Here & Now

By NPR

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NPR and WBUR's live midday news program

Episode Date
June 19, 2018: Hour 1
2701
There have been many voices against President Trump's chosen policy of family separation at the U.S. border. We get the views of a supporter of the administration's "zero-tolerance" policy, conservative talk show host Sandy Rios. Also, author Kelly Yang came to the Unites States from China at the age of 6. From ages 8-12, she helped her parents manage motels, often by taking charge of the front desk. She's now published the kids' book "Front Desk," which was inspired by her own experiences. And, the small town of Abita Springs, Louisiana, is on an ambitious track to switch to 100 percent renewable energy. We speak with Mayor Greg Lemons about his commitment to provide the town with electricity from renewable sources by 2030. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's June 19, 2018 full broadcast.
Jun 19, 2018
June 19, 2018: Hour 2
2642
Gaming disorder will appear in a new draft of the World Health Organization's International Classification of Diseases. We speak with Dr. Hilarie Cash, a psychologist and co-founder of reSTART, a residential facility for adults and adolescents addicted to the internet and video gaming. Also, Ford today is announcing new plans for a building that was instrumental to Detroit back in the city's heyday: Michigan Central Station. And, poet Terrance Hayes won a National Book Award for his 2010 collection "Lighthead." His new book "American Sonnets for My Past and Future Assassin" is out today. We speak with Hayes about his work. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's June 19, 2018 full broadcast.
Jun 19, 2018
June 18, 2018: Hour 2
2641
The policy of separating children from their families at the Mexican border is dividing Republicans as Democrats push to end the practice. We speak with Sen. Chris Van Hollen, a Democrat from Maryland, about visiting a border patrol processing center over the weekend in McAllen, Texas. Also, a recent report from the American Psychiatric Association urges people to "participate in policy and advocacy to combat climate change." And that's just one of the medical groups writing about the connection between adverse mental health effects and global disasters related to changing climate. And, according to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the percentage of workers between ages 25 and 54 who are employed are looking for work is well below the rate of other developed countries. We speak with one economist who has done research that shows that in counties where there are high rates of opioid prescriptions, there has been a drop in the labor force participation rate. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's June 18, 2018 full broadcast.
Jun 18, 2018
June 18, 2018: Hour 1
2651
President Trump blames Democrats for an administration policy of separating children from parents at the U.S.-Mexico border. Critics say he's using an old law to try to force border security legislation, and many other Republicans have continued to voice their opposition to the policy. Also, across the country and beyond, drug donations are quietly emerging. At least 37 states in the U.S. have created drug donation programs for unused medication. But in Athens, Greece, a tech startup is helping people redistribute their leftover medicine through an app called GivMed. We speak with the app's co-founder. And, while there's a whole industry around getting into the top few schools in the country, one college counselor says putting all your efforts into those name-brand schools may not be the best approach. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's June 18, 2018 full broadcast.
Jun 18, 2018
June 15, 2018: Hour 2
2743
For almost an hour Friday morning, President Trump gave impromptu interviews to reporters on the White House lawn. We discuss what Trump said with NPR White House correspondent Scott Horsley. Also, Red Letter Christians eschew politics altogether, saying they choose instead to follow Jesus' teachings: feeding the poor, sheltering immigrants and tending to the sick. The group's executive director joins us to discuss its conflicts with conservative evangelicals. And undergraduate applicants to the University of Chicago no longer have to include SAT or ACT scores in their applications. It's the first top-tier university to make the tests optional, though a growing number of other schools are making similar moves. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's June 15, 2018 full broadcast.
Jun 15, 2018
June 15, 2018: Hour 1
2753
NBC senior politics editor Beth Fouhy and NPR White House reporter Ayesha Rascoe join us to break down President Trump's impromptu news conference Friday morning, which included comments on former campaign chairman Paul Manafort, a Justice Department inspector general report, North Korea, Crimea and more. Also, minority groups, including biracial families and the LGBT community, say they continue to be let down by brands that fail to create diverse and inclusive advertising. But those complaints are leading some companies to change their ad strategies. And Crimson Education seeks to help students from around the world get into top universities by using an algorithm like eHarmony's to match students with mentors to help them prepare to apply. We talk with the startup's 23-year-old co-founder and CEO. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's June 15, 2018 full broadcast.
Jun 15, 2018
June 14, 2018: Hour 2
2686
June 14, 2018: Hour 2
Jun 14, 2018
June 14, 2018: Hour 1
2744
Antarctica's ice sheets are melting three times as fast as they were in 2007. We talk with the lead author of a new study that says the rapid melting will cause sea levels to rise six inches over the next 80 years. Also, "Queer Eye," the Netflix reboot of the reality makeover show "Queer Eye for the Straight Guy," rolls out its second season on Friday. For the first time, the show will feature a makeover of a transgender person. One of the stars of the new season, Tan France, tells us he uses his role as fashion expert "as a vehicle for a much deeper conversation." And if you want cake but don't feel like baking on a hot summer day, chef Kathy Gunst has three recipes — and only one involves firing up the oven. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's June 14, 2018 full broadcast.
Jun 14, 2018
June 13, 2018: Hour 2
2752
Chavie Weisberger grew up in an ultra-Orthodox Hasidic Community in Monsey, New York, where she raised her three children after her 2008 divorce. But as she began questioning her faith and her sexuality, her neighbors told the religious authorities there that she was allowing secular behavior in her home. Her estranged husband sued for custody and won. We speak with Weisberger and Lani Santo of Footsteps about transitioning to secular life. Also, a raccoon became a social media sensation after it scaled a tall building in broad daylight Tuesday in St. Paul, Minnesota. And, Cameroon's minority Anglophone community is protesting Francophone domination in their country, a conflict which has roots in the colonial era. We speak with a human rights lawyer and activist about the ongoing conflict. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's June 13, 2018 full broadcast.
Jun 13, 2018
June 13, 2018: Hour 1
2681
President Trump tweeted Wednesday that North Korea is "no longer" a nuclear threat. Democratic Rep. Karen Bass of California tells Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson that isn't the case. Also, for DJs John and Heidi Small, the 1980s was a decade of glowing, positive pop music. They join us in our latest DJ Session to listen to a few songs that showcase that theme of can-do enthusiasm. And IHOP stirred up social media this week when it announced it would be changing its name to IHOb. The B stands for burgers. The move is temporary, but will it actually drive up sales? That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's June 13, 2018 full broadcast.
Jun 13, 2018
June 12, 2018: Hour 2
2734
The historic face-to-face meeting between President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is over, and the world is interpreting the two countries' commitment "to work toward complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula." We speak with NPR Beijing correspondent Anthony Kuhn, who covered the meeting from Singapore. Also, looking for summer books that test your brain but are still accessible? Author and podcaster Steve Almond shares some of his picks, from Zadie Smith's "Feel Free" to Ray Bradbury's "Fahrenheit 451." And, in Iowa, there's a conversation going on about whether to raise the degree requirements for morticians for the first time in 60 years. We speak with the president of the Iowa Funeral Directors Association. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's June 12, 2018 full broadcast.
Jun 12, 2018
June 12, 2018: Hour 1
2729
President Trump returns to the U.S. on Tuesday after a historic face-to-face meeting with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. The two leaders released a joint statement committing to establish new diplomatic relations and "to work toward complete denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula." But what does it mean? Also, with warmer weather comes more reliance on air conditioning. We take a look at the state of the industry, and get some consumer tips to keep cool without wasting energy. And the CEO of Maya Cinemas discusses his company's aim to bring first-run movie theaters to underserved communities with large Latino populations. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's June 12, 2018 full broadcast.
Jun 12, 2018
June 11, 2018: Hour 2
2690
Joel Wit, a former State Department official who has negotiated with Kim Jong Un's representatives in the past, discusses how President Trump should approach negotiations with the North Korean leader this week. Also, Steven Spielberg's "Jurassic Park" was released 25 years ago on June 11, 1993. We speak with Jack Horner, paleontologist and adviser to the film series, about the power of "Jurassic Park" and what has been discovered since its release. And, as Congress continues to tussle over immigration this week, Mayor Dee Margo of El Paso, Texas, says he wants to see some action on immigration, especially on DACA. We speak with Margo about policy and his hopes that a NAFTA resolution will be reached. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's June 11, 2018 full broadcast.
Jun 11, 2018
June 11, 2018: Hour 1
2714
President Trump escalated his rhetoric against Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau over the weekend after leaving the G-7 summit in Canada. CBC senior reporter Evan Dyer discusses how the conflict between longtime allies is playing north of the U.S. border. Also, the Broadway hit "The Band's Visit" — which revolves around an Egyptian police band's arrival in a tiny Israeli desert village, instead of the thriving cultural center that bears a similar name — took 10 Tony Awards on Sunday night. We revisit our conversation with stars Tony Shalhoub and Katrina Lenk and director David Cromer, who each won an award. And some economists are worried that, 12 years after the last recession, another could be on the horizon because of the way corporations are using cheap debt. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's June 11, 2018 full broadcast.
Jun 11, 2018
After Accident Left Him Paralyzed, ER Doctor Adjusts To Life In A Wheelchair
1441
Last year, a mountain bike accident left Daniel Grossman paralyzed from the waist down. Five months later, he was back at work as an ER doctor at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota — after relearning how to do his job and live his life. "Option A is, 'You are paralyzed, what are you going to do about it?' Option B is, 'You are paralyzed. Let's sit and wallow in self-pity.' I decided for option A, and honestly I think most people do decide for option A," Grossman tells Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson.
Jun 08, 2018
June 8, 2018: Hour 2
2691
CBC senior reporter Evan Dyer joins us with the view from Quebec as the G-7 summit gets underway. Also, we speak with an assistant clinical professor of psychiatry at Columbia University about suicide prevention, as the deaths of designer Kate Spade and chef-turned-TV-star Anthony Bourdain renew a sadly familiar conversation about mental health. And Terrance Mannery was closing the Doki Doki dessert shop in Salt Lake City, Utah, on Saturday night when four distraught men burst in. Behind them, Mannery saw a group of about 15 people, who witnesses say were shouting anti-gay slurs. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's June 8, 2018 full broadcast.
Jun 08, 2018
June 8, 2018: Hour 1
2677
We look back at how Anthony Bourdain explored cultures through the food he ate and the people he ate with, and revisit his conversation with Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson from last year. The TV host and chef was found dead in a hotel room in France, his employer CNN said in a statement Friday morning. He was 61. Also, Ohio may soon allow dogs on restaurant patios. This week, the state's House of Representatives passed a bill that would redefine health code requirements so that customers could dine outside with their dogs. And we talk with Don Iveson, mayor of Edmonton, Alberta, about how his landlocked city is planning for climate change. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's June 8, 2018 full broadcast.
Jun 08, 2018
June 7, 2018: Hour 2
2584
House Republicans met behind closed doors Thursday morning but were not able to reach an agreement on immigration legislation. NPR congressional correspondent Scott Detrow joins us with the latest. Also, Hernan Diaz's debut novel "In the Distance" was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and the PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction. The book tells the story of Håkan, an immigrant from Sweden who makes his way through the American West in the early to mid 1800s. And in an effort to get more people to live in the state, Vermont recently passed legislation for a program that would offer people up to $10,000 to move there and work remotely. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's June 7, 2018 two full broadcast.
Jun 07, 2018
June 7, 2018: Hour 1
2644
President Trump's on-again-off-again summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un is scheduled to happen on June 12 in Singapore. We preview with CNN international correspondent Will Ripley, who has made more than a dozen trips to North Korea. Also, we continue with our story on Dr. Daniel Grossman, who's had to adjust to life in a wheelchair after a bike accident left him paralyzed from the waist down. He's already back at work at the Mayo Clinic, less than a year after the injury. And the small-town Redwood Falls Gazette in Redwood, Minnesota, removed the online version of an obituary that went viral earlier this week. It read, in part, "She will not be missed by Gina and Jay, and they understand that this world is a better place without her." That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's June 7, 2018 full broadcast.
Jun 07, 2018
June 6, 2018: Hour 1
2615
We break down Tuesday's primaries with NPR lead politics editor Domenico Montanaro, including California's, where Democrats avoided being shut out of key congressional races throughout the state despite a crowded field. Also, Dr. Daniel Grossman lost the use of his legs after a mountain biking accident less than a year ago. He's already back at work as an emergency physician at the Mayo Clinic in Minnesota. And in this week's Here & Now DJ Session, host Jeremy Hobson speaks with KCRW DJ Anthony Valadez about new music that Valadez says pushes the boundaries of pop, including songs by Puma Blue, Ric Wilson and Bardo Martinez. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's June 6, 2018 full broadcast.
Jun 06, 2018
June 5, 2018: Hour 2
2642
The latest in politics headlines: Federal prosecutors accuse former Trump campaign manager, Paul Manafort, of tampering with witnesses involved in the federal tax and money laundering case against him. And, a memo confirms that President Trump dictated a statement regarding a meeting with a Russian lawyer in Trump Tower. Also, in February, we spoke with John LaDue of Minnesota, one of dozens of thwarted school attackers. John's father, David LaDue, shares all he's learned from the experience. And, in Arizona, incidents of drivers entering the freeway going the wrong way are more common than one might think, according to law enforcement officials. Now the state is testing a detection system to prevent crashes. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's June 5, 2018 full broadcast.
Jun 05, 2018
June 5, 2018: Hour 1
2648
Rescue operations are still underway in Guatemala, after the eruption of the Fuego volcano over the weekend, and thousands have been forced to evacuate. We discuss the eruption with a volcanologist at Michigan Technological University. Also, there is a crowded batch of primary races across the country Tuesday. There's a lot at stake in particular in California, where voters will weigh in on the race for governor, as well as some key House and Senate seats. And we talk with financial journalist Paddy Hirsch about his debut novel, "The Devil's Half Mile," which is set on Wall Street — in 1799. The book's hero is investigating the death of his father, who may have been involved in some shady deals. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's June 5, 2018 full broadcast.
Jun 05, 2018
June 4, 2018: Hour 2
2642
North Korea's state news agency announced today that Syrian President Bashar Assad will make a state visit to the country. This will be the first time North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has hosted a head of state since assuming power in 2011. Also, Venkat Ranjan, a 13-year-old eighth-grader from San Ramon, California, won the 2018 National Geographic Bee last month. We speak with Ranjan about the competition and how he prepared for it. And, 50 years ago this week, Robert F. Kennedy won the California Democratic presidential primary. Shortly after he wrapped up his victory speech, he was shot by an assassin in Los Angeles. He died the next day. We discuss with historian Julian Zelizer. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's June 4, 2018 full broadcast.
Jun 04, 2018
June 4, 2018: Hour 1
2649
The Supreme Court today upheld the right of a baker in Colorado to refuse to make a wedding cake for a same-sex couple. Also, voters in Northern California will cast ballots Tuesday on whether or not to recall a judge who gave what critics consider a too-lenient sentence to Stanford University swimmer Brock Turner, who was found guilty of sexually assaulting an unconscious woman. And Apple CEO Tim Cook is expected to announce a new digital health feature Monday for iPhones and iPads, aimed at helping people better manage the amount of time they're spending on the devices. We look at whether the companies behind the devices that many are blaming for technology addiction are helping to reduce the problem. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's June 4, 2018 full broadcast.
Jun 04, 2018
June 1, 2018: Hour 2
2661
Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, French President Emmanuel Macron and congressional Republicans in the U.S. are speaking out against President Trump's steel and aluminum tariffs. We hear perspective from the CEO of the American Chamber of Commerce to the European Union. Also, Charlotte Fox, part of a group that huddled overnight during a disastrous blizzard on Mount Everest in 1996 that killed eight climbers, died last week after an apparent fall. We speak with Alison Osius, executive editor of Rock and Ice magazine and a friend of Fox's. And torrential rain triggered deadly floods this week across the South, including in Ellicott City, Maryland, where Angie Tersiguel lives and owns a restaurant. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's June 1, 2018 full broadcast.
Jun 01, 2018
June 1, 2018: Hour 1
2797
This week in politics, U.S. allies Canada, Mexico and the European Union reacted sharply to new tariffs on steel and aluminum, and North Korean negotiators arrived in New York City and Washington, D.C. to try to jump-start a summit on denuclearization. We review those stories and more with Time magazine White House correspondent Brian Bennett and CNN Politics senior writer Juana Summers. Also, a Harvard University study tracked 122 men and women released from prison in Massachusetts between 2012 and 2014, and found 42 percent of them had seen someone killed during their childhood. And for more than three decades, Don Cherry has been a fixture on the TV show "Hockey Night in Canada." Before he became a famous hockey analyst, Cherry was an NHL coach who won Coach of the Year honors in both the NHL and AHL. But there's always been a knock against him. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's June 1, 2018 full broadcast.
Jun 01, 2018
May 31, 2018: Hour 2
2750
President Trump signed a bill into law this week that would allow terminally ill patients quicker access to unapproved medications. The "right-to-try" legislation has been debated for years, and dozens of states have already passed similar laws. Also, most weddings aren't nearly as opulent as the royal wedding. But millions of people will be tying the knot this summer, and as the season gets underway, we hear insight from an Atlanta-based wedding planner. And the senior vice president at the Center for European Policy Analysis joins us to discuss the faked murder of Russian journalist Arkady Babchenko, and what it says about Russian President Vladimir Putin's enemies. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's May 31, 2018 full broadcast.
May 31, 2018
May 31, 2018: Hour 1
2730
We check in with economist Diane Swonk about the White House announcing Thursday that it will impose steel and aluminum tariffs against the European Union, Canada and Mexico. Also, for the first time, federal reimbursement will be available to states that provide foster care services, after President Trump signed into law the Family First Prevention Services Act, aimed at keeping children with their families and not in foster care. And people aren't usually overjoyed to see a spider crawling around inside their home. But researcher Matt Bertone says spiders are an important part of our indoor ecosystem and rarely a danger to humans, so it's best to just leave them alone. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's May 31, 2018 full broadcast.
May 31, 2018
May 30, 2018: Hour 2
2753
Republican strategist Alice Stewart and Democratic strategist Karine Jean-Pierre join us to discuss the political fallout from ABC's decision to cancel "Roseanne," and more news out of Washington. Also, we look at the Trump administration's decision to end temporary protected status for Hondurans and its potential impacts with TPS holder Marta Connor and Martin Pineda, an organizer with the Central American Resource Center. And for most people, "early music" means Beethoven, Bach and Debussy. But scholar Angela Mariani is interested in what came before those composers. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's May 30, 2018 full broadcast.
May 30, 2018
May 30, 2018: Hour 1
2769
Roseanne Barr has apologized for the tweet about former Obama adviser Valerie Jarrett that caused ABC to cancel her show. But Barr has tweeted about a number of conspiracy theories in the past. Also, how far-fetched are shows like "The Americans," in which undercover agents switch into different disguises? It turns out, not as far-fetched as you might think. We speak with a former CIA officer who says the show actually gets a lot right about spies donning different looks. And a new study of schizophrenia finds the genetic markers identified with raising the risk of schizophrenia in childbirth pose less of a risk in a healthy pregnancy. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's May 30, 2018 full broadcast.
May 30, 2018
May 29, 2018: Hour 2
2746
President Trump has said he wants to launch a new anti-drug ad campaign to fight opioid use. But how have these public service announcements worked in the past? Also, the last planned search for the missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 wraps up Tuesday. That flight, carrying 239 people, vanished in March 2014 on a flight path from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. And as President Trump tries to get his planned North Korea summit back on track, we look back at the opening to Russia during the Obama administration known as the "reset," and track its successes and failures, with former U.S. Ambassador to Russia Michael McFaul. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's May 29, 2018 full broadcast.
May 29, 2018
May 29, 2018: Hour 1
2714
Alberto is now a tropical depression, but forecasters warn the storm's danger is not over as it continues to dump heavy rain across parts of the Southeast. We get the latest from the director and chief meteorologist of the Florida Public Radio Emergency Network. Also, students are returning to Santa Fe High School in Texas for the first time since the mass shooting there less than two weeks ago. Ten people were killed, including Cynthia Tisdale, a substitute teacher who had been teaching an art class when the shooting began. She was also a full-time caregiver for her husband, diagnosed with a life-threatening lung disease. And former North Korean spy chief Kim Yong Chol is on his way to New York to resume negotiations for an on-again, off-again presidential-level summit in June. We learn more about him, and what might be next for the summit, from a Korea analyst for the Wilson Center. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's May 29, 2018 full broadcast.
May 29, 2018
May 28, 2018: Hour 2
2696
Subtropical Storm Alberto has people in Florida preparing for flooding and high winds, as the first storm of the Atlantic hurricane season makes its way toward the U.S. Gulf Coast. We get the latest from the chief meteorologist of the Florida Public Radio Emergency Network. Also, every Memorial Day there's a ceremony at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Arlington National Cemetery. A new book tells the story of how that first soldier was selected and interred there. And tomorrow, May 29, has been dubbed "529 Day," to draw attention to 529 education savings plans. CBS News business analyst Jill Schlesinger joins us to explain how they work. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's May 28, 2018 full broadcast.
May 28, 2018
May 28, 2018: Hour 1
2750
Janice Chance lost her son, Marine Capt. Jesse Melton, in the war in Afghanistan in September 2008. He was killed when the Humvee he was riding in hit a roadside bomb. Chance, president of Maryland Gold Star Mothers, joins us to talk about her son's life and service, and how she plans to remember him on Memorial Day. Also, there's been a lot of discussion about how misinformation and inaccurate news spreads on websites like Facebook and Twitter. But even thorough journalism can become problematic on these sites. And, should Amazon break up? That's the question asked by The Atlantic senior editor Derek Thompson in his latest piece. The online retail giant could soon become the first trillion-dollar company in American history. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's May 28, 2018 full broadcast.
May 28, 2018
May 25, 2018: Hour 2
2692
Here & Now security analyst Jim Walsh weighs in on what comes next amid President Trump's back-and-forth on a summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. Also, Academy Award-winning director, writer and animator Nick Park's latest film "Early Man" pits cavemen versus Bronze Age-men in an epic soccer match. We revisit our conversation with Park from February. And Amazon has confirmed that one of its Echo speakers recorded a private conversation between a Seattle couple, and, unbeknownst to them, sent it to a third party. We discuss with Roben Farzad, who hosts the podcast "Full Disclosure." That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's May 25, 2018 full broadcast.
May 25, 2018
May 25, 2018: Hour 1
2689
President Trump says negotiations with North Korea are back on, and that the summit he abruptly canceled Thursday might even take place on June 12 after all. We discuss that story and others from the week in politics with NBC and Telemundo news anchor José Díaz-Balart and Chad Pergram of Fox News. Also, Gino Bartali is remembered as one of Italy's greatest cyclists, winning the country's prestigious Giro d'Italia three times between 1936 and 1946 and the Tour de France twice. But he also had a secret — one that he kept for most of his life. And the National Transportation Safety Board said in a preliminary report that Uber had disabled an emergency braking system in a self-driving vehicle that struck and killed a woman in Arizona in March. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's May 25, 2018 full broadcast.
May 25, 2018
May 24, 2018: Hour 2
2700
We continue with reaction following President Trump's decision to cancel his June 12 summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un. Also, the New York City Department of Homeless Services is planning to convert a hotel into a homeless shelter for 154 families in a small neighborhood in Queens known as Blissville. It would be the third homeless shelter in the neighborhood. We hear from the vice president of the Blissville Civic Association, which opposes the move. And millions of Americans will be heading off to the beach, the mountains, forests and other cherished vacation spots this Memorial Day weekend. But what is the history of the great American vacation? That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's May 24, 2018 full broadcast.
May 24, 2018
May 24, 2018: Hour 1
2714
We start with the latest on President Trump cancelling the summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un that had been set for June 12 in Singapore, following "tremendous anger and open hostility" from the North. Also, you might have noticed the sesame seed condiment tahini popping up a lot more often on supermarket shelves and in recipes lately. Here & Now resident chef Kathy Gunst joins host Jeremy Hobson to explain what tahini is, and share recipes that showcase its versatile flavor. And we talk with a former Washington Post bureau chief in Beijing about Trump's unorthodox diplomatic relationship with China, amid ongoing trade and tariff tensions between the two countries. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's May 24, 2018 full broadcast.
May 24, 2018
May 23, 2018: Hour 2
2693
We welcome political strategists Alice Stewart and Jamal Simmons to discuss the results of primary election voting in four state Tuesday, as well as President Trump's statements that a summit with North Korea's Kim Jong Un might be called off for June 12. Also, House leaders are promising to bring up legislation on immigration next month. We speak with Sheriff Justin Smith of Larimer County, Colorado, about what he's hoping for out of Washington. And, on this week's DJ Session, strictly jazz. KCRW DJ Bo Leibowitz shares some of the jazz he has been listening to lately, including singer Melody Gardot and archival tracks from Miles Davis and John Coltrane. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's May 23, 2018 full broadcast.
May 23, 2018
May 23, 2018: Hour 1
2686
It's worrying "how rapidly we have forgotten" the aftermath of the 2008 financial crisis, financial journalist Diana Henriques says following a House vote Tuesday to undo part of the Dodd-Frank banking regulations. Also, by the end of this week Texas Gov. Greg Abbott says he plans to have hosted three roundtable discussions in response to last Friday's school shooting in Santa Fe, Texas. We hear more about what the topics of conversation have been. And what happens if there's a medical emergency at 35,000 feet? One doctor tells us about some of the most common in-flight ailments, and what measures airlines can take to assist passengers. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's May 23, 2018 full broadcast.
May 23, 2018
May 22, 2018: Hour 2
2679
We speak with Anna North, senior reporter at Vox, to look at where we are in the #MeToo movement, whether it's leading to lasting social change and where it might be heading. Also, Americans are borrowing a near-record level of money right now. According to a new analysis from the loan comparison website LendingTree, by the end of this year, our debt could reach a record $4 trillion. And, one of the largest health insurers in the nation, Anthem, is getting more pushback from doctors for resisting paying for what it sees as avoidable visits to the emergency room. We look at how this impacts patients.
May 22, 2018
May 22, 2018: Hour 1
2667
White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders says the Justice Department will ask its inspector general to lead an internal investigation into "any irregularities" with the "tactics concerning the Trump campaign." We discuss the latest with Rick Klein, ABC News political director. Also, the allegations earlier this year that the now-defunct data firm Cambridge Analytica improperly gathered information on 87 million Facebook users set off a firestorm. But another powerful data company has largely escaped public scrutiny. And we meet four K-9 veterans being honored with the American Humane Lois Pope Life K-9 Medal of Courage today on Capitol Hill, for their service overseas alongside U.S. troops. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's May 22, 2018 full broadcast.
May 22, 2018
May 21, 2018: Hour 2
2730
The U.S. Supreme court, by a 5-4 vote margin, has ruled for the first time that workers may not band together to challenge violations of federal labor laws. We look at what this means for employers and employees. Also, health workers in the Democratic Republic of Congo began vaccinating people Monday against an outbreak of Ebola that's killed at least 26 people. This is the first time a vaccine will be used to control an Ebola outbreak. Plus, a mountain biker has died and a second person was seriously injured after a cougar attacked them on a remote trail in Washington state. And, we chat with Matt Quinn of the indie folk group Mt. Joy, which found unexpected success when its song "Astrovan" took off on Spotify. It now has almost 7 million streams.
May 21, 2018
May 21, 2018: Hour 1
2701
A law professor joins us to discuss some of the legal questions surrounding President Trump's call over the weekend for the Justice Department investigate whether the FBI infiltrated his campaign. Also, the same 3D printing technology that might one day custom-print heart valves or lead to astronauts manufacturing their own tools aboard the International Space Station could also be used to print bombs and explosives, according to a new RAND Corporation paper. And we discuss concern among sports gambling addiction researchers following a recent Supreme Court ruling that opens the door to legalized sports betting. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's May 21, 2018 full broadcast.
May 21, 2018
May 18, 2018: Hour 2
2650
We get an update from Santa Fe, Texas, where police say multiple people are dead following a shooting at a high school. Also, The Oak Ridge Boys have been making country music with a bit of pop and rock flavor for decades. But their new album, "17th Avenue Revival," features gospel with a bit of '50s flair. And the Ebola virus has spread to a major city in the Democratic Republic of Congo. As health workers on the ground try to contain the risk, Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson looks at lessons learned from the 2014-2016 outbreak with Dr. Tom Frieden, former director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's May 18, 2018 full broadcast.
May 18, 2018
May 18, 2018: Hour 1
2614
We discuss President Trump's response Friday to a school shooting at Santa Fe High School near Houston, and more from the week in politics, with NBC senior politics editor Beth Fouhy and CNN White House correspondent Abby Phillip. Also, Bruce Smit decided to seek out the two little girls he tormented as a child in elementary school, 60 years later. They were willing to meet with him. And final preparations are underway for Saturday's royal wedding. Here & Now's Robin Young checks in with NPR's Frank Langfitt in London for the latest buzz. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's May, 18, 2018 full broadcast.
May 18, 2018
May 17, 2018: Hour 2
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USA Today immigration reporter Alan Gomez joins us to discuss President Trump calling some unauthorized immigrants "animals" during a meeting Wednesday, and more immigration news coming out of the White House. Also, Mike Shirkey grew up in the Arkansas Delta, listening to "pickin' music" — bluegrass, country, folk and the like. He's host of "The Pickin' Post" on KUAF, and joins Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson to share some new finds in the latest edition of our DJ Sessions. And a recent study found a more rigorous high school math and science curriculum correlated with decreased risky student health behavior, like binge drinking and drug use. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's May 17, 2018 full broadcast.
May 17, 2018
May 17, 2018: Hour 1
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NPR national security editor Phil Ewing joins us to discuss the Mueller investigation, as it moves into its second year. Also, musician, composer and lyricist David Yazbek says the music for the Tony-nominated Broadway show "The Band's Visit" is the most personal he's written. And we discuss the latest on Israel, Palestine and Gaza with journalist Neri Zilber and Ghaith al-Omari, a former Palestinian peace negotiator. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's May 17, 2018 full broadcast.
May 17, 2018
May 16, 2018: Hour 2
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Hawaii "lava chaser" and photographer Demian Barrios has seen the Kilauea volcano up close, and tells Here & Now's Jeremy Hobson about how he stays safe. Also, Democratic strategist Jamal Simmons and Republican strategist Paris Dennard join us to discuss results of primaries in four states Tuesday, and other news from Washington. And despite opposition from researchers and other critics, the vaping industry is now worth billions of dollars, and some worry that the trend has taken hold in high schools around the country. We hear from the director of the Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education at the University of California San Francisco, who says research shows e-cigarettes are linked with significant health problems. That and more, in hour two of Here & Now's May 16, 2018 full broadcast.
May 16, 2018
May 16, 2018: Hour 1
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We hear from a former State Department senior adviser who says North Korea's recent change in tone over next month's planned summit with President Trump isn't "impulsive," but rather "part of a longer-term strategy." Also, New York magazine published a story this week about the dynamics of the relationship between Fox News host Sean Hannity and President Trump — a connection based mainly on late-night phone calls. We talk with reporter Olivia Nuzzi, who wrote the story. And the new book "West Like Lightning" tells the story of the Pony Express, which for a brief period in 1860 and 1861 reduced the time it took to carry messages from Missouri to California to around 10 days. That and more, in hour one of Here & Now's May 16, 2018 full broadcast.
May 16, 2018