lusophone Atlantic: Dancing Toward The Future
00:59:00
Afro-Lisbon And The Lusophone Atlantic: Dancing Toward The Future - On this special Hip Deep edition, we take you on a journey to Lisbon, a city facing both the sea and 600 years of its own history. We’ll go to African club nights, hang out with obsessive record collectors, learn how to dance kizomba, and visit the projects that have produced a musical revolution. And through it all, we will try to answer a seemingly simple question: Just where did this music come from? Episode #722 Airdate: 12.17.2015<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/u2WCzpypIlo" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Dec 17, 2015
Riqueza Del Barrio: Puerto Rican Music in the United States
00:59:00
[APWW #509] [Originally aired in 2006] Once Puerto Ricans became U.S. citizens in 1917, El Barrio sprang up in New York. By the 1930s, they were the dominant Latin group in the city. Tito Puente, born on 110th St. in 1923, was the first important Latin star who was a native speaker of English. Puerto Ricans’ distinctive way of playing popular Cuban styles became, almost paradoxically, an expression of Puerto Rican national identity, even as traditional Puerto Rican bomba and plena became a familiar sound in New York, and as Ricans invented a unique jazz style. In the last few years, reggaetón has dominated Latin radio internationally. “Riqueza del Barrio” will explore Puerto Rico’s distinctive cultural identity as expressed through flavorful music. Produced by Hip Deep cofounder Ned Sublette, author of Cuba and Its Music, with guest scholar Juan Flores, author of From Bomba to Hip Hop.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/0Li2Wz0UNxY" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Dec 10, 2015
Stocking Stuffers 2015
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #721] Tuareg blues, Angelique Kidjo with a symphony orchestra, the return of Les Ambassadeurs and Kandia Kouyate of Mali. New sounds from Zambia and Nigeria, and classic ones from Senegal, Colombia, Zimbabwe, and the Dominican Republic. These are just a few of the musical highlights we'll hear on Afropop's annual roundup of the year's best music. Georges Collinet and Banning Eyre sit down for a lively whirlwind tour of another great year in music. Get out your notebook. There's sure to be a few holiday gift ideas for the music lovers in your life.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/YJMm3R3n4nk" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Dec 03, 2015
Hip Deep: Congo-Goma: Music, Conflict and NGOs
00:59:00
Hip Deep: Congo-Goma: Music, Conflict and NGOs Original Air-date: 11.26.2015 Show# 720 Produced by Morgan Greenstreet<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/kb6WNU_hIxw" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Nov 25, 2015
Inside The Nile Project
00:59:00
#719 Inside The Nile Project Produced by Banning Eyre and Ian Coss Airdate: Nov 19th 2015 The Nile Project is an ambitious and imaginative attempt to bring about better stewardship of one of the world’s longest rivers by fostering collaboration among artists from the 11 countries the river traverses. It’s an endeavor that spans the Muslim north and the Christian south, as well as the diverse languages, cultures, and music styles in between. This program takes listeners inside the Nile Project's creative process, letting us hear how artists find common ground and create songs--from first encounters through rehearsal and refinement, all the way to the concert stage.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/Qy5scdsKGgg" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Nov 19, 2015
African Sounds Of The Indian Subcontinent
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #663] [Originally aired in 2013] "African Sounds of the Indian Subcontinent" In this Hip Deep program, Afropop explores musical connections between Africa and India. First up is the story of the Afro-Indian Sidi community. In the 13th century, Africans arrived in India as soldiers in the armies of Muslim conquerors. Some were able to rise through the ranks to become military leaders and even rulers. Their descendants continue to live in India today, performing African-influenced Sufi trance music at shrines to the Black Muslim saint named Baba Gor. Next, we dive into the swinging jazz era of 1930s Bombay, when African-American jazz musicians arrived by the dozen to perform at the glitzy Taj Mahal Hotel. They trained a generation of Indian jazz musicians who would become instrumental in the rise of India’s Hindi film music industry. Then we head south to the island of Sri Lanka, where Africans have had a presence for almost 500 years. We explore their history through the groovy Afro-Indo-Portuguese pop music style known as baila, popularized by 1960s star Wally Bastiansz and still performed at parties in Sri Lanka today. Finally, we speak with Deepak Ram, an Indian jazz flutist who recounts his experiences growing up Indian in apartheid South Africa. Throughout, we hear from leading experts, and of course, introduce fantastic and often-unexpected music.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/9YmKvM71qXM" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Nov 12, 2015
Afro-tech: Stories of Synths in African Music
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #676] [Originally aired in 2013] Technology is one of the great drivers of musical change, and often one of its least understood. In this episode, we will explore the synthesizer, looking closely at the history of this ubiquitous (and often debated) piece of musical technology, and investigating how and why it was first used in a variety African musics. Enabled by groundbreaking reissues of synth pioneers like William Onyeabor (Nigeria) and Hailu Mergia (Ethiopia), disco stars like Kris Okotie, and South African bubblegum superstars like Brenda Fassie, we will take you back to the ’70s and ’80s, listening to the birth of a distinctly African electronic sound.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/ZwuKq0H1ung" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Nov 05, 2015
Soundin' Like Weself - The Trinidadian Rapso Tradition
00:29:52
Producer Jake Hochberger brings us to the southernmost island in the Caribbean, Trinidad. Trinidad is the birthplace of the steel drum, calypso and soca music, and is home to the largest Carnival celebration in the world. Here we encounter the musical and philosophical movement called rapso--an infectiously danceable rhythmic oration style that comes with a philosophy championing a Trinidadian identity in the face of a colonial history and a globalized present. We meet three generations of artists, from the founding King of Rapso, Brother Resistance, to the emerging musicians behind the American hip-hop influenced trapso sound. Brother Resistance shares stories of how local rhythms and participation in Trinidad’s Black Power movement influenced him to define his music as the most recent manifestation of an ancient oral tradition, as passed down from the West African griot. Omari Ashby of Kindred, Wendell Manwarren of 3Canal, and Ataklan bring us into the Trinidadian cultural matrix, where speed-rapping Carnival masquerade characters come to life through this music of rebellion and social uplift.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/menZHPjEWPM" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Nov 02, 2015
Afropop Live 2015
00:59:00
[APWW #718] It's our annual roundup of live recordings Afropop Worldwide has made in the past year. This program includes highlights from the 29th Nuits d'Afrique festival in Montreal including a performance by Cuba's Los Van Van. We'll also hear a selection from Angolan music pioneer Paulo Flores's U.S. debut at Le Poisson Rouge in New York City--rare sound, as this was Paulo's only appearance here so far (though certainly not his last). We'll also hear live sounds from Tal National of Niger recorded at Le Poisson Rouge: Put on your dancing shoes and crank it up! Produced by Banning Eyre and Jesse Brent.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/KKp73UNuKc0" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Oct 29, 2015
Borderless Sounds: The New North Africa
00:59:00
Show number: 692 encore: Oct 22nd 2015 original airdate : 8/14/2014 North African music receives very little coverage in the United States. There are no high-profile mixes of recent Tunisian underground dance music from hip DJs, and no young Algerian musicians with major distribution deals in the U.S. So we decided to explore what exactly is going on today in this part of the world. We trace the origins of some of the region’s most interesting current music to the banlieues of Paris, like raï ’n’b--a new Autotuned and synth-heavy offshoot of raï. We also explore the Gnawa reggae movement, which finds common ground between Sufi trance and the message of Marley. Returning to familiar traditions, we present a live recording of Kabyle mandole player Hamid Ouchène from Montreal’s Nuits d’Afrique festival, backed by a group of Montreal-based musicians with origins throughout the African continent. We next turn to the North African metal scene that developed during Algeria’s civil conflict to meld Berber folk music with black metal. Finally, we check out the new chaabi revival. Produced by Jesse Brent.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/Vxc167llsk8" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Oct 22, 2015
The Story Of Rai
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #482] [Originally aired in 2005] Afropop Worldwide listeners have heard the brilliant singer Khaled often on our program. In this Hip Deep portrait, Khaled shares stories and insights from his remarkable career--from his early days growing up in cosmopolitan Oran on the Mediterranean coast of Algeria, to his groundbreaking creation of modern pop rai music, incorporating Arab songs and rhythms with Western rock, funk, reggae and more. Khaled's music swept a generation of North Africans with his hurricane force vocals and his tales of partying and romance. Rai was seen as "the voice of the voiceless." Our collaborator on this program is anthropologist Marc Schade-Poulsen, author of Men and Popular Music in Algeria. Produced by Sean Barlow.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/x74MAAxejeE" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Oct 15, 2015
Voodoo To Go Festival
00:59:00
Producer Morgan Greenstreet follows the trail of West African Vaudou spiritual music to a very unlikely place--Utrecht, Netherlands--for the first edition of the Voodoo To Go Festival. The three-day festival, pioneered by Togolese entrepreneur Leopold Ekué Messan, set out to demystify Vaudou/Vodun/Voodoo spiritual practices by featuring music and dance from Togo, Benin, Haiti, Cuba and Suriname and bringing people together for films, food and a panel discussion about "Good and Evil in Voodoo." From the opening ceremony, to the climactic final moments of the festival, the music at Voodoo To Go was filled with the spirit: Trance-inducing traditional music from Togolese/Beninois diaspora group Djogbé; heavy, retro Vaudou funk from Togolese musician Peter Solo and Vaudou Game, based in Lyon, France; Surinamese Kawina music from Rotterdam-based dance band Dray-ston; Late-night Haitian Vaudou-jazz from Erol Josué; and, finally an intense collaboration between Cuban jazz maestro Omar Sosa and Togolese musician and dancer Ayaovi Kokoussé. Alongside the excellent music, we hear from various participants in the festival discussing what Voodoo means to them: a Winti priestess; fascinated Dutch music fans; and, of course, the musicians who make music inspired by the spirit.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/fUWkQZXRmp8" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Oct 08, 2015
Benin Roots Alive
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #706] [Originally aired April 2015] In this program, we follow producer Morgan Greenstreet on a musical tour of Benin’s roots-pop music and Afro-jazz, while exploring the deep cultural and spiritual traditions that inspire contemporary musicians. We will visit a midnight album launch party for a star of roots-pop music in Abomey, meet Norberka, an acclaimed singer, drummer and dancer, at the home of her patron, his majesty Hounon Behumbeza, a vodun priest. We’ll visit the rehearsals, studios and homes of some of Cotonou’s most creative Afro-jazz musicians, including Jah Baba, Fifi Finder and Vi-Phint; we’ll visit Ouidah for the recently established Vodun Festival, and Porto Novo to meet a living legend, Sagbohan Danialou. Along the way, we’ll hear original live recordings from Les Freres Guedehoungue, Gangbé Brass Band, and some previously unrecorded groups. (Produced by Morgan Greenstreet)<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/CQinmuY-q2g" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Oct 01, 2015
Three Survivors: Paulo Flores, Emmanuel Jal, Lagbaja
00:59:00
We profile three African musicians who have created significant careers in the face of daunting challenges in their countries. Paulo Flores, champion of semba and kizomba in Angola, came of age in the midst of that country's long post-independence civil war. He's probably done more for Angola's spiritual health during these difficult decades than anyone alive. Emmanuel Jal faced still worse as a child soldier who escaped Sudan under horrific circumstances to become an internationally acclaimed singer and rapper. Today, he must watch as his homeland--now called South Sudan--descends into another brutal, senseless war. The masked man of Nigerian pop, Lágbájá, has created diverse, socially conscious music through a series of military regimes in his homeland, and has new advice for his countrymen in a fragile democracy. We'll meet all three artists and hear an awesome variety of music.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/TZZ6XqjHnPA" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Sep 24, 2015
Afropop Exclusive Mix: Afro-Venezuela
00:27:59
We're back with another installment in our Afropop exclusive mixtape series! This one comes courtesy of Ricardo Vergara, who put together a mix of some terrific Venezuelan music in styles ranging from the African influenced tambor to the folk styles gaita and llanera. Track List: 0:00 Tambor Urbano - El Hacha 5:17 Los Amigos Invisibles - Loco Por Tu Amor 8:59 VHG - La Voy a Tocar a Pie 12:30 María Rivas - El Manduco 15:36 Oscar D'León - Llorarás 19:21 Las Chicas del Can - El Negro No Puede (Waka Waka) 23:24 Reynaldo Armas - La Muerte del Rucio Moro<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/hjaeBcY5BmI" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Sep 18, 2015
Africa Now!
00:59:00
Africa Now! Join us for a whirlwind tour to hear the hottest artists in Lagos, Accra, Nairobi, Kinshasa, Jo'burg and Cairo. We'll check out the hits shaking the dance floors for today's youth. And we'll get the inside stories and scandals.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/J4--Rv59cMw" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Sep 17, 2015
Juju Jubilee
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #317] [Originally aired in 1998] Juju maestro Chief Commander Ebenezer Obey recently made a rare U.S. tour in the summer of 2013 which made us want to hear more! In this program, Chief Obey breaks down his band’s sound instrument by instrument—traditional percussion, horns, guitars–which makes his version of juju all the more enjoyable. And he tells us stories behind some of his hit songs. Also telling stories is the other maestro of Nigerian juju, the legendary King Sunny Ade. Continuing our celebration of Afropop’s 25th anniversary, we pay special tribute to KSA whose celebrated 1982-83 U.S. tour played a huge role in inspiring Afropop producer Sean Barlow to develop Afropop Worldwide.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/Gf_8s29TPM0" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Sep 10, 2015
Dread Inna Inglan
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #681] [Originally aired in 2014] We unravel the complex history of how Jamaican music in the United Kingdom became a major component in navigating the cultural and racial landscape for many blacks in a post-imperial Britain while pushing the genre into new musical soundscapes.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/C63eioVsAvc" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Sep 03, 2015
Cuts From The Crypt 2: Bannings Picks
00:59:00
As work continues on the vast Afropop archive, producer Banning Eyre takes a deep dive and comes up with some gems. On the vinyl front, the focus is on South African and Zimbabwe, where the Afropop team collected a good deal of rare vinyl in the 1980s. Then Banning samples some his favorite field recordings from Zanzibar to Mali. In the age of YouTube, Pandora and Spotify, you might have the impression that all the music ever recorded is there at your finger tips. Here's proof that's not so. You'll hear music on this program you can't find anywhere else.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/K5Mu7TxR6fk" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Aug 27, 2015
Hip Deep Ghana: 21st Century Accra From Gospel To Hiplife
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #669] [Originally aired in 2014] Hiplife, a fusion of hip-hop and highlife, has come of age, spawning subgenres tilting to roots culture, international rap, and boldly humorous satire, not to mention azonto, a dance craze that has rocketed to global renown in just over a year. But for all that, the biggest-selling music in the country, by far, is gospel. On this whirlwind Hip Deep tour of Accra, we meet stars like Reggie Rockstone, M.anifiest, Efya, Soul Winners, and the genre-bending FOKN Bois. Jesse Weaver Shipley, anthropologist and author of the book Living the Hiplife: Celebrity and Entrepreneurship in Ghanaian Popular Music, helps untangle the complex world of award ceremonies, corporate endorsements, live music in church, and the emergence of women in Ghana’s male-dominated pop world.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/4JHF-Q1kDnc" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Aug 20, 2015
Living In New Orleans Part 1
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #458] [Originally aired in 2005] Aug. 29, 2015 is the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, and the catastrophic failure of the Mississippi River levees that put the city of New Orleans under water. In tribute to the city’s struggles of the last 10 years, we are rebroadcasting our Hip Deep program made in spring 2005, a few short months before life in New Orleans was turned upside down. “Living in New Orleans, Part 1″ takes you to the rambunctious street music scene in the Crescent City around Mardi Gras time. This is one town where kids still pick up tubas, and young brass bands have lots of work, parading along the same funky streets where jazz was born. We’ll get inside the world of the Mardi Gras Indians as Hip Deep producer Ned Sublette, who is spending the year on the ground in New Orleans, talks with musician and educator Big Chief Donald Harrison; Sylvester Francis of the Backstreet Cultural Museum; scholar and former New Orleans resident Joseph Roach of Yale University, author of Cities of the Dead; and Vicki Mayer of Tulane University. We’ll hear music from Kermit Ruffins and Rebirth Brass Band, Cyril Neville and the Uptown All-Stars, and Bo Dollis and the Wild Magnolias. Produced by Ned Sublette.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/jLVb0okzbh0" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Aug 13, 2015
The Podcast Special
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #693] [Originally aired in 2014] Afropop launched a new and improved podcast, making your favorite world-spanning radio show available in a whole new way. To celebrate, we’ve put together a show featuring some of our favorite moments from the podcast. Previously available only online, these segments are airing for the very first time. We’ll share the story of soul man Geraldo Pino, the “African James Brown.” You’ll hear the musical visions of the eccentric Jamaican guitarist Brushy One String. And much more!<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/bn2raYur88E" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Aug 06, 2015
Kadongo Kamu Special ft. DJ Paddy
00:17:44
Kadongo Kamu, which literally means "one guitar," is a lyrical genre of Ugandan pop music dating back to the 1950s. For this podcast, producer Ian Coss sits down with the Boston-based DJ Paddy to talk about the music's history and learn the significance of some of its classic tracks.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/9DQ9W8PI-Bc" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Aug 04, 2015
San Francisco: Afropop By The Bay
00:59:00
[APWW #713] [Originally aired 2015] It turns out that the first American city to host a roster of local African bands was not New York, Miami, or Chicago, but the San Francisco Bay Area. Hugh Masekela brought Hedzoleh Soundz from Ghana, and the settled in Santa Cruz. Nigerian maestros O.J. Ekemode and Joni Haastrup lived in Oakland in the 1970s. South African musicians from the touring theatre show Ipitombi also settled in the Bay Area and started the band Zulu Spear. By the early ‘80s, the Bay Area “worldbeat” scene was in full swing, and along with it came Kotoja, Mapenzi, Big City, The Nigerian Allstars and more. Join us for a tour through the sounds and stories of the Bay Area’s catalytic African music scene.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/aZStsKnatl0" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jul 30, 2015
Afropop Exclusive Mix: Brazilian Underground, Vol. Two
01:34:12
The first Brazilian Underground mix was one of our favorites in the Afropop Exclusive Mix Series, so we asked Rio-based journalist Marcelo Monteiro of Amplificador if he could make us one more. We are very excited to be once again featuring some incredible new songs from the new generation of Brazil. Enjoy! Track List: 01. Ava Rocha - Hermética 02. Metá Metá - Atotô 03. Ive Seixas - Praia no Inverno 04. Mohandas - Your Eyes 05. Abayomy - Obatala 06. Bixiga 70 - Mil Vidas 07. Fukai - Soma 08. The Baggios - Esturra Leão 09. Far From Alaska - Mama 10. Boogarins – Doce 11. Cícero - Camomila 12. Graveola - Lembrete 13. Iconili - Nego Preto 14. Siba - Marcha Macia 15. Carne Doce - Preto Negro 16. Bruna Mendez - Pra Ela 17. Quarto Negro - Orlando 18. Maglore - O Sol Chegou 19. O Terno - Ai, Ai, Como Eu Me Iludo 20. Chapa Mamba - Beleléu 21. Câmera - Till Life Do Us Apart 22. Amplexos - Cai pra Dentro 23. Frevotron e Jorge Du Peixe – Travessia 24. Astronauta Marinho - Negord! 25. I.F.Á. Afrobeat - Suffer 26. The Outs - What Brings Me Down 27. Kung Fu Johnny - Say I Want 28. Burro Morto – Lucifercolombia 29. Fabricio - Feito Tamborim 30. Macaco Bong – Abramacabra 31. Camarones - Silêncio, Barulho a Vista 32. Muñoz - The Flight Of Alligators<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/FVbHN87LMcM" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jul 28, 2015
Hip Deep In Madagascar The Tsapiky Story
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #695] [Originally aired in 2014] The southwest of Madagascar is a land of fishermen, mining prospectors and cattle ranchers—not exactly a homogenous region in terms of lifestyle or ethnicity. But one thing that unites all the people of this region is the giddy, electric guitar-driven boogie music known as tsapiky (pronounced tsa-PEEK). First created in the late 1970s, tsapiky has become the required music at large family ceremonies (circumcisions, weddings, and especially, funerals), where music and partying goes nonstop for three days or more. In this Hip Deep program, we unfold the unique origins of this music, and other traditional styles of southwest Madagascar. And we’ll meet some of tsapiky’s great guitar practitioners: Damily, Teta and Pascal. We’ll hear a song from Damily’s recent public concert in Tulear—his first in 14 years–and sample a variety of beautiful music from this remote and remarkable corner of Madagascar.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/Wbu1JChWF3w" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jul 23, 2015
Sounds Like Brooklyn
00:59:00
At Afropop, we have gone far and wide, from Brazil to England to Madagascar to Egypt, tracking down incredible music to bring back home to our headquarters in Brooklyn. For our newest program, "Sounds Like Brooklyn," we stay closer to home, tracing a hidden music economy of CD vendors in bodegas, copy shops and food markets around the five boroughs. Accompanying us on our travels is poet and "Bodega Pop" WFMU radio host Gary Sullivan. Along the way, we check out a Caribbean gospel rap performance in Bed-Stuy's Restoration Plaza, dust off some cassettes at VP Records in Jamaica, and chat with DJ Wow at his African CD store in Harlem. New York is a city of immigrants and we salute the creativity they bring with them from all corners of the world!<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/TjQ_czaBM00" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jul 16, 2015
Fania At 50
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #696] [Originally aired in 2014] New York City is home to the earthshaking Latin dance music known as salsa. From the mid-1960s through the 1980s, Fania Records released many of the landmark albums in the history of the music, creating a salsa boom that reverberated around the world. In 2014, Fania celebrated 50 years in the business; and to celebrate, we dug into the label’s history. We’ll hear from some of the principal players, including Aurora Flores, Nicky Marrero and Larry “El Judeo Maravilloso” Harlow, and tell a few Afropop-centric stories along the way.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/SJwkvXH_G0M" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jul 09, 2015
Afropop Exclusive Mix: DJ Mundi's CHAMPETA MIXX
00:54:18
Here's another great edition to the Afropop exclusive mix series! This one comes courtesy of DJ Mundi, who put together a fantastic collection of champeta, soundsystem-based music from the Caribbean coast of Colombia, strongly influenced by African styles like makossa and soukous. The cover art for the mix displays picos, hand-crafted and painted soundsystems of champeta. For more info and music check the links --> http://www.afropop.org/23645/afropop-exclusive-mix-dj-mundis-champeta-mixx/ https://vimeo.com/66570670 https://youtu.be/0RzwcBxoiKg?t=6m19s https://soundcloud.com/dj-champeta-man/lucas-silva-champeta-mixdown PALENQUE RECORDS - https://soundcloud.com/palenque-records https://itunes.apple.com/album/champeta-criolla-vol-2-visionary/id864909986 http://palenquerecords.blogspot.com AFRICOLOMBIA BLOG - https://acbia.wordpress.com DJ MUNDI - https://soundcloud.com/djmundi<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/mgCedv2eiuM" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jul 02, 2015
Hip Deep Portrait Of King Sunny Ade
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #468] [Originally aired in 2005] King Sunny Adé was, in many ways, the inspiration for what would become Afropop Worldwide. And he was by no means only an inspiration to us! Many fans in America first got hooked on Afropop (and African music in general) through the landmark 1982-83 tour by King Sunny Ade and his African Beats: the propulsive polyrhythms of traditional drums mixed with sophisticated guitar arrangements and pedal steel were like nothing they had ever heard. Topped by graceful choreography and the beaming presence of the “Chairman” himself, the effect was totally intoxicating. In this program, we travel to Lagos to talk to people there who help us fill in the picture of King Sunny Ade’s earlier career in the 1960s and '70s. KSA also granted Afropop Worldwide a three-hour interview. We’ll hear his stories and some classic recordings. Featured in the show are highlights from a sublime acoustic concert Ade and the African Beats gave at Joe’s Pub in New York City.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/UAd-i7k1Wc8" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jul 02, 2015
Grand Master Franco
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #316] [Originally aired in 1999] Celebrating Grand Master Franco<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/yD1kgyC4Hd4" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 30, 2015
Mama Africa - Miriam Makeba
00:58:21
[APWW PGM #331] [Originally aired in 2000] Mama Africa, Miriam Makeba<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/hhzEkdBYfro" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 30, 2015
Franco And Tabu Ley
00:58:22
[APWW PGM #14] [Originally aired in 1989] Franco and Tabu Ley: A celebration of the lives and work of the late giants of Congolese music--Franco and Tabu Ley Rochereau. Afropop visits with two giants of Congolese music, Franco Luambo Makiadi and Tabu Ley Rochereau at their palatial homes in Kinshasa<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/jOjMtlFZM2s" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 30, 2015
On The Red Carpet At The Peabodys
00:59:00
Afropop Worldwide recently won a highly prestigious Peabody Institutional Award honoring the entire 27-year body of our work. And the Peabody Awards threw a big party at Cipriani Wall Street hosted by Saturday Night Live alum Fred Armisen. Hear highlights of the evening from the Red Carpet and from the stage. And we'll enjoy excerpts from some of our favorite programs over the years: Our meeting with Ali Farka Toure, in his hometown Niafounke; visits with two giants of Congolese music, Franco Luambo Makiadi and Tabu Ley Rochereau at their palatial homes in Kinshasa; and an audience with Mama Africa, Miriam Makeba. Also on parade are our Hip Deep programs on samba in Brazil and the musical legacy of Al-Andalus in medieval Spain.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/tNYo3mNcvUM" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 26, 2015
Hip Deep Madagascar in 21st Century Antananarivo
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #697] [Originally aired in 2014] Antananarivo, known as Tana to the locals is the highland capital of Madagascar. Afropop's Senior Producer Banning Eyre took a research trip to the beautiful Indian Ocean nation. Join us as we delve deep into the modern musical landscape of Antananarivo. We start off with the upbeat and fast stylings of Tence Mena to the dance craze sweeping the nation called Kilalaky to Malagasy diva Black Nadia and to the protest rap of Agrad & Skaiz and much more.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/LjrCK-29GI0" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 18, 2015
Afropop Exclusive Mix: Cultures Of Soul's Worldwide Disco Fever
00:32:06
Cultures of Soul has been the source of some of our favorite international disco compilations recently, providing much-needed focus on incredible music of the '70s and '80s from places as far ranging as São Paulo, Guadeloupe and Mumbai. We reached out to the label founder and director Jeff Swallow, who made us a mix, featuring some of the hottest tracks from his recent releases. Tracklist: Joanne Wilson - Got to Have You Camille Hidevert - Caribbean People Tim Maia - Verão Carioca 2001 & Beto - Labirinto Emilio Santiago - Bananeira C.S. Crew - Love Is Peace Shadow - Let's Get Together (Whiskey Barons' Rework) Stanton Davis' Ghetto Mysticism - High Jazz Reprise<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/QeUwY7j_G34" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 18, 2015
An Atlantic Journey: From Cape Town to Cape Verde
00:59:00
Join us on a freewheeling musical excursion. We start in Cape Town listening to jazz, rock, and even classical music inspired by the city’s signature sound: goema. Veteran rocker and now composer Mac McKenzie is our charismatic guide. Then on to Namibia where we meet one of the country’s most innovative and soulful singer/songwriter/bandleaders, Elemotho Galelekwe. We end in Cape Verde to hear old and new sounds from the first Portuguese settlement in Africa—from the vintage crooning of Ze Luis, to the new sounds of cola-zouk.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/fF-_KW8MePs" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 11, 2015
Two Tenors of Arabic Music Play Las Vegas
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #332] [Originally aired in 2000] In Las Vegas in the year 2000, two legends of Arabic art music performed an historic concert. Wadi’ Al-Safi was called “the pure voice of Lebanon" because for decades he had brought the folkloric songs of the Lebanese countryside to the Lebanese airwaves and the grandest stages of the world. Sabah Fakhri, then one of the most celebrated and beloved singers of Syria, powerfully channeled the ecstatic Sufi art music of Aleppo in performances that riveted audiences throughout the region. Soon would come 9/11, rearranging American perceptions of the world; Syria, and especially Aleppo, would be devastated by war a decade later; and Al-Safi would die at 91 in 2013. All the more reason why this brilliant concert, under the musical direction of Simon Shaheen, who also performs with his group Qantara, deserves a fresh listen.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/okcAp805lh8" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 06, 2015
Thomas Mapfumo Live At SOBs
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #55] [Originally aired in 1992] In 1991, Thomas Mapfumo and the Blacks Unlimited made their second tour of the United States. It was a fascinating transitional moment in the band’s history. Mapfumo had recently added two musicians playing the metal-pronged, Shona mbira, enriching the band’s lineup of guitar, bass, drums, keyboards, brass and percussion. The band had now evolved into a kind of folk orchestra in which everyone sang, allowing for beautifully layered vocal arrangements. This recording, made by Afropop Worldwide at S.O.B.'s in New York City during that historic tour, is a true gem in the Afropop archive. It captures one of Africa’s most innovative and unusual artists and bandleaders at the height of his powers. One listen to this sublime recording and you will understand why producer Banning Eyre devoted some 15 years to writing the new book Lion Songs: Thomas Mapfumo and the Music That Made Zimbabwe.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/uUnPMYO6W-k" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 28, 2015
Dancefloor Dynamite: Future Grooves Today
00:59:00
Sometimes it's hard to sit still in the Afropop office. The funkiest, most leg-shakingly infectious music blasts from our speakers on a regular basis. Impromptu dance demonstrations have been known to take place. It's our mission to share this wealth of musical excitement with you, our audience. Today, we bring you everything from the latest Chilean electro-pop to the reggae revival that's heating up Jamaica to the psychedelic frontiers of South Africa. Get down with what the future's dancefloors sound like. You're hearing it here first.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/R_yEbFH0ebA" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 22, 2015
The Music Of Black Peru: Cultural Identity in the Pacific
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #558] [Originally aired in 2008] The “Black Pacific” is a term coined by our guide, ethnomusicologist Heidi Carolyn Feldman. She describes the circumstance of African descendants displaced not only from their ancestral homes in Africa, but also from the Atlantic coast nations where their enslaved ancestors were originally brought. This Hip Deep edition explores the sonically vibrant realm of Afro-Peruvian music, a young genre identification that has flourished since the 1950s and has produced artists of international renown, such as singer Susana Baca, and the black folkloric company Peru Negro. The music is sensuous and deeply beautiful, and represents a fascinating and little-understood history. We will hear from Juan Morillo, who represents Peru Negro, from Susana Baca, and other artists and community scholars with whom Feldman has worked during her extensive research of this topic.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/u0OT_kS3O_Y" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 15, 2015
Thomas Mapfumo: The War Years
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #477] [Originally aired in 2013] This Hip Deep edition explores the legendary early career of Thomas Mapfumo, a singer, composer and bandleader whose 1970s music set the stage for the birth of a new nation, Zimbabwe. Using rare, unreleased recordings, and recollections by Mapfumo, key band members, and prominent Zimbabweans who lived through the liberation struggle, this program traces the development of chimurenga music. Central to the program, are research materials gathered by Mapfumo biographer Banning Eyre, and commentary by ethnomusicologist Thomas Turino, author of Nationalists, Cosmopolitans, and Popular Music in Zimbabwe. One of the great stories of African music’s role in history is told here as never before.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/oDegHijI3cU" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 14, 2015
Cuts From The Crypt
00:59:00
In early 2015, Afropop relocated its archives from a variety of storage units and apartments, and brought it all together in one place. The goal? Sorting, organizing, and preservation. But along the way, we also found more than a few musical gems. Today, join us as we dig through stacks of vinyl, and quite literal mountains of CDs, for the long forgotten, the often overlooked, the totally classic, and the absolutely amazing, as we play some of the albums that we’ve been spinning in our office for the past few months. Spread love, it’s the Brooklyn way. Right?<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/_OyZV3Mm8zk" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 01, 2015
Music In A Changing Cuba
00:59:00
What's up in Havana besides tourism? Ned Sublette, who recently traveled to Cuba for Billboard magazine, talks with Sean Barlow about the present moment in the fast-changing music capital. Timba from Havana D'Primera, jazz/son by Pancho and Daniel Amat, and a mastermix of reguetón by Chacal y Yakarta, El Micha, and others.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/lflEKfjN9aM" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Apr 24, 2015
Afropop Exclusive Mix: Roots-Pop in Benin
00:23:05
In Benin, a small francophone country in West Africa, traditional style roots music is extremely popular: artists sell thousands of CDs and DVDs of music videos, pack stadiums for concerts and frequently appear on national television. There are many, many styles of roots-pop, but the baseline of dense percussion and intricate vocals is a constant. Producer Morgan Greenstreet focused on these styles for our program Benin Roots Alive. He also made an exclusive Benin Roots Pop Mix from recordings he collected during his trip to Benin in January 2015. Enjoy!<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/ySLGSGRtotA" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Apr 22, 2015
Benin Roots Alive!
00:59:00
In this program, we follow producer Morgan Greenstreet on a musical tour of Benin’s roots-pop music and Afro-jazz, while exploring the deep cultural and spiritual traditions that inspire contemporary musicians. We will visit a midnight album launch party for a star of roots-pop music in Abomey, meet Norberka, an acclaimed singer, drummer and dancer, at the home of her patron, his majesty Hounon Behumbeza, a vodun priest. We’ll visit the rehearsals, studios and homes of some of Cotonou’s most creative Afro-jazz musicians, including Jah Baba, Fifi Finder and Vi-Phint; we’ll visit Ouidah for the recently established Vodun Festival, and Porto Novo to meet a living legend, Sagbohan Danialou. Along the way, we’ll hear original live recordings from Les Freres Guedehoungue, Gangbé Brass Band, and some previously unrecorded groups. (Produced by Morgan Greenstreet)<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/06xvSLh-nsQ" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Apr 16, 2015
Sahel Sounds: New Music From Mali
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #666] [Originally aired in 2013] Working closely with Chris Kirkley, the writer and recordist behind the Sahel Sounds Blog and label, we will meet the newest generation of musicians from Mali. With their possibilities transformed by technology and their musical tastes reshaped by an exposure to sounds drawn from across the world, these young musicians are radically rethinking centuries old traditions. Get ready for the fast paced guitar bands of the north, the mp3 markets in which digital music passes from cellphone to cellphone, and the balani show music of Bamako (Produced by Sam Backer)<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/HFwicNosQg4" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Apr 10, 2015
Afropop Exclusive Mix: Sahel Sounds
00:40:07
Encore Mix! In conjunction with our current episode on Christopher Kirkley and his website and label, Sahel Sounds, Afropop offers this exclusive mix from Mr. Kirkley himself. It features some of the most interesting sounds currently coming out of Mali. Enjoy! Tracklist: Alkibar Junior - Homage Le Marchand du Soleil - Laila Je T'aime Mdou Moctar - Nikali Talit Amanar - Alghafiat Lakal Kanaye - Soul Tamashek Yeli Fuzzo - Abande Pheno S. - Souroulouklouk Meleke and MC Waraba - Ado Do Abubakar Sani and Fati Niger - Tofi (Photo By Christopher Kirkley)<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/Cc0l4ridzm0" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Apr 09, 2015
Bachata Takeover: From The Bronx To The World
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #694] [Originally aired in 2014] While bachata may have originated in the Dominican Republic, its growth in popularity over the past 10 years is not rooted within the shores of the small Caribbean nation but in the outer boroughs of New York City. It was here that the now-legendary bachata group Aventura formed. Aventura would go on to change the sound and style of bachata by mixing the style with the rap and r&b they were hearing on the streets of the Bronx. Christened “urban bachata,” the new style has catapulted the genre to greater international recognition and is starting to make its way into mainstream pop radio. Artists like Romeo Santos have already collaborated with the likes of Drake and Nicki Minaj, sold out numerous shows at Madison Square Garden, Staples Center, Yankee Stadium, and just about every major city in Latin America, while 25-year old New York-based artist Prince Royce already has a slew of chart-topping singles under his belt as well as three albums that have reached number one on the U.S. charts. We trace things back to their origins, talking to producers, artists and industry execs about the growing popularity of bachata and the astounding story of how a couple of Dominican teenagers from the Bronx completely revolutionized the genre and created the most popular Latin music of a generation.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/7NUCT76o1Fw" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Apr 06, 2015
After The Money: Salsa for Love in NYC
00:17:49
Salsa, the dance, is more popular than ever in New York City, its birthplace. Yet salsa musicians are having a harder time than ever making a living from playing the music. In "After The Money" we explore why this might be: we hear from some of the masters who lived through the golden years and experienced the decline of live salsa, and meet the young bandleaders and DJs who continue to make salsa the center of their lives, even if it means struggling to make a living.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/eA1M2rxnW3Q" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Apr 01, 2015
Africa in America: Ladies Edition
00:59:00
Afropop's occasional series on African music made in America continues with a focus on three remarkable women. Marie Daulne, founder of the genre bending vocal group Zap Mama, collaborates with New York Afrobeat band Antibalas, and we hear them live in concert. Madagascar-born Razia introduces her new tri-continental CD, Akory. And Somi tells her story from her days as a Midwestern girl with African ancestry, to her musical career in New York, to her adventurous 18-month stay in Lagos, Nigeria, and her new album, The Lagos Music Salon. These stories and more in a music-packed hour of Afro-femininity!<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/BSvws8xJSjk" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Mar 26, 2015
Afropop Exclusive Mix: Dj Chibuikem- Muster Point Mix 2015
01:02:46
Take note: Soca's not just for Carnival anymore. Though this mix from New York-based DJ Chibuikem weaves together the highlights of this year's Carnival in Trinidad, it's fit for any kind of festive occasion. Soca's a genre that's firmly rooted in a time (Carnival) and a place (Trinidad) but this year, it seems poised to make an international breakout.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/CUG_2P5rs-0" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Mar 26, 2015
Dread Inna Inglan: How the UK took to reggae
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #681] [Originally aired in 2014] Jamaican music journeyed to England in the ‘60s when immigrants from the island flocked to the UK in search of jobs and a better life. But as racism, unemployment and poor living conditions developed in the 70s, a new generation of UK-based reggae and dancehall artists transformed the music into a major platform for voicing the concerns, struggles and hard, daily reality of life in the UK for black immigrants. Through interviews with David Hinds of Steel Pulse, Dennis Bovell, Papa Levi and many more, we unravel the complex history of how Jamaican music in the United Kingdom became a major component in navigating the cultural and racial landscape for many blacks in a post-empire Britain while pushing the genre into new, musical soundscapes.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/eUJvxoH0PIs" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Mar 20, 2015
Afropop Exclusive Mixtape- Palenque Records
01:01:24
Lucas Silva, the man behind the always amazing Palenque Records, dropped this dynamite mix of Colombian favorites new, old, and in-between. Dig in! And be sure to check out our interview with Lucas here ==> http://bit.ly/Lucas-Silva-Mix<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/s5AJd9mKdC0" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Mar 18, 2015
Bonus Podcast: Zaki Nassif and Sabah
00:14:57
This special feature is a supplement to the Afropop Worldwide program, “Lebanon 1: Fairuz, A Woman for All Seasons.” The feature introduces two important contemporaries of Fairuz and the Rahbani brothers, namely composer Zaki Nassif and legendary singer Sabah. Want a deeper delve into Lebanese music? This one's for you.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/XspdtZ5JJ4w" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Mar 12, 2015
Crabs With Brains: The Mangue Revolution & New Sounds of Recife
00:59:14
In the early 1990s, mangueboys and manguegirls stimulated fertility in the veins of Recife, Brazil. They were interested in hip-hop, the collapse of modernity, chaos and marine predator attacks (mainly sharks). Armed with boundless creativity, they turned one of the world's most poverty-stricken cities into one of Brazil's greatest centers of culture. Mangue artists mixed hip-hop, Jamaican ragamuffin and punk rock with styles from Brazil's northeast like maracatu and embolada. In this program, we explore the legacy of the mangue bit movement and its biggest star, Chico Science of Nação Zumbi. We also take a look at a new generation of adventurous musicians in Recife. Join us as we connect the good vibrations of the mangue with the world network of pop! Produced by Jesse Brent [APWW PGM #704].<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/mQKj6AzhMkY" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Mar 11, 2015
Hip Deep Lebanon 1: Fairuz, A Woman for All Seasons
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #671] [Originally aired in 2013] Fairuz is the most popular living singer throughout the Arabic-speaking world and an artist with no real counterpart in Europe or the Americas. Since the ‘50s, she has appealed across boundaries of age, gender, class, religion, nationality, regional dialect, and political persuasion. Creating music as serious and engaged as it is popular, Fairuz—along with her collaborators from the Rahbani family of composer poets—has achieved near-universal appeal during a time of unprecedented division and social strife. This program explores Fairuz’s remarkable biography guided by her biographer Kenneth Habib, and Ghady Rahbani, among others. The deepest understanding of Fairuz’s success carries a message that harmony among the Abrahamic faiths is not a lofty illusion, but something lost in the near past, that can be regained.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/YuKKysIenF0" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Mar 10, 2015
Accounting for Taste: Dire Straits, Jim Reeves, and Death Metal in Africa
00:59:00
When we talk about the influence of American performers on African music, we usually think about a few obvious examples, legends like Michael Jackson, Jimi Hendrix or James Brown. In this episode, we go beyond these stars to explore the legacy of some lesser-known inspirations. We’ll learn how the fluid guitar playing of '70s rock band Dire Straits became massively popular in the Sahel, influencing Tuareg rockers like Tinariwen and Tamikrest. We’ll hear about the American country superstar Jim Reeves' African career, and the unlikely story of how the pedal steel made it from Hawaii to Lagos. Finally, we’ll travel to Angola with the help of director Jeremy Xido, to explore that nation’s death metal scene. And along the way, we will try to understand just how to account for taste. Produced by Sam Backer [APWW PGM #703].<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/p5uAYX2Djgo" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Feb 25, 2015
Sierra Leone: Celebration, War, And Healing
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #552] [Originally aired in 2008] While Sierra Leone is currently in the news for the horrific outbreak of Ebola that has devastated the nation in recent months, the country is no stranger to tragedy. This also means that it has deep reserves of resilience, an ability to come together and overcome great obstacles embedded in its culture. To provide the kind of history that is all too often overlooked when reporting on current events on the African continent, we are encoring this episode of Hip Deep episode, which explores the nation’s past. When Sierra Leone gained independence in 1961, Freetown swayed to the beguiling, breezy lilt of palm wine guitar and danced to the funky pop of Geraldo Pino and the Heartbeats. Once a center of the trans-Atlantic slave trade, Sierra Leone became an improbable amalgamation of indigenous peoples and repatriated Africans freed from slavery. Thirty years of political and economic disintegration led to a horrific civil war that claimed tens of thousands of victims and created a generation of maimed bodies and ruined lives between 1991 and 2002. This program profiles the inspiring story of Sierra Leone's Refugee All Stars, a band formed in war-era refugee camps in Guinea. This band played a key role in giving citizens the courage to return home, and now, along with other young musicians in Freetown, attempt to pick up where others left off before the war. Produced by Simon Rentner with Wills Glasspiegel.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/K6MtxKzmNaQ" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Feb 16, 2015
Escaping The Delta
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #452] [Originally aired in 2005] Escaping the Delta is the title of a provocative book by award-winning author Elijah Wald that explores how a mythology of the blues grew around the figure of Robert Johnson. On this episode of Hip Deep, Wald talks with producer Ned Sublette, and plays lesser-known recordings by Peetie Wheatstraw, Lonnie Johnson, Leroy Carr and others, who provided source material for some of Johnson's now more famous tunes. Produced by Ned Sublette.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/iu-NraJzhmg" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Feb 13, 2015
Afropop Mixtape: New Music from the Brazilian Underground
02:25:54
A playlist of fantastic new tracks from the Brazilian underground, courtesy of Marcelo de Carvalho Monteiro, a Rio-based journalist who writes for Amplificador. Read our interview (and dig into his list of fantastic new bands) here ==> http://bit.ly/Brazilpop Track List: 1. Logun – Metá Metá 2. Gaiola da Saudade – Jam da Silva 3. Dino Vs. Dino – Far From Alaska 4. Lucifernandis – Boogarins 5. Summertime – Luziluzia 6. Sertão Urbano – Carne Doce 7. Você não vai Passar – Ava Rocha 8. Damião – Juçara Marçal 9. Cervejas Populares – Ive Seixas 10. Só sei dançar com você – Tulipa Ruiz 11. Lúcifer Colômbia – Burro Morto 12. Retirantes – Bixiga 70 13. Afro – The Baggios 14. Last Chance Trip – Muddy Brother 15. Essa é pra Tocar no Rádio – BNegão 16. No Shit – Abayomy 17. Faria Lima Pra Cá – Passo Torto 18. Avante – Siba 19. A Melhor Hora – Nação Zumbi 20. Desdenha – Graveola e o Lixo Polifônico 21. Cartão de Visita – Criolo 22. Zumbi – André Sampaio e os Afromandinga 23. Solar – Iconili 24. Paraquedas – Russo Passapusso 25. Leão – Amplexos 26. Iracema – Fino Coletivo 27. Pirraça – Vanessa da Mata 28. Lenda – Céu 29. Legal e Ilegal – Felipe Cordeiro 30. Lobitos Show – Zebrabeat Afro-Amazônia Orquestra 31. Vagabundo Iluminado – Tagore 32. Amigos Bons – Junio Barreto 33. Baggiones – Camarones Orquestra Guitarrística 34. Nobody Likes Me – Kung Fu Johnny 35. Rio Grande – Motormama 36. Tão Além – Maglore<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/touJNrbvGok" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Feb 11, 2015
Music Of The Harlem Renaissance
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #226] [Originally aired in 1996] The Harlem Renaissance of the 1920’s was an astounding explosion of African-American cultural innovation, producing art, literature, poetry, and of course, fantastic music. In honor of Black History month, we are encoring our tribute to this magnificent period. We’ll hear from stars like Mamie Smith, Fats Waller, Louis Armstrong, and Duke Ellington, as we use their music to explore the often fraught history of Manhattan’s heights. Produced by Ned Sublette.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/KwkOEcKnANc" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Feb 03, 2015
The Nature Of Trance
00:59:00
[APWW #702] In many communities throughout Africa and the diaspora, music and spiritual life are deeply connected through the experience of trance: ritual possession by ancestors, spirits, deities, or simply the trance of communal dancing—usually accompanied by hypnotic melodies and rhythms. In this program, we explore the phenomenon of trance through a survey of musical and spiritual traditions. We'll discover how different cultural and spiritual ideas are expressed musically, and how innovations from behavioral psychology and neurology give insight into how trance works in the brain.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/vdCxdV0-hM4" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jan 29, 2015
Sub - Saharan Cassette Shopping
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #135] [Originally aired in 1993] We take you back in time with this deliciously retro episode. When cassette tapes hit Africa, they hit hard, offering a whole spectrum of musicians access to recording for the first time. And they really took advantage of it! In this show, Georges Collinet shares some of the finest of these sounds, mixing smoking South African pop, astounding mbalax, and much, much more.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/h37xgAQ4slA" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jan 20, 2015
Podcast Special II
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #701] Once again, we pull together some of our best Web-only podcasts for your listening pleasure. To start off with, we join veteran reporter Marika Partridge on the Washington Mall for highlights from the astounding Kenyan edition of the Smithsonian Folklife Festival. Then, producer Sam Backer explores the history of the elusive South African producer DJ Spoko in his first-ever international interview. Finally, Banning Eyre takes us back to Madagascar, where we hear the guitar-heavy style of "Beko and Blues." Production by Banning Eyre, Marika Partridge, and Sam Backer.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/RjkshuhCx4U" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jan 14, 2015
Malagasy Roots In America
00:21:55
Most African-Americans trace their roots to West or Central Africa. But it turns out that since the 17th century, there has been a trickle of migration--involuntary and voluntary--from Madagascar to the United States. Afropop's Banning Eyre delves into that history with Dr. Wendy Wilson-Fall, who has both lived and studied this fascinating history.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/iXICnHBM3HU" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jan 07, 2015
Afropop Live 2014
00:59:00
On "Afropop Live 2014," we're playing highlights from some fantastic concerts we saw over the past year. At Montreal's Nuits d'Afrique festival, we caught Chinese reggae band Long Shen Dao, who mix dreadlocks with guzheng (a Chinese zither). Also in Montreal: the Haitian-Canadian band Rara Soley put on a rousing set of songs for celebration and protest. And from Joe's Pub in New York, Wake Up Madagascar raised awareness for deforestation with the sweet sounds of salegy.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/HgwXqRg7_o0" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Dec 19, 2014
Afropop Exclusive Mix: Shamon Cassette- A Mix of Things Nonrelated
00:51:45
Shamon Cassette first landed on our radar with Wave Crusher, the brilliant Afro-futurist electro-rap mixtape he made with Spoek Mathambo. He's back in Brooklyn now, but his experience in South Africa led him to create this exclusive mix for Afropop, which starts with a previously unreleased track from the Wave Crusher sessions. Here's Shamon on "A Mix of Things Nonrelated": "This year, a few months back I maxed out my tourist visa in South Africa and really had the blessings to adapt and become closer and in tune with what was going on in the southern region first hand. When i got back to Brooklyn I was asked by Afropop Worldwide to make a playlist of current songs and artist that inspired or caught my attention during the process. Here it goes." TRACK LIST: 1. BORN GREAT (SPOEK x SHAMON CASSETTE) 2.ALLBLACKCLACKKAT (OKMALUMKOOLKAT) 3.LIFE (PUSH PUSH) 4.POP MODELS (BIG FKN GUN) 5.HAND IN DIRT (JUMPING BACK SLASH) 6.ZOMBIE (SPOEK ,EVE RAKOW, SHAMON CASSETTE) 7.WASH YOU SLEEP (BIGSPACE) 8.ONDELA 9.BATAUWENG (DJ SPOKO) 10.WHO YOU KNOW (RVWR) 11.RABUBI (MOONCHILD) 12.SPIN MY WORLD AROUND (THE ARROWS) 13.DISGUISES (CARD ON SPOKES RMX)<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/UrOriP_e5Sw" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Dec 17, 2014
Kenya Mambo Poa: Live from the 2014 Smithsonian Folklife Festival
00:27:23
In this special podcast extra, Marika Partridge takes the APWW microphone to the National Mall to record music and stories representing the 42 tribes of Kenya. Kenya and China were featured at the festival. We'll hear the latest from Ayub Ogada, Eric Wainaina, John Nzenze, Winyo and other Kenyan music stars.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/AvlN08_yYVA" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Dec 10, 2014
The Story Of East African Taarab
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #471] [Originally aired in 2005] The “taarab” music of East Africa’s Swahili coast offers an amazing history lesson. Bantu and coastal Africans, Arabs, Portuguese, Germans, Brits, and Indians all figure in. With guest, anthropologist and author, Kelly Askew, this Hip Deep program explores the taarab music of Zanzibar, Dar es Salaam, Tanga, and Mombasa, Kenya. The show features rare recordings by the likes of taarab pioneer Siti Bint Saad, groups Babloom Modern Taarab and Tanzania One Theatre, and Afropop’s own recordings of Culture Musical Club of Zanzibar and Maulidi Musical Party of Mombasa.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/PsUCEyhnbnM" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Dec 09, 2014
Stocking Stuffers 2014
00:59:00
Afropop’s annual round up of the hot new releases of 2014. Georges Collinet and Banning Eyre sit down for a music filled survey of African and African diaspora sounds that hit the street this year. Garifuna soul, acoustic and electric roots from Mali and Guinea, Angelique Kidjo, Caetano Veloso, a Mauritanian griot with a voice for the ages, plus new Latin sounds, dancehall, and as many great tunes as these two musical omnivores can cram into an hour of radio. Count on great gift ideas for the holidays!<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/7qUDujJzf8w" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Dec 02, 2014
Soundings: Recordings of African-Americans
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #301] [Originally aired in 2000] The rural south has changed profoundly since it served as the birthplace of blues, and in the intervening years, many of the traditional forms so vital to American musical history have disappeared. It’s lucky then, that the record industry (not to mention some intrepid folklorists) got there before everything changed. This program celebrates the deep and essential sounds they captured on tape, vinyl, acetate, Edison cylinder, and piano roll. You’ll hear historic early recordings by black American performers from 1893 forward. The show also includes the first hit blues record, Mamie Smith’s “Crazy Blues,” along with a sampling of Lomax field recordings from the 1930s.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/Hr3RbBo0rZA" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Nov 26, 2014
Hip Deep Madagascar: Songs From The North
00:59:00
Salegy is a churning, harmonious groove with spine-stiffening vocal harmonies that emerged from towns and cities of northern Madagascar in the mid-20th century. On a trip to Diego Suarez, we learn that salegy’s older origins are both fascinating and mysterious. We meet young salegy stars Ali Mourad and Jacs, and speak with the genre’s reigning legend, Jaojoby, on the roof of his nightclub in Antananarivo. Along the way we visit a music school in Diego and hear blazing guitar riffs and get a finger picking tour of the entire island from guitar maestro Hajazz.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/11ZVYco7nMY" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Nov 19, 2014
Podcast- Live From 21st Century Tana
00:56:33
Less talking, more music! This podcast surveys live recordings Afropop Worldwide made in Antananarivo, Madagascar, in spring 2014. From the frenetic dance grooves of Aly Mourad and Thominot, to the acoustic guitar mastery of D'Gary, Sammy, Johnny, and the jazz-fused Silo, to soulful folkloric performances... It's a full-course musical meal from a spectacular and under-recognized destination.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/TZr3xl8KwRU" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Nov 17, 2014
Afropop Exclusive Mix: Abdala's Experimental Brazil
00:57:08
Abdala tells stories with sounds he captures with a tape recorder from his home and the streets of Goîania, a city in Brazil's center. He also runs Propósito Records, home to some of Brazil's most experimentally-minded artists. Abdala just put out his sixth release of 2014, For Those Who Came From Nothing. To celebrate that prolific accomplishment, he's also put together a mix for Afropop, featuring his own music and songs by other artists from Brazil's new avant-garde. Read our interview with Abdala====> http://www.afropop.org/wp/21167/a-matter-of-rhythm-abdalas-experimental-brazil/ Tracklisting: Guilherme Granado - Cooking Zoo Efeito Horizonte: Sinergia Abdala - Bença Pequod_ - Circunstância do instante Desassossego - Prana (record with cellphone) M Takara - aaawww (desmonta records) Holofônica - solidão quatro Carlos Issa - Ordem Jonathan Gall - Revel on the man, kind Diversões Eletrônicas - Live session Abdala - Rompimento<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/o0S947I8gMw" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Oct 29, 2014
Hip Deep In Madagascar: 21st Century Tana
01:03:15
On this Hip Deep edition, we visit nightclubs, cultural centers, radio stations, and the homes of prominent musicians to take the pulse of Madagascar’s lively highland capital, Antananarivo (Tana). Long the seat of power on the island, Tana is now home to spectacular artists from all the country’s ethnic regions. We’ll hear from rappers, traditional musicians, guitar innovators, veterans like Sammy, Hanitra, and Rossy, and lots of newcomers--also a dance band playing the latest club craze—a footloose dance style known as kilalaky. The program is rich with live recordings and acoustic performances created especially for Afropop Worldwide. With insights from Johns Hopkins historian Pier Larson and Duke University anthropologist Margaret Lou Brown, we also reflect on Madagascar’s complex history, politics and troubled governance in recent years.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/oHyf5nSOjb0" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Oct 23, 2014
Beko And Blues In Southwest Madagascar
00:26:44
[Podcast] - Beko (pronounced BEH-koo) is a ceremonial vocal style performed by various ethnic groups in southwest Madagascar. It has also been an inspiration to successful popular musicians, both for it's blues-like emotional qualities, and its social message. In this "Hip Deep in Madagascar" podcast, we hear from Monika and Lala Njava, singer/songwriter Mikea, and the great Antandroy musician Remanindry.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/iovPO8Adlxs" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Oct 17, 2014
Fania At 50
00:48:00
New York City is home to the earth-shaking Latin dance music known as ‘salsa.’ From the mid 1960s through the 1980s, Fania Records released many of the most important albums in the history of the music, creating a salsa ‘boom’ that provided an outlet for many important musicians to share their contributions with the world. In 2014, Fania celebrated 50 years in the business; and to celebrate, we dug into the label’s history. We’ll hear from some of the principal players, including Aurora Flores, Nicky Marrero, and, El Judeo Maravilloso, Larry Harlow, and tell a few Afro-pop centric stories along the way.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/bsCAysZs4GU" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Oct 15, 2014
Ghost Man: DJ Spoko's Bacardi House
00:16:19
DJ Spoko, the South African producer behind some of the country's (and maybe the continent's) wildest electronic sounds, has long been something of a mystery. Aside from a few scattered production credits, a handful of Youtube videos, and one solitary EP, it was pretty much impossible to HEAR the guy. That's why we jumped at the chance to interview Spoko about his new album, "War God," which features a full 20 tracks of "pure disease- and pure love." Spoko told us his story, everything from taxi-driving gangsters and clubs filled with Bacardi to the presence of the divine via Fruity Loops 1.1. We'll hear that, plus some MASSIVE cuts from his discography.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/58o_AOAHP1k" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Oct 10, 2014
Afropop Exclusive Mix: Peru Bravo! with Tiger's Milk Records
00:35:00
Afropop Exclusive Mix! Tiger's Milk Records is one of our favorite labels, dishing out a helping of Peruvian tunes as delicious as the ceviche they cook in their award winning restaurants. This mix is compiled to celebrate the release of "Peru Bravo," the label's latest compilation. Connecting the dots between the funk, psych, and rock'n'roll featured on the album with more modern strains of Peruvian music (and a few equally tasty geographic outliers.)It's a terrific journey from start to finish. So dig in! Read our interview with Tiger's Milk Founder Martin Morales ==> http://www.afropop.org/wp/20744/peru-bravo-interview/ Tracklisting 1. Tres Lunas – La Noche Boca Arriba (Self Released) 2. Pirana Sound System – Naranja Limones (Tiger’s Milk) 3. Tribilin Sound – Un Hasta Luego (Self Released) 4. Dengue Dengue Dengue – R2 (Auxiliar) 5. Bareto – Bombo Baile (Unreleased) 6. Compadres Del Ande – La Mecedora (Tiger’s Milk) 7. Los Belking’s – Sabata (Tiger’s Milk) 8. Los Destellos – Onsta La Yerbita (Tiger’s Milk) 9. Débruit & Alsarah – Hawya (Soundway Records) 10. Menelik Wesnatchew – Tezeta (Ethiopiques) 11. Lucia de la Cruz – Toro Mata (Tiger’s Milk) 12. Brian Eno & David Byrne – Qu’ran (Polydor)<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/Bk3HksZIPcI" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Oct 08, 2014
Hip Deep in Madagascar: The Tsapiky Story
00:59:00
The southwest of Madagascar is a land of fishermen, mining prospectors, and cattle ranchers—not exactly a homogenous region in terms of lifestyle or ethnicity. But one thing that unites all the people of this region is the giddy, electric guitar-driven boogie music known as tsapiky (pronounced tsa-PEEK). Born only in the late 1970s, tsapiky has become the required music at large family ceremonies (circumcisions, weddings and, especially, burials), where music and partying goes nonstop for three days or more. In this Hip Deep program, we unfold the unique origins of this music, and other traditional styles of southwest Madagascar. And we’ll meet some of tsapiky’s great guitar practitioners: Damily, Teta and Pascal. We’ll hear a song from Damily’s recent public concert in Tulear—his first in 14 years--and sample a variety of beautiful music from this remote and remarkable corner of Madagascar.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/frhdORlgMXA" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Sep 23, 2014
Guest Mix: For The Love Of Djazaïr!
00:52:14
And it's guest mix time! For this installment of audio pleasure, we have a selection of Algerian music from the cities of Oran and Algiers compiled for us by Chris Silver, who writes the Jewish Morocco blog. Check out Chris's write-up for the mix here- http://www.afropop.org/wp/20467/guest-mix-for-the-love-of-djazair/ You can also read more of Chris's work here- http://jewishmorocco.blogspot.com/<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/RkCh4-EptMg" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Sep 12, 2014
Bachata Takeover
00:59:00
While bachata may have originated in the Dominican Republic, its growth in popularity over the past 10 years is not rooted within the shores of the small Caribbean nation but in the outer boroughs of New York City. It was here that the now-legendary bachata group Aventura formed. Aventura would go on to change the sound and style of bachata by mixing the style with the rap and r&b they were hearing on the streets of the Bronx. Christened “urban bachata,” the new style has catapulted the genre to greater international recognition and is starting to make its way into mainstream pop radio. Artists like Romeo Santos have already collaborated with the likes of Drake and Nicki Minaj, sold out numerous shows at Madison Square Garden, Staples Center, Yankee Stadium, and just about every major city in Latin America, while 25-year old New York-based artist Prince Royce already has a slew of chart-topping singles under his belt as well as three albums that have reached number one on the U.S. charts. We trace things back to their origins, talking to producers, artists and industry execs about the growing popularity of bachata and the astounding story of how a couple of Dominican teenagers from the Bronx completely revolutionized the genre and created the most popular Latin music of a generation.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/_uuZbNWPDvU" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Sep 09, 2014
Podcast Special
00:59:00
This summer, Afropop launched a new and improved podcast, making your favorite world-spanning radio show available in a whole new way. To celebrate, we’ve put together a show featuring some of our favorite moments from the podcast. Previously available only online, these segments are airing for the very first time. We’ll share the story of soul man Geraldo Pino, the “African James Brown.” You’ll hear the musical visions of the eccentric Jamaican guitarist Brushy One String. And much more!<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/ovj6N-QRoB8" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Aug 27, 2014
Borderless Sounds: The New North Africa
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #692] North African music receives very little coverage here in the United States. There are no high-profile mixes of recent Tunisian underground dance music from hip DJs, and no young Algerian musicians with major distribution deals in the US. So, we decided to find out what exactly is going on today in this part of the world. We trace the origins of some of the region’s most interesting current music to the banlieues of Paris, like raï’n’b--a new autotune and synth-heavy offshoot of raï. We also explore the gnawa reggae movement, which finds common ground between Sufi trance and the message of Marley. Returning to familiar traditions, we present a live recording of Kabyle mandole player Hamid Ouchène from Montreal’s Nuits d’Afrique festival, backed by a group of Montreal-based musicians with origins throughout the African continent. We next turn to the North African metal scene that developed during Algeria’s civil conflict to meld Berber folk music with black metal. Finally, we check out the new chaabi revival. Produced by Jesse Brent.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/uvALhbCFsZc" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Aug 12, 2014
The Mighty Amazon
00:59:00
The Mighty Amazon The Amazon has long been a mystery to Brazil. Located far from the centers of business and power in the nation's South-East, the jungle provinces of the Brazilian North have long been ignored by the nation at large. But recently, Brazilians have been discovering that the cities and waterways of the Amazon are home to some of the nation's hottest music. In this Hip Deep episode—a musical history of Pará state, where Afro-Caribbean influences have created a unique local flavor that connects the dots between Brazilian music and the rest of Latin America. We check out the guitar heroes of old-school Amazonian dance bands, investigate the origins of the early '90s lambada dance craze, and explore the bubblegum bass culture of tecnobrega. Featuring interviews with singer Gaby Amarantos, lambada revivalist Felipe Cordeiro and ethnomusicologist Darien Lamen, among others. Lead Producer: Marlon Bishop Assistant Production: Saxon Baird, Joe Dobkin<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/kGyF9twB6lA" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jul 28, 2014
Proving the Bubu Myth: Janka Nabay, War and Witchcraft in Sierra Leone
00:59:00
On Sierra Leone's independence day in late April, musicians descend upon Freetown from rural villages to participate in parades and celebrations throughout the city, traversing and joining diverse neighborhoods together with the sound of processional music including one particular local style called bubu. Bubu is a trance inducing sound played by groups of young men blowing interlocking, hocketed breath patterns into bamboo shoots. Bubu resonates with other African diasporic horn traditions (rara and gaga especially). It has long been a part of the cultural fabric of Sierra Leone, yet its deeper story has so far eluded scholarly examination. This program, supported by original fieldwork begins a serious exposition and investigation of the intriguing mythology and history that surrounds this unique, hypnotic music, through a focus on one Bubu musician Ahmed Janka Nabay, the artist recognized widely in Sierra Leone (and beyond) as "the Bubu King." Written and produced by Wills Glasspiegel and Drew Alt. This program is hosted by Sahr Ngaujah, star of the Broadway musical Fela!.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/VGSjO3VrzxA" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jul 17, 2014
Rio 1- Samba at the Dawn of Modern Brazil Podcast
00:50:58
In part one of our Hip Deep Brazil series, we travel back in time to Rio de Janeiro in the early 20th century to explore the birth of Brazil’s most iconic sound: samba. Beginning with the arrival of poor nordestinos in the city after the end of slavery in 1888, we follow the exploits of the early sambistas as they forged the genre that would come to represent the nation. Brazilian scholar Carlos Sandroni shows us how Afro-Brazilian religious music and popular styles like modinha transformed into the syncopated samba beat. Then, media scholar Bryan McCann guides us through the glamor and political intrigue of 1930s Rio as samba explodes as the popular music of choice throughout the country. We speak with samba greats from the old guard to the young bloods, including Dona Yvone Lara, Heitorzinho dos Prazeres, Paulão 7-Cordas and Luciana Rabelo. In closing, we find out how samba, an ambitious radio station and a populist dictatorship worked together to shape Brazilians’ ideas about race, society and the Brazilian nation itself.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/MkO2sKQplkE" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jul 14, 2014
Party and Dissent: World Cup Brazil 2014
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #689} World Cup mania continues in Brazil. The games are a source of great national pride, as well as bitter dissent due to the fact that billions were spent on stadiums, rather than schools, hospitals and public transport. What does the music community think? We check in with the latest baile funk from Rio’s favelas. Label owner Renato M2 introduces us to a new style–the slowed down Afro-Brazilian tinged rasterhina. In São Paulo, the cosmopolitan city of 20 million where musical innovation is always happening, we hear Ba-Boom–afoxé mixed with dancehall. From Bahia, we hear the latest from tropicália legend Caetano Veloso and introduce Russo Passapusso, who is reviving the 1970’s MPB sound. Long neglected in Brazil, female MC’s are finally getting their due–we check out Karol Conka and Pearls Negras. Up the coast in Recife, we catch up with Siba and Zé Brown, veterans of the mangue bit movement, who are ably mixing local roots music with international sounds. We’re introduced to the active Brazilian avant garde by Chico Dub. Our last stop is Belém on the Amazon River, where we hear innovative brega artist Felipe Cordeiro. Produced by Jesse Brent.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/PypEPGeN4Mk" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 25, 2014
Rumba Para Bebo
00:59:00
[APWW PGM #678] [Originally Aired in 2013] The legendary Cuban pianist / bandleader / composer Ramón "Bebo" Valdés used to say, el día que me muera, no quiero lloradera. Que toquen una rumba, que tomen ron y coman chocolate, y que toquen mi música más bailable. The day I die, I don’t want weeping. Have a rumba, drink rum and eat chocolate, and play my most danceable music. Bebo passed on March 22, 2013 at the age of 94, and to honor his memory in high spirits, Afropop Worldwide producer Ned Sublette travels to the Voll-Damm Barcelona International Jazz Festival for an exclusive presentation: highlights from the historic Rumba Para Bebo – part concert, part memorial, part Cuban jazz jam, part rumba, and part Kongo ceremony. The show features Bebo's son and former pupil, the reigning grandmaster Cuban pianist / bandleader / composer Jesús "Chucho" Valdés and the Afro Cuban Messengers, and with special guests Jerry González, Omar Sosa and Malongo, Mayra Caridad Valdés, Lázara Cachao, Javier Massó “Caramelo,” Javier Colina, Mauricio Vallina, Paloma Manfugás, Eladio Reinón, David Pastor, and more!<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/Nqh1wjPOOQY" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 19, 2014
Hip Deep Ghana 2 Podcast: Gospel in Modern Accra
00:17:38
While other forms of music have switched to digital production, gospel remains as the arena for live music, and as the most popular form of live performance in the city of Accra. In this web exclusive podcast, we explore Ghanaian gospel's popularity in a city with thousands upon thousands of churches.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/afropop/podcast/~4/P5TaH55U4ps" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 16, 2014