Brief History Podcast

By Andrew Knight

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Description

Brief History comprehensively packaged in under an hour, perfect for the commute, lunch break or in your spare time.

Episode Date
Palestine - Israel Conflict
2276
Ethnic Cleansing, Genocide or War Crimes commited by both sides.? All discussed in this episode. The Brief History Podcast under an hour. Perfect for the commute to work or on you lunch break or in your precious free time. Please review, share, rate 5 star and follow us and like on socials: Twitter - @bhistorypodcast Facebook and Instagram - Brief History Podcast Snapchat - bhistorypodcast Host and Author - Andrew Knight Producer and Composer - Harry Edmondson
May 22, 2018
Announcement
170
Announcement The Brief History Podcast under an hour. Perfect for the commute to work or on you lunch break or in your precious free time. Please review, share, rate 5 star and follow us and like on socials: Twitter - @bhistorypodcast Facebook and Instagram - Brief History Podcast Snapchat - bhistorypodcast ------------------------------ Host and Author - Andrew Knight Producer and Composer - Harry Edmondson
May 15, 2018
The Korean War
3090
The Korean War 25 June 1950 – 27 July 1953) was a war between North Korea (with the support of China and the Soviet Union) and South Korea (with the principal support of the United States). The war began on 25 June 1950 when North Korea invaded South Korea following a series of clashes along the border. The United Nations, with the United States as the principal force, came to the aid of South Korea. China came to the aid of North Korea, and the Soviet Union also gave some assistance to the North. ---------------------- The Brief History Podcast under an hour. Perfect for the commute to work or on you lunch break or in your precious free time. Please review, share, rate 5 star and follow us and like on socials: Twitter - @bhistorypodcast Facebook and Instagram - Brief History Podcast Snapchat - bhistorypodcast ------------------------------ Host and Author - Andrew Knight Producer and Composer - Harry Edmondson
May 08, 2018
The Douma Chemical Attack
1700
Dogma Chemical Attack Special The Syrian Civil War (Arabic: الحرب الأهلية السورية‎, Al-ḥarb al-ʼahliyyah as-sūriyyah) is an ongoing multi-sided armed conflict in Syria fought primarily between the Ba'athist Syrian Arab Republic led by President Bashar al-Assad, along with its allies, and various forces opposing both the government and each other in varying constellations. The unrest in Syria, part of a wider wave of 2011 Arab Spring protests, grew out of discontent with the Assad government and escalated to an armed conflict after protests calling for his removal were violently suppressed. The war is being fought by several factions: the Syrian government and its international allies, a loose alliance of Sunni Arabrebel groups (including the Free Syrian Army), the majority-Kurdish Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF), Salafi jihadist groups (including al-Nusra Front), and the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), with a number of countries in the region and beyond being either directly involved, or providing support to one or another faction. Iran, Russia, and Hezbollah support the Syrian government militarily, with Russia conducting air operations since September 2015. On the other hand, the U.S.-led international coalition established in 2014 with a declared purpose of countering ISIL, have conducted airstrikes against ISIL in Syria as well as against government and pro-government targets. Turkey on the other hand has become deeply involved since 2016 and beyond actively supporting the Syrian opposition, occupied large swathes of Northern Syria. International organizations have accused the Syrian government, ISIL, and Syria rebel groups of severe human rights violations, and of many massacres. The conflict has caused a major refugee crisis. Over the course of the war a number of peace initiatives have been launched, including the March 2017 Geneva peace talks on Syria led by the United Nations, but fighting continues. ---------------------------------- The Brief History Podcast under an hour. Perfect for the commute to work or on you lunch break or in your precious free time. Please review, share, rate 5 star and follow us and like on socials: Twitter - @bhistorypodcast Facebook and Instagram - Brief History Podcast Snapchat - bhistorypodcast ------------------------------ Host and Author - Andrew Knight Producer and Composer - Harry Edmondson
Apr 30, 2018
The Syrian Civil War Part 2
2512
The Syrian Civil War (Arabic: الحرب الأهلية السورية‎, Al-ḥarb al-ʼahliyyah as-sūriyyah) is an ongoing multi-sided armed conflict in Syria fought primarily between the Ba'athist Syrian Arab Republic led by President Bashar al-Assad, along with its allies, and various forces opposing both the government and each other in varying constellations. The unrest in Syria, part of a wider wave of 2011 Arab Spring protests, grew out of discontent with the Assad government and escalated to an armed conflict after protests calling for his removal were violently suppressed. The war is being fought by several factions: the Syrian government and its international allies, a loose alliance of Sunni Arabrebel groups (including the Free Syrian Army), the majority-Kurdish Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF), Salafi jihadist groups (including al-Nusra Front), and the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), with a number of countries in the region and beyond being either directly involved, or providing support to one or another faction. Iran, Russia, and Hezbollah support the Syrian government militarily, with Russia conducting air operations since September 2015. On the other hand, the U.S.-led international coalition established in 2014 with a declared purpose of countering ISIL, have conducted airstrikes against ISIL in Syria as well as against government and pro-government targets. Turkey on the other hand has become deeply involved since 2016 and beyond actively supporting the Syrian opposition, occupied large swathes of Northern Syria. International organizations have accused the Syrian government, ISIL, and Syria rebel groups of severe human rights violations, and of many massacres. The conflict has caused a major refugee crisis. Over the course of the war a number of peace initiatives have been launched, including the March 2017 Geneva peace talks on Syria led by the United Nations, but fighting continues. ---------------------------------- The Brief History Podcast under an hour. Perfect for the commute to work or on you lunch break or in your precious free time. Please review, share, rate 5 star and follow us and like on socials: Twitter - @bhistorypodcast Facebook and Instagram - Brief History Podcast Snapchat - bhistorypodcast ------------------------------ Host and Author - Andrew Knight Producer and Composer - Harry Edmondson
Apr 23, 2018
The Syrian Civil War Part 1
2920
The Syrian Civil War (Arabic: الحرب الأهلية السورية‎, Al-ḥarb al-ʼahliyyah as-sūriyyah) is an ongoing multi-sided armed conflict in Syria fought primarily between the Ba'athist Syrian Arab Republic led by President Bashar al-Assad, along with its allies, and various forces opposing both the government and each other in varying constellations. The unrest in Syria, part of a wider wave of 2011 Arab Spring protests, grew out of discontent with the Assad government and escalated to an armed conflict after protests calling for his removal were violently suppressed. The war is being fought by several factions: the Syrian government and its international allies, a loose alliance of Sunni Arabrebel groups (including the Free Syrian Army), the majority-Kurdish Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF), Salafi jihadist groups (including al-Nusra Front), and the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL), with a number of countries in the region and beyond being either directly involved, or providing support to one or another faction. Iran, Russia, and Hezbollah support the Syrian government militarily, with Russia conducting air operations since September 2015. On the other hand, the U.S.-led international coalition established in 2014 with a declared purpose of countering ISIL, have conducted airstrikes against ISIL in Syria as well as against government and pro-government targets. Turkey on the other hand has become deeply involved since 2016 and beyond actively supporting the Syrian opposition, occupied large swathes of Northern Syria. International organizations have accused the Syrian government, ISIL, and Syria rebel groups of severe human rights violations, and of many massacres. The conflict has caused a major refugee crisis. Over the course of the war a number of peace initiatives have been launched, including the March 2017 Geneva peace talks on Syria led by the United Nations, but fighting continues. ---------------------------------- The Brief History Podcast under an hour. Perfect for the commute to work or on you lunch break or in your precious free time. Please review, share, rate 5 star and follow us and like on socials: Twitter - @bhistorypodcast Facebook and Instagram - Brief History Podcast Snapchat - bhistorypodcast ------------------------------ Host and Author - Andrew Knight Producer and Composer - Harry Edmondson
Apr 16, 2018
The SAS
2324
The Special Air Service was a unit of the British Army during the Second World War that was formed in July 1941 by David Stirling and originally called "L" Detachment, Special Air Service Brigade—the "L" designation and Air Service name being a tie-in to a British disinformation campaign, trying to deceive the Axis into thinking there was a paratrooper regiment with numerous units operating in the area (the real SAS would "prove" to the Axis that the fake one existed). It was conceived as a commando force to operate behind enemy lines in the North African Campaign and initially consisted of five officers and 60 other ranks. Its first mission, in November 1941, was a parachute drop in support of the Operation Crusader offensive. Due to German resistance and adverse weather conditions, the mission was a disaster; 22 men, a third of the unit, were killed or captured. Its second mission was a major success. Transported by the Long Range Desert Group, it attacked three airfields in Libya, destroying 60 aircraft with the loss of 2 men and 3 jeeps. In September 1942, it was renamed 1st SAS, consisting at that time of four British squadrons, one Free French, one Greek, and the Folboat Section. ------------------------------- The Brief History Podcast under an hour. Perfect for the commute to work or on you lunch break or in your precious free time. Please review, share, rate 5 star and follow us and like on socials: Twitter - @bhistorypodcast Facebook and Instagram - Brief History Podcast Snapchat - bhistorypodcast ------------------------------ Host and Author - Andrew Knight Producer and Composer - Harry Edmondson
Apr 09, 2018
The Spanish - American War
3377
The Spanish–American War (Spanish: Guerra hispano-americana or Guerra hispano-estadounidense; Filipino: Digmaang Espanyol-Amerikano) was fought between the United States and Spain in 1898. Hostilities began in the aftermath of the internal explosion of the USS Maine in Havana Harbor in Cuba, leading to U.S. intervention in the Cuban War of Independence. American acquisition of Spain's Pacific possessions led to its involvement in the Philippine Revolution and ultimately in the Philippine–American War. The main issue was Cuban independence. Revolts had been occurring for some years in Cuba against Spanish rule. The U.S. later backed these revolts upon entering the Spanish–American War. There had been war scares before, as in the Virginius Affair in 1873, but in the late 1890s, U.S. public opinion was agitated by anti-Spanish propaganda led by newspaper publishers such as Joseph Pulitzer and William Randolph Hearst which used yellow journalism to call for war. The business community across the United States had just recovered from a deep depression and feared that a war would reverse the gains. It lobbied vigorously against going to war. The United States Navy armoured cruiser Maine had mysteriously sunk in Havana Harbor; political pressures from the Democratic Party pushed the administration of Republican President William McKinley into a war that he had wished to avoid. President McKinley signed a joint Congressional resolution demanding Spanish withdrawal and authorizing the President to use military force to help Cuba gain independence on April 20, 1898. In response, Spain severed diplomatic relations with the United States on April 21. On the same day, the U.S. Navy began a blockade of Cuba. On April 23, Spain stated that it would declare war if the U.S. forces invaded its territory. On April 25, Congress declared that a state of war between the U.S. and Spain had de facto existed since April 21, the day the blockade of Cuba had begun. The United States sent an ultimatum to Spain demanding that it surrender control of Cuba, but due to Spain not replying soon enough, the United States assumed Spain had ignored the ultimatum and continued to occupy Cuba. The ten-week war was fought in both the Caribbean and the Pacific. As the American agitators for war well knew, U.S. naval power proved decisive, allowing expeditionary forces to disembark in Cuba against a Spanish garrison already facing nationwide Cuban insurgent attacks and further wasted by yellow fever. American, Cuban, and Philippine forces obtained the surrender of Santiago de Cuba and Manila despite the good performance of some Spanish infantry units and fierce fighting for positions such as San Juan Hill. Madrid sued for peace after two obsolete Spanish squadrons sunk in Santiago de Cuba and Manila Bay and a third, more modern fleet was recalled home to protect the Spanish coasts. The result was the 1898 Treaty of Paris, negotiated on terms favorable to the U.S. which allowed it temporary control of Cuba and ceded ownership of Puerto Rico, Guam and the Philippine islands. The cession of the Philippines involved payment of $20 million ($588,320,000 today) to Spain by the U.S. to cover infrastructure owned by Spain. The defeat and loss of the last remnants of the Spanish Empire was a profound shock to Spain's national psyche and provoked a thorough philosophical and artistic revaluation of Spanish society known as the Generation of '98. The United States gained several island possessions spanning the globe and a rancorous new debate over the wisdom of expansionism. It was one of only five US wars (against a total of eleven sovereign states) to have been formally declared by the U.S. Congress. The Brief History Podcast under an hour. Perfect for the commute to work or on you lunch break or in your precious free time. Please review, share, rate 5 star and Follow us and like on socials. It really does make a massive difference: Twitter - @bh
Apr 03, 2018
The Boxer Rebellion
3194
The Boxer Rebellion (拳亂), Boxer Uprising or Yihetuan Movement (義和團運動) was a violent anti-foreign, anti-colonial, and anti-Christian uprising that took place in China between 1899 and 1901, toward the end of the Qing dynasty. It was initiated by the Militia United in Righteousness (Yihetuan), known in English as the "Boxers", for many of their members had been practitioners of Chinese martial arts, also referred to in the west as "Chinese Boxing." They were motivated by proto-nationalist sentiments, and by opposition to Western colonialism and the Christian missionary activity that was associated with it. The uprising took place against a background that included severe drought and disruption caused by the growth of foreign spheres of influence. After several months of growing violence, in Shandong and the North China plain, against the both foreign and Christian presence in June 1900, Boxer fighters, convinced they were invulnerable to foreign weapons, converged on Beijing with the slogan "Support the Qing government and exterminate the foreigners." Foreigners and Chinese Christians sought refuge in the Legation Quarter. In response to reports of an armed invasion to lift the siege, the initially hesitant Empress Dowager Cixi supported the Boxers and on June 21 issued an Imperial Decree declaring war on the foreign powers. Diplomats, foreign civilians and soldiers as well as Chinese Christians in the Legation Quarter were placed under siege by the Imperial Army of China and the Boxers for 55 days. Chinese officialdom was split between those supporting the Boxers and those favoring conciliation, led by Prince Qing. The supreme commander of the Chinese forces, the Manchu General Ronglu (Junglu), later claimed that he acted to protect the besieged foreigners. The Eight-Nation Alliance, after being initially turned back, brought 20,000 armed troops to China, defeated the Imperial Army, and arrived at Peking on August 14, relieving the siege of the Legations. Uncontrolled plunder of the capital and the surrounding countryside ensued, along with the summary execution of those suspected of being Boxers. The Boxer Protocol of 7 September 1901 provided for the execution of government officials who had supported the Boxers, provisions for foreign troops to be stationed in Beijing, and 450 million taels of silver—approximately $10 billion at 2018 silver prices and more than the government's annual tax revenue—to be paid as indemnity over the course of the next thirty-nine years to the eight nations involved. The Empress Dowager then sponsored a set of institutional and fiscal changes in an attempt to save the Dynasty by reforming it, but reform occurred too slowly to avert its inevitable end. The Brief History Podcast under an hour. Perfect for the commute to work or on you lunch break or in your precious free time. Please review, share, rate 5 star and Follow us and like on socials: Twitter - @bhistorypodcast Facebook and Instagram - Brief History Podcast Host and Author - Andrew Knight Producer and Composer - Harry Edmondson
Mar 26, 2018
The Armenian Genocide Part 2
2781
The Armenian Genocide (Hayots tseghaspanutyun), also known as the Armenian Holocaust, was the Ottoman government's systematic extermination of 1.5 million Armenians, mostly citizens within the Ottoman Empire and its successor state, the Republic of Turkey. The starting date is conventionally held to be 24 April 1915, the day that Ottoman authorities rounded up, arrested, and deported from Constantinople (now Istanbul) to the region of Ankara 235 to 270 Armenian intellectuals and community leaders, the majority of whom were eventually murdered. The genocide was carried out during and after World War I and implemented in two phases—the wholesale killing of the able-bodied male population through massacre and subjection of army conscripts to forced labour, followed by the deportation of women, children, the elderly, and the infirm on death marches leading to the Syrian Desert. Driven forward by military escorts, the deportees were deprived of food and water and subjected to periodic robbery, rape, and massacre. Other ethnic groups were similarly targeted for extermination in the Assyrian genocide and the Greek genocide, and their treatment is considered by some historians to be part of the same genocidal policy. Most Armenian diaspora communities around the world came into being as a direct result of the genocide. The podcast is under an hour, brief but informative and the history hit you are looking for. Please review! Follow us and like on socials: @bhistorypodcast https://www.facebook.com/pg/bhistorypodcast Host and Author - Andrew Knight Producer and Composer - Harry Edmondson
Mar 19, 2018
The Armenian Genocide Part 1
2511
The Armenian Genocide (Hayots tseghaspanutyun), also known as the Armenian Holocaust, was the Ottoman government's systematic extermination of 1.5 million Armenians, mostly citizens within the Ottoman Empire and its successor state, the Republic of Turkey. The starting date is conventionally held to be 24 April 1915, the day that Ottoman authorities rounded up, arrested, and deported from Constantinople (now Istanbul) to the region of Ankara 235 to 270 Armenian intellectuals and community leaders, the majority of whom were eventually murdered. The genocide was carried out during and after World War I and implemented in two phases—the wholesale killing of the able-bodied male population through massacre and subjection of army conscripts to forced labour, followed by the deportation of women, children, the elderly, and the infirm on death marches leading to the Syrian Desert. Driven forward by military escorts, the deportees were deprived of food and water and subjected to periodic robbery, rape, and massacre. Other ethnic groups were similarly targeted for extermination in the Assyrian genocide and the Greek genocide, and their treatment is considered by some historians to be part of the same genocidal policy. Most Armenian diaspora communities around the world came into being as a direct result of the genocide. The podcast is under an hour, brief but informative and the history hit you are looking for. Please review! Follow us and like on socials: @bhistorypodcast https://www.facebook.com/pg/bhistorypodcast/about/ Host and Author - Andrew Knight Producer and Composer - Harry Edmondson
Mar 13, 2018
The Indian Mutiny Part 2
2703
The Indian Rebellion of 1857 began as a mutiny of sepoys of the East India Company's army on 10 May 1857, in the town of Meerut, and soon escalated into other mutinies and civilian rebellions largely in the upper Gangetic plain and central India, with the major hostilities confined to present-day Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, northern Madhya Pradesh, and the Delhi region. The rebellion posed a considerable threat to Company power in that region, and was contained only with the fall of Gwalior on 20 June 1858. The rebellion is also known as the India's First War of Independence, the Great Rebellion, the Indian Mutiny, the Revolt of 1857, the Uprising of 1857, the Sepoy Rebellion, and the Sepoy Mutiny. The Mutiny was a result of various grievances. However the flashpoint was reached when the soldiers were asked to bite off the paper cartridges for their rifles which were greased with animal fat namely beef and pork. This was, and is, against the religious beliefs of Hindus and Muslims. Other regions of Company-controlled India – such as Bengal, the Bombay Presidency, and the Madras Presidency remained largely calm. In Punjab, the Sikh princes backed the Company by providing soldiers and support. The large princely states of Hyderabad, Mysore, Travancore, and Kashmir, as well as the smaller ones of Rajputana, did not join the rebellion. In some regions, such as Oudh, the rebellion took on the attributes of a patriotic revolt against European presence. Maratha leaders, such as the Lakshmibai, the Rani of Jhansi, became folk heroes in the nationalist movement in India half a century later; however, they themselves "generated no coherent ideology" for a new order. qaThe rebellion led to the dissolution of the East India Company in 1858. It also led the British to reorganize the army, the financial system and the administration in India. India was thereafter directly governed by the crown as the new British Raj. The podcast is under an hour, brief but informative and the history hit you are looking for. Please review! Follow us and like on socials: @bhistorypodcast https://www.facebook.com/pg/bhistorypodcast/about/ Narrator and Author - Andrew Knight Producer and Composer - Harry Edmondson
Feb 25, 2018
The Indian Mutiny Part 1
3316
The Indian Rebellion of 1857 began as a mutiny of sepoys of the East India Company's army on 10 May 1857, in the town of Meerut, and soon escalated into other mutinies and civilian rebellions largely in the upper Gangetic plain and central India, with the major hostilities confined to present-day Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, northern Madhya Pradesh, and the Delhi region. The rebellion posed a considerable threat to Company power in that region, and was contained only with the fall of Gwalior on 20 June 1858. The rebellion is also known as the India's First War of Independence, the Great Rebellion, the Indian Mutiny, the Revolt of 1857, the Uprising of 1857, the Sepoy Rebellion, and the Sepoy Mutiny. The Mutiny was a result of various grievances. However the flashpoint was reached when the soldiers were asked to bite off the paper cartridges for their rifles which were greased with animal fat namely beef and pork. This was, and is, against the religious beliefs of Hindus and Muslims. Other regions of Company-controlled India – such as Bengal, the Bombay Presidency, and the Madras Presidency remained largely calm. In Punjab, the Sikh princes backed the Company by providing soldiers and support. The large princely states of Hyderabad, Mysore, Travancore, and Kashmir, as well as the smaller ones of Rajputana, did not join the rebellion. In some regions, such as Oudh, the rebellion took on the attributes of a patriotic revolt against European presence. Maratha leaders, such as the Lakshmibai, the Rani of Jhansi, became folk heroes in the nationalist movement in India half a century later; however, they themselves "generated no coherent ideology" for a new order. qaThe rebellion led to the dissolution of the East India Company in 1858. It also led the British to reorganize the army, the financial system and the administration in India. India was thereafter directly governed by the crown as the new British Raj. The podcast is under an hour, brief but informative and the history hit you are looking for. Please review! Follow us and like on socials: @bhistorypodcast https://www.facebook.com/pg/bhistorypodcast/about/ Narrator and Author - Andrew Knight Producer and Composer - Harry Edmondson
Feb 16, 2018
Announcement
34
Episode 3 Announcement
Feb 12, 2018
The Zulu Wars
2583
The Anglo – Zulu wars, a clash between the might of the British Empire with the African Zulu Kingdom, began in 1879. In 1874, Sir Henry Bartle Frere was appointed High Commissioner for Southern Africa. His mission was to bring the various African kingdoms, tribal areas, and Boer Republics together under British rule, modelled after the policy which brought the various states within Canada together under one political and military control. He was opposed by several forces, mainly the various independent Boer states, and the Zulu Kingdom, with its vast army. In order to bring the region and its tribes together under as part of the British Empire, Frere decided to go to war with the Zulu Kingdom. Working on his own, without the backing of his government, Frere issued an ultimatum to the Zulu King Cetshwayo on 11 December 1878. The demands proved impossible to comply with, and war was declared. The British forces, led by Lord Chelmsford, invaded Zululand. Many battles ensued, including a stunning Zulu victory at Isandlwana, and the near-collapse of the garrison at Rorke’s Drift. However, in the end, the British were triumphant. The Zulu Nation would no longer be independent. The podcast is under an hour, brief but informative and the history hit you are looking for. Please review! Follow us and like on socials: @bhistorypodcast https://www.facebook.com/pg/bhistorypodcast/about/ Narrator and Author - Andrew Knight Producer and Composer - Harry Edmondson
Jan 16, 2018
The Boer Wars
2878
The Anglo-Boer Wars will introduce you to, one of the most fascinating Victorian Wars of the British Empire. A bite size comprehensive account of the two Anglo-Boer Wars fought between 1880-1881 and 1899-1902. A gripping tale of one of the bloodiest and expensive wars for over a century, which pitted the two Boer Republics of South Africa against the might of the British Empire. The podcast is under an hour, brief but informative and the history hit you are looking for. Please review! Follow us and like on socials: @bhistorypodcast https://www.facebook.com/pg/bhistorypodcast/about/ Narrator and Author - Andrew Knight Producer and Composer - Harry Edmondson
Jan 01, 2018