TED Talks Daily (SD video)

By TED

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Description

TED is a nonprofit devoted to ideas worth spreading. On this video feed, you'll find TED Talks to inspire, intrigue and stir the imagination from some of the world's leading thinkers and doers, speaking from the stage at TED conferences, TEDx events and partner events around the world. This podcast is also available in high-def video and audio-only formats.

Episode Date
The nightmare videos of children's YouTube -- and what's wrong with the internet today | James Bridle
00:16:32
Writer and artist James Bridle uncovers a dark, strange corner of the internet, where unknown people or groups on YouTube hack the brains of young children in return for advertising revenue. From "surprise egg" reveals and the "Finger Family Song" to algorithmically created mashups of familiar cartoon characters in violent situations, these videos exploit and terrify young minds -- and they tell us something about where our increasingly data-driven world is headed. "We need to stop thinking about technology as a solution to all of our problems, but think of it as a guide to what those problems actually are, so we can start thinking about them properly and start to address them," Bridle says.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/dzws81n0CIo" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 22, 2018
Why you should love gross science | Anna Rothschild
00:13:12
What can we learn from the slimy, smelly side of life? In this playful talk, science journalist Anna Rothschild shows us the hidden wisdom of "gross stuff" and explains why avoiding the creepy underbelly of nature, medicine and technology closes us off to important sources of knowledge about our health and the world. "When we explore the gross side of life, we find insights that we never would have thought we'd find, and we even often reveal beauty that we didn't think was there," Rothschild says.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/OL3EdMlA918" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 21, 2018
How Netflix changed entertainment -- and where it's headed | Reed Hastings
00:20:51
Netflix changed the world of entertainment -- first with DVD-by-mail, then with streaming media and then again with sensational original shows like "Orange Is the New Black" and "Stranger Things" -- but not without taking its fair share of risks. In conversation with TED curator Chris Anderson, Netflix co-founder and CEO Reed Hastings discusses the company's bold internal culture, the powerful algorithm that fuels their recommendations, the $8 billion worth of content they're investing in this year and his philanthropic pursuits supporting innovative education, among much more.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/zda9wPVRBjc" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 21, 2018
How we can bring mental health support to refugees | Essam Daod
00:05:26
The global refugee crisis is a mental health catastrophe, leaving millions in need of psychological support to overcome the traumas of dislocation and conflict. To undo the damage, child psychiatrist and TED Fellow Essam Daod has been working in camps, rescue boats and the shorelines of Greece and the Mediterranean Sea to help refugees (a quarter of which are children) reframe their experiences through short, powerful psychological interventions. "We can all do something to prevent this mental health catastrophe," Daod says. "We need to acknowledge that first aid is not just needed for the body, but it has also to include the mind, the soul."<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/S17jz6CjqYE" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 20, 2018
Technology that knows what you're feeling | Poppy Crum
00:12:42
What happens when technology knows more about us than we do? Poppy Crum studies how we express emotions -- and she suggests the end of the poker face is near, as new tech makes it easy to see the signals that give away how we're feeling. In a talk and demo, she shows how "empathetic technology" can read physical signals like body temperature and the chemical composition of our breath to inform on our emotional state. For better or for worse. "If we recognize the power of becoming technological empaths, we get this opportunity where technology can help us bridge the emotional and cognitive divide," Crum says.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/V49G5BVSWD0" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 19, 2018
The surprising science of alpha males | Frans de Waal
00:15:54
In this fascinating look at the "alpha male," primatologist Frans de Waal explores the privileges and costs of power while drawing surprising parallels between how humans and primates choose their leaders. His research reveals some of the unexpected capacities of alpha males -- generosity, empathy, even peacekeeping -- and sheds light on the power struggles of human politicians. "Someone who is big and strong and intimidates and insults everyone is not necessarily an alpha male," de Waal says.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/UocfRyUm8xo" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 18, 2018
Can home cooking change the world? | Gastón Acurio
00:13:25
When Gastón Acurio started his now world-famous restaurant Astrid & Gastón in the 1990s, no one suspected that he would elevate the Peruvian home-cooking he grew up with to haute cuisine. Nearly thirty years and a storied career later, the chef wants the rest of us to embrace our culinary roots and transform the world with the meals we prepare each day. (In Spanish with English subtitles)<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/UbPTl0-CVK8" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 18, 2018
Four billion years of evolution in six minutes | Prosanta Chakrabarty
00:05:41
Did humans evolve from monkeys or from fish? In this enlightening talk, ichthyologist and TED Fellow Prosanta Chakrabarty dispels some hardwired myths about evolution, encouraging us to remember that we're a small part of a complex, four-billion-year process -- and not the end of the line. "We're not the goal of evolution," Chakrabarty says. "Think of us all as young leaves on this ancient and gigantic tree of life -- connected by invisible branches not just to each other, but to our extinct relatives and our evolutionary ancestors."<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/XBIvLOzwuug" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 15, 2018
How I'm bringing queer pride to my rural village | Katlego Kolanyane-Kesupile
00:05:49
In a poetic, personal talk, TED Fellow Katlego Kolanyane-Kesupile examines the connection between her modern queer lifestyle and her childhood upbringing in a rural village in Botswana. "In a time where being brown, queer, African and seen as worthy of space means being everything but rural, I fear that we're erasing the very struggles that got us to where we are now," she says. "Indigenizing my queerness means bridging the many exceptional parts of myself."<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/Rt5BLnhRFNg" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 14, 2018
The incredible potential of flexible, soft robots | Giada Gerboni
00:09:27
Robots are designed for speed and precision -- but their rigidity has often limited how they're used. In this illuminating talk, biomedical engineer Giada Gerboni shares the latest developments in "soft robotics," an emerging field that aims to create nimble machines that imitate nature, like a robotic octopus. Learn more about how these flexible structures could play a critical role in surgery, medicine and our daily lives.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/sMIwhZHMJg0" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 14, 2018
How to get empowered, not overpowered, by AI | Max Tegmark
00:17:15
Many artificial intelligence researchers expect AI to outsmart humans at all tasks and jobs within decades, enabling a future where we're restricted only by the laws of physics, not the limits of our intelligence. MIT physicist and AI researcher Max Tegmark separates the real opportunities and threats from the myths, describing the concrete steps we should take today to ensure that AI ends up being the best -- rather than worst -- thing to ever happen to humanity.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/3bwA-dso14M" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 13, 2018
What we'll learn about the brain in the next century | Sam Rodriques
00:13:31
In this imaginative talk, neuroengineer Sam Rodriques takes us on a thrilling tour of the next 100 years in brain science. He envisions strange (and sometimes frightening) innovations that may be the key to understanding and treating brain disease -- like lasers that drill tiny holes in our skulls and allow probes to study the electrical activity of our neurons.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/dkQ5ycMD19I" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 12, 2018
The journey through loss and grief | Jason B. Rosenthal
00:14:08
In her brutally honest, ironically funny and widely read meditation on death, "You May Want to Marry My Husband," the late author and filmmaker Amy Krouse Rosenthal gave her husband Jason very public permission to move on and find happiness. A year after her death, Jason offers candid insights on the often excruciating process of moving through and with loss -- as well as some quiet wisdom for anyone else experiencing life-changing grief.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/SVNUqKG0TB8" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 12, 2018
Why the secret to success is setting the right goals | John Doerr
00:11:51
Our leaders and institutions are failing us, but it's not always because they're bad or unethical, says venture capitalist John Doerr -- often, it's simply because they're leading us toward the wrong objectives. In this practical talk, Doerr shows us how we can get back on track with "Objectives and Key Results," or OKRs -- a goal-setting system that's been employed by the likes of Google, Intel and Bono to set and execute on audacious goals. Learn more about how setting the right goals can mean the difference between success and failure -- and how we can use OKRs to hold our leaders and ourselves accountable.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/kqAeKU6-XUA" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 11, 2018
The discoveries awaiting us in the ocean's twilight zone | Heidi M. Sosik
00:10:01
What will we find in the twilight zone: the vast, mysterious, virtually unexplored realm hundreds of meters below the ocean's surface? Heidi M. Sosik of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution wants to find out. In this wonder-filled talk, she shares her plan to investigate these uncharted waters, which may hold a million new species and 90 percent of the world's fish biomass, using submersible technology. What we discover there won't just astound us, Sosik says -- it will help us be better stewards of the world's oceans. (This ambitious plan is one of the first ideas of The Audacious Project, TED's new initiative to inspire global change.)<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/GHr23EG6Htw" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 08, 2018
Inside the fight against Russia's fake news empire | Olga Yurkova
00:05:16
When facts are false, decisions are wrong, says editor and TED Fellow Olga Yurkova. To stop the spread of fake news, she and a group of journalists launched StopFake.org, which exposes biased or inaccurate reporting in order to rebuild the trust we've lost in our journalists, leaders and institutions. Learn more about the fight against misinformation as well as two critical ways we can ensure we're not reading (or sharing) fake news.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/MeVhrQhswiw" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 07, 2018
Let's turn the high seas into the world's largest nature reserve | Enric Sala
00:13:05
What if we could save the fishing industry and protect the ocean at the same time? Marine ecologist Enric Sala shares his bold plan to safeguard the high seas -- some of the last wild places on earth, which fall outside the jurisdiction of any single country -- by creating a giant marine reserve that covers two-thirds of the world's ocean. By protecting the high seas, Sala believes we will restore the ecological, economic and social benefits of the ocean. "When we can align economic needs with conservation, miracles can happen," Sala says.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/-LTGUHCrEWU" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 06, 2018
How technology can fight extremism and online harassment | Yasmin Green
00:13:40
Can technology make people safer from threats like violent extremism, censorship and persecution? In this illuminating talk, technologist Yasmin Green details programs pioneered at Jigsaw (a unit within Alphabet Inc., the collection of companies that also includes Google) to counter radicalization and online harassment -- including a project that could give commenters real-time feedback about how their words might land, which has already increased spaces for dialogue. "If we ever thought that we could build an internet insulated from the dark side of humanity, we were wrong," Green says. "We have to throw our entire selves into building solutions that are as human as the problems they aim to solve."<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/xICDD6eiIVQ" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 06, 2018
What if we replaced politicians with randomly selected people? | Brett Hennig
00:09:31
If you think democracy is broken, here's an idea: let's replace politicians with randomly selected people. Author and activist Brett Hennig presents a compelling case for sortition democracy, or random selection of government officials -- a system with roots in ancient Athens that taps into the wisdom of the crowd and entrusts ordinary people with making balanced decisions for the greater good of everyone. Sound crazy? Learn more about how it could work to create a world free of partisan politics.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/C58CavWT51o" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 05, 2018
The critical role librarians play in the opioid crisis | Chera Kowalski
00:12:01
Public libraries have always been about more than just books -- and their mission of community support has taken on new urgency during the current opioid epidemic. After witnessing overdoses at her library in Philadelphia, Chera Kowalski learned how to administer naloxone, a drug that reverses the effects of narcotics, and she's put it to use to save patrons' lives. In this personal talk, she shares the day-to-day reality of life on the frontline of the opioid crisis and advocates for each of us to find new ways to keep our communities safe and healthy.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/H4NYDk_4IFM" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 05, 2018
Why theater is essential to democracy | Oskar Eustis
00:13:10
Truth comes from the collision of different ideas, and theater plays an essential role in showing us that truth, says legendary artistic director Oskar Eustis. In this powerful talk, Eustis outlines his plan to reach (and listen to) people in places across the US where the theater, like many other institutions, has turned its back -- like the deindustrialized Rust Belt. "Our job is to try to hold up a vision to America that shows not only who all of us are individually, but that welds us back into the commonality that we need to be," Eustis says. "That's what the theater is supposed to do."<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/2Kvfx7inedY" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 04, 2018
How we can turn the cold of outer space into a renewable resource | Aaswath Raman
00:13:27
What if we could use the cold darkness of outer space to cool buildings on earth? In this mind-blowing talk, physicist Aaswath Raman details the technology he's developing to harness "night-sky cooling" -- a natural phenomenon where infrared light escapes earth and heads to space, carrying heat along with it -- which could dramatically reduce the energy used by our cooling systems (and the pollution they cause). Learn more about how this approach could lead us towards a future where we intelligently tap into the energy of the universe.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/I7w_LwAVufQ" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 01, 2018
How vultures can help solve crimes | Lauren Pharr
00:10:46
Can a bird that symbolizes death help the living catch criminals? In this informative and accessible talk, forensic anthropologist Lauren Pharr shows us how vultures impact crime scenes -- and the assistance they can provide to detectives investigating murders. (This talk contains graphic images.)<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/fjbfW5GGvrE" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 31, 2018
What gardening taught me about life | tobacco brown
00:06:41
Gardens are mirrors of our lives, says environmental artist tobacco brown, and we must cultivate them with care to harvest their full beauty. Drawing on her experience bringing natural public art installations to cities around the world, brown reveals what gardening can teach us about creating lives of compassion, connection and grace.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/40uXJ-wVt6I" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 31, 2018
How we'll become cyborgs and extend human potential | Hugh Herr
00:15:13
Humans will soon have new bodies that forever blur the line between the natural and synthetic worlds, says bionics designer Hugh Herr. In an unforgettable talk, he details "NeuroEmbodied Design," a methodology for creating cyborg function that he's developing at MIT, and shows us a future where we've augmented our bodies in a way that will redefine human potential -- and, maybe, turn us into superheroes. "During the twilight years of this century, I believe humans will be unrecognizable in morphology and dynamics from what we are today," Herr says. "Humanity will take flight and soar."<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/ZvOndZSKfVo" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 30, 2018
A teen scientist's invention to help wounds heal | Anushka Naiknaware
00:06:58
Working out of her garage, Anushka Naiknaware designed a sensor that tracks wound healing, becoming the youngest winner (at age 13) of the Google Science Fair. Her clever invention addresses the global challenge of chronic wounds, which don't heal properly due to preexisting conditions like diabetes and account for billions in medical costs worldwide. Join Naiknaware as she explains how her "smart bandage" works -- and how she's sharing her story to inspire others to make a difference.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/e19wZeTLobM" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 29, 2018
This simple test can help kids hear better | Susan Emmett
00:05:24
Children who live in rural areas can have a hard time getting to the doctor -- much less to an audiologist's clinic for expensive, complex tests to check their hearing. The result for too many kids is hearing loss caused by ear infections and other curable or preventable problems. That's why ear surgeon and TED Fellow Susan Emmett is working with 15 communities in rural Alaska to create a simple, low-cost test that only requires a cell phone. Learn more about her work and how it could change the lives of children who don't have access to hearing care.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/_aJtouZFg-E" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 29, 2018
Comics belong in the classroom | Gene Luen Yang
00:10:36
Comic books and graphic novels belong in every teacher's toolkit, says cartoonist and educator Gene Luen Yang. Set against the backdrop of his own witty, colorful drawings, Yang explores the history of comics in American education -- and reveals some unexpected insights about their potential for helping kids learn.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/28htNLVNRbc" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 25, 2018
How to start a conversation about suicide | Jeremy Forbes
00:12:16
Is there someone in your life dealing with anxiety, depression or thoughts of suicide -- but is too ashamed to talk about it? Jeremy Forbes saw this happening around him, and now he's on a mission to teach people how to start a conversation about it. In this deeply personal talk, Forbes shares his approach to helping a group of traditionally silent men in his community open up about their struggles. "We can all be life preservers," he says.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/yI8OR474A4M" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 24, 2018
How to turn a group of strangers into a team | Amy Edmondson
00:13:07
Business school professor Amy Edmondson studies "teaming," where people come together quickly (and often temporarily) to solve new, urgent or unusual problems. Recalling stories of teamwork on the fly, such as the incredible rescue of 33 miners trapped half a mile underground in Chile in 2010, Edmondson shares the elements needed to turn a group of strangers into a quick-thinking team that can nimbly respond to challenges.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/e2xxFqvtOxg" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 24, 2018
How I made friends with reality | Emily Levine
00:15:27
With her signature wit and wisdom, Emily Levine meets her ultimate challenge as a comedian/philosopher: she makes dying funny. In this personal talk, she takes us on her journey to make friends with reality -- and peace with death. Life is an enormous gift, Levine says: "You enrich it as best you can, and then you give it back."<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/IppNr8e3rKw" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 23, 2018
The shocking danger of mountaintop removal -- and why it must end | Michael Hendryx
00:13:44
Research investigator Michael Hendryx studies mountaintop removal, an explosive type of surface coal mining used in Appalachia that comes with unexpected health hazards. In this data-packed talk, Hendryx presents his research and tells the story of the pushback he's received from the coal industry, advocating for the ethical obligation scientists have to speak the truth.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/R_KjHUdswcE" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 22, 2018
What it's like to be the child of immigrants | Michael Rain
00:08:01
Michael Rain is on a mission to tell the stories of first-generation immigrants, who have strong ties both to the countries they grew up in and their countries of origin. In a personal talk, he breaks down the mischaracterizations and limited narratives of immigrants and shares the stories of the worlds they belong to. "We're walking melting pots of culture," Rain says. "If something in that pot smells new or different to you, don't turn up your nose. Ask us to share."<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/Y98EfZVzO7U" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 22, 2018
Where joy hides and how to find it | Ingrid Fetell Lee
00:13:38
Cherry blossoms and rainbows, bubbles and googly eyes: Why do some things seem to create such universal joy? In this captivating talk, Ingrid Fetell Lee reveals the surprisingly tangible roots of joy and shows how we all can find -- and create -- more of it in the world around us.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/ntuI_IIFYgY" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 21, 2018
Why fascism is so tempting -- and how your data could power it | Yuval Noah Harari
00:18:22
In a profound talk about technology and power, author and historian Yuval Noah Harari explains the important difference between fascism and nationalism -- and what the consolidation of our data means for the future of democracy. Appearing as a hologram live from Tel Aviv, Harari warns that the greatest danger that now faces liberal democracy is that the revolution in information technology will make dictatorships more efficient and capable of control. "The enemies of liberal democracy hack our feelings of fear and hate and vanity, and then use these feelings to polarize and destroy," Harari says. "It is the responsibility of all of us to get to know our weaknesses and make sure they don't become weapons." (Followed by a brief conversation with TED curator Chris Anderson)<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/a_5FQsXLXvM" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 18, 2018
"You Found Me" | Helen Gillet
00:05:04
Cellist and singer Helen Gillet mixes her classical training, New Orleans-based jazz roots and free improvisational skills to perform her own eclectic music. In a powerful, melodious performance, she plays her song "You Found Me."<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/fTqIUmb7H2g" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 18, 2018
How Pakistani women are taking the internet back | Nighat Dad
00:05:18
TED Fellow Nighat Dad studies online harassment, especially as it relates to patriarchal cultures like the one in her small village in Pakistan. She tells the story of how she set up Pakistan's first cyber harassment helpline, offering support to women who face serious threats online. "Safe access to the internet is access to knowledge, and knowledge is freedom," she says. "When I fight for a woman's digital rights, I am fighting for equality."<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/t_4ZCD_GlpQ" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 17, 2018
The age-old sharing economies of Africa -- and why we should scale them | Robert Neuwirth
00:09:14
From rides to homes and beyond, we're sharing everything these days, with the help of digital tools. But as modern and high-tech as the sharing economy seems, it's been alive in Africa for centuries, according to author Robert Neuwirth. He shares fascinating examples -- like apprenticeships that work like locally generated venture capital and systems for allocating scarce water -- and says that if we can propagate and scale these models, they could help communities thrive from the bottom up.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/Ech5D-5_XHE" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 17, 2018
Scientists must be free to learn, to speak and to challenge | Kirsty Duncan
00:13:55
"You do not mess with something so fundamental, so precious, as science," says Kirsty Duncan, Canada's first Minister of Science. In a heartfelt, inspiring talk about pushing boundaries, she makes the case that researchers must be free to present uncomfortable truths and challenge the thinking of the day -- and that we all have a duty to speak up when we see science being stifled or suppressed.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/QdIv9NxTnfs" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 16, 2018
The doctors, nurses and aid workers rebuilding Syria | Rola Hallam
00:07:07
Local humanitarians are beacons of light in the darkness of war, says humanitarian aid entrepreneur and TED Fellow Rola Hallam. She's working to help responders on the ground in devastated communities like Syria, where the destruction of health care is being used as a weapon of war. One of her campaigns achieved a global first: a crowdfunded hospital. Since it opened in 2017, the aptly named Hope Hospital has treated thousands of children. "Local humanitarians have the courage to persist, to dust themselves off from the wreckage and to start again, risking their lives to save others," Hallam says. "We can match their courage by not looking away or turning our backs."<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/k6nT1ZFiE-k" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 15, 2018
A healthy economy should be designed to thrive, not grow | Kate Raworth
00:15:53
What would a sustainable, universally beneficial economy look like? "Like a doughnut," says Oxford economist Kate Raworth. In a stellar, eye-opening talk, she explains how we can move countries out of the hole -- where people are falling short on life's essentials -- and create regenerative, distributive economies that work within the planet's ecological limits.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/uma3gXoKAUo" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 14, 2018
The truth about unwanted arousal | Emily Nagoski
00:15:16
Sex educator Emily Nagoski breaks down one of the most dangerous myths about sex and introduces us to the science behind arousal nonconcordance: when there's a disconnect between physical response and the experience of pleasure and desire. Talking about such intimate, private moments can feel awkward or difficult, yet in this straightforward talk Nagoski urges all of us to share this crucial information with someone -- judges, lawyers, partners, kids. "With every brave conversation we have, we make the world that little bit better," says Nagoski. (This talk contains mature content.)<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/TPE0F5U8Pc4" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 11, 2018
"Iyeza" / "Zabalaza" | Thandiswa Mazwai
00:10:47
Self-styled wild woman and rebel singer Thandiswa Mazwai rocks the TED stage with an electrifying performance of two songs: "Iyeza" and "Zabalaza."<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/Ftm_g_Bja-E" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 10, 2018
What it's like to be a transgender dad | LB Hannahs
00:13:44
LB Hannahs candidly shares the experience of parenting as a genderqueer individual -- and what it can teach us about authenticity and advocacy. "Authenticity doesn't mean 'comfortable.' It means managing and negotiating the discomfort of everyday life," Hannahs says.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/F0dAgOkZO30" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 10, 2018
Why you should make useless things | Simone Giertz
00:11:57
In this joyful, heartfelt talk featuring demos of her wonderfully wacky creations, Simone Giertz shares her craft: making useless robots. Her inventions -- designed to chop vegetables, cut hair, apply lipstick and more -- rarely (if ever) succeed, and that's the point. "The true beauty of making useless things [is] this acknowledgment that you don't always know what the best answer is," Giertz says. "It turns off that voice in your head that tells you that you know exactly how the world works. Maybe a toothbrush helmet isn't the answer, but at least you're asking the question."<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/a9c7NZsgCSk" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 09, 2018
A playful solution to the housing crisis | Sarah Murray
00:10:41
Frustrated by her lack of self-determination in the housing market, Sarah Murray created a computer game that allows home buyers to design a house and have it delivered to them in modular components that can be assembled on-site. Learn how her effort is putting would-be homeowners in control of the largest purchase of their lives -- as well as cutting costs, protecting the environment and helping provide homes for those in need.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/JUX2_lqfab8" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 08, 2018
How Baltimore called a ceasefire | Erricka Bridgeford
00:11:27
In one day, in one city, in one neighborhood -- what if everyone put their guns down? Erricka Bridgeford is a peacemaker who wants to stop the murders and violence in her hometown of Baltimore. So she helped organize the Baltimore Ceasefire, a grassroots campaign to keep the peace. In a passionate, personal talk, Bridgeford tells the story of the Ceasefire movement and their bigger vision for zero murders in Baltimore.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/44rihDqGS0g" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 08, 2018
What it takes to be racially literate | Priya Vulchi and Winona Guo
00:12:22
Over the last year, Priya Vulchi and Winona Guo traveled to all 50 US states, collecting personal stories about race and intersectionality. Now they're on a mission to equip every American with the tools to understand, navigate and improve a world structured by racial division. In a dynamic talk, Vulchi and Guo pair the personal stories they've collected with research and statistics to reveal two fundamental gaps in our racial literacy -- and how we can overcome them.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/RWxDqZeSno0" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 07, 2018
How to build (and rebuild) trust | Frances Frei
00:15:05
Trust is the foundation for everything we do. But what do we do when it's broken? In an eye-opening talk, Harvard Business School professor Frances Frei gives a crash course in trust: how to build it, maintain it and rebuild it -- something she worked on during a recent stint at Uber. "If we can learn to trust one another more, we can have unprecedented human progress," Frei says.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/nHgzPe4yEZc" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 04, 2018
Why you don't like the sound of your own voice | Rébecca Kleinberger
00:12:42
Your voice is indistinguishable from how other people see you, but your relationship with it is far from obvious. Rébecca Kleinberger studies how we use and understand our voices and the voices of others. She explains why you may not like the sound of your own voice on recordings, the differences between your outward, inward and inner voices -- and the extraordinary things you communicate without being aware of it.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/mQeTAO_FVUU" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 03, 2018
To design better tech, understand context | Tania Douglas
00:08:34
What good is a sophisticated piece of medical equipment to people in Africa if it can't handle the climate there? Biomedical engineer Tania Douglas shares stories of how we're often blinded to real needs in our pursuit of technology -- and how a deeper understanding of the context where it's used can lead us to better solutions.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/JdTiRsm62CI" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 03, 2018
It's time for the law to protect victims of gender violence | Laura L. Dunn
00:06:13
To make accountability the norm after gender violence in the United States, we need to change tactics, says victims' rights attorney and TED Fellow Laura L. Dunn. Instead of going institution by institution, fighting for reform, we need to go to the Constitution and finally pass the Equal Rights Amendment, which would require states to address gender inequality and violence. By ushering in sweeping change, Dunn says, "our legal system can become a system of justice, and #MeToo can finally become 'no more.'"<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/B-yHMxBLcK0" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 02, 2018
How a male contraceptive pill could work | John Amory
00:06:23
Andrologist John Amory is developing innovative male contraception that gives men a new option for taking responsibility to prevent unintended pregnancy. He details the science in development -- and why the world needs a male pill.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/daxBcRNiJ2c" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 01, 2018
Why tech needs the humanities | Eric Berridge
00:11:12
If you want to build a team of innovative problem-solvers, you should value the humanities just as much as the sciences, says entrepreneur Eric Berridge. He shares why tech companies should look beyond STEM graduates for new hires -- and how people with backgrounds in the arts and humanities can bring creativity and insight to technical workplaces.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/jb__ItJdgfQ" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
May 01, 2018
Is the world getting better or worse? A look at the numbers | Steven Pinker
00:18:32
Was 2017 really the "worst year ever," as some would have us believe? In his analysis of recent data on homicide, war, poverty, pollution and more, psychologist Steven Pinker finds that we're doing better now in every one of them when compared with 30 years ago. But progress isn't inevitable, and it doesn't mean everything gets better for everyone all the time, Pinker says. Instead, progress is problem-solving, and we should look at things like climate change and nuclear war as problems to be solved, not apocalypses in waiting. "We will never have a perfect world, and it would be dangerous to seek one," he says. "But there's no limit to the betterments we can attain if we continue to apply knowledge to enhance human flourishing."<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/2HeG6GbpVUk" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Apr 30, 2018
How I turn negative online comments into positive offline conversations | Dylan Marron
00:10:52
Digital creator Dylan Marron has racked up millions of views for projects like "Every Single Word" and "Sitting in Bathrooms With Trans People" -- but he's found that the flip side of success online is internet hate. Over time, he's developed an unexpected coping mechanism: calling the people who leave him insensitive comments and asking a simple question: "Why did you write that?" In a thoughtful talk about how we interact online, Marron explains how sometimes the most subversive thing you can do is actually speak with people you disagree with, not simply at them.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/ZnruJLpdCCM" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Apr 27, 2018
"RainMakers" | Qudus Onikeku and The QTribe
00:04:28
Qudus Onikeku and The QTribe summon a downpour with a poetic, powerful dance performance. Set to a composition of singing, drums and strings, the dancers radiate energy -- moving in circles, in shapes and in unison as they consume the TED stage.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/p5i9hpggnU8" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Apr 27, 2018
What I've learned about parenting as a stay-at-home dad | Glen Henry
00:10:46
Glen Henry got his superpowers through fatherhood. After leaving behind a job he hated and a manager he didn't get along with, he went to work for an equally demanding boss: his kids. He shares how he went from thinking he knew it all about being a stay-at-home parent to realizing he knew nothing at all -- and how he's now documenting what he's learned.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/rvA09Mx6mw0" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Apr 26, 2018
How work kept me going during my cancer treatment | Sarah Donnelly
00:11:30
When lawyer Sarah Donnelly was diagnosed with breast cancer, she turned to her friends and family for support -- but she also found meaning, focus and stability in her work. In a personal talk about why and how she stayed on the job, she shares her insights on how workplaces can accommodate people going through major illnesses -- because the benefits go both ways.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/TEDTalks_video/~4/SFmyQXRxt38" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Apr 26, 2018