The Examen with Fr. James Martin, SJ

By America Media

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Description

The examen is an ancient prayer practice that enables you to find God in your daily life. Our podcast is based on a technique that St. Ignatius Loyola outlined in the "Spiritual Exercises," his classic manual for prayer. Each week Fr. Martin will provide you with a new reflection and guide you through the examen prayer.

Episode Date
11th Friday of Ordinary Time
17:54

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 11th Week of Ordinary Time. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Have you ever had a mystical experience? I ask that not to make you feel inadequate in your spiritual life, much less bad about yourself, but to remind you that mystical experiences are a lot more common than you might think. You don’t have to be a saint to have them. A mystical experience, basically, is one that makes us feel like a sudden flash of truth or light that releases you from your limited sense of self and gives you a taste of a reality that somehow feels more real. It doesn’t mean seeing things or hearing things, but a kind of being taken out of yourself, or seeing things in a new way. And in my experience as a spiritual director, they are, while not common, but also not uncommon. One young man told that he felt like he was a vase filled with water about to overflow. One woman told me that she looked around at Mass and suddenly realized that everyone had once been a child. Sometimes it’s just an intense feeling of rightness, or understanding, or connection with God. I would say I’ve had them about three times in my life. I’m not going to encourage you to look for a mystical experience this week; they’re gifts, and rare ones at that. But if it happens, whether this week, this month or this year, just be open to it. And grateful.

Jun 22, 2018
11th Thursday of Ordinary Time
17:54

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 11th Week of Ordinary Time. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Have you ever had a mystical experience? I ask that not to make you feel inadequate in your spiritual life, much less bad about yourself, but to remind you that mystical experiences are a lot more common than you might think. You don’t have to be a saint to have them. A mystical experience, basically, is one that makes us feel like a sudden flash of truth or light that releases you from your limited sense of self and gives you a taste of a reality that somehow feels more real. It doesn’t mean seeing things or hearing things, but a kind of being taken out of yourself, or seeing things in a new way. And in my experience as a spiritual director, they are, while not common, but also not uncommon. One young man told that he felt like he was a vase filled with water about to overflow. One woman told me that she looked around at Mass and suddenly realized that everyone had once been a child. Sometimes it’s just an intense feeling of rightness, or understanding, or connection with God. I would say I’ve had them about three times in my life. I’m not going to encourage you to look for a mystical experience this week; they’re gifts, and rare ones at that. But if it happens, whether this week, this month or this year, just be open to it. And grateful.

Jun 21, 2018
11th Wednesday of Ordinary Time
17:54

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 11th Week of Ordinary Time. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Have you ever had a mystical experience? I ask that not to make you feel inadequate in your spiritual life, much less bad about yourself, but to remind you that mystical experiences are a lot more common than you might think. You don’t have to be a saint to have them. A mystical experience, basically, is one that makes us feel like a sudden flash of truth or light that releases you from your limited sense of self and gives you a taste of a reality that somehow feels more real. It doesn’t mean seeing things or hearing things, but a kind of being taken out of yourself, or seeing things in a new way. And in my experience as a spiritual director, they are, while not common, but also not uncommon. One young man told that he felt like he was a vase filled with water about to overflow. One woman told me that she looked around at Mass and suddenly realized that everyone had once been a child. Sometimes it’s just an intense feeling of rightness, or understanding, or connection with God. I would say I’ve had them about three times in my life. I’m not going to encourage you to look for a mystical experience this week; they’re gifts, and rare ones at that. But if it happens, whether this week, this month or this year, just be open to it. And grateful.

Jun 20, 2018
11th Tuesday of Ordinary Time
17:54

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 11th Week of Ordinary Time. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Have you ever had a mystical experience? I ask that not to make you feel inadequate in your spiritual life, much less bad about yourself, but to remind you that mystical experiences are lot more common than you might think. You don’t have to be a saint to have them. A mystical experience, basically, is one that makes us feel like a sudden flash of truth or light that releases you from your limited sense of self and gives you a taste of a reality that somehow feels more real. It doesn’t mean seeing things or hearing things, but a kind of being taken out of yourself, or seeing things in a new way. And in my experience as a spiritual director, they are, while not common, but also not uncommon. One young man told that he felt like he was a vase filled with water about to overflow. One woman told me that she looked around at Mass and suddenly realized that everyone had once been a child. Sometimes it’s just an intense feeling of rightness, or understanding, or connection with God. I would say I’ve had them about three times in my life. I’m not going to encourage you to look for a mystical experience this week; they’re gifts, and rare ones at that. But if it happens, whether this week, this month or this year, just be open to it. And grateful.

Jun 19, 2018
11th Monday of Ordinary Time
17:54

Because today is Monday, we have a new reflection of the week.

Have you ever had a mystical experience? I ask that not to make you feel inadequate in your spiritual life, much less bad about yourself, but to remind you that mystical experiences are lot more common than you might think. You don’t have to be a saint to have them. A mystical experience, basically, is one that makes us feel like a sudden flash of truth or light that releases you from your limited sense of self and gives you a taste of a reality that somehow feels more real. It doesn’t mean seeing things or hearing things, but a kind of being taken out of yourself, or seeing things in a new way. And in my experience as a spiritual director, they are, while not common, but also not uncommon. One young man told that he felt like he was a vase filled with water about to overflow. One woman told me that she looked around at Mass and suddenly realized that everyone had once been a child. Sometimes it’s just an intense feeling of rightness, or understanding, or connection with God. I would say I’ve had them about three times in my life. I’m not going to encourage you to look for a mystical experience this week; they’re gifts, and rare ones at that. But if it happens, whether this week, this month or this year, just be open to it. And grateful.

Jun 18, 2018
11th Sunday of Ordinary Time
17:54

A new reflection for the 11th week of Ordinary Time will be added on Monday.

Are you ever distracted in prayer? I bet I know that answer to that question. Yes, of course! Everyone is. It’s one of the most common concerns, or complaints, that I hear about prayer. So how do you deal with them? Well, first you need to discern what kind of distraction it is. To my mind, there are two kinds: important and not so important. What do I mean by important ones? Well, some distractions may not be distractions. A few years ago, a young Jesuit told me he kept trying to do his examen but a guy in community that he was angry about kept coming up in his prayer. Well, I said, maybe God wants you to look at that. It may be an important distraction.

But there are other distractions that may not be so important: thinking about what you’re going to have for dinner, for example. The invitation here is to let them go. But sometimes that’s hard. Even impossible, for example if you’re in physical pain. In that case, maybe you can just let them be. And remember that God can be with you even if you’re distracted. Think about it: If you were with a friend who said she was distracted, you’d be forgiving, wouldn’t you? You’d understand. So how much more forgiving and understanding is God? So don’t worry too much about being distracted, especially if you can’t help it. Just be with God.

Jun 17, 2018
10th Saturday of Ordinary Time
17:54

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 10th Week of Ordinary Time. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Are you ever distracted in prayer? I bet I know that answer to that question. Yes, of course! Everyone is. It’s one of the most common concerns, or complaints, that I hear about prayer. So how do you deal with them? Well, first you need to discern what kind of distraction it is. To my mind, there are two kinds: important and not so important. What do I mean by important ones? Well, some distractions may not be distractions. A few years ago, a young Jesuit told me he kept trying to do his examen but a guy in community that he was angry about kept coming up in his prayer. Well, I said, maybe God wants you to look at that. It may be an important distraction.

But there are other distractions that may not be so important: thinking about what you’re going to have for dinner, for example. The invitation here is to let them go. But sometimes that’s hard. Even impossible, for example if you’re in physical pain. In that case, maybe you can just let them be. And remember that God can be with you even if you’re distracted. Think about it: If you were with a friend who said she was distracted, you’d be forgiving, wouldn’t you? You’d understand. So how much more forgiving and understanding is God? So don’t worry too much about being distracted, especially if you can’t help it. Just be with God.

Jun 16, 2018
10th Friday of Ordinary Time
17:54

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 10th Week of Ordinary Time. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Are you ever distracted in prayer? I bet I know that answer to that question. Yes, of course! Everyone is. It’s one of the most common concerns, or complaints, that I hear about prayer. So how do you deal with them? Well, first you need to discern what kind of distraction it is. To my mind, there are two kinds: important and not so important. What do I mean by important ones? Well, some distractions may not be distractions. A few years ago, a young Jesuit told me he kept trying to do his examen but a guy in community that he was angry about kept coming up in his prayer. Well, I said, maybe God wants you to look at that. It may be an important distraction.

But there are other distractions that may not be so important: thinking about what you’re going to have for dinner, for example. The invitation here is to let them go. But sometimes that’s hard. Even impossible, for example if you’re in physical pain. In that case, maybe you can just let them be. And remember that God can be with you even if you’re distracted. Think about it: If you were with a friend who said she was distracted, you’d be forgiving, wouldn’t you? You’d understand. So how much more forgiving and understanding is God? So don’t worry too much about being distracted, especially if you can’t help it. Just be with God.

Jun 15, 2018
10th Thursday of Ordinary Time
17:54

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 10th Week of Ordinary Time. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Are you ever distracted in prayer? I bet I know that answer to that question. Yes, of course! Everyone is. It’s one of the most common concerns, or complaints, that I hear about prayer. So how do you deal with them? Well, first you need to discern what kind of distraction it is. To my mind, there are two kinds: important and not so important. What do I mean by important ones? Well, some distractions may not be distractions. A few years ago, a young Jesuit told me he kept trying to do his examen but a guy in community that he was angry about kept coming up in his prayer. Well, I said, maybe God wants you to look at that. It may be an important distraction.

But there are other distractions that may not be so important: thinking about what you’re going to have for dinner, for example. The invitation here is to let them go. But sometimes that’s hard. Even impossible, for example if you’re in physical pain. In that case, maybe you can just let them be. And remember that God can be with you even if you’re distracted. Think about it: If you were with a friend who said she was distracted, you’d be forgiving, wouldn’t you? You’d understand. So how much more forgiving and understanding is God? So don’t worry too much about being distracted, especially if you can’t help it. Just be with God.

Jun 14, 2018
10th Wednesday of Ordinary Time
17:54

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 10th Week of Ordinary Time. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Are you ever distracted in prayer? I bet I know that answer to that question. Yes, of course! Everyone is. It’s one of the most common concerns, or complaints, that I hear about prayer. So how do you deal with them? Well, first you need to discern what kind of distraction it is. To my mind, there are two kinds: important and not so important. What do I mean by important ones? Well, some distractions may not be distractions. A few years ago, a young Jesuit told me he kept trying to do his examen but a guy in community that he was angry about kept coming up in his prayer. Well, I said, maybe God wants you to look at that. It may be an important distraction.

But there are other distractions that may not be so important: thinking about what you’re going to have for dinner, for example. The invitation here is to let them go. But sometimes that’s hard. Even impossible, for example if you’re in physical pain. In that case, maybe you can just let them be. And remember that God can be with you even if you’re distracted. Think about it: If you were with a friend who said she was distracted, you’d be forgiving, wouldn’t you? You’d understand. So how much more forgiving and understanding is God? So don’t worry too much about being distracted, especially if you can’t help it. Just be with God.

Jun 13, 2018
10th Tuesday of Ordinary Time
17:54

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 10th Week of Ordinary Time. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Are you ever distracted in prayer? I bet I know that answer to that question. Yes, of course! Everyone is. It’s one of the most common concerns, or complaints, that I hear about prayer. So how do you deal with them? Well, first you need to discern what kind of distraction it is. To my mind, there are two kinds: important and not so important. What do I mean by important ones? Well, some distractions may not be distractions. A few years ago, a young Jesuit told me he kept trying to do his examen but a guy in community that he was angry about kept coming up in his prayer. Well, I said, maybe God wants you to look at that. It may be an important distraction.

But there are other distractions that may not be so important: thinking about what you’re going to have for dinner, for example. The invitation here is to let them go. But sometimes that’s hard. Even impossible, for example if you’re in physical pain. In that case, maybe you can just let them be. And remember that God can be with you even if you’re distracted. Think about it: If you were with a friend who said she was distracted, you’d be forgiving, wouldn’t you? You’d understand. So how much more forgiving and understanding is God? So don’t worry too much about being distracted, especially if you can’t help it. Just be with God.

Jun 12, 2018
10th Monday of Ordinary Time
17:54

Because today is Monday, we have a new reflection of the week.

Are you ever distracted in prayer?  I bet I know that answer to that question.  Yes, of course! Everyone is. It’s one of the most common concerns, or complaints, that I hear about prayer. So how do you deal with them?  Well, first you need to discern what kind of distraction it is. To my mind, there are two kinds: important and not so important. What do I mean by important ones?  Well, some distractions may not be distractions. A few years ago, a young Jesuit told me he kept trying to do his examen but a guy in community that he was angry about kept coming up in his prayer. Well, I said, maybe God wants you to look at that.  It may be an important distraction. But there are other distractions that may not be so important: thinking about what you’re going to have for dinner, for example. The invitation here is to let them go. But sometimes that’s hard. Even impossible, for example if you’re in physical pain.  In that case, maybe you can just let them be. And remember that God can be with you even if you’re distracted. Think about it: If you were with a friend who said she was distracted, you’d be forgiving, wouldn’t you? You’d understand. So how much more forgiving and understanding is God? So don’t worry too much about being distracted, especially if you can’t help it.  Just be with God.

Jun 11, 2018
10th Sunday of Ordinary Time
17:55

A new reflection for the 10th week of Ordinary Time will be added on Monday.

Depending on where you live, it may, or may not, be summer. At least where I live, it is. That means not only is the weather getting warmer, but for many people, their normal routines are being upended. It’s also a time of transition: the school year ends, college students move back home, people go on vacations. But even if this time of year isn’t one of transition, you’ve probably, at some point in your life, felt what spiritual writers call “liminal times.” Those are when you seem “in between” one state of life and another. Maybe you’re in between jobs or in between relationships. Or maybe something is happening in your family or work or with your health, that means a transition. Now, I don’t know anyone who likes transitions, and I know a lot of people who really dislike them. But while these liminal times can be discombobulating, they can also be times of real reliance on God. When everything else seems like it’s up for grabs, it’s all the more reason to focus on our relationship with God. When things change, it’s best to pray more. So, this week, maybe you can be especially conscious of those places in your life that are in transition and see if you can find signs of God’s accompanying you there. In those liminal places, try to see God.

Jun 10, 2018
9th Saturday of Ordinary Time
17:55

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 9th Week of Ordinary Time. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Depending on where you live, it may, or may not, be summer. At least where I live, it is. That means not only is the weather getting warmer, but for many people, their normal routines are being upended. It’s also a time of transition: the school year ends, college students move back home, people go on vacations. But even if this time of year isn’t one of transition, you’ve probably, at some point in your life, felt what spiritual writers call “liminal times.” Those are when you seem “in between” one state of life and another. Maybe you’re in between jobs or in between relationships. Or maybe something is happening in your family or work or with your health, that means a transition. Now, I don’t know anyone who likes transitions, and I know a lot of people who really dislike them. But while these liminal times can be discombobulating, they can also be times of real reliance on God. When everything else seems like it’s up for grabs, it’s all the more reason to focus on our relationship with God. When things change, it’s best to pray more. So, this week, maybe you can be especially conscious of those places in your life that are in transition and see if you can find signs of God’s accompanying you there. In those liminal places, try to see God.

Jun 09, 2018
9th Friday of Ordinary Time
17:54

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 9th Week of Ordinary Time. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Depending on where you live, it may, or may not, be summer. At least where I live, it is. That means not only is the weather getting warmer, but for many people, their normal routines are being upended. It’s also a time of transition: the school year ends, college students move back home, people go on vacations. But even if this time of year isn’t one of transition, you’ve probably, at some point in your life, felt what spiritual writers call “liminal times.” Those are when you seem “in between” one state of life and another. Maybe you’re in between jobs or in between relationships. Or maybe something is happening in your family or work or with your health, that means a transition. Now, I don’t know anyone who likes transitions, and I know a lot of people who really dislike them. But while these liminal times can be discombobulating, they can also be times of real reliance on God. When everything else seems like it’s up for grabs, it’s all the more reason to focus on our relationship with God. When things change, it’s best to pray more. So, this week, maybe you can be especially conscious of those places in your life that are in transition and see if you can find signs of God’s accompanying you there. In those liminal places, try to see God.

Jun 08, 2018
9th Thursday of Ordinary Time
17:55

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 9th Week of Ordinary Time. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Depending on where you live, it may, or may not, be summer. At least where I live, it is. That means not only is the weather getting warmer, but for many people, their normal routines are being upended. It’s also a time of transition: the school year ends, college students move back home, people go on vacations. But even if this time of year isn’t one of transition, you’ve probably, at some point in your life, felt what spiritual writers call “liminal times.” Those are when you seem “in between” one state of life and another. Maybe you’re in between jobs or in between relationships. Or maybe something is happening in your family or work or with your health, that means a transition. Now, I don’t know anyone who likes transitions, and I know a lot of people who really dislike them. But while these liminal times can be discombobulating, they can also be times of real reliance on God. When everything else seems like it’s up for grabs, it’s all the more reason to focus on our relationship with God. When things change, it’s best to pray more. So, this week, maybe you can be especially conscious of those places in your life that are in transition and see if you can find signs of God’s accompanying you there. In those liminal places, try to see God.

Jun 07, 2018
9th Wednesday of Ordinary Time
17:55

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 9th Week of Ordinary Time. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Depending on where you live, it may, or may not, be summer. At least where I live, it is. That means not only is the weather getting warmer, but for many people, their normal routines are being upended. It’s also a time of transition: the school year ends, college students move back home, people go on vacations. But even if this time of year isn’t one of transition, you’ve probably, at some point in your life, felt what spiritual writers call “liminal times.” Those are when you seem “in between” one state of life and another. Maybe you’re in between jobs or in between relationships. Or maybe something is happening in your family or work or with your health, that means a transition. Now, I don’t know anyone who likes transitions, and I know a lot of people who really dislike them. But while these liminal times can be discombobulating, they can also be times of real reliance on God. When everything else seems like it’s up for grabs, it’s all the more reason to focus on our relationship with God. When things change, it’s best to pray more. So, this week, maybe you can be especially conscious of those places in your life that are in transition and see if you can find signs of God’s accompanying you there. In those liminal places, try to see God.

Jun 06, 2018
9th Tuesday of Ordinary Time
17:55

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 9th Week of Ordinary Time. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Depending on where you live, it may, or may not, be summer. At least where I live, it is. That means not only is the weather getting warmer, but for many people, their normal routines are being upended. It’s also a time of transition: the school year ends, college students move back home, people go on vacations. But even if this time of year isn’t one of transition, you’ve probably, at some point in your life, felt what spiritual writers call “liminal times.” Those are when you seem “in between” one state of life and another. Maybe you’re in between jobs or in between relationships. Or maybe something is happening in your family or work or with your health, that means a transition. Now, I don’t know anyone who likes transitions, and I know a lot of people who really dislike them. But while these liminal times can be discombobulating, they can also be times of real reliance on God. When everything else seems like it’s up for grabs, it’s all the more reason to focus on our relationship with God. When things change, it’s best to pray more. So, this week, maybe you can be especially conscious of those places in your life that are in transition and see if you can find signs of God’s accompanying you there. In those liminal places, try to see God.

Jun 05, 2018
9th Monday of Ordinary Time
17:54

Because today is Monday, we have a new reflection for the week.

Depending on where you live, it may, or may not, be summer. At least where I live, it is. That means not only is the weather getting warmer, but for many people, their normal routines are being upended. It’s also a time of transition: the school year ends, college students move back home, people go on vacations. But even if this time of year isn’t one of transition, you’ve probably, at some point in your life, felt what spiritual writers call “liminal times.” Those are when you seem “in between” one state of life and another. Maybe you’re in between jobs or in between relationships. Or maybe something is happening in your family or work or with your health, that means a transition. Now, I don’t know anyone who likes transitions, and I know a lot of people who really dislike them. But while these liminal times can be discombobulating, they can also be times of real reliance on God. When everything else seems like it’s up for grabs, it’s all the more reason to focus on our relationship with God. When things change, it’s best to pray more. So, this week, maybe you can be especially conscious of those places in your life that are in transition and see if you can find signs of God’s accompanying you there. In those liminal places, try to see God.

Jun 04, 2018
Solemnity of the Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ
18:03

A new reflection for the 9th week of Ordinary Time will be added on Monday.

Now that the Easter Season and Pentecost have concluded, we’re back to Ordinary Time. And that can feel so, well, ordinary, can’t it? If you’re a churchgoing Christian, you might start to think, “Well, there’s not much going on between now and Advent, is there?” But that’s a somewhat skewed way of looking at life, at least at Jesus’s life. Because there’s an awful lot between the time he was born and the time he died--to put it mildly. And even when you take out his public ministry—his preaching and healing in Galilee and Judea, which takes up most of the Gospels—you’re left with a big chunk of his life that we know little about. This part of his life, between ages 12, when he’s found in the Temple teaching, and age 30, is called the “Hidden Life.” The Hidden Life is the time that Jesus spent in Nazareth, growing up as a boy, learning to be a carpenter and then working as a carpenter. Remember he’s called “carpenter” more than he’s called “rabbi” in the Gospels. Now, one reason that there’s little about the Hidden Life in the Gospels is probably because it was so ordinary. And yet Jesus is no less the Son of God when he is sawing a piece of wood in his workshop in Nazareth. That ordinary life helped to form something extraordinary. This week, why not ask yourself: What ordinary parts of my life do I want to thank God for? Maybe they’re more extraordinary than you think.

Jun 03, 2018
8th Saturday of Ordinary Time
18:03

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 8th Week of Ordinary Time. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Now that the Easter Season and Pentecost have concluded, we’re back to Ordinary Time. And that can feel so, well, ordinary, can’t it? If you’re a churchgoing Christian, you might start to think, “Well, there’s not much going on between now and Advent, is there?” But that’s a somewhat skewed way of looking at life, at least at Jesus’s life. Because there’s an awful lot between the time he was born and the time he died--to put it mildly. And even when you take out his public ministry—his preaching and healing in Galilee and Judea, which takes up most of the Gospels—you’re left with a big chunk of his life that we know little about. This part of his life, between ages 12, when he’s found in the Temple teaching, and age 30, is called the “Hidden Life.” The Hidden Life is the time that Jesus spent in Nazareth, growing up as a boy, learning to be a carpenter and then working as a carpenter. Remember he’s called “carpenter” more than he’s called “rabbi” in the Gospels. Now, one reason that there’s little about the Hidden Life in the Gospels is probably because it was so ordinary. And yet Jesus is no less the Son of God when he is sawing a piece of wood in his workshop in Nazareth. That ordinary life helped to form something extraordinary. This week, why not ask yourself: What ordinary parts of my life do I want to thank God for? Maybe they’re more extraordinary than you think.

Jun 02, 2018
8th Friday of Ordinary Time
18:03

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 8th Week of Ordinary Time. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Now that the Easter Season and Pentecost have concluded, we’re back to Ordinary Time. And that can feel so, well, ordinary, can’t it? If you’re a churchgoing Christian, you might start to think, “Well, there’s not much going on between now and Advent, is there?” But that’s a somewhat skewed way of looking at life, at least at Jesus’s life. Because there’s an awful lot between the time he was born and the time he died--to put it mildly. And even when you take out his public ministry—his preaching and healing in Galilee and Judea, which takes up most of the Gospels—you’re left with a big chunk of his life that we know little about. This part of his life, between ages 12, when he’s found in the Temple teaching, and age 30, is called the “Hidden Life.” The Hidden Life is the time that Jesus spent in Nazareth, growing up as a boy, learning to be a carpenter and then working as a carpenter. Remember he’s called “carpenter” more than he’s called “rabbi” in the Gospels. Now, one reason that there’s little about the Hidden Life in the Gospels is probably because it was so ordinary. And yet Jesus is no less the Son of God when he is sawing a piece of wood in his workshop in Nazareth. That ordinary life helped to form something extraordinary. This week, why not ask yourself: What ordinary parts of my life do I want to thank God for? Maybe they’re more extraordinary than you think.

Jun 01, 2018
8th Thursday of Ordinary Time
18:03

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 8th Week of Ordinary Time. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Now that the Easter Season and Pentecost have concluded, we’re back to Ordinary Time. And that can feel so, well, ordinary, can’t it? If you’re a churchgoing Christian, you might start to think, “Well, there’s not much going on between now and Advent, is there?” But that’s a somewhat skewed way of looking at life, at least at Jesus’s life. Because there’s an awful lot between the time he was born and the time he died--to put it mildly. And even when you take out his public ministry—his preaching and healing in Galilee and Judea, which takes up most of the Gospels—you’re left with a big chunk of his life that we know little about. This part of his life, between ages 12, when he’s found in the Temple teaching, and age 30, is called the “Hidden Life.” The Hidden Life is the time that Jesus spent in Nazareth, growing up as a boy, learning to be a carpenter and then working as a carpenter. Remember he’s called “carpenter” more than he’s called “rabbi” in the Gospels. Now, one reason that there’s little about the Hidden Life in the Gospels is probably because it was so ordinary. And yet Jesus is no less the Son of God when he is sawing a piece of wood in his workshop in Nazareth. That ordinary life helped to form something extraordinary. This week, why not ask yourself: What ordinary parts of my life do I want to thank God for? Maybe they’re more extraordinary than you think.

May 31, 2018
8th Wednesday of Ordinary Time
18:03

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 8th Week of Ordinary Time. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Now that the Easter Season and Pentecost have concluded, we’re back to Ordinary Time. And that can feel so, well, ordinary, can’t it? If you’re a churchgoing Christian, you might start to think, “Well, there’s not much going on between now and Advent, is there?” But that’s a somewhat skewed way of looking at life, at least at Jesus’s life. Because there’s an awful lot between the time he was born and the time he died--to put it mildly. And even when you take out his public ministry—his preaching and healing in Galilee and Judea, which takes up most of the Gospels—you’re left with a big chunk of his life that we know little about. This part of his life, between ages 12, when he’s found in the Temple teaching, and age 30, is called the “Hidden Life.” The Hidden Life is the time that Jesus spent in Nazareth, growing up as a boy, learning to be a carpenter and then working as a carpenter. Remember he’s called “carpenter” more than he’s called “rabbi” in the Gospels. Now, one reason that there’s little about the Hidden Life in the Gospels is probably because it was so ordinary. And yet Jesus is no less the Son of God when he is sawing a piece of wood in his workshop in Nazareth. That ordinary life helped to form something extraordinary. This week, why not ask yourself: What ordinary parts of my life do I want to thank God for? Maybe they’re more extraordinary than you think.

May 30, 2018
8th Tuesday of Ordinary Time
18:03

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 8th Week of Ordinary Time. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Now that the Easter Season and Pentecost have concluded, we’re back to Ordinary Time. And that can feel so, well, ordinary, can’t it? If you’re a churchgoing Christian, you might start to think, “Well, there’s not much going on between now and Advent, is there?” But that’s a somewhat skewed way of looking at life, at least at Jesus’s life. Because there’s an awful lot between the time he was born and the time he died--to put it mildly. And even when you take out his public ministry—his preaching and healing in Galilee and Judea, which takes up most of the Gospels—you’re left with a big chunk of his life that we know little about. This part of his life, between ages 12, when he’s found in the Temple teaching, and age 30, is called the “Hidden Life.” The Hidden Life is the time that Jesus spent in Nazareth, growing up as a boy, learning to be a carpenter and then working as a carpenter. Remember he’s called “carpenter” more than he’s called “rabbi” in the Gospels. Now, one reason that there’s little about the Hidden Life in the Gospels is probably because it was so ordinary. And yet Jesus is no less the Son of God when he is sawing a piece of wood in his workshop in Nazareth. That ordinary life helped to form something extraordinary. This week, why not ask yourself: What ordinary parts of my life do I want to thank God for? Maybe they’re more extraordinary than you think.

May 29, 2018
8th Monday of Ordinary Time
18:02

Because today is Monday, we have a new reflection for the week.

Now that the Easter Season and Pentecost have concluded, we’re back to Ordinary Time. And that can feel so, well, ordinary, can’t it? If you’re a churchgoing Christian, you might start to think, “Well, there’s not much going on between now and Advent, is there?” But that’s a somewhat skewed way of looking at life, at least at Jesus’s life. Because there’s an awful lot between the time he was born and the time he died--to put it mildly. And even when you take out his public ministry—his preaching and healing in Galilee and Judea, which takes up most of the Gospels—you’re left with a big chunk of his life that we know little about. This part of his life, between ages 12, when he’s found in the Temple teaching, and age 30, is called the “Hidden Life.” The Hidden Life is the time that Jesus spent in Nazareth, growing up as a boy, learning to be a carpenter and then working as a carpenter. Remember he’s called “carpenter” more than he’s called “rabbi” in the Gospels. Now, one reason that there’s little about the Hidden Life in the Gospels is probably because it was so ordinary. And yet Jesus is no less the Son of God when he is sawing a piece of wood in his workshop in Nazareth. That ordinary life helped to form something extraordinary. This week, why not ask yourself: What ordinary parts of my life do I want to thank God for? Maybe they’re more extraordinary than you think.

May 28, 2018
Holy Trinity Sunday
17:49

A new reflection for the 8th week of Ordinary Time will be added on Monday.

On the Feast of Pentecost, the Holy Spirit was poured out, in a powerful way, onto the disciples, who were gathered together in the same room where the Last Supper occurred. The New Testament describes an incredible scene, with tongues of fire appearing over people’s heads and everyone speaking in foreign languages. Did it happen exactly that way? Who knows? It also may be true that this was the only way that writer of the Acts of the Apostles could describe such a profound experience of the Holy Spirit. As was the case with Easter, Pentecost was something that had never happened before and so was probably impossible to describe. One of the lessons of Pentecost, though, is that the Holy Spirit gives us the graces we need to spread the Good News that God loves us and that God is with us. Now, the Holy Spirit, I think, might be the forgotten person of the Holy Trinity. We tend to think a lot about God the Father and a lot about Jesus. But, in fact, it’s through the Spirit that we encounter both the Father and Son today. The Spirit also encourages us, consoles us, urges us on, and literally “in-spires” us. So this week, as you look back over your daily life, you might pay special attention to those times when you really felt the presence of the Holy Spirit.

May 27, 2018
7th Saturday of Ordinary Time
17:50

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 7th Week of Ordinary Time. New reflections will be added every Monday.

On the Feast of Pentecost, the Holy Spirit was poured out, in a powerful way, onto the disciples, who were gathered together in the same room where the Last Supper occurred. The New Testament describes an incredible scene, with tongues of fire appearing over people’s heads and everyone speaking in foreign languages. Did it happen exactly that way? Who knows? It also may be true that this was the only way that writer of the Acts of the Apostles could describe such a profound experience of the Holy Spirit. As was the case with Easter, Pentecost was something that had never happened before and so was probably impossible to describe. One of the lessons of Pentecost, though, is that the Holy Spirit gives us the graces we need to spread the Good News that God loves us and that God is with us. Now, the Holy Spirit, I think, might be the forgotten person of the Holy Trinity. We tend to think a lot about God the Father and a lot about Jesus. But, in fact, it’s through the Spirit that we encounter both the Father and Son today. The Spirit also encourages us, consoles us, urges us on, and literally “in-spires” us. So this week, as you look back over your daily life, you might pay special attention to those times when you really felt the presence of the Holy Spirit.

May 26, 2018
7th Friday of Ordinary Time
17:50

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 7th Week of Ordinary Time. New reflections will be added every Monday.

On the Feast of Pentecost, the Holy Spirit was poured out, in a powerful way, onto the disciples, who were gathered together in the same room where the Last Supper occurred. The New Testament describes an incredible scene, with tongues of fire appearing over people’s heads and everyone speaking in foreign languages. Did it happen exactly that way? Who knows? It also may be true that this was the only way that writer of the Acts of the Apostles could describe such a profound experience of the Holy Spirit. As was the case with Easter, Pentecost was something that had never happened before and so was probably impossible to describe. One of the lessons of Pentecost, though, is that the Holy Spirit gives us the graces we need to spread the Good News that God loves us and that God is with us. Now, the Holy Spirit, I think, might be the forgotten person of the Holy Trinity. We tend to think a lot about God the Father and a lot about Jesus. But, in fact, it’s through the Spirit that we encounter both the Father and Son today. The Spirit also encourages us, consoles us, urges us on, and literally “in-spires” us. So this week, as you look back over your daily life, you might pay special attention to those times when you really felt the presence of the Holy Spirit.

May 25, 2018
7th Thursday of Ordinary Time
17:50

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 7th Week of Ordinary Time. New reflections will be added every Monday.

On the Feast of Pentecost, the Holy Spirit was poured out, in a powerful way, onto the disciples, who were gathered together in the same room where the Last Supper occurred. The New Testament describes an incredible scene, with tongues of fire appearing over people’s heads and everyone speaking in foreign languages. Did it happen exactly that way? Who knows? It also may be true that this was the only way that writer of the Acts of the Apostles could describe such a profound experience of the Holy Spirit. As was the case with Easter, Pentecost was something that had never happened before and so was probably impossible to describe. One of the lessons of Pentecost, though, is that the Holy Spirit gives us the graces we need to spread the Good News that God loves us and that God is with us. Now, the Holy Spirit, I think, might be the forgotten person of the Holy Trinity. We tend to think a lot about God the Father and a lot about Jesus. But, in fact, it’s through the Spirit that we encounter both the Father and Son today. The Spirit also encourages us, consoles us, urges us on, and literally “in-spires” us. So this week, as you look back over your daily life, you might pay special attention to those times when you really felt the presence of the Holy Spirit.

May 24, 2018
7th Wednesday of Ordinary Time
17:50

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 7th Week of Ordinary Time. New reflections will be added every Monday.

On the Feast of Pentecost, the Holy Spirit was poured out, in a powerful way, onto the disciples, who were gathered together in the same room where the Last Supper occurred. The New Testament describes an incredible scene, with tongues of fire appearing over people’s heads and everyone speaking in foreign languages. Did it happen exactly that way? Who knows? It also may be true that this was the only way that writer of the Acts of the Apostles could describe such a profound experience of the Holy Spirit. As was the case with Easter, Pentecost was something that had never happened before and so was probably impossible to describe. One of the lessons of Pentecost, though, is that the Holy Spirit gives us the graces we need to spread the Good News that God loves us and that God is with us. Now, the Holy Spirit, I think, might be the forgotten person of the Holy Trinity. We tend to think a lot about God the Father and a lot about Jesus. But, in fact, it’s through the Spirit that we encounter both the Father and Son today. The Spirit also encourages us, consoles us, urges us on, and literally “in-spires” us. So this week, as you look back over your daily life, you might pay special attention to those times when you really felt the presence of the Holy Spirit.

May 23, 2018
7th Tuesday of Ordinary Time
17:50

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 7th Week of Ordinary Time. New reflections will be added every Monday.

On the Feast of Pentecost, the Holy Spirit was poured out, in a powerful way, onto the disciples, who were gathered together in the same room where the Last Supper occurred. The New Testament describes an incredible scene, with tongues of fire appearing over people’s heads and everyone speaking in foreign languages. Did it happen exactly that way? Who knows? It also may be true that this was the only way that writer of the Acts of the Apostles could describe such a profound experience of the Holy Spirit. As was the case with Easter, Pentecost was something that had never happened before and so was probably impossible to describe. One of the lessons of Pentecost, though, is that the Holy Spirit gives us the graces we need to spread the Good News that God loves us and that God is with us. Now, the Holy Spirit, I think, might be the forgotten person of the Holy Trinity. We tend to think a lot about God the Father and a lot about Jesus. But, in fact, it’s through the Spirit that we encounter both the Father and Son today. The Spirit also encourages us, consoles us, urges us on, and literally “in-spires” us. So this week, as you look back over your daily life, you might pay special attention to those times when you really felt the presence of the Holy Spirit.

May 22, 2018
7th Monday of Ordinary Time
17:49

Because today is Monday, we have a new reflection for the week.

On the Feast of Pentecost, the Holy Spirit was poured out, in a powerful way, onto the disciples, who were gathered together in the same room where the Last Supper occurred. The New Testament describes an incredible scene, with tongues of fire appearing over people’s heads and everyone speaking in foreign languages. Did it happen exactly that way? Who knows? It also may be true that this was the only way that writer of the Acts of the Apostles could describe such a profound experience of the Holy Spirit. As was the case with Easter, Pentecost was something that had never happened before and so was probably impossible to describe. One of the lessons of Pentecost, though, is that the Holy Spirit gives us the graces we need to spread the Good News that God loves us and that God is with us. Now, the Holy Spirit, I think, might be the forgotten person of the Holy Trinity. We tend to think a lot about God the Father and a lot about Jesus. But, in fact, it’s through the Spirit that we encounter both the Father and Son today. The Spirit also encourages us, consoles us, urges us on, and literally “in-spires” us. So this week, as you look back over your daily life, you might pay special attention to those times when you really felt the presence of the Holy Spirit.

May 21, 2018
Pentecost Sunday
17:47

A new reflection for the 7th week of Ordinary Time will be added on Monday.

A few weeks ago, I was in the Holy Land with a group of pilgrims, and together we visited the Chapel of the Ascension, in Jerusalem. The little stone chapel is right where the Gospels describe the event occurring, that is, somewhat near the town of Bethany. The building passed through many different religious hands over the centuries, thanks to the constant political changes in the Holy Land, and eventually it ended up as a mosque. But it’s open for all to see, and I’m always glad to pray there. This week we celebrate the Ascension of Jesus Christ, which the Gospels describe as Jesus being as taking up, bodily, into heaven. For me, that mysterious event has two important meanings. First, our bodies are important. Remember: after his Passion and Death, Jesus returns to the disciples with his body, still showing his wounds. And at the Ascension he wasn’t just taken up “in spirit.” It’s a reminder to all those who try to remove the body from the spiritual life. That leads to a second insight: Jesus is with the Father. At the end of his public ministry Jesus is brought into complete union with the Father. So, two questions to ask ourselves this week: What place does your body have in your spiritual life? Can you remember it during your examen?

May 20, 2018
7th Saturday of Easter
17:49

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 7th Week of Easter. New reflections will be added every Monday.

A few weeks ago, I was in the Holy Land with a group of pilgrims, and together we visited the Chapel of the Ascension, in Jerusalem. The little stone chapel is right where the Gospels describe the event occurring, that is, somewhat near the town of Bethany. The building passed through many different religious hands over the centuries, thanks to the constant political changes in the Holy Land, and eventually it ended up as a mosque. But it’s open for all to see, and I’m always glad to pray there. This week we celebrate the Ascension of Jesus Christ, which the Gospels describe as Jesus being as taking up, bodily, into heaven. For me, that mysterious event has two important meanings. First, our bodies are important. Remember: after his Passion and Death, Jesus returns to the disciples with his body, still showing his wounds. And at the Ascension he wasn’t just taken up “in spirit.” It’s a reminder to all those who try to remove the body from the spiritual life. That leads to a second insight: Jesus is with the Father. At the end of his public ministry Jesus is brought into complete union with the Father. So, two questions to ask ourselves this week: What place does your body have in your spiritual life? Can you remember it during your examen?

May 19, 2018
7th Friday of Easter
17:49

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 7th Week of Easter. New reflections will be added every Monday.

A few weeks ago, I was in the Holy Land with a group of pilgrims, and together we visited the Chapel of the Ascension, in Jerusalem. The little stone chapel is right where the Gospels describe the event occurring, that is, somewhat near the town of Bethany. The building passed through many different religious hands over the centuries, thanks to the constant political changes in the Holy Land, and eventually it ended up as a mosque. But it’s open for all to see, and I’m always glad to pray there. This week we celebrate the Ascension of Jesus Christ, which the Gospels describe as Jesus being as taking up, bodily, into heaven. For me, that mysterious event has two important meanings. First, our bodies are important. Remember: after his Passion and Death, Jesus returns to the disciples with his body, still showing his wounds. And at the Ascension he wasn’t just taken up “in spirit.” It’s a reminder to all those who try to remove the body from the spiritual life. That leads to a second insight: Jesus is with the Father. At the end of his public ministry Jesus is brought into complete union with the Father. So, two questions to ask ourselves this week: What place does your body have in your spiritual life? Can you remember it during your examen?

May 18, 2018
7th Thursday of Easter
17:49

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 7th Week of Easter. New reflections will be added every Monday.

A few weeks ago, I was in the Holy Land with a group of pilgrims, and together we visited the Chapel of the Ascension, in Jerusalem. The little stone chapel is right where the Gospels describe the event occurring, that is, somewhat near the town of Bethany. The building passed through many different religious hands over the centuries, thanks to the constant political changes in the Holy Land, and eventually it ended up as a mosque. But it’s open for all to see, and I’m always glad to pray there. This week we celebrate the Ascension of Jesus Christ, which the Gospels describe as Jesus being as taking up, bodily, into heaven. For me, that mysterious event has two important meanings. First, our bodies are important. Remember: after his Passion and Death, Jesus returns to the disciples with his body, still showing his wounds. And at the Ascension he wasn’t just taken up “in spirit.” It’s a reminder to all those who try to remove the body from the spiritual life. That leads to a second insight: Jesus is with the Father. At the end of his public ministry Jesus is brought into complete union with the Father. So, two questions to ask ourselves this week: What place does your body have in your spiritual life? Can you remember it during your examen?

May 17, 2018
7th Wednesday of Easter
17:48

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 7th Week of Easter. New reflections will be added every Monday.

A few weeks ago, I was in the Holy Land with a group of pilgrims, and together we visited the Chapel of the Ascension, in Jerusalem. The little stone chapel is right where the Gospels describe the event occurring, that is, somewhat near the town of Bethany. The building passed through many different religious hands over the centuries, thanks to the constant political changes in the Holy Land, and eventually it ended up as a mosque. But it’s open for all to see, and I’m always glad to pray there. This week we celebrate the Ascension of Jesus Christ, which the Gospels describe as Jesus being as taking up, bodily, into heaven. For me, that mysterious event has two important meanings. First, our bodies are important. Remember: after his Passion and Death, Jesus returns to the disciples with his body, still showing his wounds. And at the Ascension he wasn’t just taken up “in spirit.” It’s a reminder to all those who try to remove the body from the spiritual life. That leads to a second insight: Jesus is with the Father. At the end of his public ministry Jesus is brought into complete union with the Father. So, two questions to ask ourselves this week: What place does your body have in your spiritual life? Can you remember it during your examen?

May 16, 2018
7th Tuesday of Easter
17:49

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 7th Week of Easter. New reflections will be added every Monday.

A few weeks ago, I was in the Holy Land with a group of pilgrims, and together we visited the Chapel of the Ascension, in Jerusalem. The little stone chapel is right where the Gospels describe the event occurring, that is, somewhat near the town of Bethany. The building passed through many different religious hands over the centuries, thanks to the constant political changes in the Holy Land, and eventually it ended up as a mosque. But it’s open for all to see, and I’m always glad to pray there. This week we celebrate the Ascension of Jesus Christ, which the Gospels describe as Jesus being as taking up, bodily, into heaven. For me, that mysterious event has two important meanings. First, our bodies are important. Remember: after his Passion and Death, Jesus returns to the disciples with his body, still showing his wounds. And at the Ascension he wasn’t just taken up “in spirit.” It’s a reminder to all those who try to remove the body from the spiritual life. That leads to a second insight: Jesus is with the Father. At the end of his public ministry Jesus is brought into complete union with the Father. So, two questions to ask ourselves this week: What place does your body have in your spiritual life? Can you remember it during your examen?

May 15, 2018
7th Monday of Easter
17:47

Because today is Monday, we have a new reflection for the week.

A few weeks ago, I was in the Holy Land with a group of pilgrims, and together we visited the Chapel of the Ascension, in Jerusalem. The little stone chapel is right where the Gospels describe the event occurring, that is, somewhat near the town of Bethany. The building passed through many different religious hands over the centuries, thanks to the constant political changes in the Holy Land, and eventually it ended up as a mosque. But it’s open for all to see, and I’m always glad to pray there. This week we celebrate the Ascension of Jesus Christ, which the Gospels describe as Jesus being as taking up, bodily, into heaven. For me, that mysterious event has two important meanings. First, our bodies are important. Remember: after his Passion and Death, Jesus returns to the disciples with his body, still showing his wounds. And at the Ascension he wasn’t just taken up “in spirit.” It’s a reminder to all those who try to remove the body from the spiritual life. That leads to a second insight: Jesus is with the Father. At the end of his public ministry Jesus is brought into complete union with the Father. So, two questions to ask ourselves this week: What place does your body have in your spiritual life? Can you remember it during your examen?

May 14, 2018
7th Sunday of Easter
17:47

A new reflection for the 7th week of Easter will be added on Monday.

We’ve spent a few weeks now contemplating the great mystery of Easter.  And if you’ve been to any Sunday Mass recently, you’ve heard a wide variety of Gospel readings: first, the appearances of the Risen Christ to Mary Magdalene, then to the Apostle Thomas, then to the disciples on the way to Emmaus.  Then the Gospels shifted to some beautiful imagery that Christ used to describe himself: the Good Shepherd and the True Vine. The great variety of readings over the last few weeks remind us that Easter can’t be understood in just one way.  We have to come at it from different angles, and use different stories and images just to take it in. Any profound experience in our lives is like that. We might experience the birth of a child, or suffer the loss of a loved one, or undergo a sudden illness or even have a new and exciting possibility at work open up.  So this week you might ask yourself: Is there something in my life that I need to take time to ponder, time to understand? And how is God asking me to ponder this strange thing? Can I be as patient as the church is, in its journey to understand Easter?

May 13, 2018
6th Saturday of Easter
17:47

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 6th Week of Easter. New reflections will be added every Monday.

We’ve spent a few weeks now contemplating the great mystery of Easter.  And if you’ve been to any Sunday Mass recently, you’ve heard a wide variety of Gospel readings: first, the appearances of the Risen Christ to Mary Magdalene, then to the Apostle Thomas, then to the disciples on the way to Emmaus.  Then the Gospels shifted to some beautiful imagery that Christ used to describe himself: the Good Shepherd and the True Vine. The great variety of readings over the last few weeks remind us that Easter can’t be understood in just one way.  We have to come at it from different angles, and use different stories and images just to take it in. Any profound experience in our lives is like that. We might experience the birth of a child, or suffer the loss of a loved one, or undergo a sudden illness or even have a new and exciting possibility at work open up.  So this week you might ask yourself: Is there something in my life that I need to take time to ponder, time to understand? And how is God asking me to ponder this strange thing? Can I be as patient as the church is, in its journey to understand Easter?

May 12, 2018
6th Friday of Easter
17:47

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 6th Week of Easter. New reflections will be added every Monday.

We’ve spent a few weeks now contemplating the great mystery of Easter.  And if you’ve been to any Sunday Mass recently, you’ve heard a wide variety of Gospel readings: first, the appearances of the Risen Christ to Mary Magdalene, then to the Apostle Thomas, then to the disciples on the way to Emmaus.  Then the Gospels shifted to some beautiful imagery that Christ used to describe himself: the Good Shepherd and the True Vine. The great variety of readings over the last few weeks remind us that Easter can’t be understood in just one way.  We have to come at it from different angles, and use different stories and images just to take it in. Any profound experience in our lives is like that. We might experience the birth of a child, or suffer the loss of a loved one, or undergo a sudden illness or even have a new and exciting possibility at work open up.  So this week you might ask yourself: Is there something in my life that I need to take time to ponder, time to understand? And how is God asking me to ponder this strange thing? Can I be as patient as the church is, in its journey to understand Easter?

May 11, 2018
6th Thursday of Easter
17:47

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 6th Week of Easter. New reflections will be added every Monday.

We’ve spent a few weeks now contemplating the great mystery of Easter.  And if you’ve been to any Sunday Mass recently, you’ve heard a wide variety of Gospel readings: first, the appearances of the Risen Christ to Mary Magdalene, then to the Apostle Thomas, then to the disciples on the way to Emmaus.  Then the Gospels shifted to some beautiful imagery that Christ used to describe himself: the Good Shepherd and the True Vine. The great variety of readings over the last few weeks remind us that Easter can’t be understood in just one way.  We have to come at it from different angles, and use different stories and images just to take it in. Any profound experience in our lives is like that. We might experience the birth of a child, or suffer the loss of a loved one, or undergo a sudden illness or even have a new and exciting possibility at work open up.  So this week you might ask yourself: Is there something in my life that I need to take time to ponder, time to understand? And how is God asking me to ponder this strange thing? Can I be as patient as the church is, in its journey to understand Easter?

May 10, 2018
6th Wednesday of Easter
17:47

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 6th Week of Easter. New reflections will be added every Monday.

We’ve spent a few weeks now contemplating the great mystery of Easter.  And if you’ve been to any Sunday Mass recently, you’ve heard a wide variety of Gospel readings: first, the appearances of the Risen Christ to Mary Magdalene, then to the Apostle Thomas, then to the disciples on the way to Emmaus.  Then the Gospels shifted to some beautiful imagery that Christ used to describe himself: the Good Shepherd and the True Vine. The great variety of readings over the last few weeks remind us that Easter can’t be understood in just one way.  We have to come at it from different angles, and use different stories and images just to take it in. Any profound experience in our lives is like that. We might experience the birth of a child, or suffer the loss of a loved one, or undergo a sudden illness or even have a new and exciting possibility at work open up.  So this week you might ask yourself: Is there something in my life that I need to take time to ponder, time to understand? And how is God asking me to ponder this strange thing? Can I be as patient as the church is, in its journey to understand Easter?

May 09, 2018
6th Tuesday of Easter
17:47

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 6th Week of Easter. New reflections will be added every Monday.

We’ve spent a few weeks now contemplating the great mystery of Easter.  And if you’ve been to any Sunday Mass recently, you’ve heard a wide variety of Gospel readings: first, the appearances of the Risen Christ to Mary Magdalene, then to the Apostle Thomas, then to the disciples on the way to Emmaus.  Then the Gospels shifted to some beautiful imagery that Christ used to describe himself: the Good Shepherd and the True Vine. The great variety of readings over the last few weeks remind us that Easter can’t be understood in just one way.  We have to come at it from different angles, and use different stories and images just to take it in. Any profound experience in our lives is like that. We might experience the birth of a child, or suffer the loss of a loved one, or undergo a sudden illness or even have a new and exciting possibility at work open up.  So this week you might ask yourself: Is there something in my life that I need to take time to ponder, time to understand? And how is God asking me to ponder this strange thing? Can I be as patient as the church is, in its journey to understand Easter?

May 08, 2018
6th Monday of Easter
17:46

Because today is Monday, we have a new reflection for the week.

We’ve spent a few weeks now contemplating the great mystery of Easter.  And if you’ve been to any Sunday Mass recently, you’ve heard a wide variety of Gospel readings: first, the appearances of the Risen Christ to Mary Magdalene, then to the Apostle Thomas, then to the disciples on the way to Emmaus.  Then the Gospels shifted to some beautiful imagery that Christ used to describe himself: the Good Shepherd and the True Vine. The great variety of readings over the last few weeks remind us that Easter can’t be understood in just one way.  We have to come at it from different angles, and use different stories and images just to take it in. Any profound experience in our lives is like that. We might experience the birth of a child, or suffer the loss of a loved one, or undergo a sudden illness or even have a new and exciting possibility at work open up.  So this week you might ask yourself: Is there something in my life that I need to take time to ponder, time to understand? And how is God asking me to ponder this strange thing? Can I be as patient as the church is, in its journey to understand Easter?

May 07, 2018
6th Sunday of Easter
17:17

A new reflection for the 6th week of Easter will be added on Monday.

Believe it or not, it’s still Easter. The liturgical season celebrating Jesus’s rising from the dead is still in swing. How have you celebrated it? And I don’t mean how did you celebrate Easter Sunday all those weeks ago, probably by going to Mass and maybe eating a few jellybeans, but something else. How have you let the joy and hope of the Risen One influence your life? The Resurrection, as you know, changes everything. It tells us that life is stronger than death. That love is stronger than hatred. That hope is stronger than despair. That suffering is never the last word. And that nothing is impossible with God. But do you believe that? Maybe this week, as you pray your examen, you can ask yourself: Do I really believe in those Easter messages? And what difference have they made in my life?

May 06, 2018
5th Saturday of Easter
17:17

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 5th Week of Easter. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Believe it or not, it’s still Easter. The liturgical season celebrating Jesus’s rising from the dead is still in swing. How have you celebrated it? And I don’t mean how did you celebrate Easter Sunday all those weeks ago, probably by going to Mass and maybe eating a few jellybeans, but something else. How have you let the joy and hope of the Risen One influence your life? The Resurrection, as you know, changes everything. It tells us that life is stronger than death. That love is stronger than hatred. That hope is stronger than despair. That suffering is never the last word. And that nothing is impossible with God. But do you believe that? Maybe this week, as you pray your examen, you can ask yourself: Do I really believe in those Easter messages? And what difference have they made in my life?

May 05, 2018
5th Friday of Easter
17:17

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 5th Week of Easter. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Believe it or not, it’s still Easter. The liturgical season celebrating Jesus’s rising from the dead is still in swing. How have you celebrated it? And I don’t mean how did you celebrate Easter Sunday all those weeks ago, probably by going to Mass and maybe eating a few jellybeans, but something else. How have you let the joy and hope of the Risen One influence your life? The Resurrection, as you know, changes everything. It tells us that life is stronger than death. That love is stronger than hatred. That hope is stronger than despair. That suffering is never the last word. And that nothing is impossible with God. But do you believe that? Maybe this week, as you pray your examen, you can ask yourself: Do I really believe in those Easter messages? And what difference have they made in my life?

May 04, 2018
5th Thursday of Easter
17:17

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 5th Week of Easter. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Believe it or not, it’s still Easter. The liturgical season celebrating Jesus’s rising from the dead is still in swing. How have you celebrated it? And I don’t mean how did you celebrate Easter Sunday all those weeks ago, probably by going to Mass and maybe eating a few jellybeans, but something else. How have you let the joy and hope of the Risen One influence your life? The Resurrection, as you know, changes everything. It tells us that life is stronger than death. That love is stronger than hatred. That hope is stronger than despair. That suffering is never the last word. And that nothing is impossible with God. But do you believe that? Maybe this week, as you pray your examen, you can ask yourself: Do I really believe in those Easter messages? And what difference have they made in my life?

May 03, 2018
5th Wednesday of Easter
17:17

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 5th Week of Easter. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Believe it or not, it’s still Easter. The liturgical season celebrating Jesus’s rising from the dead is still in swing. How have you celebrated it? And I don’t mean how did you celebrate Easter Sunday all those weeks ago, probably by going to Mass and maybe eating a few jellybeans, but something else. How have you let the joy and hope of the Risen One influence your life? The Resurrection, as you know, changes everything. It tells us that life is stronger than death. That love is stronger than hatred. That hope is stronger than despair. That suffering is never the last word. And that nothing is impossible with God. But do you believe that? Maybe this week, as you pray your examen, you can ask yourself: Do I really believe in those Easter messages? And what difference have they made in my life?

May 02, 2018
5th Tuesday of Easter
17:18

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 5th Week of Easter. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Believe it or not, it’s still Easter. The liturgical season celebrating Jesus’s rising from the dead is still in swing. How have you celebrated it? And I don’t mean how did you celebrate Easter Sunday all those weeks ago, probably by going to Mass and maybe eating a few jellybeans, but something else. How have you let the joy and hope of the Risen One influence your life? The Resurrection, as you know, changes everything. It tells us that life is stronger than death. That love is stronger than hatred. That hope is stronger than despair. That suffering is never the last word. And that nothing is impossible with God. But do you believe that? Maybe this week, as you pray your examen, you can ask yourself: Do I really believe in those Easter messages? And what difference have they made in my life?

May 01, 2018
5th Monday of Easter
17:17

Because today is Monday, we have a new reflection for the week.

Believe it or not, it’s still Easter. The liturgical season celebrating Jesus’s rising from the dead is still in swing. How have you celebrated it? And I don’t mean how did you celebrate Easter Sunday all those weeks ago, probably by going to Mass and maybe eating a few jellybeans, but something else. How have you let the joy and hope of the Risen One influence your life? The Resurrection, as you know, changes everything. It tells us that life is stronger than death. That love is stronger than hatred. That hope is stronger than despair. That suffering is never the last word. And that nothing is impossible with God. But do you believe that? Maybe this week, as you pray your examen, you can ask yourself: Do I really believe in those Easter messages? And what difference have they made in my life?

Apr 30, 2018
5th Sunday of Easter
17:42

A new reflection for the 5th week of Easter will be added on Monday.

Easter, as I mentioned last week, is a whole season.  Because it takes us a while to celebrate the Resurrection.  You know, one reason was probably so hard for the disciples to even begin to understand the Resurrection is because no one had ever experienced it before!  They didn’t know what they were experiencing. You can see traces of that in the Gospels. In some appearances the Risen Christ seems physical. He eats solid food and says, “Touch me and see that I’m not a ghost.”  In others, he seems non-physical. He can, apparently, walk through walls. In some appearances, it’s quite clearly Jesus, in others the disciples can’t recognize him at first. To me, this is a reminder of how difficult it is to explain powerful religious experiences: the disciples probably had a hard time communicating what they had seen.  But just because you can’t explain something doesn’t mean it’s not real. This week you might ask yourself if you’ve had any experiences latterly that are inexplicable, but also meaningful.

Apr 29, 2018
4th Saturday of Easter
17:42

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 4th Week of Easter. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Easter, as I mentioned last week, is a whole season.  Because it takes us a while to celebrate the Resurrection.  You know, one reason was probably so hard for the disciples to even begin to understand the Resurrection is because no one had ever experienced it before!  They didn’t know what they were experiencing. You can see traces of that in the Gospels. In some appearances the Risen Christ seems physical. He eats solid food and says, “Touch me and see that I’m not a ghost.”  In others, he seems non-physical. He can, apparently, walk through walls. In some appearances, it’s quite clearly Jesus, in others the disciples can’t recognize him at first. To me, this is a reminder of how difficult it is to explain powerful religious experiences: the disciples probably had a hard time communicating what they had seen.  But just because you can’t explain something doesn’t mean it’s not real. This week you might ask yourself if you’ve had any experiences latterly that are inexplicable, but also meaningful.

Apr 28, 2018
4th Friday of Easter
17:42

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 4th Week of Easter. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Easter, as I mentioned last week, is a whole season.  Because it takes us a while to celebrate the Resurrection.  You know, one reason was probably so hard for the disciples to even begin to understand the Resurrection is because no one had ever experienced it before!  They didn’t know what they were experiencing. You can see traces of that in the Gospels. In some appearances the Risen Christ seems physical. He eats solid food and says, “Touch me and see that I’m not a ghost.”  In others, he seems non-physical. He can, apparently, walk through walls. In some appearances, it’s quite clearly Jesus, in others the disciples can’t recognize him at first. To me, this is a reminder of how difficult it is to explain powerful religious experiences: the disciples probably had a hard time communicating what they had seen.  But just because you can’t explain something doesn’t mean it’s not real. This week you might ask yourself if you’ve had any experiences latterly that are inexplicable, but also meaningful.

Apr 27, 2018
4th Thursday of Easter
17:42

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 4th Week of Easter. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Easter, as I mentioned last week, is a whole season.  Because it takes us a while to celebrate the Resurrection.  You know, one reason was probably so hard for the disciples to even begin to understand the Resurrection is because no one had ever experienced it before!  They didn’t know what they were experiencing. You can see traces of that in the Gospels. In some appearances the Risen Christ seems physical. He eats solid food and says, “Touch me and see that I’m not a ghost.”  In others, he seems non-physical. He can, apparently, walk through walls. In some appearances, it’s quite clearly Jesus, in others the disciples can’t recognize him at first. To me, this is a reminder of how difficult it is to explain powerful religious experiences: the disciples probably had a hard time communicating what they had seen.  But just because you can’t explain something doesn’t mean it’s not real. This week you might ask yourself if you’ve had any experiences latterly that are inexplicable, but also meaningful.

Apr 26, 2018
4th Wednesday of Easter
17:42

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 4th Week of Easter. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Easter, as I mentioned last week, is a whole season.  Because it takes us a while to celebrate the Resurrection.  You know, one reason was probably so hard for the disciples to even begin to understand the Resurrection is because no one had ever experienced it before!  They didn’t know what they were experiencing. You can see traces of that in the Gospels. In some appearances the Risen Christ seems physical. He eats solid food and says, “Touch me and see that I’m not a ghost.”  In others, he seems non-physical. He can, apparently, walk through walls. In some appearances, it’s quite clearly Jesus, in others the disciples can’t recognize him at first. To me, this is a reminder of how difficult it is to explain powerful religious experiences: the disciples probably had a hard time communicating what they had seen.  But just because you can’t explain something doesn’t mean it’s not real. This week you might ask yourself if you’ve had any experiences latterly that are inexplicable, but also meaningful.

Apr 25, 2018
4th Tuesday of Easter
17:42

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 4th Week of Easter. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Easter, as I mentioned last week, is a whole season.  Because it takes us a while to celebrate the Resurrection.  You know, one reason was probably so hard for the disciples to even begin to understand the Resurrection is because no one had ever experienced it before!  They didn’t know what they were experiencing. You can see traces of that in the Gospels. In some appearances the Risen Christ seems physical. He eats solid food and says, “Touch me and see that I’m not a ghost.”  In others, he seems non-physical. He can, apparently, walk through walls. In some appearances, it’s quite clearly Jesus, in others the disciples can’t recognize him at first. To me, this is a reminder of how difficult it is to explain powerful religious experiences: the disciples probably had a hard time communicating what they had seen.  But just because you can’t explain something doesn’t mean it’s not real. This week you might ask yourself if you’ve had any experiences latterly that are inexplicable, but also meaningful.

Apr 24, 2018
4th Monday of Easter
17:42

Because today is Monday, we have a new reflection for the week.

Easter, as I mentioned last week, is a whole season.  Because it takes us a while to celebrate the Resurrection.  You know, one reason was probably so hard for the disciples to even begin to understand the Resurrection is because no one had ever experienced it before!  They didn’t know what they were experiencing. You can see traces of that in the Gospels. In some appearances the Risen Christ seems physical. He eats solid food and says, “Touch me and see that I’m not a ghost.”  In others, he seems non-physical. He can, apparently, walk through walls. In some appearances, it’s quite clearly Jesus, in others the disciples can’t recognize him at first. To me, this is a reminder of how difficult it is to explain powerful religious experiences: the disciples probably had a hard time communicating what they had seen.  But just because you can’t explain something doesn’t mean it’s not real. This week you might ask yourself if you’ve had any experiences latterly that are inexplicable, but also meaningful. 

Apr 23, 2018
4th Sunday of Easter
17:28

A new reflection for the 4th week of Easter will be added on Monday.

Easter, as one of my Jesuit friends always reminds me, is not just a day, but a whole liturgical season. This makes sense, of course. The Easter event, that is, the Resurrection of Jesus Christ, is simply too big a truth to be celebrated in just one day. Notice I didn’t say a truth to be “understood,” I said “celebrated.” Because, in the end, the Resurrection is a mystery, something to be pondered not to be figured out. But that besides pondering the mystery of the Resurrection in our prayer, we can also see signs of it in our lives. Places that seemed dead suddenly come alive. Relationships that had been frozen over thaw, and then warm. Parts of ourselves that seem impossible for God to change suddenly turn around, and we find ourselves growing. So perhaps one invitation this week is to look for signs of the Resurrection within you. Where do you see the mystery of new life in your daily life? And, Happy Easter.

Apr 22, 2018
3rd Saturday of Easter
17:28

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 3rd Week of Easter. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Easter, as one of my Jesuit friends always reminds me, is not just a day, but a whole liturgical season. This makes sense, of course. The Easter event, that is, the Resurrection of Jesus Christ, is simply too big a truth to be celebrated in just one day. Notice I didn’t say a truth to be “understood,” I said “celebrated.” Because, in the end, the Resurrection is a mystery, something to be pondered not to be figured out. But that besides pondering the mystery of the Resurrection in our prayer, we can also see signs of it in our lives. Places that seemed dead suddenly come alive. Relationships that had been frozen over thaw, and then warm. Parts of ourselves that seem impossible for God to change suddenly turn around, and we find ourselves growing. So perhaps one invitation this week is to look for signs of the Resurrection within you. Where do you see the mystery of new life in your daily life? And, Happy Easter.

Apr 21, 2018
3rd Friday of Easter
17:28

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 3rd Week of Easter. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Easter, as one of my Jesuit friends always reminds me, is not just a day, but a whole liturgical season. This makes sense, of course. The Easter event, that is, the Resurrection of Jesus Christ, is simply too big a truth to be celebrated in just one day. Notice I didn’t say a truth to be “understood,” I said “celebrated.” Because, in the end, the Resurrection is a mystery, something to be pondered not to be figured out. But that besides pondering the mystery of the Resurrection in our prayer, we can also see signs of it in our lives. Places that seemed dead suddenly come alive. Relationships that had been frozen over thaw, and then warm. Parts of ourselves that seem impossible for God to change suddenly turn around, and we find ourselves growing. So perhaps one invitation this week is to look for signs of the Resurrection within you. Where do you see the mystery of new life in your daily life? And, Happy Easter.

Apr 20, 2018
3rd Thursday of Easter
17:28

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 3rd Week of Easter. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Easter, as one of my Jesuit friends always reminds me, is not just a day, but a whole liturgical season. This makes sense, of course. The Easter event, that is, the Resurrection of Jesus Christ, is simply too big a truth to be celebrated in just one day. Notice I didn’t say a truth to be “understood,” I said “celebrated.” Because, in the end, the Resurrection is a mystery, something to be pondered not to be figured out. But that besides pondering the mystery of the Resurrection in our prayer, we can also see signs of it in our lives. Places that seemed dead suddenly come alive. Relationships that had been frozen over thaw, and then warm. Parts of ourselves that seem impossible for God to change suddenly turn around, and we find ourselves growing. So perhaps one invitation this week is to look for signs of the Resurrection within you. Where do you see the mystery of new life in your daily life? And, Happy Easter.

Apr 19, 2018
3rd Wednesday of Easter
17:28

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 3rd Week of Easter. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Easter, as one of my Jesuit friends always reminds me, is not just a day, but a whole liturgical season. This makes sense, of course. The Easter event, that is, the Resurrection of Jesus Christ, is simply too big a truth to be celebrated in just one day. Notice I didn’t say a truth to be “understood,” I said “celebrated.” Because, in the end, the Resurrection is a mystery, something to be pondered not to be figured out. But that besides pondering the mystery of the Resurrection in our prayer, we can also see signs of it in our lives. Places that seemed dead suddenly come alive. Relationships that had been frozen over thaw, and then warm. Parts of ourselves that seem impossible for God to change suddenly turn around, and we find ourselves growing. So perhaps one invitation this week is to look for signs of the Resurrection within you. Where do you see the mystery of new life in your daily life? And, Happy Easter.

Apr 18, 2018
3rd Tuesday of Easter
17:28

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 3rd Week of Easter. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Easter, as one of my Jesuit friends always reminds me, is not just a day, but a whole liturgical season. This makes sense, of course. The Easter event, that is, the Resurrection of Jesus Christ, is simply too big a truth to be celebrated in just one day. Notice I didn’t say a truth to be “understood,” I said “celebrated.” Because, in the end, the Resurrection is a mystery, something to be pondered not to be figured out. But that besides pondering the mystery of the Resurrection in our prayer, we can also see signs of it in our lives. Places that seemed dead suddenly come alive. Relationships that had been frozen over thaw, and then warm. Parts of ourselves that seem impossible for God to change suddenly turn around, and we find ourselves growing. So perhaps one invitation this week is to look for signs of the Resurrection within you. Where do you see the mystery of new life in your daily life? And, Happy Easter.

Apr 17, 2018
3rd Monday of Easter
17:28

Because today is Monday, we have a new reflection for the week.

Easter, as one of my Jesuit friends always reminds me, is not just a day, but a whole liturgical season. This makes sense, of course. The Easter event, that is, the Resurrection of Jesus Christ, is simply too big a truth to be celebrated in just one day. Notice I didn’t say a truth to be “understood,” I said “celebrated.” Because, in the end, the Resurrection is a mystery, something to be pondered not to be figured out. But that besides pondering the mystery of the Resurrection in our prayer, we can also see signs of it in our lives. Places that seemed dead suddenly come alive. Relationships that had been frozen over thaw, and then warm. Parts of ourselves that seem impossible for God to change suddenly turn around, and we find ourselves growing. So perhaps one invitation this week is to look for signs of the Resurrection within you. Where do you see the mystery of new life in your daily life? And, Happy Easter.

Apr 16, 2018
3rd Sunday of Easter
17:07

A new reflection for the 3rd week of Easter will be added on Monday.

I tend to think that Thomas’s nickname, “Doubting Thomas,” is pretty unfair. I mean, Thomas could be forgiven for not believing the other disciples when they reported that they had seen Jesus rise from the dead.  After all, no one had done that before, so how could he not doubt a bit? On the other hand, Thomas had spent enough time with his friends to know that they wouldn’t lie about something so important, so life changing.  Thomas’s problem was not that he wouldn’t believe but that he wouldn’t believe his friends. So perhaps you could ask yourself this week how the faith of other people—friends, family members, parishioners, even people you’ve not met but admire—helps to strengthen your own.  And Happy Easter!

Apr 15, 2018
2nd Saturday of Easter
17:08

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 2nd Week of Easter. New reflections will be added every Monday.

I tend to think that Thomas’s nickname, “Doubting Thomas,” is pretty unfair. I mean, Thomas could be forgiven for not believing the other disciples when they reported that they had seen Jesus rise from the dead.  After all, no one had done that before, so how could he not doubt a bit? On the other hand, Thomas had spent enough time with his friends to know that they wouldn’t lie about something so important, so life changing.  Thomas’s problem was not that he wouldn’t believe but that he wouldn’t believe his friends. So perhaps you could ask yourself this week how the faith of other people—friends, family members, parishioners, even people you’ve not met but admire—helps to strengthen your own.  And Happy Easter!

Apr 14, 2018
2nd Friday of Easter
17:08

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 2nd Week of Easter. New reflections will be added every Monday.

I tend to think that Thomas’s nickname, “Doubting Thomas,” is pretty unfair. I mean, Thomas could be forgiven for not believing the other disciples when they reported that they had seen Jesus rise from the dead.  After all, no one had done that before, so how could he not doubt a bit? On the other hand, Thomas had spent enough time with his friends to know that they wouldn’t lie about something so important, so life changing.  Thomas’s problem was not that he wouldn’t believe but that he wouldn’t believe his friends. So perhaps you could ask yourself this week how the faith of other people—friends, family members, parishioners, even people you’ve not met but admire—helps to strengthen your own.  And Happy Easter!

Apr 13, 2018
2nd Thursday of Easter
17:08

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 2nd Week of Easter. New reflections will be added every Monday.

I tend to think that Thomas’s nickname, “Doubting Thomas,” is pretty unfair. I mean, Thomas could be forgiven for not believing the other disciples when they reported that they had seen Jesus rise from the dead.  After all, no one had done that before, so how could he not doubt a bit? On the other hand, Thomas had spent enough time with his friends to know that they wouldn’t lie about something so important, so life changing.  Thomas’s problem was not that he wouldn’t believe but that he wouldn’t believe his friends. So perhaps you could ask yourself this week how the faith of other people—friends, family members, parishioners, even people you’ve not met but admire—helps to strengthen your own.  And Happy Easter!

Apr 12, 2018
2nd Wednesday of Easter
17:08

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 2nd Week of Easter. New reflections will be added every Monday.

I tend to think that Thomas’s nickname, “Doubting Thomas,” is pretty unfair. I mean, Thomas could be forgiven for not believing the other disciples when they reported that they had seen Jesus rise from the dead.  After all, no one had done that before, so how could he not doubt a bit? On the other hand, Thomas had spent enough time with his friends to know that they wouldn’t lie about something so important, so life changing.  Thomas’s problem was not that he wouldn’t believe but that he wouldn’t believe his friends. So perhaps you could ask yourself this week how the faith of other people—friends, family members, parishioners, even people you’ve not met but admire—helps to strengthen your own.  And Happy Easter!

Apr 11, 2018
2nd Tuesday of Easter
17:08

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 2nd Week of Easter. New reflections will be added every Monday.

I tend to think that Thomas’s nickname, “Doubting Thomas,” is pretty unfair. I mean, Thomas could be forgiven for not believing the other disciples when they reported that they had seen Jesus rise from the dead.  After all, no one had done that before, so how could he not doubt a bit? On the other hand, Thomas had spent enough time with his friends to know that they wouldn’t lie about something so important, so life changing.  Thomas’s problem was not that he wouldn’t believe but that he wouldn’t believe his friends. So perhaps you could ask yourself this week how the faith of other people—friends, family members, parishioners, even people you’ve not met but admire—helps to strengthen your own.  And Happy Easter!

Apr 10, 2018
2nd Monday of Easter
17:07

Because today is Monday, we have a new reflection for the week.

I tend to think that Thomas’s nickname, “Doubting Thomas,” is pretty unfair. I mean, Thomas could be forgiven for not believing the other disciples when they reported that they had seen Jesus rise from the dead.  After all, no one had done that before, so how could he not doubt a bit? On the other hand, Thomas had spent enough time with his friends to know that they wouldn’t lie about something so important, so life changing.  Thomas’s problem was not that he wouldn’t believe but that he wouldn’t believe his friends. So perhaps you could ask yourself this week how the faith of other people—friends, family members, parishioners, even people you’ve not met but admire—helps to strengthen your own.  And Happy Easter!

Apr 09, 2018
2nd Sunday of Easter
17:38

A new reflection for the 2nd week of Easter will be added on Monday.

Happy Easter! And, by the way, you can say that every day for the next few weeks, because Easter is a whole liturgical season. For the next 50 days, until Pentecost, technically it’s Easter. And it makes sense to give it a 50-day celebration. Because Easter is the main message of Christianity. What does that mean? Well, first it means that Christ has risen from the dead. That’s the central meaning and that alone would be enough to meditate on for 50 days. But also that hope always triumphs over despair, love always triumphs over hatred, life always triumphs over death and suffering is never the last word. So one question in this Easter season is where have you experienced your own Easters? Where have you seen your own resurrections? Maybe you can think about that during your examen this Easter.

Apr 08, 2018
1st Saturday of Easter
17:43

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 1st Week of Easter. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Happy Easter! And, by the way, you can say that every day for the next few weeks, because Easter is a whole liturgical season. For the next 50 days, until Pentecost, technically it’s Easter. And it makes sense to give it a 50-day celebration. Because Easter is the main message of Christianity. What does that mean? Well, first it means that Christ has risen from the dead. That’s the central meaning and that alone would be enough to meditate on for 50 days. But also that hope always triumphs over despair, love always triumphs over hatred, life always triumphs over death and suffering is never the last word. So one question in this Easter season is where have you experienced your own Easters? Where have you seen your own resurrections? Maybe you can think about that during your examen this Easter.

Apr 07, 2018
1st Friday of Easter
17:43

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 1st Week of Easter. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Happy Easter! And, by the way, you can say that every day for the next few weeks, because Easter is a whole liturgical season. For the next 50 days, until Pentecost, technically it’s Easter. And it makes sense to give it a 50-day celebration. Because Easter is the main message of Christianity. What does that mean? Well, first it means that Christ has risen from the dead. That’s the central meaning and that alone would be enough to meditate on for 50 days. But also that hope always triumphs over despair, love always triumphs over hatred, life always triumphs over death and suffering is never the last word. So one question in this Easter season is where have you experienced your own Easters? Where have you seen your own resurrections? Maybe you can think about that during your examen this Easter.

Apr 06, 2018
1st Thursday of Easter
17:43

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 1st Week of Easter. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Happy Easter! And, by the way, you can say that every day for the next few weeks, because Easter is a whole liturgical season. For the next 50 days, until Pentecost, technically it’s Easter. And it makes sense to give it a 50-day celebration. Because Easter is the main message of Christianity. What does that mean? Well, first it means that Christ has risen from the dead. That’s the central meaning and that alone would be enough to meditate on for 50 days. But also that hope always triumphs over despair, love always triumphs over hatred, life always triumphs over death and suffering is never the last word. So one question in this Easter season is where have you experienced your own Easters? Where have you seen your own resurrections? Maybe you can think about that during your examen this Easter.

Apr 05, 2018
1st Wednesday of Easter
17:43

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 1st Week of Easter. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Happy Easter! And, by the way, you can say that every day for the next few weeks, because Easter is a whole liturgical season. For the next 50 days, until Pentecost, technically it’s Easter. And it makes sense to give it a 50-day celebration. Because Easter is the main message of Christianity. What does that mean? Well, first it means that Christ has risen from the dead. That’s the central meaning and that alone would be enough to meditate on for 50 days. But also that hope always triumphs over despair, love always triumphs over hatred, life always triumphs over death and suffering is never the last word. So one question in this Easter season is where have you experienced your own Easters? Where have you seen your own resurrections? Maybe you can think about that during your examen this Easter.

Apr 04, 2018
1st Tuesday of Easter
17:38

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 1st Week of Easter. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Happy Easter! And, by the way, you can say that every day for the next few weeks, because Easter is a whole liturgical season. For the next 50 days, until Pentecost, technically it’s Easter. And it makes sense to give it a 50-day celebration. Because Easter is the main message of Christianity. What does that mean? Well, first it means that Christ has risen from the dead. That’s the central meaning and that alone would be enough to meditate on for 50 days. But also that hope always triumphs over despair, love always triumphs over hatred, life always triumphs over death and suffering is never the last word. So one question in this Easter season is where have you experienced your own Easters? Where have you seen your own resurrections? Maybe you can think about that during your examen this Easter.

Apr 03, 2018
1st Monday of Easter
17:38

Because today is Monday, we have a new reflection for the week.

Happy Easter! And, by the way, you can say that every day for the next few weeks, because Easter is a whole liturgical season. For the next 50 days, until Pentecost, technically it’s Easter. And it makes sense to give it a 50-day celebration. Because Easter is the main message of Christianity. What does that mean? Well, first it means that Christ has risen from the dead. That’s the central meaning and that alone would be enough to meditate on for 50 days. But also that hope always triumphs over despair, love always triumphs over hatred, life always triumphs over death and suffering is never the last word. So one question in this Easter season is where have you experienced your own Easters? Where have you seen your own resurrections? Maybe you can think about that during your examen this Easter.

Apr 02, 2018
Easter Sunday
17:44

A new reflection for the first week of Easter will be added on Monday.

This is the holiest week of the Christian calendar. Holy Week begins with Palm Sunday, when we remember Jesus’ triumphant entry into the city of Jerusalem, and continues all the way through what’s called the Easter Triduum: Holy Thursday, Good Friday and Easter Sunday. For me, one of the most moving parts of Holy Week is how Jesus could go from being celebrated on Palm Sunday to being crucified on Good Friday to being resurrected on Easter Sunday.

Now, I know you’re not Jesus, but I’m sure that your life has gone through some significant ups and downs. So it’s easy to lose hope. But the message of Easter is there’s always hope. Sometimes, though, you have to look hard to find it. Which is why reviewing your day, in the examen, is such a help to your spiritual life. The examen helps you hope.

Apr 01, 2018
Holy Saturday
17:43

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the Holy Week. New reflections will be added every Monday.

This is the holiest week of the Christian calendar. Holy Week begins with Palm Sunday, when we remember Jesus’ triumphant entry into the city of Jerusalem, and continues all the way through what’s called the Easter Triduum: Holy Thursday, Good Friday and Easter Sunday. For me, one of the most moving parts of Holy Week is how Jesus could go from being celebrated on Palm Sunday to being crucified on Good Friday to being resurrected on Easter Sunday.

Now, I know you’re not Jesus, but I’m sure that your life has gone through some significant ups and downs. So it’s easy to lose hope. But the message of Easter is there’s always hope. Sometimes, though, you have to look hard to find it. Which is why reviewing your day, in the examen, is such a help to your spiritual life. The examen helps you hope.

Mar 31, 2018
Good Friday
17:43

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the Holy Week. New reflections will be added every Monday.

This is the holiest week of the Christian calendar. Holy Week begins with Palm Sunday, when we remember Jesus’ triumphant entry into the city of Jerusalem, and continues all the way through what’s called the Easter Triduum: Holy Thursday, Good Friday and Easter Sunday. For me, one of the most moving parts of Holy Week is how Jesus could go from being celebrated on Palm Sunday to being crucified on Good Friday to being resurrected on Easter Sunday.

Now, I know you’re not Jesus, but I’m sure that your life has gone through some significant ups and downs. So it’s easy to lose hope. But the message of Easter is there’s always hope. Sometimes, though, you have to look hard to find it. Which is why reviewing your day, in the examen, is such a help to your spiritual life. The examen helps you hope.

Mar 30, 2018
Holy Thursday
17:44

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the Holy Week. New reflections will be added every Monday.

This is the holiest week of the Christian calendar. Holy Week begins with Palm Sunday, when we remember Jesus’ triumphant entry into the city of Jerusalem, and continues all the way through what’s called the Easter Triduum: Holy Thursday, Good Friday and Easter Sunday. For me, one of the most moving parts of Holy Week is how Jesus could go from being celebrated on Palm Sunday to being crucified on Good Friday to being resurrected on Easter Sunday.

Now, I know you’re not Jesus, but I’m sure that your life has gone through some significant ups and downs. So it’s easy to lose hope. But the message of Easter is there’s always hope. Sometimes, though, you have to look hard to find it. Which is why reviewing your day, in the examen, is such a help to your spiritual life. The examen helps you hope.

Mar 29, 2018
Wednesday of Holy Week
17:44

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the Holy Week. New reflections will be added every Monday.

This is the holiest week of the Christian calendar. Holy Week begins with Palm Sunday, when we remember Jesus’ triumphant entry into the city of Jerusalem, and continues all the way through what’s called the Easter Triduum: Holy Thursday, Good Friday and Easter Sunday. For me, one of the most moving parts of Holy Week is how Jesus could go from being celebrated on Palm Sunday to being crucified on Good Friday to being resurrected on Easter Sunday.

Now, I know you’re not Jesus, but I’m sure that your life has gone through some significant ups and downs. So it’s easy to lose hope. But the message of Easter is there’s always hope. Sometimes, though, you have to look hard to find it. Which is why reviewing your day, in the examen, is such a help to your spiritual life. The examen helps you hope.

Mar 28, 2018
Tuesday of Holy Week
17:43

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the Holy Week. New reflections will be added every Monday.

This is the holiest week of the Christian calendar. Holy Week begins with Palm Sunday, when we remember Jesus’ triumphant entry into the city of Jerusalem, and continues all the way through what’s called the Easter Triduum: Holy Thursday, Good Friday and Easter Sunday. For me, one of the most moving parts of Holy Week is how Jesus could go from being celebrated on Palm Sunday to being crucified on Good Friday to being resurrected on Easter Sunday.

Now, I know you’re not Jesus, but I’m sure that your life has gone through some significant ups and downs. So it’s easy to lose hope. But the message of Easter is there’s always hope. Sometimes, though, you have to look hard to find it. Which is why reviewing your day, in the examen, is such a help to your spiritual life. The examen helps you hope.

Mar 27, 2018
Monday of Holy Week
17:44

Because today is Monday, we have a new reflection for the week.

This is the holiest week of the Christian calendar. Holy Week begins with Palm Sunday, when we remember Jesus’ triumphant entry into the city of Jerusalem, and continues all the way through what’s called the Easter Triduum: Holy Thursday, Good Friday and Easter Sunday. For me, one of the most moving parts of Holy Week is how Jesus could go from being celebrated on Palm Sunday to being crucified on Good Friday to being resurrected on Easter Sunday.

Now, I know you’re not Jesus, but I’m sure that your life has gone through some significant ups and downs. So it’s easy to lose hope. But the message of Easter is there’s always hope. Sometimes, though, you have to look hard to find it. Which is why reviewing your day, in the examen, is such a help to your spiritual life. The examen helps you hope.

Mar 26, 2018
Palm Sunday
17:56

A new reflection for Holy Week will be added on Monday.

A few weeks ago, I made a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, with a group of 100 pilgrims. I’ve been there several times now, which has been a real surprise, since I never thought I would ever go. While we were there, it was announced that the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, which houses the place where Jesus was crucified and rose from the dead, was going to be closed, for a number of political reasons. Needless to say, our pilgrims were crushed. So we had to talk about disappointment, an inevitable part of life. Lent is a good time to think about disappointment, since the season leads up to not only Easter Sunday, but Good Friday. On Good Friday, Jesus was, to say the least, disappointed. Disappointed in his disciples’ abandoning of him. Disappointed that his message wasn’t heard: remember, he weeps over Jerusalem. And perhaps disappointed that crucifixion was his Father’s will. In the end, the Church opened in time for us to visit, but the lesson was still a good one. Jesus understands you when you are disappointed. And I hope that this can help you feel close to him, and more able to share your own disappointments.

 

Mar 25, 2018
5th Saturday of Lent
17:55

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 5th Week of Lent. New reflections will be added every Monday.

A few weeks ago, I made a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, with a group of 100 pilgrims. I’ve been there several times now, which has been a real surprise, since I never thought I would ever go. While we were there, it was announced that the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, which houses the place where Jesus was crucified and rose from the dead, was going to be closed, for a number of political reasons. Needless to say, our pilgrims were crushed. So we had to talk about disappointment, an inevitable part of life. Lent is a good time to think about disappointment, since the season leads up to not only Easter Sunday, but Good Friday. On Good Friday, Jesus was, to say the least, disappointed. Disappointed in his disciples’ abandoning of him. Disappointed that his message wasn’t heard: remember, he weeps over Jerusalem. And perhaps disappointed that crucifixion was his Father’s will. In the end, the Church opened in time for us to visit, but the lesson was still a good one. Jesus understands you when you are disappointed. And I hope that this can help you feel close to him, and more able to share your own disappointments.

Mar 24, 2018
5th Friday of Lent
17:56

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 5th Week of Lent. New reflections will be added every Monday.

A few weeks ago, I made a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, with a group of 100 pilgrims. I’ve been there several times now, which has been a real surprise, since I never thought I would ever go. While we were there, it was announced that the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, which houses the place where Jesus was crucified and rose from the dead, was going to be closed, for a number of political reasons. Needless to say, our pilgrims were crushed. So we had to talk about disappointment, an inevitable part of life. Lent is a good time to think about disappointment, since the season leads up to not only Easter Sunday, but Good Friday. On Good Friday, Jesus was, to say the least, disappointed. Disappointed in his disciples’ abandoning of him. Disappointed that his message wasn’t heard: remember, he weeps over Jerusalem. And perhaps disappointed that crucifixion was his Father’s will. In the end, the Church opened in time for us to visit, but the lesson was still a good one. Jesus understands you when you are disappointed. And I hope that this can help you feel close to him, and more able to share your own disappointments.

Mar 23, 2018
5th Thursday of Lent
17:55

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 5th Week of Lent. New reflections will be added every Monday.

A few weeks ago, I made a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, with a group of 100 pilgrims. I’ve been there several times now, which has been a real surprise, since I never thought I would ever go. While we were there, it was announced that the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, which houses the place where Jesus was crucified and rose from the dead, was going to be closed, for a number of political reasons. Needless to say, our pilgrims were crushed. So we had to talk about disappointment, an inevitable part of life. Lent is a good time to think about disappointment, since the season leads up to not only Easter Sunday, but Good Friday. On Good Friday, Jesus was, to say the least, disappointed. Disappointed in his disciples’ abandoning of him. Disappointed that his message wasn’t heard: remember, he weeps over Jerusalem. And perhaps disappointed that crucifixion was his Father’s will. In the end, the Church opened in time for us to visit, but the lesson was still a good one. Jesus understands you when you are disappointed. And I hope that this can help you feel close to him, and more able to share your own disappointments.

Mar 22, 2018
5th Wednesday of Lent
17:56

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 5th Week of Lent. New reflections will be added every Monday.

A few weeks ago, I made a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, with a group of 100 pilgrims. I’ve been there several times now, which has been a real surprise, since I never thought I would ever go. While we were there, it was announced that the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, which houses the place where Jesus was crucified and rose from the dead, was going to be closed, for a number of political reasons. Needless to say, our pilgrims were crushed. So we had to talk about disappointment, an inevitable part of life. Lent is a good time to think about disappointment, since the season leads up to not only Easter Sunday, but Good Friday. On Good Friday, Jesus was, to say the least, disappointed. Disappointed in his disciples’ abandoning of him. Disappointed that his message wasn’t heard: remember, he weeps over Jerusalem. And perhaps disappointed that crucifixion was his Father’s will. In the end, the Church opened in time for us to visit, but the lesson was still a good one. Jesus understands you when you are disappointed. And I hope that this can help you feel close to him, and more able to share your own disappointments.

Mar 21, 2018
5th Tuesday of Lent
17:55

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 5th Week of Lent. New reflections will be added every Monday.

A few weeks ago, I made a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, with a group of 100 pilgrims. I’ve been there several times now, which has been a real surprise, since I never thought I would ever go. While we were there, it was announced that the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, which houses the place where Jesus was crucified and rose from the dead, was going to be closed, for a number of political reasons. Needless to say, our pilgrims were crushed. So we had to talk about disappointment, an inevitable part of life. Lent is a good time to think about disappointment, since the season leads up to not only Easter Sunday, but Good Friday. On Good Friday, Jesus was, to say the least, disappointed. Disappointed in his disciples’ abandoning of him. Disappointed that his message wasn’t heard: remember, he weeps over Jerusalem. And perhaps disappointed that crucifixion was his Father’s will. In the end, the Church opened in time for us to visit, but the lesson was still a good one. Jesus understands you when you are disappointed. And I hope that this can help you feel close to him, and more able to share your own disappointments.

Mar 20, 2018
5th Monday of Lent
17:54

Because today is Monday, we have a new reflection for the week.

A few weeks ago, I made a pilgrimage to the Holy Land, with a group of 100 pilgrims. I’ve been there several times now, which has been a real surprise, since I never thought I would ever go. While we were there, it was announced that the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, which houses the place where Jesus was crucified and rose from the dead, was going to be closed, for a number of political reasons. Needless to say, our pilgrims were crushed. So we had to talk about disappointment, an inevitable part of life. Lent is a good time to think about disappointment, since the season leads up to not only Easter Sunday, but Good Friday. On Good Friday, Jesus was, to say the least, disappointed. Disappointed in his disciples’ abandoning of him. Disappointed that his message wasn’t heard: remember, he weeps over Jerusalem. And perhaps disappointed that crucifixion was his Father’s will. In the end, the Church opened in time for us to visit, but the lesson was still a good one. Jesus understands you when you are disappointed. And I hope that this can help you feel close to him, and more able to share your own disappointments.

Mar 19, 2018
5th Sunday of Lent
17:50

A new reflection will be added on Monday.

Lent is drawing to a close. For Christians, that means not only is there some anticipation for the celebration of Easter, but also some inevitable disappointment about your Lenten spiritual practices. Maybe you resolved to do something that you didn’t do--like pray more. Or you resolved not to do something that you did do--like gossip less. So maybe you feel a bit stuck. That’s really common in the spiritual life. Everyone feels disappointment. The key is, simple as it sounds, not giving up. God gives you a new opportunity for spiritual growth every day.

And that’s not some generic offer from God. I mean that God give you, personally, a new invitation for you to grow spiritually every single day. That’s something to think about as you do your examen. Where did you respond to that invitation?

Mar 18, 2018
4th Saturday of Lent
17:50

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 4th Week of Lent. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Lent is drawing to a close. For Christians, that means not only is there some anticipation for the celebration of Easter, but also some inevitable disappointment about your Lenten spiritual practices. Maybe you resolved to do something that you didn’t do--like pray more. Or you resolved not to do something that you did do--like gossip less. So maybe you feel a bit stuck. That’s really common in the spiritual life. Everyone feels disappointment. The key is, simple as it sounds, not giving up. God gives you a new opportunity for spiritual growth every day.

And that’s not some generic offer from God. I mean that God give you, personally, a new invitation for you to grow spiritually every single day. That’s something to think about as you do your examen. Where did you respond to that invitation?

Mar 17, 2018
4th Friday of Lent
17:49

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 4th Week of Lent. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Lent is drawing to a close. For Christians, that means not only is there some anticipation for the celebration of Easter, but also some inevitable disappointment about your Lenten spiritual practices. Maybe you resolved to do something that you didn’t do--like pray more. Or you resolved not to do something that you did do--like gossip less. So maybe you feel a bit stuck. That’s really common in the spiritual life. Everyone feels disappointment. The key is, simple as it sounds, not giving up. God gives you a new opportunity for spiritual growth every day.

And that’s not some generic offer from God. I mean that God give you, personally, a new invitation for you to grow spiritually every single day. That’s something to think about as you do your examen. Where did you respond to that invitation?

Mar 16, 2018
4th Thursday of Lent
17:49

We'll continue to use the same reflection and examen for the rest of the 4th Week of Lent. New reflections will be added every Monday.

Lent is drawing to a close. For Christians, that means not only is there some anticipation for the celebration of Easter, but also some inevitable disappointment about your Lenten spiritual practices. Maybe you resolved to do something that you didn’t do--like pray more. Or you resolved not to do something that you did do--like gossip less. So maybe you feel a bit stuck. That’s really common in the spiritual life. Everyone feels disappointment. The key is, simple as it sounds, not giving up. God gives you a new opportunity for spiritual growth every day.

And that’s not some generic offer from God. I mean that God give you, personally, a new invitation for you to grow spiritually every single day. That’s something to think about as you do your examen. Where did you respond to that invitation?

Mar 15, 2018