The Brookings Cafeteria

By The Brookings Institution, a nonprofit public policy organization (think tank) based in Washington, D.C.

Listen to a podcast, please open Podcast Republic app. Available on Google Play Store.

Description

Host Fred Dews interviews experts from the Brookings Institution, a nonprofit public policy organization (think tank) based in Washington, D.C., about their research and ideas on solutions to the most pressing public policy challenges facing the nation and the world.

Episode Date
What happened at the Trump-Kim summit in Singapore?
54:59
In this episode, five Brookings experts offer their reactions to the recent summit between President Trump and Kim Jong-un, their analyses of the key outcomes, and their assessments of what comes next. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter.
Jun 14, 2018
Understanding when Black Lives Matter protests occur
24:24
Governance Studies Fellow Vanessa Williamson discusses her research on the Black Lives Matter movement, the connection between police-involved killings and protest activity, and the scope of racial inequity in America’s criminal justice system. Also in this episode, William Frey analyzes recent census data that show waning growth rates for some big cities, and faster growth in many suburbs. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Jun 08, 2018
One year after Trump’s decision to leave the Paris Climate Agreement
47:29
Todd Stern, Brookings senior fellow and the chief climate negotiator in the Obama administration, discusses his role in negotiating the Paris Climate Agreement and the implications of President Trump announcing his intention to withdrawal the United States from the agreement on June 1, 2017. Also in this episode, David Wessel describes the recent rise in housing prices and why it’s difficult for young people to enter the housing market. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter.
May 31, 2018
Remaking education to help young people thrive
31:23
Rebecca Winthrop, director of the Center for Universal Education at Brookings, describes the skills children need to succeed in life and how to improve the quality of learning for the most marginalized children and youth, including girls and children affected by extreme violence. Also in this episode, Molly Reynolds looks at the major factors that affect midterm elections and what you should watch out for in her regular “What’s Happening in Congress” segment.
May 24, 2018
How artificial intelligence will change the future of work
41:27
Darrell West, director of the Center for Technology Innovation, discusses his recent book “The Future of Work: Robotics, AI, and Automation.” West explains that as robots, artificial intelligence, and automation make it possible to be more productive while working fewer hours, society must change its definition of work. Also in this episode, foreign policy expert Célia Belin unveils why she became a scholar and Susan Hennessey introduces Sourcelist, a database of experts in technology policy from diverse backgrounds. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter.
May 18, 2018
Improving opportunity with policies for women and families
28:22
Senior Fellow Isabel V. Sawhill discusses her research on the “success sequence” and how the combination of work, education, and family planning can help reduce poverty and increase opportunity in America. Also in this episode, Alan Berube previews his new report on the challenges facing older industrial cities throughout the Northeast and Midwest for the latest edition of our Metro Lens segment. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
May 11, 2018
Racial disparities in school discipline
24:04
Jon Valant, a fellow in the Brown Center on Education Policy, discusses his research on disparities and discrimination in how schools discipline students of different racial and economic backgrounds. Also in this episode, David Wessel explains the policies China has pursued to spur economic development and innovation following his recent trip to Xi’an and Shenzhen. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
May 04, 2018
Is anyone addressing Venezuela’s refugee crises?
36:14
Dany Bahar, David M. Rubenstein Fellow in the Global Economy and Development program, discusses his recent trip to the Venezuelan border and the economic and refugee crises the country is currently facing. Also in this episode, Molly Reynolds explains the politics behind the Senate’s confirmation of President Trump’s appointments in her regular “What’s Happening in Congress” segment. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.  
Apr 27, 2018
Fixing America's broken marijuana policies
44:21
Senior Fellow John Hudak discusses recent changes in public policy toward medical and recreational marijuana in the United States. Also in this episode, nuclear strategy and arms control expert Frank A. Rose makes his Brookings podcast debut in our regular Coffee Break segment, and Jung H. Pak answers a question on tensions in the Korean peninsula from one of our listeners. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Apr 20, 2018
Grand strategy in the age of Trump
28:28
Hal Brands, a professor at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, discusses his new book, “American Grand Strategy in the Age of Trump,” and what an “America First” foreign policy framework looks like. Also in this episode, Joe Parilla explains the economic development incentives that state and local governments offer to get corporations, such as Amazon, to locate there. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Apr 17, 2018
Tax day is coming, what are the experts saying?
24:24
Brookings experts discuss some of the biggest issues in the current tax policy debate including American’s sense of patriotic duty to pay taxes and why filing can be so complicated. Also in this episode, Andre Perry discusses how racism continues to impact racial disparities in a new edition of our regular Metro Lens segment. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Apr 13, 2018
Intro to Southeast Asia: Diversity, security, and politics
35:17
Senior Fellow Jonathan Stromseth discusses the economic and security tensions in Southeast Asia, and relations among its nations with the United States and China. Also in this episode, Jon Valant previews his research on racial disparities in school discipline. A full interview with Jon will air later in May. And finally, David Wessel puts talk of the federal debt and deficits into context. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Apr 06, 2018
America's aging population could worsen the federal budget problem
28:30
Senior Fellow Louise Sheiner discusses demographic shifts in the United States and the long term effects an aging population will have on the federal budget. Also in this episode, Molly Reynolds on the recently-passed omnibus spending bill and what priorities each chamber will likely address after Congress returns from recess. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Mar 30, 2018
Empowering young people to end Chicago’s gun violence problem
30:21
Former U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan sits down with young men from Chicago CRED (Creating Real Economic Diversity) to discuss the steps they have taken to disrupt the cycle of gun violence in their community and transition into the legal economy. Also in this episode, meet David M. Rubenstein Fellow Randall Akee in a recent edition of our Coffee Break segment. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Mar 23, 2018
Giving minority men a chance to succeed
36:48
Senior Fellow Camille Busette discusses the new Race, Prosperity, and Inclusion Initiative at Brookings and a recent article she authored on the lack of opportunity for poor African-American and Native-American boys. Also in this episode, Joe Parilla explains the economic development incentives that state and local governments offer to get corporations, such as Amazon, to locate there. And finally, Niam Yaraghi on the security of Americans’ medical records. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Mar 16, 2018
Marvin Kalb’s stories from Russia
47:18
Nonresident Senior Fellow Marvin Kalb discusses his experience as a diplomatic attaché at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow in his recent book, “The Year I Was Peter the Great.” Also in this episode, David Wessel shares lessons learned from a recent event with former Fed Chairs Janet Yellen and Ben Bernanke. Finally, Alan Krueger discusses his new paper with Eric Posner on three reforms for protecting low-income workers from monopsony and collusion. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Mar 09, 2018
The millennial generation is a bridge to America's diverse future
39:59
William Frey, demographer and senior fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program, discusses his research on the millennial generation. Frey explains why the millennial generation, now the most diverse adult generation in American history, serves as a social, economic, and political bridge to America’s diverse future. Also in this episode, Molly Reynolds discusses whether Congress will consider gun safety legislation, and Foreign Policy Senior Fellow Mireya Solís interviews retired Japanese Lt. Gen. Noboru Yamaguchi. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Mar 02, 2018
America's track record in building foreign militaries
36:04
Mara Karlin, nonresident senior fellow in the Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence and Foreign Policy program at Brookings, discusses her work at the Department of Defense and her new book, “Building Militaries in Fragile States: Challenges for the United States.” Karlin explains how the United States trains and equips partner militaries abroad, and what failure and success look like through the examples of Vietnam, Greece, and Lebanon. Also in this episode, Scott Anderson, a David M. Rubenstein Fellow in the Governance Studies program, joins us for a new edition of our Coffee Break segment.
Feb 23, 2018
Overcoming extremism in Pakistan
37:16
Madiha Afzal, nonresident fellow in the Global Economy and Development program at Brookings, discusses her new book, “Pakistan Under Siege: Extremism, Society, and the State,” with the director of the Brookings Institution Press, Bill Finan. Afzal explains Pakistanis’ own views on terrorist groups, jihad, and America, the relationship between Islam and the Pakistani state, and how the country could redefine its sense of nationalism without what she calls "the crutch of religion." Also in this episode, Bill Frey discusses the demographics of millennial generation, now the largest generation in the United States, and what implications millennials’ diversity could have on the country. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Feb 16, 2018
Who is Kim Jong-un?
30:55
Jung Pak, senior fellow in Foreign Policy and the SK-Korea Foundation Chair in Korea Studies, discusses North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un’s rise to power, his objectives, and the United States’ military and diplomatic options for the Korean peninsula. In a new Brookings Essay, “The education of Kim Jong-un,” Pak further explains Kim’s upbringing and makes recommendations for thwarting Kim’s ambitions. Also in this episode, David Wessel discusses his views on the recent volatility of the stock market and what relationship, if any, it has to the economy. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Feb 09, 2018
How cities can thrive in the age of Trump
52:36
Bill Finan, director of the Brookings Institution Press, discusses “The New Localism: How Cities can Thrive in the Age of Populism” with authors Bruce Katz and Jeremy Nowak. In their book and in the interview, Katz and Nowak explain why cities and the communities that surround them are best suited to address many of the economic, social, and environmental challenges facing the world today. Also in this episode, Molly Reynolds explains what impact President Trump’s State of the Union address may have on his legislative agenda—specifically on immigration, infrastructure, and health care—in her regular “What’s Happening in Congress” segment. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Feb 02, 2018
How cities are creating inclusive economies, part III
49:29
In the last of a special three-episode series on Brookings's Inclusive Economic Development Lab, we talk to civic leaders from Indianapolis, Nashville, and San Diego about potential solutions each of their cities are considering to address the challenges of a rapidly-changing economy. In episodes one and two of this series, we took a closer look at some of those challenges and what city leaders learned from working with Brookings experts through the Inclusive Economic Development Lab. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Jan 30, 2018
How cities are creating inclusive economies, part II
48:39
In the second of a three-episode series, we discuss what civic leaders from Indianapolis, Nashville, and San Diego learned while working with Brookings experts through the Inclusive Economic Development Lab. In episodes one and three of this series, we explore the challenges and opportunities these cities face in a rapidly-changing economy and the potential solutions they are considering. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Jan 29, 2018
How cities are creating inclusive economies, part I
43:58
In the first of a special three-episode series on Brookings’s Inclusive Economic Development Lab, Rachel Barker, a policy analyst and engagement strategist in the Metropolitan Policy Program, speaks to civic leaders in Indianapolis, Nashville, and San Diego about the challenges and opportunities their cities face in a rapidly-changing economy. In episodes two and three of this series, we explore what leaders from each city learned while working with Brookings experts through the Inclusive Economic Development Lab, and the potential solutions they are considering. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Jan 26, 2018
Countering the wildlife trafficking and poaching threat
39:59
Vanda Felbab-Brown, Senior Fellow in Foreign Policy and the Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence, discusses her new book “The Extinction Market: Wildlife Trafficking and How to Counter It.” She explains the threats posed by poaching, trophy hunting, and wildlife trafficking, and what policy measures can be taken to combat them. Also in this episode, John Austin explains why we should not paint the Rust Belt region with one broad brush, and what policies really matter for the Rust Belt’s revival in the latest installment of our Metro Lens segment. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Jan 19, 2018
Post-American Europe and the new geopolitics
50:29
Thomas Wright, senior fellow in Foreign Policy and director of the Center on the United States and Europe, discusses the state of transatlantic relations and argues that it’s in U.S. interests to engage more with Europe. He also discusses his book “All Measures Short of War,” analyzing the nature of geopolitical competition in the world today. Also in this episode, David Wessel stops by for his economic update, and Jamie Kirchick, a visiting fellow in the Center on the United States and Europe, joins us for the first time in another edition of our regular “Coffee Break” segment. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Jan 12, 2018
The top economic issues in 2018
42:33
Ted Gayer, vice president and director of Economic Studies at Brookings and the Joseph A. Pechman Senior Fellow, analyzes the top economic issues facing the United States in the upcoming year. Also in this episode, Molly Reynolds on what Congress left unfinished before their holiday recess and the additions of Senators Doug Jones (D-Ala.) and Tina Smith (D-Minn.) in our regular “What’s Happening in Congress” segment, and Bill Galston answers a question from a listener. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Jan 05, 2018
Best of the Brookings Cafeteria podcast in 2017
42:04
As 2017 ends, we look back gratefully on another excellent year for the Brookings Cafeteria podcast. We aired 52 episodes (not including this one), talked with over 60 guests, and covered dozens of policy topics. The Academy of Podcasters at Podcast Movement honored us once again with the award for best education podcast of the year. Our team experienced some changes but still turned out a terrific show every week. To celebrate the closing of the year, today’s show features our favorite clips from past 12 months. We hope you enjoy it and perhaps take the opportunity to download full episodes that interest you, share the show with friends, and rate the podcast on Apple Podcasts. Visit the home page for the Brookings Cafeteria podcast to listen to all of the episodes mentioned in this one. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. BCP is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Dec 29, 2017
Winners and losers in the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act
40:23
Adam Looney, a senior fellow in Economic Studies and former deputy assistant secretary for tax analysis at the U.S. Treasury Department, discusses the good, the bad, and the ugly parts of the recently passed Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, and explains the implications it will have on pass-through businesses, individual and corporate tax rates, and more. Also in this episode, Jenny Schuetz, David M. Rubenstein Fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program, explains in our latest Metro Lens segment how a provision in the new tax plan which lowers the mortgage interest deduction amount could affect home values and potential home owners.  Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Dec 22, 2017
Putin’s disinformation war on the West
42:05
Alina Polyakova, David M. Rubenstein Fellow in the Center on the United States and Europe and Foreign Policy program, discusses the disinformation campaign waged by the Russian Federation and President Vladimir Putin on the United States and European democracies through election interference, cyber-attacks, and the cultivation of political allies. Also in this episode, David Wessel evaluates the legacy of outgoing Fed Chair Janet Yellen and the challenges facing her successor, Jerome Powell. And finally, we interviewed Noha Aboueldahab, visiting fellow at the Brookings Doha Center, on transitional justice and the litigation of past crimes and atrocities, specifically in Egypt. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Dec 15, 2017
When militants, criminals, and warlords take over
34:18
Vanda Felbab-Brown and Shadi Hamid, both senior fellows in the Foreign Policy program, discuss their new book "Militants, Criminals, and Warlords: The Challenge of Local Governance in an Age of Disorder" with the director of the Brookings Institution Press Bill Finan. In the interview and in their new book, Felbab-Brown and Hamid address the origins of some of these nonstate actors and make recommendations on how the international community should address them. Also in this episode, Molly Reynolds explains how polarization and gridlock in the appropriations process create the possibility of a government shutdown in our regular “What’s Happening in Congress” segment. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Dec 08, 2017
Today’s mayors are tackling new challenges
34:56
Alaina Harkness, fellow in the Centennial Scholar Initiative at Brookings and the Project on 21st Century City Governance, discusses the key findings from her report on the evolving role of mayors and their position on the frontlines of public policy challenges like refugee resettlement and workforce development. Also in this episode, Mark Muro, senior fellow and policy director in the Metropolitan Policy Program, introduces his research on the digitalization of the American workforce. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Dec 01, 2017
Policy ideas to be thankful for
37:06
In this special episode of the Brookings Cafeteria podcast, we reflect on some of the forward-thinking policy ideas and good news stories that have emerged from events hosted by the Bookings Institution in 2017. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Nov 24, 2017
Turkey’s troubled relations with the West
37:40
Kemal Kirişci, TÜSİAD senior fellow in the Foreign Policy program at Brookings and director of the Turkey Project, discusses his new book Turkey and the West: Fault Lines in a Troubled Alliance with the director of the Brookings Institution Press Bill Finan. Also in this episode, Stephen Hess, senior fellow emeritus in the Governance Studies program, shares an excerpt on the day President Kennedy was assassinated from his forthcoming political memoir. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Nov 17, 2017
Reflecting on Trump’s presidency one year after his election
29:16
A year after one of the greatest political upsets in American history, Elaine Kamarck, the founding director of the Center for Effective Public Management and a senior fellow in the Governance Studies program, reflects on Trump’s presidency, his greatest challenges and successes, and what we should expect from the 2018 midterms and future of the Trump administration. Also in this episode, Molly Reynolds discusses Republicans "punting" on difficult decisions in the House tax bill for our regular “What’s Happening in Congress” segment. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Nov 10, 2017
Why black cities matter
29:32
Andre Perry, a David M. Rubenstein Fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program, discusses his new research project on the more than 1,200 majority-black communities in the United States. Also in this episode, Makada Henry-Nickie, also a new David M. Rubenstein Fellow in the Governance Studies program, joins us for our regular “Coffee Break” segment. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.  
Nov 03, 2017
How investing in girls’ education can help fight climate change
31:11
Christina Kwauk, postdoctoral fellow for the Center for Universal Education in the Global Economy and Development program, discusses the findings of a new report which examines how promoting girls’ reproductive rights, investing in girls’ education, and developing girls’ life skills for a green economy are effective strategies for mitigating the effects of climate change. Also in this episode, Joseph Kane addresses the complex water infrastructure challenges the United States faces in a new Metro Lens segment. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Oct 27, 2017
The real cost of hosting the 2016 Rio Olympics
38:50
Juliana Barbassa and Theresa Williamson, two contributors to "Rio 2016: Olympic Myths, Hard Realities" from the Brookings Institution Press, discuss the corruption, disruption, and overall economic costs of hosting last year’s summer Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro. Also in this episode, David Wessel stops by for his regular economic update, and Bill Galston, senior fellow in the Governance Studies program, answers a question from one of our listeners. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Oct 20, 2017
Voices on U.S. foreign assistance Pt. 2
45:26
In the second part of a two-part series on challenges facing U.S. foreign assistance, experts from the global development community discuss the importance of the private sector in aid financing, measuring aid effectiveness, foreign assistance success stories, and more. These experts, including Brookings Senior Fellow Homi Kharas, were some of the members of the 14th annual Brookings-Blum Roundtable. Also in this episode, Molly Reynolds, a fellow in the Governance Studies program, analyzes Senator Bob Corker’s (R-Tenn.) critique of President Trump and the relationship between congressional Republicans and the White House in our regular “What’s Happening in Congress” segment. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Oct 13, 2017
Voices on US foreign aid (part 1)
50:53
Leading voices from the global development community, including George Ingram, a senior fellow in the Global Economy and Development program, discuss the challenges facing U.S. foreign aid. These experts were all participants at the 14th annual Brookings Blum Roundtable. The experts address the role of U.S. leadership in an increasingly multipolar world, what Americans think of foreign assistance programs, ideas to reform the U.S. foreign aid architecture, and more. This is part one of a two-part series of conversations on the U.S. development assistance under challenge. Also in this episode, Andre Perry, a new Rubenstein Fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program, stops by for our regular “Coffee Break” segment. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Oct 06, 2017
How Pittsburgh went from steel town to innovation city
40:59
Brookings expert Scott Andes discusses the findings of a new report from the Centennial Scholar Initiative, “Capturing the next economy: Pittsburgh’s rise as a global innovation city,” which examines how Pittsburgh was able to transform itself from a manufacturing economy to leader in global innovation and technology. Also in this episode, Adie Tomer and Ranjitha Shivaram discuss broadband subscription rates in American neighborhoods in a new Metro Lens segment, and Ryan Nunn, policy director for the Hamilton Project, answers a question from one of our listeners. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Sep 29, 2017
After Snowden—surveillance, protecting privacy, and reforming the NSA
34:49
Tim Edgar, former ACLU lawyer and National Security Council advisor on cybersecurity, and current senior fellow at the Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs, discusses his new book “Beyond Snowden: Privacy, Mass Surveillance, and the Struggle to Reform the NSA” with the director of Brookings Institution Press Bill Finan. Also in this episode, David Wessel joins us for his regular economic update and Robin Lewis discusses a new report from Brookings Center for Technology Innovation on financial and digital inclusion around the world. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Sep 22, 2017
10 years after the Great Recession, why aren't more Americans working?
45:32
10 years after the Great Recession, new research from the Hamilton Project at Brookings scholars Jay Shambaugh and Ryan Nunn demonstrates that although the 'jobs gap' from the recession is now closed, millions of American men and women of prime working age remain out of the labor force. Also in this episode, Molly Reynolds explains what's happening in Congress and John Villasenor discusses new research on private sector investment in health research and development. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Sep 15, 2017
The true costs of Trump's border wall (part 2)
32:24
In the second of two parts of a conversation about the U.S.-Mexico border wall that President Trump has pledged to build, Brookings Senior Fellow Vanda Felbab-Brown discusses the costs of a wall for the U.S. economy and the environment, and whether it would have any effect on crime and violence. Also in this episode, meet Jay Shambaugh, new director of the Hamilton Project at Brookings. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Sep 08, 2017
The true costs of Trump's border wall (part 1)
36:12
President Donald Trump pledges to build a wall on the border between the U.S. and Mexico, claiming that it will stop criminals and drugs from entering the United States. Vanda Felbab-Brown, a senior fellow in the Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence at Brookings and author of the new Brookings Essay, “The Wall: The real costs of a barrier between the United States and Mexico,” addresses these and other claims made about the border wall. This is part one of a two-part conversation about her essay and the wall. Also: in another installment of Metro Lens, the Metropolitan Policy Program's Joseph Parilla discusses why services exports (as opposed to goods exports) need to be a more central part of the Trump administration’s focus on its made in America agenda. Thanks to audio producer Gaston Reboredo with assistance from Mark Hoelscher, and to producer Vanessa Sauter.  Additional support comes from Jessica Pavone, Eric Abalahin, Rebecca Viser, and David Nassar. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Sep 01, 2017
Limitations of the senate filibuster
24:54
Molly Reynolds, fellow in Governance Studies, discusses her new book Exceptions to the Rule: The Politics of Filibuster Limitations in the U.S. Senate, and introduces "majoritarian exceptions" as a key instrument of majority party power in the Senate. Also in this episode, David Wessel provides us with his regular economic update. Thanks to audio producer Gaston Reboredo with assistance from Mark Hoelscher, and to producer Vanessa Sauter.  Additional support comes from Jessica Pavone, Eric Abalahin, Rebecca Viser, and David Nassar. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Aug 25, 2017
Welfare, segregation, economic mobility
51:56
Bradley Hardy, the Okun-Model Fellow in Economic Studies and an associate professor in the School of Public Affairs at American University, talks about his research on why people participate, or don't, in social welfare programs like food stamps, and also new research on how past segregation may predict modern-day economic mobility. Also in this episode: Molly Reynolds, a fellow in Governance Studies, offers her assessment of what's happening in Congress, and what will happen in Congress after the August recess ends. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Aug 18, 2017
Crisis in Qatar
29:30
Nader Kabbani, director of research at the Brookings Doha Center and a senior fellow in Global Economy and Development, provides a background on the Qatar-Gulf crisis and outlines its social, economic, and political implications. Also in this episode:  David Wessel, senior fellow in Economic Studies and director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy, answers a listener question on corporate income tax and addresses the role of taxes in economic growth for our regular 'Ask an Expert' segment. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Aug 11, 2017
The community college-employer connection
32:01
Elizabeth Mann, a fellow in the Brown Center on Education Policy in Governance Studies, discusses her work on the relationship between community colleges and employers and outlines how cooperation between the two can counter the skills gap in the American workforce. Also in this episode: Scott W. Allard, a nonresident senior fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program, chronicles poverty in the suburbs in our regular ‘Metro Lens’ segment. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.  
Aug 04, 2017
Weapons of mass destruction and global health security
28:37
Ambassador Bonnie Jenkins, a joint visiting fellow with Brookings and the University of Pennsylvania Perry World House and the former coordinator for Threat Reduction Programs in the Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation at the Department of State, discusses her work on global security issues, from weapons of mass destruction to the spread of infectious disease.  Also in this episode: David Wessel, director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal & Monetary Policy and a senior fellow in Economic Studies, discusses inflation in our regular "Wessel's Economic Update" segment. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Jul 28, 2017
Crisis in Caracas, unrest in Venezuela
25:30
Dany Bahar, a fellow in the Global Economy and Development program, explains the circumstances behind increasing social, political, and economic unrest in Venezuela and offers some recommendations on a response to the situation. Also in this episode: Molly Reynolds, a fellow in Governance Studies, describes why it has been so difficult for Senate Republicans to even begin writing legislation to repeal and replace Obamacare in our regular "What's Happening in Congress" segment. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Jul 21, 2017
A life in foreign service
29:56
Ambassador James Dobbins discusses his new book Foreign Service: Five decades on the front lines of American diplomacy and his experiences working to advance U.S. national interests in some of the country's most difficult situations. Also in this episode: William Gale, the Arjay and and Frances Fearing Miller Chair in Federal Economic Policy and a senior fellow in Economic Studies, recounts the Kansas tax cut experiment and outlines its implications for future tax reform efforts. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Jul 14, 2017
After the Paris climate accord
29:35
Nathan Hultman, a nonresident senior fellow in Global Economy and Development, addresses the future of governmental response to climate change following President Trump's decision to withdraw from the Paris Agreement. Also in this episode: Martha Ross, a senior fellow at the Metropolitan Policy Program, takes a closer look at out-of-work Americans in our regular "Metro Lens" segment. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Jul 07, 2017
Can President Trump implement his immigration agenda?
28:05
Elaine Kamarck, a senior fellow in the Governance Studies program and director of the Center for Effective Public Management at the Brookings Institution, discusses her new report "Hitting the wall: On immigration, campaign promises clash with policy realities" and addresses the costs associated with implementing Trump's proposed policies. Also in this episode: David Wessel, director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal & Monetary Policy, explains productivity growth in our regular "Wessel's Economic Update" segment. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Jun 30, 2017
Net neutrality: The war is over
36:43
Stuart N. Brotman, a nonresident senior fellow in the Center for Technology Innovation, provides a brief history of net neutrality and addresses the future of the FCC's telecommunications rule-making under Title II. Also in this episode: Molly Reynolds, a fellow in Governance Studies, gives an update on the budget process in our regular "What's Happening in Congress Segment". Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Jun 23, 2017
Hoarding the American Dream
28:15
Richard Reeves, a senior fellow in Economic Studies and co-director of the Center on Children and Families, discusses his new book Dream Hoarders: How the American Upper Middle Class is Leaving Everyone Else in the Dust, Why That is a Problem, and What to Do about It and outlines why distinctions in the American middle class matter.  Also in this episode: Camille Busette, director the of Race, Place, and Economic Mobility Initiative, stops in for our regular "Coffee Break" segment. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on Apple Podcasts, send feedback by email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Jun 16, 2017
Career paths and earnings after college
30:16
Ryan Nunn, a fellow in Economic Studies and policy director for the Hamilton Project, addresses the earnings of college graduates based on their choices in career path and course of study.  Also in this episode: Louise Sheiner, a senior fellow in Economic Studies and policy director for the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy, answers a listener’s question about the effectiveness of the U.S. tax system when compared to other advanced nations in “Ask an Expert.” Finally, Richard Shearer, a senior research associate with the Metropolitan Policy Program, discusses the challenges of extending the benefits of economic growth to everyone in our regular “Metro Lens” segment. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Jun 09, 2017
The 1967 Arab-Israeli War
56:28
Between June 5 and June 10, 1967, Israel and an Arab coalition of Egypt, Syria, and Jordan fought a war that Israelis call the Six Day War, and that Arabs generally call the June War. By war’s end, Israel had captured territories on all three fronts: the Sinai Peninsula and Gaza Strip from Egypt; the Golan Heights from Syria; and the West Bank and East Jerusalem from Jordan. And with those territories hundreds of thousands of people, primarily Palestinians (today numbering millions), came under Israeli control. In this episode, five Brookings scholars share their insights and expertise on a range of current policy issues that have roots in the conflict. These include how the war changed both Israel and its Arab neighbors; the transformation of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict; the rise of political Islam as an alternative to Arab secular nationalism, particularly in Egypt; regional repercussions and peace deals; and the role of US diplomacy. On the 50th anniversary of the 1967 War, our experts look back as they look forward to grapple with these issues and how the conflict’s legacies continue to resonate today. This episode is part of a larger effort by the Center for Middle East Policy at Brookings to offer perspectives on the war’s anniversary, to ask what can be learned from it, and how these lessons inform our understanding about the current turmoil in the region.
Jun 02, 2017
Is Africa still rising?
28:53
Brahima Sangafowa Coulibaly, director of the Africa Growth Initiative and senior fellow in Global Economy and Development, discusses his new role at the Africa Growth Initiative and what challenges and opportunities African nations are facing today.  Also in this episode, David Wessel provides his regular economic update and Elaine Kamarck reviews the difficult process of impeachment.  Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.    
May 26, 2017
The global middle class
30:14
Homi Kharas, senior fellow and co-director of Global Economy and Development, discusses his report, "The unprecedented expansion of the global middle class" and explores the challenges and opportunities this brings in emerging and developing economies.  Also in this episode, Molly Reynolds, fellow in Governance Studies, provides her regular “What’s Happening in Congress” update. This week: the investigative options available to Congress and the impact on the Republicans' legislative agenda.  Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
May 19, 2017
Europe and the world
38:30
Javier Solana, a distinguished fellow at Brookings, discusses why Europe and European institutions such as the EU and NATO are important not only in terms of European integration, but for the world. Solana has held numerous leadership posts, including: member of the Spanish parliament; Spanish foreign affairs minister; secretary-general of NATO; European Union high representative for common foreign and security policy; and secretary general of the Council of the European Union. Also in this episode, Bill Finan speaks with Foreign Policy VP and Director Bruce Jones about his new book (editor), “The Marshall Plan and the Shaping of American Strategy.” In it, Jones explores how the United States helped restore a Europe battered by World War II and created the foundation for the postwar international order. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
May 12, 2017
Demography and democracy
35:01
William H. Frey, a senior fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program at Brookings, talks about his collaborative research project, "States of Change," which explores demographic change and its effects on the U.S. electorate and politics. Also in this episode, Senior Fellow Jonathan Pollack talks about the threat from North Korea in an installment of the Unpacked series. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
May 05, 2017
Tunisian youth and their politics
32:09
Sarah Yerkes, fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and former nonresident fellow in the Center for Middle East Policy, considers the low youth participation in Tunisian politics and the implications for the country's democracy.  Also in this episode, David Wessel, senior fellow in Economic Studies and director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy, provides his regular economic update.  Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network
Apr 28, 2017
What Putin and Russia want
28:24
Pavel Baev, nonresident senior fellow in the Center on the United States and Europe, addresses the character and ambitions of President Vladimir Putin and discusses what policies to pursue in managing the challenging U.S.-Russia relationship. Also in this episode, Molly Reynolds, fellow in Governance Studies, provides her regular “What’s Happening in Congress” update. This week: special elections in Kansas and Georgia and avoiding government shutdown. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network
Apr 21, 2017
Proud to pay taxes
33:40
Vanessa Williamson, fellow in Governance Studies, explains why the civic commitment of tax paying makes Americans proud and how misinformation about the tax system can negatively influence public perception of taxes. Also, brought to you by the Brookings Creative Lab "Unpacked" series, George Ingram, senior fellow in Global Economy and Development, breaks down the myths surrounding U.S. foreign aid and explains how providing international aid acts as an investment in making the world more stable and economically prosperous. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.  
Apr 14, 2017
The water problem
32:25
Patricia Mulroy, senior fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program and editor of "The Water Problem," discusses her new book and sheds light on the critical water crisis in the United States. Also in this episode, John Villasenor, nonresident senior fellow in Governance Studies and the Center for Technology Innovation, discusses his research on how public sector governance capacity can help in expanding private sector investment in global health. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Apr 07, 2017
The Arab world should employ more women
33:56
Bessma Momani, nonresident fellow at the Brookings Doha Center and author of Arab Dawn, examines how Arab countries would benefit from more women joining the formal workforce and how this would promote gender equality throughout the region. Also in this episode, David Wessel, senior fellow and director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy, provides his regular economic update. This week: five big questions on economic policy. Finally, Matt Fiedler, fellow with the Center for Health Policy in Economic Studies,  discusses why he became a scholar and why he believes health care reform is currently the most pressing policy issue. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter.  The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Mar 31, 2017
The Pakistan challenge
35:46
Bruce Riedel, senior fellow and director of the Brookings Intelligence Project, offers his expert view on the policy challenges facing the new administration with respect to Pakistan, their double-sided government, and their tumultuous regional relations. Also in this episode, Molly Reynolds, fellow in Governance Studies, returns with her regular “What’s Happening in Congress” update. This week: confirming Neil Gorsuch, passing an Obamacare replacement, contention over the budget, and the investigation of Russian interference into the US presidential election. Finally, Tom Loveless examines disproportionate suspension rates for African American students from his 2017 Brown Center Report on American Education. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter.  The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Mar 24, 2017
What went wrong with college sports
31:13
Donna A. Lopiano, adjunct lecturer in sports management at Southern Connecticut State University and president of Sports Management Resources consulting firm, and former Women's Athletic Director at the University of Texas at Austin, discusses her most recent title, co-authored with Gerald Gurney and Andrew Zimbalist, "Unwinding Madness: What Went Wrong with College Sports--and How to Fix It" (Brookings Institution Press, 2017) which looks at how college sports have undermined what college is supposed to do for students: educate them. Also in this podcast, Stephen Hess, senior fellow emeritus in Governance Studies, recounts travelling with vice-presidential candidate Spiro T. Agnew, in this installment of "Steve Hess Stories." Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Mar 17, 2017
Regulatory policy in the Trump administration
41:34
Philip Wallach, senior fellow in Governance Studies, breaks down the regulatory process and considers the shape of regulation in Trump’s administration. Also in this episode, an excerpt from an event with Ma Ying-jeou, former President of the Republic of China, as he discusses Taiwan's past, present, and future. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. The Brookings Cafeteria is a part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Mar 10, 2017
Understanding the global refugee crisis
29:50
Jessica Brandt, associate fellow in Foreign Policy and special assistant to the president in the Executive Office, examines the state of the global refugee crisis today and addresses what steps the United States and international community should take to provide relief. Also in this episode, David Wessel, senior fellow and director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy, provides his regular economic update. This week, he introduces the center's new Fiscal Impact Measure, which interprets the impact of fiscal policy on GDP growth in real time. Finally, Lynn Kuok, nonresident fellow in the Center for East Asia Policy Studies, discusses tensions in the South China Sea in our "Ask an Expert" segment. Follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. BCP is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Mar 02, 2017
Is Russia a threat?
44:44
Steven Pifer, senior fellow and director of the Arms Control and Non-Proliferation Initiative, examines the relationship between the U.S. and Russia in terms of nuclear policy, arms control, and the conflict with Ukraine. Also in this episode, Molly Reynolds, fellow in Governance Studies, discusses recent congressional town hall meetings and the likelihood that members of Congress will change their actions when they return to Washington. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter.
Feb 24, 2017
Fixing, or replacing, the Affordable Care Act
33:39
Alice Rivlin, a senior fellow in Economic Studies and the Center for Health Policy, addresses the claim that the Affordable Care Act is "collapsing," and provides her expert analysis on what actions the new administration and Congress should take on health care. Also in this episode, Jonathan Sallet, a visiting fellow in Governance Studies, discusses why became a scholar after serving in government on our Coffee Break segment. He explains why the idea of "truth" is most critical to preserving democracy, and why he considers it a pressing issue of our time. Finally, in our Metro Lens segment, Elizabeth Kneebone, fellow at the Metropolitan Policy Program, explains how EITC aids low-income Americans. Thanks to audio producer Gaston Reboredo and producer Vanessa Sauter, and also thanks for additional support from Eric Abalahin, Jessica Pavone, Nawal Atallah, Kelly Russo, and Rebecca Viser. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter.   BCP is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Feb 17, 2017
Islamism after the Arab Spring
46:57
Shadi Hamid, senior fellow in the Project on U.S. Relations with the Islamic World in the Center for Middle East Policy, discusses his new co-authored paper "Islamism After the Arab Spring: Between the Islamic State and the Nation State." He explains what "Islamism" means and how it has evolved over the past few years. Also in this episode, Dany Bahar, a fellow in the Global Economy and Development program, explains how immigrants strengthen our country.  Finally, Fred Dews reviews the highlights of what experts have said in the previous week regarding the Trump administration in our new “First 100 Days” segment. This week:a possible rise in terrorism due to the "Muslim ban," repealing or repairing the ACA, and a shift in the U.S.-Mexico relationship.  Thanks to audio producer Gaston Reboredo and producer Vanessa Sauter, and also thanks for additional support from Eric Abalahin, Jessica Pavone, Nawal Atallah, Kelly Russo, and Rebecca Viser. Follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. BCP is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Feb 10, 2017
Introducing "5 on 45": A new podcast from the Brookings Podcast Network
50
Want a daily bite of analysis from Brookings experts on what’s happening with the Trump administration? Subscribe to 5 on 45 through your favorite podcast app for a quick hit of commentary on the day’s news. And don't forget to follow @policypodcasts for the latest updates. 
Feb 09, 2017
A short history of marijuana
29:48
John Hudak, deputy director of the Center for Effective Public Management and senior fellow in Governance Studies, discusses why marijuana is an important public policy issue and how its image is changing, which is the focus of his new book, "Marijuana: A Short History." Also in this episode, David Wessel, senior fellow in Economic Studies and director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy, provides his regular economic update. Finally, Fred Dews reviews the highlights of what Brookings experts have said in the previous week regarding the Trump administration in our new “First 100 Days” segment. This week: the "Muslim ban," Trump's trade stance, moving the US embassy in Israel from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem, and the attack on sanctuary cities.  Thanks to audio producer Gaston Reboredo and producer Vanessa Sauter, and also thanks for additional support from Eric Abalahin, Jessica Pavone, Nawal Atallah, Kelly Russo, and Rebecca Viser. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. BCP is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Feb 03, 2017
The top economic issues in 2017
40:12
Ted Gayer, vice president and director of Economic Studies and the Joseph A. Pechman Senior Fellow, looks at the top economic issues in the upcoming year. Tune in to hear his views on the performance of the U.S. economy and job markets, as well as the trends he sees with the new administration. Also in this podcast: Joseph Kane, senior research analyst and associate fellow at the Metropolitan Policy Program, discusses the increasing water infrastructure challenges we face today, and what action cities need to take to tackle their water challenges in our regular "Metro Lens" segment. Finally, Fred Dews reviews the highlights of what experts have said in the previous week regarding the Trump administration in our new "First 100 Days" segment. This week: withdrawing from the Trans-Pacific Partnership, security relations with China, and our possible transition into a new world order. Thanks to audio producer Gaston Reboredo and producer Vanessa Sauter, and also thanks for additional support from Eric Abalahin, Jessica Pavone, Nawal Atallah, Kelly Russo, and Rebecca Viser. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. BCP is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Jan 27, 2017
What do ex-presidents do?
24:21
Elaine Kamarck, director of the Center for Effective Public Management and a Senior Fellow in Governance Studies, discusses what's next for Barack Obama and what role former presidents play in our civic life. She also offers some predictions about how Trump will deal with his presidency based off of her book, "Why Presidents Fail and How They Can Succeed Again." Also in this episode, Bradley Hardy, the Okun-Model Fellow in Economic Studies, discusses why he became a scholar and what he believes is the most pressing public policy issue today. Thanks to audio producer Gaston Reboredo and producer Vanessa Sauter, and also thanks for additional support from Eric Abalahin, Jessica Pavone, Nawal Atallah, Kelly Russo, and Rebecca Viser. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. BCP is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Jan 19, 2017
India's foreign policy
29:21
Shivshankar Menon, a distinguished fellow in Foreign Policy at Brookings and a former Indian foreign minister and national security advisor, shares some of his experiences behind the scenes of some of India’s most critical foreign policy decisions. In his new book, “Choices: Inside the Making of India’s Foreign Policy,” Ambassador Menon reflects on the difficult choices that one of the world’s great, rising powers has had to make. Also in this episode, part three of a conversation with Greg Clark, author of the 2016 book, “Global Cities: A Short History.” You can listen to part one about the history of global cities in our November 4 episode, and part 2—a discussion of cities to include Singapore, Vienna, and San Diego—aired on December 9. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. BCP is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Jan 13, 2017
Trump's national security and defense team
48:18
Donald Trump’s inauguration as 45th president of the United States is right around the corner, and so the nation's (and world's) focus turns to the end of his transition to the White House and the start of his administration. Senior Fellow Michael O’Hanlon--director of research for Foreign Policy, co-director of the Center on 21st Century Security and Intelligence, and the Sydney Stein, Jr., Chair--came on the show to talk about the president-elect’s incoming national security team and the most salient foreign policy, national security, and defense issues for the new administration.  Also in this episode, Senior Fellow David Wessel, director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy, talks about investing in human capital in his regular Wessel's Economic Update. And, Visiting Fellow Philippe Le Corre talks about China's global rise and how the U.S. and European Union can meet the challenge Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. BCP is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Jan 06, 2017
Best of the Brookings Cafeteria in 2016
40:41
2016 is finally over and with it another great year for the Brookings Cafeteria podcast. We had 52 episodes, over 60 guests, and covered dozens of policy topics. We celebrated the centennial of the Brookings Institution in a few episodes. The Academy of Podcasters at Podcast Movement honored us once again with a nomination as best education podcast of the year. Our team experienced some changes but still turned out a terrific show every week. To celebrate the closing of the year, today’s show features our favorite clips from past 12 months. Thanks to all of those who made 2016 another great year for the show: Gaston Reboredo, audio engineer and producer, who took over from Zack Kulzer after Zack moved out west Vanessa Sauter, producer, who replaced Carisa Neitsche, who left to pursue graduate studies Bill Finan, interviewer with the authors of Brookings Press books Adrianna Pita, the host of the Intersections podcast and guest host of some episodes Sara Abdel Rahim and Basseem Maliki, interns extraordinaire. Basseem helped  find all the clips for this show Mark Hoelscher, who produced a few shows and assisted with audio production in others Jessica Pavone, Eric Abalahin, and Rebecca Viser, who provide design and web support Richard Fawal and David Nassar, who provide their leadership and support. Show Notes: Visit the home page for the Brookings Cafeteria podcast to listen to all of the episodes mentioned in this one. Subscribe to Brookings podcasts here or on iTunes, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. BCP is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Dec 30, 2016
The global political economy
49:41
Kemal Derviş, vice president and director of Global Economy and Development at Brookings, discusses policies for a globally interdependent world, which is the focus of his new book “Reflections on Progress: Essays on the Global Political Economy.” Also in this episode, Molly Reynolds, fellow in Governance Studies, answers a listener’s question on whether ideology or choice of candidate is more important for American voters in our regular “Ask an Expert” segment. Additionally, Richard Shearer, senior research associate and senior project manager with the Metropolitan Policy Program, examines the ways in which the divide between big city and small town America play out in our politics. Finally, an excerpt from a recent Brookings event featuring Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel and British Member of Parliament Tristram Hunt talking about cities in the age of Trump and Brexit. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. BCP is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Dec 16, 2016
Open government and Trump's transition ethics
46:49
Ambassador Norman Eisen, visiting fellow in Governance Studies and former U.S. ambassador to the Czech Republic, discusses the controversies surrounding President-elect Trump’s transition to the White House and his new report on open government. Also in this episode, Rebecca Winthrop, director of the Center for Universal Education and senior fellow in Global Economy and Development, analyzes the ways in which education systems should evolve in the digital age. Finally, Bill Finan and Greg Clark, nonresident senior fellow at the Metropolitan Policy Program, continue their conversation on Clark’s new book “Global Cities: A Short History.” The first part of this interview can be found in our “Election 2016: It’s almost over” episode. Thanks to audio producer Gaston Reboredo and producer Vanessa Sauter, and also thanks for additional support from Eric Abalahin, Jessica Pavone, Nawal Atallah, Basseem Maleki, and Rebecca Viser. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. BCP is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Dec 09, 2016
Megachange is upending the world
24:07
Darrell West, vice president and director of Governance Studies and author of “Megachange: Economic Disruption, Political Upheaval, and Social Strife in the 21st Century,” analyzes how recent dramatic disruptions in trends, such as the rise of Donald Trump and Brexit, are challenging institutions and societies. Also in this episode, David Wessel, senior fellow and director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal on Monetary Policy, talks about the types of economic policies that we can expect from a Trump presidency. Finally, Vanda Felbab-Brown, senior fellow in Foreign Policy and the Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence, answers a listener’s question on what President Trump can do about NAFTA in our regular “Ask an Expert” segment. Thanks to audio producer Gaston Reboredo and producer Vanessa Sauter, and also thanks for additional support from Eric Abalahin, Jessica Pavone, Nawal Atallah, Basseem Maleki, and Rebecca Viser. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. BCP is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Dec 02, 2016
Trump's transition to the White House
30:09
Elaine Kamarck, senior fellow in Governance Studies and founding director of the Center for Effective Public Management, discusses the ongoing transition of president-elect Donald Trump to the White House. Also in this episode, Joshua Meltzer, senior fellow in Global Economy and Development, examines the U.S.’s relationship with international trade. Finally, David Victor, co-chair of the Energy Security and Climate Initiative, and Adrianna Pita, host of Brookings’s Intersections Podcast, talk about the Paris Climate Agreement. Thanks to audio producer Gaston Reboredo and producer Vanessa Sauter, and also thanks for additional support from Eric Abalahin, Jessica Pavone, Nawal Atallah, Basseem Maleki, and Rebecca Viser. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. BCP is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Nov 25, 2016
The rise of Chinese President Xi Jinping
44:35
Cheng Li, senior fellow in Foreign Policy and director of the John L. Thornton China Center, talks about the rise of Chinese President Xi Jinping through the Chinese communist party leadership, which is the focus of his new book, “Chinese Politics in the Xi Jinping Era: Reassessing Collective Leadership.” Also in this episode, Laurence Chandy, fellow in Global Economy and Development, examines how technology and globalization affect inequality. Finally, Harsha Singh, executive director of the Brookings India Center, discusses his career, Brookings India, and current events in India. Thanks to audio producer Gaston Reboredo and producer Vanessa Sauter, and also thanks for additional support from Eric Abalahin, Jessica Pavone, Nawal Atallah, Basseem Maleki, and Rebecca Viser. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. BCP is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Nov 18, 2016
After Election 2016
52:59
Brookings experts discuss Election 2016 and the transition ahead. David Wessel, senior fellow in Economic Studies and director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy, moderates a conversation with Stuart Butler, senior fellow in Economic Studies, John Hudak, senior fellow in Governance Studies and deputy director of the Center for Effective Public Management, Elaine Kamarck, senior fellow in Governance Studies and founding director of the Center for Effective Public Management, and Bruce Riedel, senior fellow in Foreign Policy and director of the Intelligence Project, on the results of the 2016 U.S. presidential election and what to expect from President-elect Donald Trump. Special thanks to the event moderator, David Wessel, and the events team, Eric Bull, Adrianna Pita, and Camilo Ramirez. Additional thanks to audio producer Gaston Reboredo and producer Vanessa Sauter, and also thanks for additional support from Eric Abalahin, Jessica Pavone, Nawal Atallah, Basseem Maleki, and Rebecca Viser. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. BCP is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Nov 10, 2016
Election 2016: It's almost over
44:43
John Hudak, deputy director of the Center for Effective Public Management and a senior fellow in Governance Studies, discusses the final stretch of the 2016 U.S. presidential election and what to expect after the election is over.    Also in this episode, Adie Tomer, fellow at the Metropolitan Policy Program, talks about infrastructure challenges for the next president. Finally, Bill Finan interviews Greg Clark, nonresident senior fellow at the Metropolitan Policy Program, on his new book “Global Cities: A Short History.” Thanks to audio producer Gaston Reboredo and producer Vanessa Sauter, and also thanks for additional support from Eric Abalahin, Jessica Pavone, Nawal Atallah, Basseem Maleki, and Rebecca Viser. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. BCP is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Nov 04, 2016
Election 2016 and low-income white Americans
44:10
Carol Graham, senior fellow in Global Economy and Development, explores the socioeconomic factors impacting the health and happiness of low-income white Americans and how they are playing out in the 2016 presidential election. Also in this episode, Joshua Meltzer, senior fellow in Global Economy and Development, answers a listener’s question on trade policy in our regular “Ask an Expert” segment. Finally, Harsha Singh, senior fellow and executive director of Brookings India, offers his thoughts on the U.S. 2016 presidential election from an Indian perspective. Thanks to audio producer Gaston Reboredo and producer Vanessa Sauter, and also thanks for additional support from Eric Abalahin, Jessica Pavone, Nawal Atallah, Basseem Maleki, and Rebecca Viser. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu, and follow us and tweet us at @policypodcasts on Twitter. BCP is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Oct 28, 2016
How the next president can impact US alliances and the international liberal order
01:03:38
As part of the Brookings Election 2016 project, the Brookings Podcast Network brings you a special edition episode in which Indira Lakshamanan, Washington columnist for the Boston Globe and contributor to Politico, moderates a conversation with Fiona Hill, senior fellow in Foreign Policy and director of the Center on the United States and Europe, and Thomas Wright, fellow in Foreign Policy and director of the Project on International Order and Strategy, on the ways in which the next president should treat current U.S. alliances, engage with Russia, and how all of this will affect the international order over the next 4-8 years. Special thanks to the event moderator, Indira Lakshamanan, and the events team, Eric Bull, Adrianna Pita, and Camilo Ramirez. Additional thanks to audio producer Gaston Reboredo and producer Vanessa Sauter, and also thanks for additional support from Eric Abalahin, Jessica Pavone, Nawal Atallah, Basseem Maleki, and Rebecca Viser. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu. BCP is part of the Brookings Podcast network.
Oct 27, 2016
Globalization and the 2016 presidential election
32:25
Homi Kharas, deputy director in the Global Economy and Development program and one of the authors of Brookings’s new “11 Global Debates” series, examines how issues of globalization are playing out in the 2016 presidential election. Also in this episode, John Hudak, deputy director of the Center for Effective Public Management and a senior fellow in Governance Studies, provides an update on the presidential and down-ballot races. Finally, Jon Valant, fellow in Governance Studies and the Brown Center on Education Policy, explains what inspired him to become a scholar of education policy and why he thinks education policy builds the foundation that solves many social problems. Thanks to audio producer Gaston Reboredo and producer Vanessa Sauter, and also thanks for additional support from Eric Abalahin, Jessica Pavone, Nawal Atallah, Basseem Maleki, and Rebecca Viser. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu. The Brookings Cafeteria podcast is part of the Brookings Podcast Network.
Oct 21, 2016
Down-ballot races in the 2016 election
32:24
Molly Reynolds, fellow in Governance Studies, examines the upcoming down-ballot races and how they will shape Congress and state governments. Also in this episode, John Hudak, deputy director of the Center for Effective Public Management and a senior fellow in Governance Studies, provides an update on where the presidential race stands. Finally, this episode features an excerpt from an episode of Brookings’s Elections 101 Video Series in which William Galston, senior fellow in Governance Studies, talks about how to increase voter participation and make voting easier. Thanks to audio producer Gaston Reboredo and producer Vanessa Sauter, and also thanks for additional support from Eric Abalahin, Jessica Pavone, Nawal Atallah, Basseem Maleki, and Rebecca Viser. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Oct 14, 2016
Minority voting in the 2016 election
38:58
Fredrick C. Harris, nonresident senior fellow in Governance Studies and director of the Center on African American Politics and Society at Columbia University, and guest interviewer Adrianna Pita, host of the Intersections podcast, discuss the history of African-American participation in politics and how minority turnout might affect the results of this year’s presidential election. Also in this episode, Elaine Kamarck, senior fellow in Governance Studies and author of a new paper titled, “The relationship that rules the world: Modern presidents and their vice presidents,” analyzes the recent vice presidential debate and the role of vice presidents. This episode also includes an excerpt from an episode of Brookings’s Elections 101 Video Series in which John Hudak, deputy director of the Center for Effective Public Management and senior fellow in Governance Studies, explains the importance of swing states. Finally, Joseph Parilla, fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program, talks about globalization and urbanization in China. Thanks to audio producer Gaston Reboredo and producer Vanessa Sauter, and also thanks for additional support from Eric Abalahin, Jessica Pavone, Nawal Atallah, Basseem Maleki, and Rebecca Viser. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Oct 07, 2016
What does success in the Middle East look like for the next president?
01:03:15
As part of the Brookings Election 2016 project, the Brookings Cafeteria brings you a special edition podcast where Indira Lakshamanan, columnist for the Boston Globe, moderates a conversation with Robert Einhorn, senior fellow in the Arms Control and Non-Proliferation Initiative and former negotiator of the Iran nuclear deal, and Michael O’Hanlon, senior fellow in Foreign Policy and co-director of the Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence, who discuss how the next president can balance the dual goals of U.S. security and the protection of Syrian lives. Special thanks to the event moderator, Indira Lakshamanan, and the events team, Eric Bull, Adrianna Pita, and Camilo Ramirez. Additional thanks to audio producer Gaston Reboredo and producer Vanessa Sauter, and also thanks for additional support from Eric Abalahin, Jessica Pavone, Nawal Atallah, Basseem Maleki, and Rebecca Viser. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu
Oct 06, 2016
Foreign policy issues in the presidential election
39:38
Michael O’Hanlon, senior fellow in Foreign Policy and co-director of the Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence, discusses ISIS, refugees, trade, and other foreign policy issues weighing on the minds of voters. He also addresses many of the issues the next president will have to deal with, whether or not they are part of the campaign discussion. O’Hanlon also previews the new Election 2016 and America’s Future project, a series of policy briefs and events on the biggest issues facing the nation. Also in this episode, John Hudak, deputy director of the Center for Effective Public Management and senior fellow in Governance Studies, provides an analysis of the first presidential debate. This episode also includes an excerpt from an episode of Brookings’ Elections 101 Video Series where E.J. Dionne, senior fellow in Governance Studies, explains polling and how to determine the accuracy of polls. Finally, Dany Bahar, fellow in the Global Economy and Development program, is featured in a new segment titled, “Ask an Expert,” where we take BCP to the streets and get a passerby to ask one of our Brookings experts a question. Thanks to audio producer Gaston Reboredo and producer Vanessa Sauter, and also thanks for additional support from Eric Abalahin, Jessica Pavone, Nawal Atallah, Basseem Maleki, and Rebecca Viser. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Sep 30, 2016
Economic issues in the presidential election
48:37
David Wessel, senior fellow and director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy, looks at Hillary Clinton’s and Donald Trump’s different approaches to policy issues including taxes, family leave, and trade. Also in this episode, John Hudak, deputy director of the Center for Effective Public Management and a senior fellow in Governance Studies, provides a general election update and discusses the upcoming first presidential debate. Finally, Bill Finan interviews John Bessler, professor of Law at the University of Baltimore School of Law and an adjunct professor at the Georgetown University Law Center, who edited the new Brookings volume, “Against the Death Penalty,” which offers Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer’s passionate dissent in a 2015 death penalty case. Thanks to audio producer Gaston Reboredo and producer Vanessa Sauter, and also thanks for additional support from Eric Abalahin, Jessica Pavone, Nawal Atallah, Basseem Maleki, and Rebecca Viser.
Sep 23, 2016
Syrian refugees and Western inaction
53:39
Guest host Robert McKenzie, visiting fellow in the Project on U.S. Relations with the Islamic World, and Leon Wieseltier, the Isaiah Berlin Senior Fellow in Culture and Policy, discuss how Western inaction impacts Syrian refugees and the political landscape in Europe. Also in this episode, Elizabeth Mann, fellow in the Brown Center on Education Policy, addressesthe importance of providing every child with a high level of education. Finally, Bill Finan interviews Donald Kettl about his new book, “Escaping Jurassic Government: How to Recover America’s Lost Commitment to Competence.” Thanks to audio producer Mark Hoelscher and producer Vanessa Sauter, and also thanks for additional support from Eric Ablahan, Jessica Pavone, Nawal Atallah, Basseem Maleki, and Rebecca Viser. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Sep 16, 2016
U.S. business in Africa
43:08
Amadou Sy, senior fellow and director of the Africa Growth Initiative, addresses both the opportunities and challenges of U.S. economic engagement in Africa as the second U.S.-Africa Business Forum approaches. Also in this episode, Elizabeth Kneebone discusses the significance of the increasing number of high poverty neighborhoods in our regular Metro Lens segment. Finally, Bill Finan interviews Steven Koltai, guest scholar in Governance Studies, on his new book Peace through Entrepreneurship. Thanks to audio producer Mark Hoelscher and producer Vanessa Sauter, and also thanks for additional support from Jessica Pavone, Eric Abalahin, and Rebecca Viser. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Sep 09, 2016
Why presidents fail
22:57
Elaine Kamarck, senior fellow in Governance Studies and director of the Center for Effective Public Management, talks about why we need a managerial presidency, a central argument in her most recent book Why Presidents Fail and How They Can Succeed Again.  Also in this podcast, Aaron Klein, fellow in Economic Studies and policy director of the Initiative on Business and Public Policy, discusses what inspires him in public policy and public service. Finally, Steve Hess looks back on his time in the Eisenhower White House.   Thanks to audio producer Mark Hoelscher and producer Vanessa Sauter, and also thanks for additional support from Jessica Pavone, Eric Abalahin, and Rebecca Viser. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Sep 02, 2016
Financial ecosystems and the move toward equity
19:10
John Villasenor, nonresident senior fellow in Governance Studies and the Center for Technology Innovation, discusses his new report on digital and financial inclusion. Also stay tuned for our regular election update from John Hudak, deputy director of the Center for Effective Public Management and a senior fellow in Governance Studies.  Thanks to audio producer Mark Hoelscher and producer Vanessa Sauter, and also thanks for additional support from Jessica Pavone, Eric Abalahin, and Rebecca Viser. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Aug 26, 2016
The case for trade and the TPP
32:12
Mireya Solís, senior fellow and the Philip Knight Chair in Japan Studies in the Brookings Center for East Asia Policy Studies, explores the domestic and international importance of the Trans-Pacific Partnership, comments on what the presidential candidates are saying about trade, and also addresses the fears people have about losing their jobs to trade. Also stay tuned for our regular economic update from David Wessel, senior fellow and director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy. Thanks to audio producer Mark Hoelscher and producer Vanessa Sauter, and also thanks for additional support from Jessica Pavone, Eric Abalahin, and Rebecca Viser. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Aug 19, 2016
America’s 'insane' politics
23:31
Jonathan Rauch, senior fellow in Governance Studies, expands on his widely popular new article in The Atlantic titled, “How American Politics Went Insane.” Also in this episode, Metropolitan Policy Program Associate Fellow Devashree Saha examines the impact of crashing oil prices on state and metro economies.   How American politics went insane The state of state parties, a neglected path to healthier politics Political Realism: How Hacks, Machines, Big Money, and Back-Room Deals Can Strengthen American Democracy Permanent trust funds: Funding economic change with fracking revenues Thanks to audio producer Mark Hoelscher, plus thanks to Carisa Nietsche, Bill Finan, Vanessa Sauter, Jessica Pavone, Eric Abalahin, and Rebecca Viser. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Aug 12, 2016
Brazil on the global stage
28:09
Harold Trinkunas, senior fellow and director of the Latin America Initiative at Brookings, and David Mares, guest scholar in the Latin America Initiative, discusses their new book Aspirational Power: Brazil’s Long Road to Global Influence.  Also in this episode, Steve Hess recounts navigating a challenging request from President Nixon. Finally, Metropolitan Policy Program Fellow Adie Tomer narrates his path to public policy research on infrastructure.  Aspirational Power: Brazil on the Long Road to Global Influence  The 2016 Rio Olympics: Will Brazil’s emergence get a second wind? Brazil and the international order: Getting back on track Los Angeles will vote again whether to self-finance its infrastructure future Thanks to audio producer Mark Hoelscher, plus thanks to Carisa Nietsche, Bill Finan, Vanessa Sauter, Jessica Pavone, Eric Abalahin, Rebecca Viser, and our intern Sara Abdel-Rahim. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Aug 05, 2016
Fracking + election update
33:42
  After the conventions, a presidential election update from John Hudak. In the interview, Mark Muro, senior fellow and policy director of the Metropolitan Policy Program discusses a plan to address the economic boom-bust cycle in states that rely heavily on “fracking” and how this plan can spur innovation, inclusive economic development, and de-carbonization in the U.S. Also in this podcast a Coffee Break from Eyerusalem Siba, research fellow with the Africa Growth Initiative in the Global Economy and Development program.  LINKS: Permanent trust funds: Funding economic change with fracking revenues Busted: State budgets feel fracking crash Look to advanced industries to help drive productivity gains Enabling female entrepreneurs and beyond Bloomberg’s Clinton endorsement signals a big business problem for Trump and the GOP  
Jul 29, 2016
Coup attempt in Turkey
32:43
Kemal Kirişci, TÜSİAD Senior Fellow in Foreign Policy, discusses the recent coup in Turkey and its implications for Turkey’s regional role, foreign policy, and its democracy. Also in this podcast our final Syrian Refugee series segment with Matteo Garavoglia, a visiting fellow in the Foreign Policy Center on the United States and Europe. Also stay tuned for William Frey, Senior Fellow, Metropolitan Policy Program as he discusses America’s racial and age divide and its effect on the political environment. Links - Turkey after the coup attempt: Implications for Turkish democracy, foreign policy, and the future of the Syrian War - Erdoğan's real opportunity after the failed coup in Turkey - Is Turkish foreign policy becoming pragmatic again? - Diversity Explosion: How New Racial Demographics are Remaking America - Convention cities make exemplary stages to discuss America's racial divide - Is Italy the new Greece? New trends in Europe’s migrant crisis Thanks to audio engineer and producer Zack Kulzer, with editing help from Mark Hoelscher, plus thanks to Carisa Nietsche, Bill Finan, Jessica Pavone, Eric Abalahin, Rebecca Viser, and our intern Sara Abdel-Rahim. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu 
Jul 22, 2016
Islam: A conversation with Shadi Hamid
56:18
Shadi Hamid, senior fellow in the Project on U.S. Relations with the Islamic World in the Center for Middle East Policy and author of the new book Islamic Exceptionalism: How the Struggle Over Islam is Reshaping the World, discusses his own personal experience as an American Muslim, and talks about Islam in the context of modern America and the world. Also in this episode Constanze Stelzenmueller, Robert Bosch Senior Fellow in the Center on the United States and Europe, discusses refugee integration in Germany.   Links Project on U.S. Relations with the Islamic World Islamic Exceptionalism: How the Struggle Over Islam Is Reshaping the World  “Temptations of Power: Islamists and Illiberal Democracy in a New Middle East ” Trump's proposed ban on Muslims Is Islam "exceptional"?   Thanks to audio engineer and producer Zack Kulzer, with editing help from Mark Hoelscher, plus thanks to Carisa Nietsche, Bill Finan, Jessica Pavone, Eric Abalahin, Rebecca Viser, and our intern Sara Abdel-Rahim. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu 
Jul 15, 2016
What Brexit means for Britain and the EU
49:52
Fiona Hill, director of the Center on the United States and Europe at Brookings and a senior fellow in Foreign Policy, discusses the decision of a majority of voters in Britain to leave the E.U. and the consequences of Brexit for the country’s economy, politics, position as a world power, and implications for its citizens. Show Notes   Mr. Putin (New and Expanded) The "greatest catastrophe" of the 21st century? Brexit and the dissolution of the U.K. Brexit—in or out? Implications of the United Kingdom’s referendum on EU membership EU: how to decide (Anand Menon) Thanks to audio engineer and producer Zack Kulzer, with editing help from Mark Hoelscher, plus thanks to Carisa Nietsche, Bill Finan, Jessica Pavone, Eric Abalahin, Rebecca Viser, and our intern Sara Abdel-Rahim. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu 
Jul 08, 2016
Arne Duncan on solutions to Chicago’s youth violence crisis
37:41
Arne Duncan, former U.S. secretary of education during the Obama administration and now a nonresident senior fellow with the Brown Center on Education Policy, discusses the crisis of youth violence in Chicago and solutions that strengthen schools and encourage more opportunities for those who are marginalized to make a living in the legal economy.  “The best thing we can do is create hope, opportunity and jobs particularly on the South and West side for young and black men who have been disenfranchised, who have been on the streets. If we can give them some chances to earn a living in a legal economy not selling drugs and not on street corners, I think we have a chance to do something pretty significant here,” Duncan says. “My fundamental belief is that the police cannot solve this on their own we have to create opportunities for young people in communities who have been marginalized for far too long.” Also in this episode, Bruce Katz, the Centennial Scholar, who discusses how European cities are addressing the refugee crisis in a new segment from our Refugee Series. 
Jul 01, 2016
The Syrian refugee crisis
29:15
Bobby McKenzie, a visiting fellow in the Project on U.S. Relations with the Islamic World, discusses the current situation with and solutions for the Syrian refugee crisis.  “The scale, scope and complexity of the Syria crisis is staggering. Nearly half a million people have lost their lives, 13.5 million are in need of humanitarian assistance, 6.5 million are internally displaced, and there 5 million refugees in neighboring countries - namely, Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey. And hundreds of thousands have made their way to Europe in search of refuge and rights,” McKenzie says. Also in this episode: Bill Finan talks to Elizabeth Ferris Nonresident Senior Fellow in Foreign Policy, and Kemal Kirişci, TÜSİAD Senior Fellow in Foreign Policy, about their new book “The Consequences of Chaos: Syria's Humanitarian Crisis and the Failure to Protect.” Show Notes Towards solutions to the Syrian refugee crisis Rights and responsibilities: Solutions to the Syrian refugee crisis A Syrian refugee speaks From Homs to Hamburg: Refugee movements from Syria to Europe and beyond Event: Refuge and Responsibility: The Syrian Refugee Crisis in 2016 Thanks to audio engineer and producer Zack Kulzer, with editing help from Mark Hoelscher, plus thanks to Carisa Nietsche, Bill Finan, Jessica Pavone, Eric Abalahin, Rebecca Viser, and our intern Sara Abdel-Rahim. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu 
Jun 24, 2016
2016 election (not-a-horse race) update
33:25
John Hudak, deputy director of the Center for Effective Public Management and a senior fellow in Governance Studies, discusses the fundamental dynamics of the 2016 election, the importance of the ground game, vice presidential picks, and prospects for the Senate and/or House flipping from Republican to Democratic control. “I think policy itself is what’s not getting enough attention in these campaigns. … It is not something that is a sexy issue that people want to particularly hear about, they are more interested in the horse race or in this case the fighting that is going on,” Hudak says. “What Americans need to do is take a step back and think about the issues that matter most to them. You have to think a lot about what issues matter the most to you and hold the candidates accountable as much as possible.” Also in this podcast, Teresa Ter-Minassian explains public-private partnerships and their role in development based on her paper for the new project on 21st Century City Governance. Show Notes After California, it’s time for Clinton and Trump to pick their VPs Fiscal and financial issues for 21st century cities Thanks to audio engineer and producer Zack Kulzer, with editing help from Mark Hoelscher, plus thanks to Carisa Nietsche, Bill Finan, Jessica Pavone, Eric Abalahin, Rebecca Viser, and our intern Sara Abdel-Rahim. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu
Jun 17, 2016
Becoming brilliant: What science tells us about raising successful children
45:41
Kathryn Hirsh-Pasek, senior fellow in the Center for Universal Education and a psychology professor at Temple University, and University of Delaware professor Roberta Michnick Golinkoff, also a psychologist, discuss their new book: "Becoming brilliant: What science tells us about raising successful children." In this podcast, Hirsh-Pasek and Golinkoff discuss ways to reimagine what successful learning looks like in a global world using six major skills that will help kids succeed beyond traditional perceptions of success such as good test scores. “What we need to do is train thinkers, to be able to attack the problems in the world,” Golinkoff says. These skills prepare children to become competitive business leaders, entrepreneurs, and scientific pioneers. As Hirsh-Pasek says, “The times have changed. As more businesses realize that their interactions are going to be global, they realize that they need creative thinkers, innovators, and problem solvers.” Also stay tuned for our regular economic update with David Wessel as he looks at four big questions to determine what this year and next will look like for the U.S. economy. Show Notes Becoming brilliant: What science tells us about raising successful children Race against the machine Becoming brilliant: Reimagining education for our time Playful language and communication Thanks to audio engineer and producer Zack Kulzer, with editing help from Mark Hoelscher, plus thanks to Carissa Nietsche, Bill Finan, Jessica Pavone, Eric Abalahin, Rebecca Viser, Brionne Smith, and our intern Sara Abdel-Rahim. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu  
Jun 10, 2016
Phil Klay on the citizen-soldier
43:34
In this podcast, award-winning author and veteran Phil Klay discusses how his experience as a Marine Corps officer in Iraq informed his short-story collection Redeployment, which won the National Book Award in 2014; and also talks about the themes he explores in the new Brookings Essay, “The citizen-soldier: Moral risk and the modern military.” “Most people sign up with the hope of being part of an institution that is doing something good in the world,” Klay says, and that “they will be putting their shoulders to the wheel along with a lot of other people by advancing the ideals of American democracy.” Show Notes The citizen-soldier: Moral risk and the modern military Redeployment Landays told by Afghan women Shade It Black: Death and After in Iraq Red badge of courage What it is like going to war audible.com
Jun 03, 2016
Invest in children for better outcomes
34:06
Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach, director of The Hamilton Project and senior fellow in Economic studies, discusses the importance of investments in children, especially those who are from low socio-economic backgrounds. She highlights issues such as early childhood education, child poverty, and food insecurity, issues about which The Hamilton Project has produced significant research and recommendations. “[W]e’re dangerously underinvesting in children today. And there’s emerging research that indicates that if we spend more on schools, if we make sure that families have more income, or if we alleviate food insecurity, that has a payoff not just today but down the line, in terms of more productive people when they grow up,” Schanzenbach says. Also in this episode: a presidential election update with John Hudak. And our new Metro Lens segment with Martha Ross as she discusses Employment and disconnection among teens and young adults. Show Notes Expanding Preschool Access for Disadvantaged Children Strengthening SNAP to reduce food insecurity and promote economic growth In defense of federal food aid Thanks to audio engineer and producer Zack Kulzer, with editing help from Mark Hoelscher, plus thanks to Carissa Nietsche, Bill Finan, Jessica Pavone, Eric Abalahin, Rebecca Viser, Brionne Smith, and our intern Sara Abdel-Rahim. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu
May 27, 2016
Sextortion: The New cyber crime
44:43
Benjamin Wittes, a senior fellow in Governance Studies and co-founder and editor-in-chief of The LawFare Blog, is co-author of a new study,-“Sextortion: Cyber Security, Teenagers, & Remote Sexual Assault”; and a legislative proposal to close the sextortion sentencing gap. In the podcast, Wittes explains the crime itself; the importance of cyber security and how teens and parents can protect themselves online. “Teenager cyber security hygiene actually matters a great deal,” Wittes says. “It just matters a great deal to protect values and goods that the cyber security community has not traditionally focused on.” Also in this podcast: meet Alaina Harkness, a fellow for the Project on 21st Century City Governance, part of the Centennial Scholar Initiative. Also stay up-to-date about a potential “Brexit” from the EU with some highlights from our Brookings event “Brexit – in or out? Implications of the United Kingdom’s referendum on EU membership.”   Show Notes Sextortion: Cyber Security, Teenagers, & Remote Sexual Assault Closing the Sextortion Sentencing Gap: A Legislative Proposal Justice Department Report : “National Strategy for Child Exploitation Prevention and Interdiction” The LawFare Blog   Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu. Thanks to audio engineer and producer Zack Kulzer, with editing help from Mark Hoelscher, plus thanks to Carissa Nietsche, Bill Finan, Jessica Pavone, Eric Abalahin, Rebecca Viser, Brionne Smith, and our intern Sarah AbdelRahim.        
May 19, 2016
Foreign policy in the Obama era
44:18
Martin Indyk, executive vice president of the Brookings Institution, offers his take on a broad spectrum of foreign policy issues, including peace in the Middle East, the liberal international order, and his own journey in foreign affairs leadership and policymaking. He also discusses the contours of an "Obama doctrine" in foreign policy, and whether the next president will bring continuity or change. Also in this podcast: an economic update from David Wessel, director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy. Also hear Philippe Le Corre, visiting fellow in the Center on the United States and Europe, discuss his upcoming book “China’s Offensive in Europe.”   Show Notes Obama's article in "Atlantic Monthly" Order from Chaos blog   Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu. Thanks to audio engineer and producer Zack Kulzer, with editing help from Mark Hoelscher, plus thanks to Carissa Nietsche, Bill Finan, Jessica Pavone, Eric Abalahin, Rebecca Viser, Brionne Smith, and our intern Sarah AbdelRahim.  
May 13, 2016
Ironic: Vietnam decision-making worked
24:54
Les Gelb, a former Brookings fellow and co-author of the 1979 book The Irony of Vietnam: The System Worked –which is being released this month as a Brookings Press Classic – discusses the influence the Vietnam War has had on how the U.S handles wars and the need for American pragmatism in foreign policy decision-making today. “What made this country great was Americans using their pragmatism, solving problems, and realizing there were certain problems they couldn’t solve--at least, not solve them right away,” Gelb says.   In the podcast, Gelb also explains the “domino theory” that guided U.S. policymakers during the Vietnam conflict. “Vietnam was the essential domino and if it fell to communism, if it fell to the Soviet Union and China, in effect, [then] all of Asia would fall right behind it.”   Also in this episode: another installment of "Steve Hess Stories" with Senior Fellow Emeritus Stephen Hess; and hear more from the Brookings event Examining Charter Schools in America.   Show Notes The Irony of Vietnam: The System Worked    Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
May 06, 2016
The U.S.-Cuba thaw
24:59
Richard Feinberg, a nonresident senior fellow in the Latin America Initiative and author of the forthcoming book, “Open for Business: Building a New Cuban Economy” (Brookings, 2016), discusses current U.S. and Cuba relations after President Obama's visit and looks ahead to Cuba's increasing engagement with the global economy. “The younger generation does have a respect for Fidel Castro and what the older generation accomplished,” Feinberg says. “They want to see a fresh generation of leadership, they want to see a more relaxed political atmosphere, they want more opportunities economically to exercise their own profession and exercise their own talents. They want and fully expect normal relations between Cuba and the United States.”  In this podcast, Feinberg explains how Cuba can reintegrate itself into global economy while encouraging a gradual opening of economic relations with the U.S. Also in this podcast, meet new scholar Susan Hennessey, fellow in National Security in Governance Studies and stay tuned for our presidential election update with John Hudak.    Show Notes Open for Business: Building the New Cuban Economy Obama scores a triple in Havana In Cuba, Obama looks to the post-Castro era   Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Apr 29, 2016
How to get millions learning in the developing world
33:37
Jenny Perlman Robinson, a nonresident fellow in the Center for Universal Education, and Rebecca Winthrop, a senior fellow and director of the Center for Universal Education, discuss a new report: Millions learning: Scaling up quality education in developing countries. In this podcast, Robinson and Winthrop discuss the state of children’s education around the world while highlighting some cases that show how the quality and reach of children’s education can be improved. “Nine out of 10 kids in the world is in primary school, but there is still a lot to be done,” Winthrop says. “A lot of kids are dropping out before they finish secondary school. 75% percent of girls in Sub-Saharan Africa enter primary school but only 8% finish secondary school.” Also in this podcast a Coffee Break with Paul Ginsburg, director of the Health Policy Center and an interview with author Malcolm Sparrow on his new book, "Handcuffed: What Holds Policing Back, and the Keys to Reform." Show Notes: Millions learning: Scaling up quality education in developing countries Getting millions to learn: The impact of Sesame Street around the world Why developing countries must focus on getting millions to learn Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Apr 22, 2016
Hacking hospitals: Is our personal information at risk?
29:18
In this episode, Niam Yaraghi, a fellow in the Brookings Institution's Center for Technology Innovation, explains the current dilemma of security breaches of medical records that are hitting the health care industry.  “The difference between the IT revolution in the health care sector and in any other sector is that other businesses embraced IT naturally and gradually and that allowed them to prepare in all other technological and organizational aspects that are necessary to appropriately use IT,” says Yaraghi. “In the health care sector it happened overnight. From 9.4% in 2008 to 96.9 in 2014.” Also stay tuned for our regular economic update with David Wessel, who talks about taxes; and hear our new Metro Lens segment with Natalie Holmes who discusses concentrated poverty in places like Cleveland and San Antonio. Show notes: Hackers, phishers, and disappearing thumb drives: Lessons learned from major health care data breaches Hospital hacks expose security weaknesses Tear down this health care information breach “wall of shame” U.S. concentrated poverty in the wake of the Great Recession Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.  
Apr 15, 2016
Burma/Myanmar and Aung San Suu Kyi
40:28
In this podcast, Lex Rieffel, a nonresident senior fellow in the Global Economy and Development program, discusses Myanmar’s transition to democracy, examining the economic, social and political aspects of the transition, as well as potential obstacles in the short run. “So much foreign aid has poured in and will continue to pour in now that Aung San Suu Kyi is leading the government that it may do more harm than good, becoming a factor that actually derails the transition," says Rieffel. Also in this episode: another installment of "Steve Hess Stories" with Senior Fellow Emeritus Stephen Hess; and a conversation with Tanvi Madan, director of The India Project at Brookings. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen in all the usual places, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Apr 08, 2016
Baltimore a year after the riots
32:03
One year after: Observations on the rise of innovation districts Jennifer S. Vey, a fellow with the Centennial Scholar Initiative, discusses the current economic, social, and political situation in Baltimore a year after the riots. “1/5 people in Baltimore lives in a neighborhood of extreme poverty,” Vey says. In this podcast, Vey describes the current state of Baltimore and urges the start of discussions about the abject poverty facing many cities in the United States. Also in this episode: stay tuned for our presidential election update with John Hudak. Also, Vanda Felbab-Brown discusses global drug policy and the upcoming United Nations General Assembly special session on drug policy. Show Notes "The Third Rail" One year after: Observations on the rise of innovation districts Confronting Suburban Poverty in America Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Apr 01, 2016
How well are American students learning?
39:05
Tom Loveless, a nonresident senior fellow in Governance Studies, explains his latest research on measuring achievement of American students. “The bottom line here: the implementation of the common core has appeared to have very little impact on student achievement,” Loveless says. In this episode, he discusses whether the common core is failing our students, whether AP achievement is indicative of student success, and the role of principals as instructional leaders. Also in this episode: Get to know Constanze Stelzenmüller, the Robert Bosch Senior Fellow in the Center on the United States and Europe, during our "Coffee Break” segment. Also stay tuned to hear the final episode in our centenary series with current and past Brookings scholars. Show notes: The 2016 Brown Center Report on American Education Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Mar 25, 2016
Why the poorest kids quit high school
26:00
Melissa Kearney, a nonresident senior fellow in Economic Studies, explains her new research (with Phillip Levine for the Brookings Papers on Economic Activity) on high school students who are growing up in places with high income inequality and their decision to stay in high school or not. “Kids at the bottom of the income distribution are discouraged by higher levels of income inequality as opposed to being driven by it,” Kearney says. “Low income kids are more likely to drop out of high school than high income kids. But conditional to being low income, kids who are growing up in states or cities characterized by high levels of lower tail income inequality—a greater gap between the bottom and the middle—are more likely to drop out of high school.” Also in this episode: Our regular economic update with David Wessel, senior fellow and director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy. Also stay tuned to hear our new Metro Lens segment with Amy Liu, vice president and director of the Metropolitan Policy Program. Show Notes: Generation Unbound Income Inequality, Social Mobility, and the Decision to Drop Out Of High School Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Mar 18, 2016
The Supreme Court after Scalia
31:39
Russell Wheeler, a visiting fellow in Governance Studies and an expert on federal courts, discusses the process and politics of replacing Associate Justice Antonin Scalia on the U.S. Supreme Court given the current political climate.  “This polarization our politics has affected the polarization of the confirmation and nomination process and I don’t see how it gets ratcheted down,” Wheeler says. “It gets ratcheted up but I don’t see what happens to get us back to the day in which the Senate basically fulfilled its duty, which was to advise and consent to confirmation of qualified nominees and we’re moving away from that basic obligation of the Senate.” In the podcast, Wheeler gives an overview of the president's and the Senate's constitutional duties for replacing a Supreme Court justice. He also discusses the implications of appointing a Supreme Court justice now, or waiting until the next president is sworn in. Also in this episode: another segment of “Steve Hess Stories” with Senior Fellow Emeritus Stephen Hess; and Lincoln Mitchell discusses his new book, “The Democracy Promotion Paradox.”   Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Mar 11, 2016
A Syrian refugee speaks
51:00
  Qutaiba Idlbi, a Syrian refugee and activist, and Robert L. McKenzie, a Brookings visiting fellow and  expert on the Middle East and North Africa, discuss the Syrian crisis from a personal and public policy perspective. In this podcast, Idlbi shares his own experience participating in the Syrian revolution as it began and the repercussions for him and his family. McKenzie also provides feedback on the crisis from a policy perspective and the role that the United States should play in accepting refugees. “Getting arrested is worse than getting killed because when you are arrested you wish you could get killed every moment you are in prison because of how much you are tortured,” Idlbi says about his experience in Syria. McKenzie says that, “There is no question that the Syrian crisis is the defining crisis of our time. It is a complex emergency that is ongoing.” See also: Syrian refugees tell their stories Also, Senior Fellow Elaine Kamarck gives her assessment of what happened on Super Tuesday, and looks ahead to the continuing presidential primary contest. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Mar 04, 2016
How public policy has changed over the decades
32:34
As a part of Brookings Centenary series, Strobe Talbott, current president of Brookings, and Bruce MacLaury, president of Brookings from 1977 to 1995, look to the major policy challenges that Brookings should take on in its second century while they reflect on their own periods of leading Brookings. Talbott and MacLaury discuss the role of Brookings in the past, present, and future as a nexus of non-partisan ideas, with a passionate commitment to the common good.  From their perspectives, the two presidents examine how the landscape of public policy research and analysis has changed since the years they assumed the presidency of Brookings.
Feb 26, 2016
The rich-poor life expectancy gap
18:13
Gary Burtless, a senior fellow in Economic Studies, explains new research on the growing longevity gap between high-income and low-income Americans, especially among the aged. “Life expectancy difference of low income workers, middle income workers, and high income workers has been increasing over time,” Burtless says. “For people born in 1920 their life expectancy was not as long typically as the life expectancy of people who were born in 1940. But those gains between those two birth years were very unequally distributed if we compare people with low mid-career earnings and people with high mid-career earnings.” Burtless also discusses retirement trends among the educated and non-educated, income inequality among different age groups, and how these trends affect early or late retirement rates. Also stay tuned for our regular economic update with David Wessel, who also looks at the new research and offers his thoughts on what it means for Social Security. Show Notes Later retirement, inequality and old age, and the growing gap in longevity between rich and poor Disparity in Life Spans of the Rich and the Poor Is Growing Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Feb 19, 2016
Five Rising Democracies
30:19
Ted Piccone, a senior fellow in the Project on International Order and Strategy discusses the five rising democracies; Brazil, South Africa, India, Indonesia, and Turkey and their role in the international liberal order. “These countries show that you can have democratization and improvements in political freedom and at the same time grow your economies and improve in terms of human development,” Piccone says. In the podcast, Piccone provides an overview of each of the five nations highlighted in his new book, “Five Rising Democracies and the Fate of the International Liberal Order,” and how their economic, social, and political development allows them greater access in global politics. Also in this episode, “Steve Hess Stories” with Senior Fellow Emeritus Stephen Hess. Show Notes Five Rising Democracies and the Fate of the International Liberal Order More Steve Hess Stories on SoundCloud   Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Feb 12, 2016
What happened in Iowa and the next presidential primaries
33:29
Molly Reynolds, a fellow in the Governance Studies Program at Brookings, explains why the Iowa Caucuses matter so much in the presidential election. She also discusses what to expect from Congress this year for both congressional elections and the presidential election. “There are a lot of quirky details to the Iowa Caucus,” Reynolds says. In this interview, she explains what makes the Iowa Caucuses so important in the presidential nomination process and what to expect as the races continue. She also weighs in on what we can expect from Congress this year, including appropriations and what Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says he plans to do. Also in this episode: Listen to Hollie Russon Gilman, a fellow at New America and Harvard’s Ash Center for Democratic Governance and Innovation, discuss her new book "Democracy Reinvented." Also, get to know Vanessa Williamson, a fellow in Governance Studies at Brookings, during our "Coffee Break." Show Notes: Primary Politics: Everything You Need to Know about How America Nominates Its Presidential Candidates How unrepresentative are the early presidential primary states? After Iowa, advice from "The West Wing" might get Hillary to the Oval Democracy Reinvented Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Feb 05, 2016
Celebrating the Brookings Centenary: The Trustees
21:08
This episode features two of the leaders of the Brookings Institution: the co-chairs of the Brookings Board of Trustees, John L. Thornton and David M. Rubenstein. They reflect on our first 100 years and share their thoughts on Brookings’s second century. The episode is the first in a series celebrating 100 years of the Brookings Institution. Later in this series, you’ll hear from former and current Brookings presidents as well as scholars.
Jan 28, 2016
Made in Africa: manufacturing and economic growth
46:44
In this week’s episode, John Page, a senior fellow in the Global Economy and Development Program, assesses the potential role of several economic strategies in transforming Africa’s industrial development for the global economy. “Between now and about 2030, the estimates are that as many as 85 million jobs at [the] bottom end of manufacturing will migrate out of China. So the question is: where will they go?” In this podcast, Page explains that with policy change, great focus, and a cohesive implementation of economic strategies, a number of African countries can capitalize on this opportunity in the global market. Also in this episode: Our regular economic update with David Wessel, senior fellow and director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy. Also, a new segment about issues affecting metropolitan areas with Alan Berube, senior fellow and deputy director of the Metropolitan Policy Program. Show Notes: Made in Africa Made in Africa: Some New Thinking on Africa Industrialization Day Foresight Africa: Top priorities for the continent in 2016 Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Jan 21, 2016
Obama and the 2016 elections
36:06
Tune in to hear Sarah Binder, senior fellow in Governance Studies, and Bill Galston, senior fellow and the Ezra K. Zilkha Chair in Governance Studies and former policy advisor to President Bill Clinton, review President Obama’s State of the Union address and look ahead to the 2016 presidential and congressional elections. In this episode, they assess policy issues from the Obama Administration and discuss how the presidential candidates will address these issues. They identify the political party of the next President as a determining characteristic in the legacy President Obama will leave behind. Show Notes: Obama's final State of the Union: An incomplete success State of the Union 2016 research and commentary America's Political Dynasties Brookings, Esquire team up on critical choices for America   Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Jan 15, 2016
Top economic issues in 2016
27:09
Ted Gayer, vice President and director of the Economic Studies Program at Brookings and the Joseph A. Pechman Senior Fellow, forecasts the top economic issues in the upcoming year. Tune in to hear more about the labor market, wages, and productivity growth in 2016. Gayer also outlines which economic issues the presidential candidates should be talking about in the elections and how much impact the president has in economic policy decisions. Also in this podcast: “What’s Happening in Congress” with John Hudak, senior fellow in Governance Studies and deputy director of the Center for Effective Public Management. And also get to know Mike Hansen, senior fellow and deputy director of the Brown Center on Education Policy, during our “Coffee Break.” Show Notes: Rising morbidity and mortality in midlife among white non-Hispanic Americans in the 21st century (Case/Deaton study) Top Economic Stories of 2015 (from Economic Studies Program) Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Jan 08, 2016
Best of the Brookings Cafeteria in 2015
31:28
In this last episode of the Brookings Cafeteria podcast for 2015, you'll hear some of the best moments from the show selected from the year's episodes. Thanks to the team that makes this podcast possible: Zack Kulzer, Mark Hoelscher, Carissa Nitchy, Jessica Pavone, Rebecca Viser and Eric Abalahin. Also, special thanks to the leadership and support of David Nassar and Richard Fawal. And a very special thanks to our intern Karen WaelGirgis, who was instrumental in putting this episode and many others together. Show Notes: Visit the home page for the Brookings Cafeteria podcast to listen to all of the episodes. Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Dec 31, 2015
Why girls’ education is the world’s best investment
21:35
Rebecca Winthrop, senior fellow and director of the Center for Universal Education at Brookings, discusses her new book (co-authored with Gene Sperling and Christina Kwauk) "What Works in Girls' Education: Evidence for the World's Best Investment" (Brookings Institution Press, 2015). “Girls’ education really is quite unique in terms of interventions you can do," she says. "Not because it’s a silver bullet; there are no such things as silver bullets. But, certainly in developing country contexts, it has so many high returns across such a wide variety of areas important for society.” In this podcast, Winthrop walks us through the evolution of girls’ education and how “Twenty-five years ago, girls’ education was an issue in every single country in the world.” She reminds us that there’s a reason to be optimistic: “There are a lot of huge gains in girls’ education. There is a lot to celebrate. Over the last twenty years, the number of girls who have been out of school have been cut in half.” Also in this podcast: Listen to Bill Frey, senior fellow in the Metropolitan Policy program and author of the book “Diversity Explosion,” answer a question from one of our listeners on how we define post-baby boom generations. And also stay tuned for the next installment of “Steve Hess Stories,” in which Senior Fellow Emeritus Stephen Hess discusses his childhood in New York City and his first memories of the presidency. ______________________________________________ Show Notes: What Works in Girls’ Education: Evidence for the World’s Best Investment Diversity Explosion: How New Racial Demographics are Remaking America America’s Political Dynasties Also listen to our other podcast episodes about global education: Education challenges in the Arab world, with Maysa Jalbout The power of universal education, with Julia Gillard A bleak picture for children's education in the Arab world, with Hafex Ghanem and Liesbet Steer Educating Children Worldwide: Access Plus Learning, with Rebecca Winthrop __________________________________________________________ Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Dec 22, 2015
Foreign policy issues the candidates should be talking about
35:25
“A lot of the issues that we focus on as crises on a daily basis—I think particularly of Syria—they are certainly crises in their own right,” says Jeremy Shapiro. “But to my mind the failure to deal with them does have a lot to do with the consequences of the breakdown in international order and the breakdown in the international capacity to create order.” Jeremy Shapiro, fellow in the Project on International Order and Strategy and the Center on the United States and Europe at Brookings, gives his view on the top foreign policy issues of the day and in the 2016 presidential election. “The interesting thing about terrorism is that it is never, at least for advanced societies, a direct threat in any existential way, despite what many of our politicians say,” argues Shapiro in this podcast, “What can threaten a nation like ours is that in the process of responding to an attack like in San Bernardino or in Paris that we destroy the things that are most precious to us, like our freedoms, like our civil liberties, that we engage in foreign policy adventures in order to try to make ourselves feel more secure and more safe that actually erode our power.” Also in this podcast: The final installment of the Paris climate conference series by Bruce Jones, vice president and director of Foreign Policy at Brookings. And also stay tuned for our regular economic update with David Wessel, senior fellow and director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy. ______________________________________________ Show Notes: Order from Chaos: Foreign policy in a troubled world 'What U.S. Foreign Policy Really Needs Is...' Suzanne Maloney talks U.S.-Iran relations, the Iran nuclear deal, and the future of Iran  How Russia and America make the same mistakes in Syria How not to overreact to ISIS The perils of "French Islam": France’s misguided response to the Paris attacks _____________________________________________________ Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Dec 18, 2015
Hong Kong, China, and the Umbrella Movement
35:55
Richard Bush, director of the Center for East Asia Policy Studies and holder of the Chen-Fu and Cecilia Yen Koo Chair in Taiwan Studies and also the Michael H. Armacost Chair, talks about Hong Kong’s relationship to China, the umbrella movement of 2014, and the future of democracy in Hong Kong. “First of all,” Bush says, “there is the continuing challenge of how you make the Hong Kong economy competitive in a global economy that is … constantly changing technologically.” “On the political side, I personally believe that Hong Kong would benefit from having competitive elections for senior leaders. … But elections in and of themselves won’t solve all the governance problems that Hong Kong has.” Also in this podcast: Listen to with the first installment of “Steve Hess Stories,” in which Senior Fellow Emeritus Stephen Hess explains how he came to write a best-selling book, America's Political Dynasties, while serving in the Army. And part four of our Paris climate conference series with Fellow Philip Wallach. ______________________________________________ Show Notes: The return of the Taiwan issue to U.S.-China relations Why Hong Kong’s next election really matters Hong Kong: The next round on universal suffrage What’s at stake at the U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue? Hong Kong government announces electoral reform details What does China having the largest GDP mean? _____________________________________________________ Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Dec 11, 2015
College Rankings: Is there a better system?
38:32
Jonathan Rothwell, fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program at Brookings, tells us what’s missing in conventional college ranking systems like that of U.S. News & World Report. And using President Obama’s new college score card, Rothwell talks about his new value added approach to rankings. “I don’t actually think we need more college ranking systems. I think we need better ranking systems,” argues Rothwell. The “problems with U.S. News and some of the conventional rankings,” he continues, include “way too much emphasis on selectivity. Non-selective schools have no chance to ever make it towards the top of the rankings. And as a result there are a lot of hidden gems out there … that are providing great outcomes for [their] students.” Also in this podcast: In our Coffee Break segment, meet a scholar who grew up in Vancouver, the son of World War II refugees, visiting fellow Alar Olljum. And stay tuned for part three of our Paris climate conference series as Senior Fellow Adele Morris discusses the role of carbon pricing in reducing greenhouse gas emissions. ______________________________________________ Show Notes: Using earnings data to rank colleges: A value-added approach updated with College Scorecard data Toward an economic mobility ranking of U.S. colleges Understanding the College Scorecard Skills, success, and why your choice of college matters Is it me or my college? These rankings will help you find out Alumni from these colleges (almost) always pay their debts In ‘value-added’ college rankings, these public schools step up ______________________________________________ Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Dec 03, 2015
The ISIS attack on Paris
22:27
Daniel Byman, an expert on counterterrorism and Middle East Security, and research director for the Center for Middle East Policy at Brookings, explains what we know and don’t know about the ISIS terrorist attack in Paris and whether he thinks ISIS will strike the U.S. Also, part two of our Paris climate talk series on new technology from Mark Muro, senior fellow and policy director of the Metropolitan Policy Program. “The real danger to me is not taking care of the refugee problem,” argues Byman, “If these refugees are trapped in the Middle East, if they’re in these huge camps where there are no opportunities, if they’re not integrated into host societies, over time we’re going to see the development of a terrorism and radicalization problem among large numbers of refugees.” Also in this podcast: “What’s Happening in Congress” with special guest Molly Reynolds, a fellow in Governance Studies. ______________________________________________ Show Notes: What do the Paris attacks tell us about foreign fighters? Five things to know about the Paris attack A look at the policy options in war torn Syria (video) Do Syrian refugees pose a terrorism threat? The believer: How an introvert became the leader of the Islamic State Five ways to make innovation 'sticky' Green banking goes local ______________________________________________ Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Nov 19, 2015
Paris climate conference (COP21): what you need to know
44:55
Timmons Roberts, nonresident senior fellow at Brookings and Ittleson Professor of Environmental Studies and Sociology at Brown University discusses climate change and the upcoming global climate talks in Paris.  “Scientists are telling us,” Roberts says, “that about 2 degrees Celsius is about the highest limit to stay safe... And in fact right now we’re just under 1 degree Celsius of warming and we’re already seeing these impacts of wildfires, droughts, heat waves, flooding, sea level rise, melting Greenland icesheets and Antarctica being potentially destabilized. There are great risks we’re running at 1 degree. What is it going to be like at 2?” Also hear from Senior Fellow Audrey Singer as she discusses a new report on immigrants and their integration into American society. ______________________________________________ Show Notes: Climate and Development Lab (Brown University) 2015 Paris Climate Conference (COP21) Why we (still) need the UN to deliver on climate change? Obama walking a razor's edge in Alaska on climate change Power in a warming world The Integration of Immigrants into American Society ______________________________________________ Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Nov 13, 2015
The 2016 presidential election and why primaries matter
26:04
This week, Elaine Kamarck talks presidential primaries, congressional primaries, and the problems facing our current nominating system. She also offers predictions on the likely GOP and Democratic presidential nominees. Listen to find out who she’s tapped to win. “Political parties are incredibly important,” says Kamarck, “They shape Americans’ behaviors. They are the best predictor of how Americans are going to vote. And there are in fact real and meaningful differences between the parties. You can’t really have democracies without political parties. Political parties are the sort of essence of democracy, but they’re also the part of democracy that voters love to hate.” Kamarck is a senior fellow and founding director of the Center for Effective Public Management. She is also author of Primary Politics: Everything You Need to Know about how America Nominates its Presidential Candidates. “The primary method of nominating candidates increases polarization,” argues Elaine. “The place that you see it affect behavior most dramatically is in congressional primaries. … So what happens is the most extreme voters tend to dominate and they pull the Democrats to the left and Republicans to the right. What a surprise then when they get to Congress and nobody can agree on anything?” Also hear David Wessel give his regular economic update, this time on tax reform proposals from the campaign trail. ______________________________________________ Show Notes: The GOP Debates: Can any Republican beat the celebrity candidates? The illusive appeal of the non-politician A new kind of politics, not Benghazi, doomed McCarthy Speaker's bid Why Speaker Boehner can't govern: Primaries, parties, privacy, and pork Increasing turnout in congressional primaries In praise of old fashioned politics ______________________________________________ Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Nov 06, 2015
Ukraine’s long Russian entanglement
31:46
Marvin Kalb, a nonresident senior fellow at Brookings and former CBS News Correspondent, discusses his new book "Imperial Gamble: Putin, Ukraine and the New Cold War." “I think since 1991 at the end of the Soviet Union, the end of Communism as a global philosophy, Ukrainians have come to understand that they are an independent culture,” explains Kalb. “The shame of it is that though they are, they are locked into a history which may deny them the full expression of their politics and their culture. And they can’t escape that; it is simply a part of their history.” “When I started doing the research for this book,” Kalb says, “one of the things that I did was to go back and read notes of the classes I used to do fifty and sixty years ago as a graduate student. … And I realized, rather quickly I’m happy to say, that unless you went back a thousand years, truly, you would not understand why Putin is doing what he’s doing now either in Crimea, or Ukraine, or even in Syria. You couldn’t because the thousand years gives you the perspective and the reasoning and the psychological backdrop for current actions that may confound the West, may confound the president of the United States, but they don’t confound Russian nationalists, people who have been raised on this history.” Also in this podcast: Get to know Matteo Garavoglia, a dual German and Italian citizen and an Italy Program Fellow, during our “Coffee Break.” ______________________________________________ Show Notes: Read more about Marvin’s book “Imperial Gamble” Mr. Putin: Operative in the Kremlin Putin’s Crimean gamble: Russia, Ukraine, and the new Cold War Russia’s intervention in Syria: Protracting an already endless conflict Really, actually avoiding a new Cold War Stumbling towards conflict with Russia? Putin’s deceptive pause: What are Russia’s next steps in Ukraine? ______________________________________________ Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Oct 30, 2015
Can we end rural hunger and reach the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals?
45:08
Homi Kharas and John McArthur discuss their Ending Rural Hunger project, designed to help the world achieve one important facet of the “No Hunger” Sustainable Development Goal.   “[P]robably about ¾ of the [food insecurity] problem that we’re dealing with globally is actually in rural areas,” Kharas says in this podcast. McArthur explains, “I think the first thing to note is that the world is making progress. So roughly speaking, undernourishment as a share of the world is dropping by about 1 percent every three years.” Also in this episode, John Hudak gives his regular “What’s happening in Congress” update. ______________________________________________ Show Notes: Ending Rural Hunger (Report) Why 17 is a Beautiful Number 15 Million Success Stories Under the Millennium Development Goals I expect great outcomes from the Sustainable Development Goals The promise and pitfalls of partnerships in tackling extreme poverty around the world Dispatch from Italy: Ending Rural Hunger United Nations: Sustainable Development Goals   A Note from Our Guests: Homi and John are very grateful to the full team that contributed to the Ending Rural Hunger project. The report itself was prepared by a group in Brookings’s Global Economy and Development program, which also included: Geoffrey Gertz, Sinead Mowlds, and Lorenz Noe, assisted by Julie Biau, Soumya Chattopadhyay, Krista Rasmussen and Madelyn Swift. The report design and interactive website were developed in collaboration with Data Act Lab, including: Alexandra Silfverstolpe, Daniel Lapidus, Mikael Göransson, Niklas Beinhoff, Martin Lindbratt, Tobias Strollo and Arkadiusz Mytych. ______________________________________________ Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.  
Oct 23, 2015
A discussion on the Israeli-Palestinian conflict
47:24
Fellows Natan Sachs and Khaled Elgindy from the Center for Middle East Policy at Brookings debate the challenges facing the Israeli-Palestinian peace process. “In the long term, [Hamas] is not where peace lies… What doomed the disengagement in Gaza was the rise of Hamas and the continuation of the war from it… This reality, where war continues from a territory that is evacuated is perhaps the biggest [factor], except for the second intifada,… that has made Israelis skeptical of peace,” explains Natan.  “The other two trends on the ground are deepening Israeli occupation…You would expect if you are moving towards a two state solution…that there would be movement towards disengaging from that reality rather than deepening it. But it is in fact deepening. There are more settlers, more construction. And that is a source of anger for Palestinians who see more and more of their land being swallowed up… and their hopes for an independent state sort of vanishing before their eyes,” says Khaled in this podcast. Also in this podcast: "Coffee Break" with Molly Reynolds. Coffee Break is a new segment where we ask scholars at Brookings six questions to get to know them and their work more personally. ______________________________________________ Show Notes: Palestinian political crisis deepens with collapse of unity government The end of the peace process: What comes next? Abbas’ UN speech: What it means and what it doesn’t The new politics of religion and gender in Israel Israel and the United States: A dialogue of the deaf Dilemmas of the Israeli-Palestinian impasse  ______________________________________________ Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Oct 16, 2015
The future of American land warfare
34:10
“To use some of the time honored clichés, ‘The enemy may get a vote too.’ Or the Bolshevik line, ‘You may not have an interest in war, but war may have an interest in you.’ I paraphrase that to say we may not, at the moment, have an interest in counterinsurgency and stabilization missions, but they may have an interest in us… we can’t be like the ostrich putting our head in the sand just because we’re tired of these kinds of wars. They might come back, whether we like it or not.” says Senior Fellow Michael O’Hanlon about his new book, The Future of Land Warfare. After learning about the various scenarios that might necessitate land warfare, we’ll hear Russ Whitehurst, senior fellow in Economic Studies and Editor of the Evidence Speaks project, discuss the cost of universal Pre-K. “The question is: what should the nation or states do to increase participation rates to a universal level?” Whitehurst asks in this project. “And what I’ve found by looking at the evidence is that actually people haven’t provided very good evidence on how many children are presently served.” Also, stay tuned to hear expert David Wessel update us on one of the nation’s most alarming economic problems – wage stagnation. Show Notes: Read more about O'Hanlon's book The Future of Land Warfare The future of the U.S. army Toward a ‘‘Reaganov’’ Russia: Russian Security Policy after Putin Obama the Carpenter: The President's National Security Legacy  What role will evidence play in the 2016 election? Do we already have universal preschool? Why public school vouchers could have bi-partisan appeal Hutchins Roundup: wealth inequality, student borrowing, and more Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Oct 08, 2015
The plight of Syrian refugees
54:39
“For someone who has followed these issues from 1989 ... it is a sad moment,” says Kemal Kirişci in this podcast. “It is a sad moment because we feel that international solidarity is not there. And that solidarity was, ... for a fleeting moment, triggered by that little child ... on the beaches of Turkey.” Kirisci, TÜSİAD Senior Fellow at Brookings and an expert on Turkish foreign policy and migration studies, speaks on why Syrians are fleeing to Europe, the impact of Syrian displacement on neighboring countries, and how the failure of the international community to do its part in resettling refugees has increased Syrian reliance on human smugglers. “I think there is a growing loss of hope. There is a growing feeling that the likelihood of things improving in Syria is less than nil,” he says. Also stay tuned for "What’s happening in Congress" with Brookings Fellow John Hudak, and hear Senior Fellows E.J. Dionne and William Galston discuss their new paper advocating for universal voting. Show Notes: Europe is not enough: Coping with the Syrian refugee crisis globally Why 100,000s of Syrian refugees are fleeing to Europe What Turkey's open-door policy means for Syrian Refugees Notes from the Syrian-Turkish border Refugees as Survivors  Northern Exodus: How Turkey Can Integrate Syrian Refugees Elizabeth Ferris and Kemal Kirişci forthcoming paper Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Sep 25, 2015
U.S.-Iran relations, the Iran nuclear deal, and the future of Iran
30:04
“Iran gets out of jail free. I mean, they’re out of the penalty box at this point," says Senior Fellow Suzanne Maloney in this podcast on Iran in a post-nuclear deal world. "The rest of the world will do business as usual with Iran. Iran will be welcomed to international fora. The ... stench of pariah-hood that had attached itself to Iran during the presidency of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad—both because of the nuclear escalation and because of Ahmadinejad’s proclivity for really provocative statements and reprehensible rhetoric on the Holocaust and other issues—that problem is now gone.” Maloney, the interim deputy director of Foreign Policy at Brookings, and a senior fellow in the Center for Middle East Policy, examines the impact of the nuclear deal on U.S.-Iran relations and on the Iranian people, discusses Iran’s place in the international community, and talks about her optimism for the future of Iran. “It’s a young, dynamic, incredibly well-positioned society for the future,” she says. “I think if I were to place a bet on the long-term democratic opportunities in the region, Iran is it. By a long shot.”  Also in this episode, Senior Fellow David Wessel, director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal & Monetary Policy, delivers his regular "Wessel's Economic Update, this time on the distribution of student loan debt. Show Notes: Follow Suzanne Maloney on Twitter @MaloneySuzanne The Brookings Essay: Iran Surprises Itself and the World: A new president may take his country in a new direction Debating the Iran Deal Series Iran, Syria, And The Secretarian Challenge Letters to the Ayatollah: Why Obama's Latest Outreach to Iran's Supreme Leader Was A Mistake Maloney's new book: Iran's Political Economy since the Revolution Brookings's Markaz blog on Middle East Politics and Policy Debating the Iran Nuclear Deal by Robert Einhorn   Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Sep 11, 2015
Community colleges and college affordability
19:08
“Almost half of undergraduates in the United States start at a community college,” says Fellow Adela Soliz in this podcast. Soliz, a new fellow in the Brown Center on Education Policy at Brookings, identifies challenges faced by students looking to transfer from community colleges to four-year institutions, reacts to President Obama’s proposal to make community college free, and discusses the conflict between for-profit colleges and community colleges. Regarding the conflict between the two, she says, “From an institutional perspective, there is a lot of potential for competition to be a beneficial thing. If the community colleges are losing students to the for-profits, then that could encourage them to increase their efficiency and increase their quality. [However] there are a couple of reasons why that may not be happening.”   Also in this episode, Fellow John Hudak, managing editor of FixGov blog, offers his "What's Happening in Congress" update. Show Notes: Increasing community college student transfer rates Will free college lead to more degrees? Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.  
Aug 21, 2015
Jihadist terrorism, Islamic State, and the war in Yemen
30:38
“We have successfully built up our defenses so that here, at home in the United States, we’re probably safer than we were a decade ago but abroad our terrorist enemy is more numerous, more barbaric, more dangerous than ever before,” says Senior Fellow Bruce Riedel in this podcast. Riedel, director of the Intelligence Project at Brookings, and also a former CIA officer and senior policy official, identifies the catalysts of the global jihadist movement, discusses the rise of the Islamic State and its rivalry with al-Qaida, addresses the crisis in Yemen, and examines how the Obama administration can better deploy soft power tools. “A strategy that only uses the stick isn’t going to work,” he says. “We have to have a strategy that not only goes after the terrorists but also seeks to deal with the underlying issues that produce this wave of terrorism. That’s easy to say and very very hard to do.” Also in this episode, Senior Fellow David Wessel, director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal & Monetary Policy, delivers his regular "Wessel's Economic Update." Show Notes: Another royal reshuffle in Saudi Arabia: King Salman reorders his court again The war in Yemen has one local winner: al-Qaida. Why aren't the Saudis more concerned? The Pakistani Pivot from Saudi Arabia to China Interview on "Stand Up! with Pete Dominick" JFK's Forgotten Crisis: Tibet, the CIA, and Sino-Indian War What We Won: America's Secret War in Afghanistan, 1979-89 Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu. "22" by Taylor Swift, Max Martin, and Shellback (Big Machine Records, Republic Records)
Aug 06, 2015
Economic costs of hosting the Olympics and World Cup
43:43
“Go and interview a restaurateur in central London near Piccadilly or go and interview a theatre manager in central London about how their business was in central London in August of 2012 [during the Summer Olympics] and they’ll say ‘It was awful. It was like the great depression,’” says economist Andrew Zimbalist in this podcast. Zimbalist, a professor of economics at Smith College and the author of Circus Maximus: The Economic Gamble Behind Hosting the Olympics and the World Cup (Brookings Institution Press, 2015), reveals the real economic costs and benefits of hosting mega-sporting events and discusses the prospects of FIFA following the corruption scandal. “This is what the modern Olympics and the modern World Cup are really about,” he says. “It’s the Circus Maximus in the old days of referring to these gigantic stadiums and elaborate facilities, but it’s also a Circus Maximus in the sense that it’s a circus.” Also in this episode, Senior Fellow John Hudak, managing editor of FixGov blog, offers his "What's Happening in Congress" update. -------------------------------------------------------------------- Show Notes: Circus Maximus: The Economic Gamble Behind Hosting the Olympics and the World Cup  Sports, Jobs, and Taxes: The Economic Impact of Sports Teams and Stadiums, Andrew Zimbalist and Roger Noll  Andrew Zimbalist explains how FIFA treats the Women’s World Cup differently than the Men’s  Olympics numbers don’t add up (Zimbalist op-ed in Boston Globe) -------------------------------------------------------------------- Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu. 
Jul 13, 2015
New Orleans’ resilience 10 years after Hurricane Katrina
28:04
“New Orleans is still in the middle of a major urban experiment,” says Senior Fellow Amy Liu in this podcast, the 50th episode of the Brookings Cafeteria. “It’s an urban experiment that is not so much just about responding to Katrina and the oil spill, but really is the great experiment of our time.” The central question within that experiment is, “regardless of any environmental or economic disaster—like the Great Recession, the loss of a manufacturing sector—how does an economic center, a population center, really continue to grow and adapt?” Liu is co-director of the Metropolitan Policy Program at Brookings and has been an expert on the rebuilding efforts in greater New Orleans and southern Louisiana post Hurricane Katrina, the Gulf oil spill, and the recession.  -------------------------------------------------------------------- Also in this episode, Senior Fellow David Wessel, director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy, offers his regular "Wessel's Economic Update." -------------------------------------------------------------------- Show Notes: The Data Center The New Orleans Index (2011) "New Orleans Five Years After: A Transformation Unfolding" "Resilience and Opportunity: Lessons from the U.S. Gulf Coast after Katrina and Rita" (book, 2011) -------------------------------------------------------------------- Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.  
Jul 07, 2015
Jean-Marie Guéhenno on his leadership of UN peacekeeping and "The Fog of Peace"
24:42
“More and more we see that the separation between war and peace is not as clear-cut as it used to be,” says Jean-Marie Guéhenno in this podcast. Guéhenno, president and CEO of the International Crisis Group and a nonresident senior fellow at Brookings, was head of United Nations peacekeeping operations from 2000 to 2008, the longest-serving person in that post. In this podcast, he talks about his toughest peacekeeping operation, his best results, and why a political process is so important to the success of peacekeeping operations, all themes in his latest book, “The Fog of Peace: A Memoir of International Peacekeeping in the 21st Century" (Brookings Institution Press, 2015). Also in this episode, Governance Studies Fellow John Hudak explains what’s happening in Congress. --- Show Notes: The Fog of Peace: A Memoir of International Peacekeeping in the 21st Century United Nations peacekeeping fact sheet  Crisisgroup.org --- Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Jun 18, 2015
Why the European Union matters
27:49
“The European Union is, in a way, a treasure,” says Distinguished Brookings Fellow Javier Solana in this podcast. “It’s a treasure that really signifies peace, that signifies cooperation … the type of thing the global world of today needs.” Solana, former secretary general of NATO and EU foreign policy chief, describes how he started as a physics professor before turning to policy-making and reaching the highest levels of Spanish and European institutions; discusses how the EU negotiates the shoals of nationalism; addresses the EU’s responses to the crisis in Ukraine and its approach to the negotiations with Iran; and offers his advice for success in navigating a global world.    Also in this episode, Senior Fellow David Wessel, director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy, offers his regular "Wessel's Economic Update," focusing on the question of whether the Federal Reserve's quantitative easing program increased inequality. And, George Burroughs gets an update from Nonresident Senior Fellow Pat Mulroy on the water crisis in the western states. This follows the Brookings Cafeteria podcast episode with Mulroy, the "Vegas water czar." Show Notes: Sovereignty's revenge: Populism and the future of European integration (event) Europe's Sovereignty Illusion Javier Solana's columns on Project Syndicate Monnet's Brandy and Europe's Fate, Brookings Essay by Strobe Talbott Saving Europe: Anatomy of a Dream (New and Expanded Edition), by Carlo Bastasin Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Jun 04, 2015
Ukraine's struggle for independence
40:45
What is happening in Ukraine is a tremendous threat to Putin’s Russia precisely because of the kinship that Russians feel with Ukraine,” says Chrystia Freeland in this podcast. Freeland, a Member of Parliament in Canada and also a journalist and author, talks about her own family’s connection to Ukraine, why the Russian propaganda machine has been effective, and why the Russian-Ukrainian language divide is oversimplified. Listen to find out why she thinks that the “Maidan and what has followed is the most hopeful moment ever in Ukrainian history.” --- Also in this episode, Fellow John Hudak explains what’s happening in Congress, including a rare moment of agreement between President Obama and the Republicans in Congress. --- Show Notes: • "My Ukraine: A personal reflection on a nation's dream of independence and the nightmare Vladimir Putin has visited upon it" • Chrystia Freeland's parliamentary bio --- Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.  
May 21, 2015
MOOCs, college costs, and the future of higher education
41:37
“Ten years from now college is going to look a lot different,” says Senior Fellow Stuart Butler in this podcast. Butler, an expert on the future of higher education, economic mobility, budget process reform, and federal entitlement reform, explains how developments in education technology, such as MOOCs, are driving college costs down, changing university business models, and could have a dramatic effect on social mobility in this country. “If you have a higher education system that actually does provide students with the skills they really need at a much lower cost than today,” he says, “that’s good for everybody, and good for the economy.” Plus, in "Wessel's Economic Update," David Wessel, director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy, discusses the re-release of Arthur Okun's classic book, "Equality and Efficiency: The Big Tradeoff." Show Notes: New Arizona State-edX MOOC: Another blow to traditional college How Google and Coursera may upend the traditional college degree Beyond College Rankings: A Value-Added Approach to Assessing Two- and Four-Year Schools Reimagine College Tottering Ivory Towers City & Guilds Social Mobility Memos Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
May 07, 2015
Education challenges in the Arab world
26:18
“The Arab world has made huge progress in giving children access to school,” says Maysa Jalbout, a nonresident fellow with the Center for Universal Education at Brookings. Yet even so, she calls the 2.6 million Syrian children out of school in the region “perhaps the biggest education crisis globally.” In the podcast, Jalbout—former CEO of the Queen Rania Foundation and a global leader on education in international development—discusses the challenges and solutions to educating children in the Arab world, why quality and not just access matters, how the education crisis is a global security issue, and why 3 out of 4 Arab women remain out of the labor force in their countries. Much of the discussion is about Jalbout’s new report, “Reaching all Children with Education in Lebanon: Opportunities for Action.” Show Notes: Center for Universal Education Reaching all Children with Education in Lebanon: Opportunities for Action The Arab World Learning Barometer Unlocking the potential of educated Arab women Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Apr 23, 2015
Taxes and the IRS
21:03
“Anger at the IRS for the complexity of the tax system is misplaced,” says Senior Fellow Bill Gale in this podcast. “The IRS does not legislate the tax code; Congress does. And if the tax code is complicated, that is Congress’s fault.” Gale, co-director of the Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center, explains one reason why the complicated tax code might be a good thing. Gale also addresses a variety of issues, including: what tax reform means; whether reform is good for economic growth; what are meant by a flat tax and consumption tax; and political rhetoric about abolishing the IRS. "You can argue about whether you want lower taxes or higher taxes, but I don’t think there should be an argument about whether we want an effective enforcement agency. It’s just a good government thing." - Bill Gale Show Notes: Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center How do IRS budget cuts affect taxpayers and the tax system? (event w/ IRS Commissioner Koskinen) Rubio-Lee hints at tax reform's troubling direction Tax Policy in 2014: Two Developments That May Set The Table For the Future Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Apr 13, 2015
Vegas water czar on West’s water crisis
28:48
“I know that California has got a nightmare on [its] hands right now,” says Pat Mulroy, former general manager for the Southern Nevada Water Authority and now a Brookings nonresident senior fellow, in this podcast taped just as California announced statewide water restrictions. Mulroy, who has been called “the water empress of Vegas,” discusses a path forward in California’s crisis; explains why criticizing the Bellagio fountain’s water use is misplaced; reflects on how she got into the water business in the first place; and offers insights from her experience on how communities can cooperate on water issues. “We in this country have no idea how fortunate we are,” she says. “We are a small minority around the world that actually has reliable 24/7 water.” (Hoover Dam photo by Sareen Hairabedian) Show Notes: Video about Pat Mulroy (YouTube) Longtime Vegas water czar warns other cities to brace for climate change Pat Mulroy’s bio at UNLV’s Boyd School of Law Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Apr 09, 2015
Robert Putnam on "Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis"
22:09
Brookings Fellows E.J. Dionne and Richard Reeves speak with noted political scientist and author Robert Putnam, professor of public policy at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, about his new book Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis. Putnam explains how an “opportunity gap” has emerged over the past twenty-five years between education for wealthy and poor children in America, and how differences in politics, class, and race are impacting the American dream. Also in this episode, Governance Studies Fellow John Hudak explains "What's Happening in Congress."  Show Notes: - Our Kids: The American Dream in Crisis, by Robert D. Putnam- Social Mobility Memos Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Apr 02, 2015
Julia Gillard on the power of universal education
21:33
“The forces of darkness, the terrorists, know that education is a powerful change agent,” says former Australian Prime Minister Julia Gillard in this podcast about her commitment to global education. Ms. Gillard, now a distinguished fellow with the Center for Universal Education at Brookings and chair of the Global Partnership for Education, discusses a variety of topics, including her path to becoming Australia’s 27th prime minister; overcoming barriers to achieving universal education; why quality of education matters as much, or more, than getting children into school; and what needs to be done in the post-2015 development agenda to achieve gender equity in education. Show Notes: - Brookings Center for Universal Education- Global Partnership for Education- The future of global education: What is the role of non-state actors?- #GirlsEdu: The Value of Girls’ Education in 2014 and Beyond- The Life of an Australian Prime Minister: A Conversation with Julia Gillard on "My Story" Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Mar 19, 2015
The Federal Reserve and "Audit the Fed"
29:12
“The real question is, are the proponents of ‘Audit the Fed’ legislation seeking to make the Fed more accountable …? Or are they basically people who don’t like what the Fed is doing and see ‘Audit the Fed’ as a lever to change the Fed?” asks Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy Director David Wessel in this podcast. Listen to find out why Wessel calls “Audit the Fed” a misnomer, but also how he explains why we are asking the Fed to do too much in the economy. He also offers ideas on useful reforms to Fed accountability and transparency. Plus, find out why he describes a return to the gold standard as “snake oil.” Wessel is also a senior fellow in Economic Studies and former economics editor of the Wall Street Journal. Show Notes: - The Fed in the 21st century: Independence, governance, and accountability- The Hutchins Center Explains: Audit the Fed- Congress vs. Yellen: Partisanship or accountability?- Central Banking After the Financial Crisis- The Global Financial Crisis: Lessons from History- Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Mar 03, 2015
North and South Korea: Pride, Prejudice and Unification Challenges
56:03
"We have a deficit of knowledge about the Koreas" in both the academy and public discourse, says Kathy Moon, the SK-Korea Foundation Chair in Korea Studies and a senior fellow in the Center for East Asia Policy Studies at Brookings. In this podcast, Moon, who is also a political science professor at Wellesley College, describes her own journey to becoming a scholar with a focus on Asia and the Koreas; talks about what she observed during her trip to North Korea; explains the sources of North Koreans' national pride; and offers her thoughts on the very serious challenges for Korean reunification. Also in the podcast, a discussion between John Hudak of Governance Studies and Michael O'Hanlon in Foreign Policy about President Obama's request to Congress for an Authorization for Use of Military Force against ISIS. Show Notes: - Shared Challenges and Cooperation for Korea, China and the U.S. - Protesting America: Democracy and the U.S.-Korea Alliance - Ethnicity and U.S. Foreign Policy: Korean Americans - Sandalwood Death, by Mo Yan - The Orphan Master's Son, by Adam Johnson ---- Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.    
Feb 20, 2015
The Affordable Care Act, America's health, and leading the CBO
31:13
"I think the Affordable Care Act is actually doing quite well," says Senior Fellow Alice Rivlin in this podcast. Rivlin, the Leonard D. Schaeffer Chair in Health Policy Studies and director of the Engelberg Center for Health Care Reform at Brookings, cited the expansion of medical insurance coverage, declining cost growth, and other positive factors for the ACA. She also reflects on continued political opposition to the law, the impending King v. Burwell Supreme Court case, and what it was like to stand up a new federal agency, the Congressional Budget Office, in 1975. Also in the podcast, Senior Fellow David Wessel, director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal and Monetary Policy, offers his regular "Wessel's Economic Update." Show Notes: • Improving Health While Reducing Cost Growth, What is Possible? (with Mark McClellan) • People Who Wanted Market-Driven Health Care Now Have it in the Affordable Care Act  • Health360: The latest views on health policy Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Feb 06, 2015
Bruce Katz on the 21st Century Metro: Innovative, Powerful, and Leading the Country Forward
37:07
“Cities and metro areas are networks, they are not governments; therefore we need to put them central to the debate of how the country moves forward,” Bruce Katz says in this podcast on the metropolitan revolution—metro areas’ recognition that they are where change does and should happen, especially in an era of congressional gridlock. Katz, vice president and director of the Metropolitan Policy Program and also the Adeline M. and Alfred I. Johnson Chair in Urban and Metropolitan Policy, explains that the nation’s 388 metropolitan areas are “the true organic economies”; discusses why metro areas are at the “vanguard of policy innovation”; describes why the traditional federalism pyramid should be flipped to feature cities and metros on top; and offers insights into the new spatial geography of innovation that is spurring production-oriented economic growth.   Also in the podcast, Governance Studies Fellow John Hudak offers his regular update, "What's Happening in Congress." Show Notes: • The Metropolitan Revolution: How Cities and Metros Are Fixing Our Broken Politics and Fragile Economy (with Jennifer Bradley)• The Rise of Innovation Districts: A New Geography of Innovation in America (with Julie Wagner)• Mapping Freight: The Highly Concentrated Nature of Goods Trade in the United States (Adie Tomer and Joseph Kane)• What Should the Role of the Federal Government Be in Supporting Innovation Districts? • What the United States Can Teach the U.K. About Federalism• The Global Cities Initiative Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Jan 20, 2015
Strobe Talbott on His Life, the World, and Everything
47:58
In this podcast, Brookings President Strobe Talbott reflects on growing up in Cleveland, his career—as a journalist, State Department Official, and think tank leader—and today’s challenges for governance and stability. Learn how a career in journalism prepared him for State Department diplomacy; about his role in defusing two international crises in one dangerous week in June 1999; what he thinks about Vladimir Putin and Russia’s course; and why nuclear proliferation and climate change are “existential threats.” And also listen to his reflections on Brookings’s centenary next year. Also at the top of the podcast, David Wessel, director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal & Monetary Policy, offers his economic update and previews two important upcoming events. Show Notes: • Mr. Putin: Operative in the Kremlin, by Fiona Hill and Clifford Gaddy (2d edition)• The Limits of Partnership: U.S.-Russian Relations in the Twenty-First Century, by Angela Stent• Fast Forward: Ethics and Politics in the Age of Global Warming, by Strobe Talbott and William Antholis (revised edition)• Brookings India Initiative• "Monnet's Brandy and Europe's Fate: A determined Frenchman's vision of integration serves as a guide to ending the eurozone crisis," Brookings Essay by Strobe Talbott Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Jan 09, 2015
Nixon and Moynihan: White House Odd Couple
59:07
In 1969, a conservative president made a liberal professor his urban affairs adviser in the White House. When Richard Nixon brought Daniel Patrick Moynihan onto the White House staff, the consequences for both would be tremendous, as recounted by Stephen Hess in this podcast based on his fascinating tale of those years, The Professor and the President: Daniel Patrick Moynihan in the Nixon White House (Brookings, 2014). Hess, a senior fellow emeritus at Brookings who was not only Moynihan’s deputy on the Urban Affairs Council but also a close friend, offers vivid anecdotes of what he witnessed, including: why “in a strange way Nixon fell in love with [Moynihan]”; a visit from actor Kirk Douglas; how Moynihan invented the Presidential Medal of Freedom; and the White House jazz concert led by Duke Ellington, the award’s first recipient. Also in the podcast, Governance Studies Fellow John Hudak, in his "What's Happening in Congress" commentary, reviews the end of the 113th Congress and looks ahead to the next; and Bruce Jones, deputy director of Foreign Policy at Brookings, talks about his new book, with David Steven, The Risk Pivot: Great Powers, International Security, and the Energy Revolution, which is about the "revolutionary changes in the supply, demand, and flow of energy" worldwide. Show Notes: • The Professor and the President: Daniel Patrick Moynihan in the Nixon White House• The Nixon Sightings, a series in which Hess recalls five key moments of his time working with Richard M. Nixon• The "Benign Neglect" memo, Moynihan to Nixon (January 16, 1970) (pdf)• A New Revelation From the Nixon White House, story of the 1969 jazz all-star concert (Len Garment, The New York Times, Aug. 25, 2002)• Watch this video of Hess   Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Dec 18, 2014
How to Make Government Programs Work
47:49
“One thing most people don't know is that our [social] programs don't work,” says Senior Fellow Ron Haskins in this podcast about how the Obama administration is starting to create a “culture of evidence” for the design and evaluation of government programs, with the ultimate aim to increase equality of opportunity in America and spend less money doing it. Haskins, the Cabot Family Chair and co-director of both the Center on Children and Families and the Budgeting for National Priorities project, is the co-author, with Greg Margolis, of Show Me the Evidence: Obama's Fight for Rigor and Results in Social Policy (Brookings, 2014). The book, Haskins says, tells the story of “how the Obama administration has been the most important administration ever for using the results of social science research and especially scientific program evaluation to improve federal programs.” Listen as Haskins describes the origin of the research, the “sausage making” of the policy process, and the move to instill a commitment to evidence-based policymaking across the political spectrum. “There is a growing commitment to evidence and a growing accepting by both parties of the logic of evidence that we need to figure out if these programs work,” Haskins says.   In the segments, first hear from Hutchins Center on Fiscal & Monetary Policy Director David Wessel discuss the problem of uncertain forecasts about the federal budget, and tee up an upcoming event, The Long Run Outlook for the Federal Budget: Do We Know Enough to Worry? on December 15. Second, after the interview, Wells Bennett, fellow in National Security Law, explains a recent paper series about the future of civilian robotics, which explores various questions about the integration of robots and robotics into civilian life. Show Notes: • Show Me the Evidence: Obama's Fight for Rigor and Results in Social Policy • Social Programs that Work • The Obama Administration’s Evidence-Based Social Policy Initiatives: An Overview • Social Science Rising: A Tale of Evidence Shaping Policy • Uncontrolled: The Surprising Payoff of Trial-and-Error for Business, Politics, and Society • Murray and Ryan Team Up to Propose Commission On Evidence-Based Policymaking   Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Dec 05, 2014
Our Dysfunctional Politics and the Road to 2016
53:11
“The Republican Party has become like a parliamentary party, vehemently oppositional and opposed to anything that the other party would do,” says Thomas Mann in this podcast in which he shares his expertise and insight on political dysfunction in America, on the roots of today’s divisive partisanship, on ideas for solutions, and on the 2016 presidential contest. Mann, a senior fellow in Governance Studies and the W. Averell Harriman Chair in American Governance, also reflects on his 45 years studying and engaging with the political scene in Washington, sharing what he has seen, heard and done along the way. In his regular segment on what's happening in Congress, Fellow John Hudak explains what Congress is doing now that the midterm elections are over. He focuses on the new confirmation environment for the president and also how congressional Republicans will react to Obama's executive action on immigration.  Show notes: • It’s Even Worse Than It Looks: How the American Constitutional System Collided with the New Politics of Extremism (with Norman Ornstein)• Which Republican Party Won the Midterms?• 2014 Midterms Post-Election Special (podcast)• 2014 Midterms: Why the Election Will Matter... and Why It Won't• Party Polarization and Campaign Finance• Pew Research Center poll Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Nov 21, 2014
America's Diversity Explosion Is Coming Just in Time
35:31
"I am convinced that the United States is in the midst of a pivotal period ushering in extraordinary shifts in the nation's racial demographic makeup," writes William Frey in his new book, Diversity Explosion: How New Racial Demographics are Remaking America. In this podcast, Frey, a senior fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program and an internationally regarded demographer, explains what he means by "diversity explosion"; why growing minority populations are so important for America; and what public officials, community leaders, and decision-makers need to understand about the importance of educating and training a new generation of workers. Frey also discusses how he got into the field of demography, and what it means when people say "demography is destiny."  Also in the podcast, David Wessel, director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal & Monetary Policy, offers his regular economic update, noting that "something weird is going on" when broad measures of the labor market are looking better yet two-thirds of the voters say the economy is getting worse. Show notes: • Diversity Explosion: How New Racial Demographics Are Remaking America• Immigrants Continue to Disperse, with Fastest Growth in the Suburbs• Social Mobility Memos• "The Great American Melting Pot" (music/lyrics by Lynn Ahrens, performed by Lori Lieberman, Schoolhouse Rock, 1977) Subscribe to the Brookings Cafeteria on iTunes, listen on Stitcher, and send feedback email to BCP@Brookings.edu.
Nov 14, 2014
2014 Midterms Post-Election Special
41:06
In this special edition of the Brookings Cafeteria, Senior Fellows Thomas Mann,Sarah Binder, and William Galston offered their insights and analysis about the 2014 midterm election results. Listen to find out why Mann called the results "a red tsunami"; why Binder said it was "oddly predictable"; and why, for Galston, the outcome was "challenging" in a variety of ways. Mann is the W. Averell Harriman Chair in American Governance and co-author of It’s Even Worse Than It Looks: How the American Constitutional System Collided With the New Politics of Extremism. Binder is a professor of political science at George Washington University, a contributor to the Monkey Cage blog, and author of many books including Stalemate: Causes and Consequences of Legislative Gridlock. Galston, the Ezra K. Zilkha Chair in Governance Studies, was a policy advisor to President Bill Clinton and presidential candidates. He authored the recent essay, "The New Challenge to Market Democracies: The Political and Social Costs of Economic Stagnation." Send your feedback about this or any other podcast to BCP@brookings.edu. Subscribe on iTunes or listen on Stitcher.
Nov 05, 2014
Latin America: Grand Vision of a Shared Future
28:37
“Latin America actually lacks an identity because it has them all,” says Ernesto Talvi—a Brookings nonresident senior fellow—as he reflects on how Peruvian poet Mario Vargas Llosa described Latin America. In this podcast, Talvi, who directs the Brookings Global-CERES Economic and Social Policy in Latin America Initiative, explains why there are actually three Latin Americas based on macroeconomic factors; why nations such as Chile, Peru, Mexico and Colombia have very strong fundamentals (and why Argentina and Venezuela are troubling); why economic growth has slowed in the region since 2011; and why inequalities throughout the region are inconsistent with a stable social order. Also, listen to find out why Talvi chose the University of Chicago and its frigid winters for graduate study in economics, a world away from his temperate native country, Uruguay. Talvi recently authored the report, “Macroeconomic Vulnerabilities in an Uncertain World: One Region, Three Latin Americas.” In one of our regular special segments, Governance Studies Fellow John Hudak describes the blog series on the most important issues and Senate races in the upcoming midterm elections. Visit FixGov blog to learn more. Show Notes: • Macroeconomic Vulnerabilities in an Uncertain World: One Region, Three Latin Americas• A New Trans-American Partnership• U.S. Embassy Montevideo fact sheet on Uruguay (PDF)• Brookings Global-CERES Economic and Social Policy in Latin America Initiative• Latin America Initiative• The Paradoxes of Latin America (article by Mario Vargas Llosa)• Podcast: What You Should Know about the Rise of Brazil and the Rest of Latin America• Podcast: Trade Clearly Matters
Oct 31, 2014
Why Marriage Is the Best Environment for Kids
32:04
“Two married parents are the best environment for kids, on average,” says Isabel Sawhill in this podcast about her new book, Generation Unbound: Drifting into Sex and Parenthood without Marriage. Adding that “we all know single parents who are doing a great job,” Sawhill explains how her research and data show that gaps in education, family structure and parenting styles create unequal starts for American children in the aggregate. Seventy percent of all pregnancies to unmarried women under 30 are unplanned, she says, and today 40 percent of all children in American are born outside marriage. In the podcast, Sawhill, a senior fellow and co-director of the Center on Children and Families, talks about one of the central themes of the book, how to change “drifters” into “planners,” to “have people take responsibility and make explicit choices about when to have children, whether to have children, who to have children with, and not to treat it so casually.” Plus, in a new feature, Senior Fellow David Wessel, director of the Hutchins Center on Fiscal & Monetary Policy, offers his thoughts in "Wessel's Economic Update." And finally, introducing a new series of FixGov blog posts on the website that will focus on the upcoming midterm elections. The series will feature Brookings scholars discussing key policy issues in the election, and spotlights from academics on key senate races. Show Notes: • Generation Unbound: Drifting into Sex and Parenthood without Marriage• Media Influences on Social Outcomes: The Impact of MTV’s 16 and Pregnant on Teen Childbearing• Bedsider.org• Hutchins Center on Fiscal & Monetary Policy• The Fiscal Barometer• FixGov blog Send feedback and questions for podcast guests to BCP@brookings.edu.   * N.b.: In the podcast, Sawhill refers to the concept of "marriage-go-round" and cites Kathy Edin. The phrase "marriage-go-round" was originally used in sociologist Andrew Cherlin's book of the same name. The phenomenon has, however, also been referred to by Edin as the "family-go-round."
Oct 17, 2014
Trade Clearly Matters
40:46
Every increase of $1 billion in U.S. exports is estimated to support 6,000 jobs, and 95 percent of the world’s consumers live outside the United States, says Miriam Sapiro in her new report, “Why Trade Matters.” It clearly matters, as she explains in this wide-ranging interview about the importance of trade, how trade negotiations work, why trade leads to net job gains, the prospects for ongoing trade negotiations with European and Asia-Pacific countries, and more. Sapiro, a visiting fellow in Global Economy and Development at Brookings, was deputy U.S. trade representative from 2009 to 2014, and also served on the National Security Council and at the U.S. State Department.   Plus, in a recent event on the future of civilian robotics, moderator Benjamin Wittes, a senior fellow and editor-in-chief of Lawfare (and also the first guest on the Brookings Cafeteria), described the background of a flight experiment he and colleagues did with off-the-shelf drones, one that the FAA said could not take place in Washington, DC. Learn more about it on Lawfare. And finally, in a new "What’s Happening in Congress" segment, Fellow John Hudak offers his views of how both Congress and President Obama dealt with the administration’s decision to take military action against ISIS targets in Syria and Iraq. Show Notes: • Why Trade Matters (paper by Miriam Sapiro)• Export Nation 2013 (data and interactive from the Metropolitan Policy Program)• The Trans-Pacific Partnership and Asia-Pacific Integration: A Quantitative Assessment (the Peterson Institute report)• Steven Pifer's podcast• The Lawfare Drone Smackdown• The Future of Civilian Robotics (event)• FixGov blog   Send feedback and questions for podcast guests to BCP@brookings.edu.
Oct 03, 2014
Billionaires Are Not Like You and Me
30:10
The 1,645 wealthiest men and women worldwide—492 of them in the United States—who control assets worth $6.5 trillion are shaping the world for the better and sometimes for the worse. In this podcast and in his new book, Darrell West, vice president and director of Governance Studies at Brookings, explains who the billionaires are, how they are more involved than ever in politics and society, why this matters, and how, for many reasons, they really are not like the rest of us. Also, hear what John Hudak has to say about what's happening now in Congress.   Show Notes: • Billionaires: Reflections on the Upper Crust• U.S. Billionaire Political Power Index• Global Billionaire Political Power Index• More resources about billionaires• Saving Horatio Alger: Equality, Opportunity, and the American Dream• FixGov blog Feedback or questions? Send an email to BCP@brookings.edu.
Sep 17, 2014
On ISIS, Syria, Iran, and President Obama’s Middle East Strategy
41:03
ISIS establishes a jihadist caliphate across Syria and Iraq. Iran pursues its nuclear ambitions. Syria remains mired in a terrible civil war, exacting a toll on the civilian population and region. In this podcast, Senior Fellow Mike Doran (@doranimated) offers his views on these and related developments, the Obama administration’s response to them, and what he believes is the “great white whale” of President Obama’s Middle East strategy. Although he says that Obama’s initiatives in the region have failed, he explains what the president can do to put together a coalition of like-minded powers to act as a counterweight to the ISIS threat. Doran also offers candid thoughts on why “academia is a profoundly conformist place,” how he made the transition from that world to government and then to a think tank, and why he wanted to be a Middle East scholar in the first place. Plus, highlights from a recent Brookings expert panel on Russia and Ukraine, and what Russia's foreign policy moves indicate about Vladimir Putin's view on the global order.  Show Notes: • "Somebody Else's Civil War" (Doran's article in Foreign Affairs, January/February 2002)•  The Arc of Crisis: Beirut to Baghdad (Brookings event in which Doran made the Sarah Palin reference)• "Iran Surprises Itself and the World" (Brookings Essay by Suzanne Maloney)• "Is Obama Like Eisenhower?" (article by Doran)• "Pursue Regime Change in Syria" (Big Bets/Black Swans memo by Doran)• "Reconciliation with Iran Helps Fuel Middle East Mayhem" (for Doran's Captain Ahab reference)• "Going the Distance: On and off the road with Barack Obama" (David Remnick's interview with the president) Send feedback or questions for podcast guests to BCP@brookings.edu.
Sep 05, 2014
Much of What We Think about Privacy, Liberty, Security and Threat is Wrong
29:46
(originally aired on 8/30/13) In this inaugural edition of the Brookings Cafeteria podcast, Benjamin Wittes, senior fellow in Governance Studies, talks with host Fred Dews about a range of issues at the junction of liberty and security, privacy and government surveillance. Wittes explains how liberty and security are not always in tension; how we might think about the government's surveillance activities; and why technology makes this moment in the history of the world both exciting and terrifying. Wittes is the co-founder and editor-in-chief of Lawfare blog, which is devoted to sober and serious discussion of hard national security choices, and where you can read his detailed piece on what Ben Franklin really meant when he wrote, “Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.”
Sep 04, 2014
Health Care Reform Opportunities and Affordable Care Act Implementation
39:33
(originally published 9/13/13) What is the state of health care in America? Can costs be reduced and outcomes improved? Will the Affordable Care Act (aka “Obamacare”) implementation be successful? Which aspects of ACA are already having a positive impact? What to expect on October 1 when state health exchanges go online? Kavita Patel, a fellow in the Engelberg Center for Health Care Reform at Brookings and also a practicing internal medicine physician with Johns Hopkins Medicine, speaks with host Fred Dews about these and other questions related to one of the most important aspects of our lives. Patel says that one thing that worries her about health care is that “nobody feels as if it is their responsibility to tackle that cost [of health care].” She also says that she is worried about "active resistance" to implementation of the Affordable Care Act despite the benefits that are already apparent. Show notes: Containing Health Care Costs: Recent Progress and Remaining Challenges, testimony by Kavita Patel to the U.S. Senate Budget Committee Advancing Reform: Medicare Physicians Payments, testimony by Kavita Patel to the U.S. Senate Finance Committee Affordable Excellence: The Singapore Health Care System, Brookings book by William Haseltine Bitter Pill: Why Medical Bills Are Killing Us, TIME magazine article by Steven Brill Views of US Physicians About Controlling Health Care Costs, Journal of the American Medical Association Making Sense Of Geographic Variations In Health Care: The New IOM Report
Sep 04, 2014
U.S. Immigrants and Prospects for Immigration Reform
28:40
(originally published 9/27/13) The foreign-born population in America is over 13 percent of the total population, the largest share of immigrants since the 1920s. Over 40 million immigrants—documented and undocumented, young and old—live and work in towns and metropolitan areas throughout the country. In this podcast, Audrey Singer, a senior fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program, puts today's immigrant population into historical context, explains where they live now and how they contribute to their communities, and looks ahead to the prospect for comprehensive immigration reform at the federal and local levels. Singer, an expert on immigrants and demographic change, says that one important issue on which emphasis should be placed is the social, economic, civic and political integration of immigrants into the places where they live. Show notes: Contemporary Immigrant Gateways in Historical Perspective  Immigration Facts: Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) Immigration Reform: What’s Next for Cities and Metros
Sep 04, 2014
Social Mobility and the American Dream
32:05
(originally published 10/11/13) The American Dream is not dead, but Americans today experience less socioeconomic fluidity between where they are born and where they end up than people in comparable nations, including Great Britain. It is "in need of some health care," says Richard Reeves, an Economic Studies fellow and policy director of the Center on Children and Families. In this podcast, Reeves discusses his research on policies to make evidence-based social mobility—from birth, through childhood into adulthood—a priority, at both state- and federal-levels. Family and parents matter, and governments can help; "That's a place where Republicans and Democrats can really meet around." Reeves, who edits the Social Mobility Memos blog at Brookings, discusses evidence-based approaches to understanding social mobility and devising policies to increase it. "The belief that [American] society is open and fluid and classless," he says, "may actually be inhibiting action to make that true." He says that "an unequal society can become a stratified society. Inequality can begin to perpetuate itself almost automatically." Show notes:  • The Parenting Gap• A New Federal Policy Architecture to Promote Social Mobility • Reeves on "Philosophy Bites" podcast on John Stuart Mill• John Stuart Mill: Victorian Firebrand• State of the Nation 2013: social mobility and child poverty in Great Britain
Sep 04, 2014
Arms Control, Russia, Ukraine and the European Union
30:17
(originally published 10/23/13) Arms Control. Russia. Ukraine. Three distinct issues that share multiple connections. In this podcast, Steven Pifer, senior fellow and director of the Brookings Arms Control Initiative, connects the dots. A former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine and career foreign service officer, Pifer calls for an additional round of strategic arms reductions between the U.S. and Russia, on top of those agreed-to under the New START treaty. He also examines Russian foreign policy and explains how Ukraine is attempting to follow a path to greater integration with Europe while facing pressure from Moscow. Show notes: • Ukraine’s Yanukovych Caught Between Russia and the European Union• Nuclear Arms Control: Another New START• Nonstrategic Nuclear Weapons, Policy and Arms Control: Issues for the United States, NATO and Russia• External Influences on Ukraine’s European Integration• The Opportunity: Next Steps in Reducing Nuclear Arms, with Michael O'Hanlon 
Sep 04, 2014
Who Are the Foreign Students Studying in U.S. Higher Ed?
22:23
Over 800,000 foreign students are studying in the U.S. at institutions of higher education. Where are they coming from? What are they studying? And how can U.S. visa policy be improved to take advantage of this talented group? To find out the answers to these questions, I spoke with Associate Fellow Neil Ruiz from the Metropolitan Policy Program. Show Notes: • The Geography of Foreign Students in U.S. Higher Education: Origins and Destinations• Immigration Facts on Foreign Students• H-1B Visas and the STEM Shortage• Beyond H-1B: Other Avenues to Adding Skilled Workers• FixGov blog
Aug 15, 2014
Is There Really a Student Loan Debt Crisis?
27:01
As of last year, student loan debt in the U.S. exceeded $1.2 trillion, more than any other type of household debt except home mortgages. Media accounts have described this as the "potential next debt bomb for the U.S." and "the next financial disaster." But is there really a student loan debt crisis? To find out, I spoke with Beth Akers, a fellow in the Brown Center on Education Policy at Brookings. She explains how evidence sheds light on the problem, noting that it's difficult to reconcile reports of bad outcomes with what is, in general, a very good investment. Also in this podcast, listen to Senior Fellow Bruce Riedel speak about his new book, What We Won: America's Secret War in Afghanistan, 1979-89 (Brookings Institution Press, 2014). Show notes: • Is a Student Loan Crisis on the Horizon? (report by Beth Akers and Matt Chingos)• The Typical Household with Student Loan Debt (Brown Center Chalkboard)• Student Loan Safety Nets: Estimating the Costs and Benefits of Income-Based Repayment (paper by Akers and Chingos)• Student Loans Rising (paper by William Gale, Benjamin Harris, Bryant Renaud, and Katherine Rodihan)
Aug 01, 2014
Islamists, Democracy, and the Roots of Middle East Violence (Part 2)
26:39
This week's interview features part two of a conversation with Shadi Hamid, a Middle East expert and fellow in Foreign Policy at Brookings. Hamid discusses the perception that Islam and democracy are incompatible. Plus, he goes into more detail about what to expect from Egypt's President Sisi, and why it's a cop-out for Americans to look at Middle East violence and say that there's nothing we can do about it because the hatreds are so ancient and deep seated. (In part one, Hamid talked about meeting Muslim Brotherhood leaders, including Mohamed Morsi before he became Egypt's first democratically-elected president, about the power of social media, and about why Islamists are willing, literally, to die for their cause.) Hamid is the author of the new book, Temptations of Power: Islamists & Illiberal Democracy in a New Middle East. Also in this episode: a new segment, "Out of the Archives," where we find research from the last century of Brookings history that touches on how we see the world today. During a week in which we observe the 45th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, we take a look at Brookings's 1960 report for NASA. Show Notes: • Islamists, Democracy, and the Roots of Middle East Violence (part one of podcast)• Temptations of Power: Islamists & Illiberal Democracy in a New Middle East, by Shadi Hamid (Oxford University Press, 2014)• The End of Pluralism, by Shadi Hamid• "Why Sayed Kashua is leaving Jerusalem and never coming back" (registration required)• "The Enduring Challenge of Engaging Islamists: Lessons from Egypt," report by Shadi Hamid• Brookings Project on U.S. Relations with the Islamic World Have a question or comment about this podcast, or a question for a scholar? Send it to BCP@brookings.edu and we may address it in an upcoming episode.
Jul 25, 2014
Islamists, Democracy, and the Roots of Middle East Violence (Part 1)
27:34
This week's interview features part one of a conversation with Shadi Hamid, a Middle East expert and fellow in Foreign Policy at Brookings. In it, Hamid talks about Islamists and democracy, especially in Egypt. He also talks about meeting Mohamed Morsi before he became Egypt's first democratically-elected president, why the Muslim Brotherhood was cautious about attaining power, and why Islamists are willing, literally, to die for their cause. Part two of the conversation can be heard here. Hamid is the author of the new book, Temptations of Power: Islamists & Illiberal Democracy in a New Middle East. Also in this episode: a new segment focusing on what's happening in Congress. You've probably heard or seen the headlines about House Speaker John Boehner's proposed lawsuit against President Obama. Will this maneuver succeed or backfire? Governance Studies Fellow John Hudak offers some answers. Show Notes: • Temptations of Power: Islamists & Illiberal Democracy in a New Middle East, by Shadi Hamid (Oxford University Press, 2014)• "Why Sayed Kashua is leaving Jerusalem and never coming back" (registration required)• "The Enduring Challenge of Engaging Islamists: Lessons from Egypt," report by Shadi Hamid• Brookings Project on U.S. Relations with the Islamic World• FixGov blog Have a question or comment about this podcast, or a question for a scholar? Send it to BCP@brookings.edu and we may address it in an upcoming episode.
Jul 18, 2014
Time for Measured Optimism on Africa
31:38
Over the past decade, sub-Saharan African economies have grown 5 percent a year, and the region’s economy should double by 2030. Yet this growth is not enough to spread needed development and progress throughout the region. Amadou Sy, a senior fellow with the Africa Growth Initiative at Brookings, talks about the role of foreign direct investment, priorities for African policymakers, and the prospect for conflict resolution in the most troubled areas. Show notes: • Four Instruments to Strengthen Financial Integration in Sub-Saharan Africa• Shifts in Financing Sustainable Development: How Should Africa Adapt in 2014 (pdf)• Six Questions on the Crisis in the Central African Republic• Event on Peace and Stability in the Central African Republic• Africa in China's Foreign Policy• Africa in Focus (blog)
Jun 20, 2014
We Need to Change the Way We Think about Infrastructure in America
27:31
"We need to change the way we think about infrastructure in America," says Rob Puentes. It's not just about the federal government fixing roads and bridges anymore. In this podcast, Puentes, a senior fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program, explains how our states and metropolitan areas, through public and private partnerships, are moving forward on the nation's infrastructure goals. Show Notes: • Beyond Shovel-Ready: The Extent and Impact of U.S. Infrastructure Jobs (interactive)• The Future is Now: What’s Next in American Infrastructure (event)• Infrastructure Jobs, They're More than You Think (blog)• Metropolitan Infrastructure Initiative (project resources)
Jun 06, 2014
The Facts on Inequality, Wealth, Income, and Working May Surprise You
39:19
Economic issues are prolific in the public sphere, from taxes and inequality, to jobs and productivity and more. Even Thomas Piketty's book on wealth distribution is now a bestseller. How can a person make sense of the terms and of the discussion? One way is to talk to an economist, like Gary Burtless, a senior fellow in the Economic Studies Program at Brookings. In this podcast, he offers his expertise to explain issues such as middle-class income gains, wealth distribution and Piketty's book in ways that both surprise and enlighten. Show notes: • Income Growth and Income Inequality: The Facts May Surprise You• Big Payroll Gains and Anemic Labor Force Growth• Potential Effects of the Affordable Care Act on Income Inequality• Impact of the Great Recession on Retirement Trends in Industrialized Countries• Urban-Brookings Tax Policy Center
May 21, 2014
What You Should Know about the Rise of Brazil and the Rest of Latin America
29:13
As nations across Latin America have become wealthier and more stable in recent years, they are seeking to engage with the world, including the United States, on a more level playing field. In this podcast, Harold Trinkunas, senior fellow and director of the Latin America Initiative at Brookings, describes Latin America's economic, social, and political challenges and opportunities, with particular attention given to Brazil's rise as a potential major power. Show notes: • Brazil's Rise: Seeking Influence on Global Governance• Four Steps Brazil Can Take to Influence Global Governance More Effectively• Changing Energy Dynamics in the Western Hemisphere: Impacts on Central America and the Caribbean• Global Trade Negotiations at a Crossroads: How Does Latin America Fit In?• Venezuela Breaks Down in Violence
May 09, 2014
Do Common Core Standards Really Matter?
31:09
Forty-four states and the District of Columbia have adopted the Common Core State Standards in English language arts and mathematics. Despite initial enthusiasm, criticism of and outright opposition to the standards are beginning to arise. Tom Loveless, a senior fellow in the Brown Center on Education Policy at Brookings, explains how the Common Core came about, why some are opposed to it now, and what his research shows about its impact on student achievement. Show notes: • A Progress Report on the Common Core (Loveless)• Predicting the Effect of the Common Core State Standards on Student Achievement (Loveless, in 2012 Brown Center Report)• In Defense of the Common Core Standards (West and Bleiberg)• Common Core Aligned Assessments: You Get What You Pay For? (Brown Center event)• 3 Technical Choke Points that Could Sink the Common Core Tests (West and Bleiberg)• Standardized Testing and the Common Core (Brown Center event)• NAEP and the Common Core Standards (Loveless)• The Common Core State Standards Initiative  
Apr 25, 2014
Governing a Changing Arctic
26:42
The Arctic is changing. As the polar ice cap recedes, new shipping routes are opening up and access to Arctic energy resources is expanding. John Banks, a nonresident senior fellow with the Energy Security Initiative at Brookings, explains what these changes mean for Arctic governance and for U.S. leadership of the Arctic Council in 2015. Show notes: • Offshore Oil and Gas Governance in the Arctic: A Leadership Role for the United States: Policy Brief | Public Event • Finland Trip Report: Harnessing Offshore Opportunities in the Arctic• Energy, Indigenous Communities and the Arctic Council• The Arctic Council
Apr 11, 2014
Measuring the Pursuit of Happiness
28:46
"Happiness." "Contentment." "Subjective well-being." Can we measure how happy people are and if so, what can we do with this information? In this podcast, Carol Graham, the Leo Pasvolsky Senior Fellow and author of The Pursuit of Happiness: An Economy of Well-Being, explains how happiness/well-being research works and why it matters for public policy in the U.S. and globally. In the podcast, Graham explains two dimensions of understanding well-being, the "Benthamite/hedonic" and the "Aristotelian/eudemonic." She explained them in this earlier publication: Those of us involved focus on two distinct dimensions: hedonic well-being, a daily experience component; and evaluative well-being, the way in which people think about their lives as a whole, including purpose or meaning. Jeremy Bentham focused on the former and proposed increasing the happiness and contentment of the greatest number of individuals possible in a society as the goal of public policy. Aristotle, meanwhile, thought of happiness as eudemonia, a concept that combined two Greek words: "eu" meaning abundance and "daimon" meaning the power controlling an individual’s destiny. Show notes: • "Why Aging and Working Makes us Happy in 4 Charts," Carol Graham• Happiness Around the World, Carol Graham• "The Decade of Public Protest and Frustration with Lack of Social Mobility," Carol Graham• "Evidence for a midlife crisis in great apes consistent with the U-shape in human well-being," Andrew Oswald and others• "You Can’t Be Happier than Your Wife: Happiness Gaps and Divorce," Cahit Guven and others• Aristotle's definition of happiness• The life of philosopher Jeremy Bentham• Gallup World Poll
Mar 28, 2014
Presidents Deliver the Bacon, Too
31:13
Pork barrel spending has traditionally been understood as the exclusive domain of Congress. Yet recent presidents are highly engaged in the practice, too, as John Hudak demonstrates in his illuminating new book, Presidential Pork: White House Influence over the Distribution of Federal Grants (Brookings, 2014). In this podcast, Hudak, a fellow in Governance Studies, explains how presidents dole out over $100 billion per year in discretionary federal grants through scores of federal agencies, often in service of improving his electoral prospects. In one example, Hudak examined why the National Park Service delivered more grants to Pennsylvania than to California, even though the former has fewer residents and fewer federally protected sites. One explanation he offers is that, during the course of his study, Pennsylvania has been a swing state while California has not. Show Notes: • Presidential Pork: White House Influence over the Distribution of Federal Grants• Pork Barrel Politics is Kosher for Presidents too - Except Obama• Live from CPAC: The Most Important Panel Everyone Missed • FixGov blog
Mar 14, 2014
A Bleak Picture for Children's Education in the Arab World
28:50
"More than half of Arab children are not learning," says Senior Fellow Hafez Ghanem in this new podcast about learning in the Arab world. He joined Liesbet Steer, a fellow also with the Center for Universal Education at Brookings, in this discussion about their findings on and solutions for a range of education issues in the region, including number and quality of teachers, accountability, gender, curriculum, and whether Arab world children are learning the skills they need to compete in the 21st century. Show notes: • The Arab World Learning Barometer• Africa Learning Barometer• Seven Facts about Global Education Financing• Learning Metrics Task Force
Feb 28, 2014
The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly Global Challenges
33:32
From East Asia to Africa, through Afghanistan to Syria and the greater Middle East, Senior Fellow Michael O'Hanlon guides us on a brief tour of the good, the bad, and in some cases, the ugly challenges facing our world today. Find out why he says, despite all the challenges, the global order is remarkably healthy right now and what that means for America's role in the world. Show notes: • Solidify the U.S.-Afghanistan Alliance (Big Bets & Black Swans presidential briefing memo)• Strengthen Stability in Africa (Big Bets & Black Swans memo)• Healing the Wounded Giant: Maintaining Military Preeminence while Cutting the Defense Budget• Understanding Tahrir Square: What Transitions Elsewhere Can Teach Us about the Prospects for Arab Democracy• Toward a Successful Outcome in Afghanistan 
Feb 14, 2014
America's War on Poverty Moves to the Suburbs
29:24
Poverty in the United States looks different now than it did when President Lyndon Johnson declared an "unconditional war on poverty" 50 years ago. With the publication of their book, Confronting Suburban Poverty in America, Elizabeth Kneebone and Alan Berube brought to the fore of the national conversation the experience of the 16.5 million people living in poverty in the suburbs. In a new podcast, Kneebone, a fellow in the Metropolitan Policy Program, says that the landscape of poverty is "dramatically different" than it was a half century ago. A third of the poor population lives in the suburbs, and during the 2000s, the poor population there grew larger and faster than in cities. While many programs from the war on poverty have been effective in keeping millions of people out of poverty, Kneebone says in this podcast that the shifting geography of poverty to suburbs means that we need to "reassess what's working" and "better adapt our policies to a new reality of suburban poverty." Learn more about the book, get case studies about communities facing suburban poverty, and download an Action Toolkit at Confronting Suburban Poverty in America. Also read "Does the Suburbanization of Poverty Mean the War on Poverty Failed?" by Kneebone and Berube.
Jan 22, 2014
Cybersecurity and Cyberwar: What You Need To Know
33:55
"Cyber issues have been too long been left only to the 'IT' crowd, ... when it's something—whether you are working in politics, in media, in military, in law, in business, or just frankly as a good citizen or as a good parent—you need to know more about. It connects to all of these different issues and yet most of us have been operating from this position of, frankly, ignorance. And we're being taken advantage of." So says Peter Singer, co-author of the new book, Cybersecurity and Cyberwar: What Everyone Needs to Know. In this podcast, Singer, a senior fellow in Foreign Policy at Brookings and director of the Center for 21st Century Security and Intelligence, talks about how individuals, businesses and governments need to be thinking about cyber issues. Our conversation touched on a variety of issues covered in the book, including the utility of parallels to the Cold War; the role of nonstate actors; how Anonymous and the Zetas Mexican drug cartel mixed it up in cyber space; and how important individual cyber hygiene is.  
Jan 08, 2014
The Intersection of Politics and Policy Is a Lonely Place
27:48
"The intersection of politics and policy is a lonely place," writes Senior Fellow Elaine Kamarck in her new book How Change Happens—Or Doesn't: The Politics of U.S. Public Policy. In this podcast, Kamarck, founding director of the Center for Effective Public Management, touches on the ideas and examples in her book to explain why politics and policy have to come together for us to understand success and failure in U.S. politics. She talks about "surveying the policy battlefield" in trying to understand the complexity of change. For example, why did unpopular President Harry Truman manage to get the Marshall Plan passed "with a hostile Republican Congress," while Barack Obama, who "came into office on the heels of a robust political victory" with majorities in both houses of Congress, failed to enact climate change legislation? The conversation ranged from how FDR's social policies reflected American values, to whether the Affordable Care Act does, to the complexity and length of modern legislation, to whether or not elections matter and if mandates exist outside politician's own minds. Show notes: • Lessons from the Shutdown: Management Matters, Even for Presidents, by Elaine Kamarck• FixGov blog• The Semi-Sovereign People: A Realist's View of Democracy in America, by E.E. Schattschneider• Myth of the Presidential Mandate, by Robert Dahl
Dec 20, 2013
Congressional Master Class: The Senate Filibuster, Congress and the Federal Reserve
26:35
In this podcast, congressional expert Sarah Binder explains why the Senate filibuster is a historical mistake. She talks about her research on Congress’s relationship with the Federal Reserve and addresses whether Congress is more polarized today than it has been in the past. Binder, a senior fellow in Governance Studies, is also a professor of political science at George Washington University and contributor to the Monkey Cage blog.  Show notes: • The Federal Reserve: Balancing Multiple Mandates (testimony by Alice Rivlin)• Boom! What the Senate Will Be Like When the Nuclear Dust Settles• Beyond the Horse Race to Lead the Fed• Droning on: Thoughts on the Rand Paul “Talking Filibuster”• Advice and Dissent: The Struggle to Shape the Federal Judiciary • The History of the Filibuster
Dec 06, 2013
Educating Children Worldwide Takes Access Plus Learning
29:23
Universal primary education by 2015 is one of the United Nations' Millennium Development Goals. While great progress has been made in expanding educational access, are children learning what they need to learn to succeed? Rebecca Winthrop, senior fellow and director of the Center for Universal Education at Brookings, talks about why access plus learning is important. In the podcast, Winthrop also describes her collaboration with the Learning Metrics Task Force, and addresses how to measure educational outcomes, the challenge of educating children in conflict-affected areas, and the significance of Malala Yousafzai to the global education movement. Show notes: • Learning Metrics Task Force• Seven Domains of Global Learning• Global Compact on Learning• Toward Universal Learning: Recommendations from the Learning Metrics Task Force • International Rescue Committee
Nov 22, 2013
Ending Extreme Global Poverty
36:30
The number of people worldwide living in extreme poverty—defined as living on $1.25 a day or less—was cut in half between 1990 and 2010. Yet more than one billion people still subsist at this level, and about three billion live at under $2.50 a day. Laurence Chandy, a fellow in the Global Economy and Development Program at Brookings, discusses the possibility that by 2030 the world might eradicate the most extreme poverty. He explains how we measure the problem, what the private sector and aid agencies can do about it, whether or not current targeting approaches are effective, and talks about the poverty problem in the United States.  Chandy, who is a scholar in the Development Assistance and Governance Initiative at Brookings, says that while a lot of progress has been made over the last decade in reducing poverty, continued progress is: going to require new approaches and new efforts to get us closer to that zero mark. That would include bringing to an end some of the persistent conflicts in low-income countries; bringing marginalized communities into the orbit of their economies; better targeting of the extreme poor. These are all things we haven’t done very well in the past and we’re going to have to do to get anywhere close to that goal of zero. Show notes: • The Final Countdown: Prospects for Ending Extreme Poverty by 2030 (Chandy)• Getting to Scale: How to Bring Development Solutions to Millions of Poor People (Chandy and others, eds.)• A World Free of Extreme Poverty – But by Which Path? (Chandy)• Is labor income responsible for poverty reduction? a decomposition approach (World Bank)• High Level Panel on the post-2015 Development Agenda • Millennium Development Goal: Eradicate Extreme Poverty and Hunger by 2015 • Rapid decline in India's poverty numbers • Givedirectly.org• Extreme Poverty in the United States, 1996 to 2011 (Luke Shaefer and Kathryn Edin)
Nov 08, 2013