Soundcheck

By WNYC Studios

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Description

Live performances and conversations in which artists talk about their work, their process, and themselves. Genre-blind but open-eared.

Episode Date
Natalie Prass Serves Up Groove, Romance and Sparkle
28:53
<p>Richmond-based musician Natalie Prass is a fighter. Her forthcoming record, <em>The Future And The Past</em>, has transformed resistance and personal heartache into defiant, groove-laden romantic anthems. With a little dash of disco, and a little bit of soul, this record might look to Janelle Monae &amp; Prince but also further back to Stevie Wonder and Marvin Gaye for its sound. That said, hear tender, big-hearted, shake-your-groove-thing songs by Natalie Prass, in-studio.</p> <p>Watch the session here:</p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="315" scrolling="no" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnewsounds%2Fvideos%2F10156368503168180%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=560" width="560" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;"></iframe></p>
Jun 23, 2018
Red Baraat Spreads Defiantly Joyful Bhangra Music
29:53
<p>On the face of it, Red Baraat is a dhol-driven big band full of brass instruments and drums (both the dhol and drumset keep the groove going), rooted in Bhangra music (Punjabi dance music), who bring a party with them wherever they go. On their latest record, <em>Sound the People</em>, they combine the sounds of South Asian diaspora, along with jazz, hip-hop, psychedelia, and a bit of Caribbean music, to draw attention to issues of migration, colonialism, and our current political climate. The record blends instruments, cultures, and offers an aural tribute to "the way diversity makes, and has always made, America great.” With a joyfully and defiantly disruptive ruckus for dancing, the band Red Baraat joins us in-studio to play some of these new tunes. </p> <p><strong>Watch here</strong>: </p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="315" scrolling="no" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnewsounds%2Fvideos%2F10156388535723180%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=560" width="560" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;"></iframe></p>
Jun 21, 2018
Weekly Music Roundup: More Unearthed Jazz, Angelique Kidjo, and The Carters
<p> <strong>Week of June 18:</strong> <span>This week, Parquet Courts Plays Total Football, Angelique Kidjo Tackles Talking Heads, and another lost jazz album is found</span></p> <hr> <p><strong>PREMIERE: A Lost Jazz Album Is Found – No, Not THAT One…</strong></p> <p><iframe frameborder="no" height="300" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/396383643%3Fsecret_token%3Ds-9NJP7&amp;color=%23ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_teaser=true&amp;visual=true" width="100%"></iframe></p> <p>Last week we heard the news of <a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/weekly-music-roundup-lost-john-coltrane-and-hungry-march-band/" data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://www.newsounds.org/story/weekly-music-roundup-lost-john-coltrane-and-hungry-march-band/&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1529415094968000&amp;usg=AFQjCNH18PTFgm9c9SdwZsJ4WmkvGy1xeQ">John Coltrane’s lost 1963 album</a>. Now comes word that an early recording by some pivotal players on the downtown jazz scene in the 1970s is about to see the light of day, after being out of print and unobtainable for almost 40 years. It’s called <em>Valley of the Search</em> and it was recorded at the Jazz Loft in 1975. Though credited to saxophonist Alan Braufman, the recording also included notable musicians like the pianist, instrument inventor, and educator <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cooper-Moore" data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cooper-Moore&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1529415094968000&amp;usg=AFQjCNH14817mOOglLDY7FRBZys6lWanaw">Cooper-Moore</a>, bassist Cecil McBee, drummer David Lee and percussionist Ralph Williams. On <span data-term="goog_1541642704"><span>June 29</span></span>, the same day that the Coltrane album comes out, <em>Valley of the Search</em> will be reissued, and will be marked by <a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/cult-valley-search-reissue-show-alan-braufman-and-cooper-moore">a series of live performances</a> by Braufman and Cooper-Moore: the first on <span data-term="goog_1541642705"><span>August 1</span></span> in <a href="http://www.thegreenespace.org/events/thegreenespace/2018/aug/01/alan-braufman-performs-valley-search-special-guest-cooper-moore/">The Greene Space at WNYC/WQXR</a>, and the second on <span data-term="goog_1541642706"><span>August 3</span></span> at National Sawdust. The session has been referred to as “free jazz,” which many people find a forbidding term (and sound), but tracks like “Destiny” show the band hewing more closely to the spiritual jazz of Pharoah Sanders (and of course, before him, Coltrane). Braufman’s sax has a questing melody that seems to be flying over a landscape sketched by percussion and subtle use of Cooper-Moore’s piano. </p> <hr> <p><strong><span>A Weekend Surprise From Beyoncé and Jay Z</span></strong></p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/kbMqWXnpXcA" width="560"></iframe></p> <p>You have to be impressed when two of the world’s biggest pop stars are able to release a new album without any leaks or online rumbling beforehand. But that’s what Jay Z and Beyoncé did this weekend. <em>Everything Is Love</em> was released, initially only on the Tidal, and is credited to The Carters (Jay Z’s real last name). The first single, called “Apeshit,” is notable for two things: the repeating line “I can’t believe we made it” seems to conclude the married couple’s very public troubles. Beyoncé called out Jay Z for infidelity in her withering album Lemonade, and Jay Z’s response album <span data-term="goog_1541642724">4:44</span> was full of self-recrimination and doubt. The new single and the album suggest the king and queen are once again in harmony, which brings us to the second notable aspect of “Apeshit”: its video features Jay Z and Beyoncé at their most imperious in no less a setting than the Louvre. The suggestion that their art is of equal stature to the overwhelmingly white, male history of western culture is hard to miss. So, by the way, is Beyoncé’s final verse, a rapid-fire rap that does not take a backseat to her husband’s NFL-dissing verse before hers.</p> <hr> <p><strong>Parquet Courts Celebrate The World Cup and Total Teamwork</strong></p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/sP9l9HBJ1o0" width="560"></iframe></p> <p>The essential NY rock band <a href="https://www.wnyc.org/people/parquet-courts/" data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://www.wnyc.org/people/parquet-courts/&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1529415094968000&amp;usg=AFQjCNEouCNBiyVhbSCwJ3dbGInMr-E89Q">Parquet Courts</a> has released a new single, just in time for the World Cup. It’s called “Total Football,” a term that was used to describe the Dutch national soccer team in the 1970's where every player except the keeper could switch positions and change fluidly to meet the needs of each situation. But Parquet Courts has more than soccer history on their minds – the song uses that Dutch team ethic as a metaphor; “collectivism and autonomy are not mutually exclusive” yells Andrew Savage at one point. The song is full of hooks, and a great, catchy moment where the band collectively shout out to artists and movements that they believe used the total football aesthetic (including the Dadaists and the Beatles). The song ends with a curious line which suggests that a certain NFL quarterback stands for personal glory at the expense of the greater good. Watch the lyric video so you don’t miss any of the verbal athletics. </p> <hr> <p><strong>Angelique Kidjo Reimagines A Talking Heads Classic</strong></p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="380" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/track/0Fi5C4uBEW6kNG6UF2ahm0" width="300"></iframe> </p> <p>The Benin-born, Brooklyn-based singer Angelique Kidjo has finally released her distinctive, distinctly African-flavored take on the 1980 album <em>Remain In Light</em> by Talking Heads. This will not be news to <em>Soundcheck</em> listeners: Kidjo and her band <a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/angelique-kidjo-reimagines-remain-light-in-studio/" data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://www.newsounds.org/story/angelique-kidjo-reimagines-remain-light-in-studio/&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1529415094968000&amp;usg=AFQjCNEltGxJ5RpGW7AbmhZQIuS3adn3qw">performed several of these songs in our live podcast series</a> last year, shortly before a sold-out performance at Carnegie Hall. But a project this big doesn’t materialize easily or quickly. The multiple Grammy-winner and occasional <em><a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/headphones-angelique-kidjo/" data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://www.newsounds.org/story/headphones-angelique-kidjo/&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1529415094968000&amp;usg=AFQjCNHK0GSQGCMR0g4qRBgZkqYbZzCnLg">New Sounds contributor</a></em> enlisted the aid of Ezra Koenig of Vampire Weekend, the great Nigerian drummer Tony Allen, and numerous others to flesh out her vision of this groundbreaking group of songs, written when David Byrne and producer Brian Eno were firmly under the spell of Afropop – especially the music of Fela Kuti, propelled by that same Tony Allen. The album is a kind of magic trick: the songs are intact and recognizable even as they sound like they’ve come from another planet. The ominous and unsettling “Listening Wind” is a personal favorite – driven by the sounds of the West African <em>balofon</em>, a type of xylophone; but a good track to start with might be “The Great Curve,” which features the line “the world moves on a woman’s hips” – a line that the staunchly feminist Kidjo somehow invests with a world of meaning and attitude.</p> <hr> <p><strong>Ladies and Gentlemen, Spiritualized Are Still Floating In Space</strong></p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/4vNrHoLS1zc" width="560"></iframe></p> <p>The English psychedelic rock band Spiritualized gained widespread fame in 1997 with their Album Of The Year-winning LP <em>Ladies And Gentlemen We Are Floating In Space</em>. The band’s appearances since then have been sporadic – founding member J. Spaceman (real name Jason Pierce) has been the only constant member, and the band hasn’t put out a record since 2012. But in September, Spiritualized will return with an album called <em>And Nothing Hurt</em>, and the first single is out now. It’s a typically gauzy, anthemic song called “I’m Your Man,” which will appeal to Beatles and Pink Floyd fans. Its video sees J. Spaceman – in full spaceman regalia – traveling through Joshua Tree and paying his respects at the memorial to <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gram_Parsons" data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gram_Parsons&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1529415094968000&amp;usg=AFQjCNERXevP3wY5mOyDG6d9IdM-Cu0gew">Gram Parsons</a>.</p> <hr> <p><strong>Protomartyr Deals A Winning Hand In New Single</strong></p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/VVLp32EjrSo" width="560"></iframe></p> <p>The Detroit post-punk band Protomartyr released an EP on Friday called <em>Consolation</em>, a collection of four songs that includes the usual rumble of distorted guitars and singer Joe Casey’s care-worn vocals. But two of the songs also feature Kelley Deal of The Breeders, who adds a touch of poignancy to the song “You Always Win.” Despite a largely well-earned reputation for abstract but barbed songwriting, Protomartyr’s best songs have also been melodic, and on recent albums, Casey has shown a flair for songs about growing up, and growing older. “Ellen,” from 2015’s <em>The Agent Intellect</em>, is an almost impossibly touching song (though still loud and edgy), that imagines his dead father singing to his mother, who is struggling with Alzheimer’s. “You Always Win” seems to be cut from the same cloth, and closes the new EP on a bittersweet note.</p>
Jun 18, 2018
Single-Minded and Direct Songs by Joan Armatrading
29:20
<p>The British guitarist and singer, Joan Armatrading, has had a long and award-winning relationship with the British folk scene, has had a strong jazz influence in a lot of her early hits, topped the American charts with a new wave song in 1980, and just a few years ago became the first British woman to debut at #1 on the Billboard Blues Chart.  Joan Armatrading has just released her 21<sup>st</sup> album, called <em>Not Too Far Away</em>, and she’s here in the studio to play some of it for us. </p> <p><strong>Watch here</strong>:</p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="349" scrolling="no" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnewsounds%2Fvideos%2F10156364187373180%2F&amp;width=620&amp;show_text=false&amp;height=349&amp;appId" width="620" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;"></iframe>  </p>
Jun 16, 2018
Monsieur Periné Blends Afro-Colombian Styles with Vintage Swing, Live In-Studio
<p>The Bogotá-based Monsieur Periné has taken the the Latin music world by storm since their start in 2008. The eight piece band takes the music of their native Columbia, and infuses it with sweet swing sensibilities of the 1920's and a good dash of modern pop styles. Their upbeat and lively arrangements are engaging, detailed, and above all such a joy to move to. Their excellent musicianship and energy has not gone unnoticed; they were given a Latin Grammy award as 2015's best new artist. They have not slowed down since then and recently released the wildly popular <em>Bailar Contigo</em>. They perform live in-studio.</p> <p><strong>Watch here</strong>:</p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="349" scrolling="no" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnewsounds%2Fvideos%2F10156405454773180%2F&amp;width=620&amp;show_text=false&amp;height=349&amp;appId" width="620" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;"></iframe></p>
Jun 15, 2018
Powerhouse Singer-Producer Ebony Bones Live In-Studio
<p>Singer-songwriter and producer Ebony Bones is a powerhouse performer with seemingly no limits. She creates energetic and driving songs with twinges of pop, punk, afrobeat, and dance music, all wrapped up into a compelling display of raw emotion and stunning degree of detail and intricacy. She has already worked with Yoko Ono, CeeLo Green, the New London Children's Choir and more.</p> <p>Her latest single, "Nephilim," is the title track of her upcoming album and features a dramatic performance from the Beijing Philharmonic Orchestra. The work focuses on how the voices of women, especially women of color, have been silenced. Ebony Bones joins us to discuss these themes and play songs from the record in-studio.</p> <p><strong>Watch here</strong>:</p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="349" scrolling="no" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnewsounds%2Fvideos%2F10156402867298180&amp;width=620&amp;show_text=false&amp;height=349&amp;appId" width="620" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;"></iframe></p>
Jun 14, 2018
Vintage Pop by England's Ruen Brothers
31:17
<p>Meet the Ruen Brothers, Rupert and Henry, who are actually brothers from the Northern England town of Scunthorpe. Their sound conjures Roy Orbison, Johnny Cash, and music on the radio from a bygone era. They'll play some of this vintage pop with classic country twang in-studio.</p> <p><strong>Watch here</strong>: </p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="315" scrolling="no" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnewsounds%2Fvideos%2F10156380889643180%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=560" width="560" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;"></iframe></p>
Jun 13, 2018
Weekly Music Roundup: Lost John Coltrane and Hungry March Band
5:59
<p><strong>Week of June 11:</strong> This week, a lost album by John Coltrane, a new <em>Superfly</em> soundtrack, and a Hungry March Band premiere.</p> <hr> <p><strong>PREMIERE: The Hungry March Band Return. Pandemonium Ensues.</strong></p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/GTGVv_x04WY" width="620"></iframe></p> <p>When the Brooklyn-based collective known as <a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/64792-klezmer-core-balkan-bangers-and-more/">The Hungry March Band</a> plays, they don’t really do much marching. Swarming is more like it. This anarcho-art-punk brass band includes a color guard and dancers as essential members, making their songs a visual experience as well as an aural one. So today we premiere the band’s latest video, for a song called “Running Through With The Sadness,”  the title track of their brand new album. It’s their fifth LP, and the first time they’ve made a conventional video where they mime to the recorded song. (Previous videos have been live performances.) Sax player Okkon Yokoyama co-authored the song, and tells us it was written to the break-neck <em>merengue</em> setting on a Casio keyboard. There are moments that remind me of Balkan gypsy bands, or circus music, or New Orleans jazz, but it all adds up to a wild ride. </p> <p>The Hungry March Band will be playing at Market Hotel on Friday night, June 22. </p> <hr> <p><strong>John Coltrane’s Lost Album Has Been Found</strong></p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="380" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/track/4Mxv2NpWywFrS477J9dIuC" width="300"></iframe></p> <p>This week’s announcement of a newly rediscovered album from jazz legend <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Coltrane">John Coltrane</a> sent shock waves through the music world. First, Coltrane is one of the towering figures in American music of the past century – a jazz pioneer, a sonic and spiritual experimentalist, and, though it’s hard to believe now, a best-selling artist on the popular music charts. Second, the lost album was made at a time when Coltrane and his quartet (the so-called Classic Quartet with McCoy Tyner on piano, Jimmy Garrison on bass, and the great Elvin Jones on drums) were at the height of their fame and popularity. And third, the set they recorded, on March 6, 1963, contains a couple of original works that were apparently never played anywhere else. So when a typically breathless press release from the label, Impulse! Records, calls it “the holy grail of jazz,” it’s actually hard to argue with. One of those previously unknown works is “Untitled Original 11383” – which features Coltrane playing not his more customary tenor sax but rather a soprano sax. It’s the only work available so far, but the rest of the album promises further surprises – McCoy Tyner sits out several of the tracks, leaving a huge amount of space in the music that might presage some of Coltrane’s later harmonic adventures. </p> <p><em>Both Directions at Once: The Lost Album </em>will be released on June 29. </p> <hr> <p><strong>Rapper/Producer Future Presents The Soundtrack To <em>Superfly</em></strong></p> <p><strong><em><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm14032784780257650841465-034f-4012-9d24-efd4c6070ab8"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Ge_mi3B9LwY?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-1032116611385793075" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ge_mi3B9LwY"></iframe></div></div>  </em></strong></p> <p>The remake of the 1972 film <em>Superfly</em> comes out on Wednesday, but the soundtrack dropped on Friday. Rapper and producer Future curated the soundtrack, co-produced the film, and will be performing some of his own music from the soundtrack on <em>Jimmy Kimmel Live</em> on Tuesday night. But not all of the music on the <em>Superfly</em> soundtrack is by Future, and at least one piece actually looks to the past. The soundtrack’s opener, “If You Want It,” is by Sleepy Brown (remember TLC’s massive hit “<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8WEtxJ4-sh4">Waterfalls</a>” in the mid-90s? He wrote that.), and it has a big, technicolor sound reminiscent of <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-cmo6MRYf5g">Curtis Mayfield’s classic score</a> to the original movie. In fact, when you hear the “chukka-chukka” of the electric guitar come in, you almost expect to hear Mayfield’s voice following. Instead we hear the voice of Scar, a singer associated with <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outkast">Outkast</a>, in a perhaps career-boosting moment. </p> <hr> <p><strong>Fun New Video From The Internet (The Band, Not The Series Of Tubes)</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm1403278464090240240b7b7-ba68-4bb4-a444-da6605426265"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/NB3gWkhLkxM?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-3696190848514669164" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NB3gWkhLkxM"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>The members of the neo-soul/funk band <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Internet_(band)">The Internet</a> spent last year engaged in solo projects – the band’s frontwoman, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syd_(singer)">Syd</a> (formerly Syd Tha Kid, a member of the hip hop collective Odd Future), has been especially active and will continue to do solo concerts this year as well. But they’ve come back together to make a new album, called <em>Hive Mind</em>, which comes out on July 20. Syd has directed a new video for the single, “Come Over.” The song itself is a likable slice of '90s-style R&amp;B, and as for the video, it is a totally good-natured story of hanging out, notable for its normalized same-sex couples and for its genial wit. Oh, and its interrupted guitar solo. </p> <p>The Internet will play at the Afropunk festival here in New York on August 25. They’ll be back opening for Gorillaz on October 13 at Barclays Center.</p> <hr> <p><strong>Twin Shadow Celebrates “Saturdays” With An Assist From Haim</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327852846272b230711a-2869-4e88-9c04-daee6903b60c"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/igKnS0b7Fhc?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a4820592626919188418" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=igKnS0b7Fhc&amp;feature=youtu.be"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>The Dominican-American singer, songwriter, guitarist, and occasional actor George Lewis Jr. makes music under the name <a href="https://www.wnyc.org/story/102061-studio-twin-shadow/">Twin Shadow</a>. That music is – despite the guitar’s presence – a synthy brand of pop reminiscent of the '80s. When Twin Shadow played in our studio, all of the listener comments noted that fact with evident satisfaction. Except for one listener who identified himself as George Lewis Sr., and simply wrote “And one day the moustache was all grown up...So prouda my boy!”  Anyway, Twin Shadow has just shared the video for "Saturdays,” a mostly live-action video (the moustache is just a – well, a shadow right now), but featuring an animated <a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/316443-haim-in-studio/">Haim</a>, the sister trio who are also known for their retro-rock sound. Their harmonies color the song’s final verse and chorus. </p> <p>Twin Shadow is also playing Afropunk in Brooklyn, but on the second day, August 26.  He too will be back in New York, at Radio City Music Hall on Sept. 27 with Børns.</p>
Jun 11, 2018
The Powerful, Deep Soul of Singer Deva Mahal
29:48
<p>Meet the impressive R&amp;B songstress Deva Mahal, who claims her parents as inspiration: blues legend Taj Mahal and dancer/artist/teacher Inshirah Mahal. Her latest record, <em>Run Deep </em>is collection of modern and seductive, rich and rocking tunes that make for a grand tour of soul, blues and classic rock. She and her band take us for a ride on powerhouse stompers and sumptuous ballads, in-studio. </p> <p><strong>Watch</strong>:</p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="349" scrolling="no" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnewsounds%2Fvideos%2F10156355234403180%2F&amp;width=620&amp;show_text=false&amp;height=349&amp;appId" width="620" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;"></iframe></p>
Jun 11, 2018
This Is The Kit: Fuzzed-Out Psych-Folk With Sexy Sax, In-Studio
29:47
<p>This Is The Kit is English singer and songwriter Kate Stables (lately based in Paris or Bristol) and whoever joins her. Under that nom de plume, she's been releasing since the 00's. Her latest album, called <em>Moonshine Freeze</em>, has been nominated for the prestigious Ivor Novello Award in the UK. This Is the Kit plays some of these songs which range from ghost stories, clapping music, sax solos and birdsong in-studio. </p> <p><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327860042704171156c0-96e5-4538-8b57-0e5b9337ac06"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/435SDzZYz0E?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-6000021054028914823" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=435SDzZYz0E"></iframe></div></div>  </p>
Jun 07, 2018
La Luz Dreams a Floating World of Surreal Surf-Noir
<p>The now L.A.-based band La Luz recently moved to California from Seattle and their surf-noir refracts that weird golden paradise. Awash in reverb, the surf guitar and fuzzy vocal harmonies from singer/guitarist Shana Cleveland, drummer Marian Li Pino, keyboardist Alice Sandahl, and bassist Lena Simon are like a dreamy B movie, surreal, and kitschy, but definitely fun. The band joins us to play songs from their latest record, <em>Floating Features, </em>in-studio.</p> <p>Watch the session here: </p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="315" scrolling="no" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnewsounds%2Fvideos%2F10156385864478180%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=560" width="560" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;"></iframe></p> <p>Also, this video for their song, "Cicada," is spectacularly goofy. Wait for the band in the hospital room...</p> <p><em><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327846960128ce28fc9f-27f1-49b8-bc3b-e25f796a9f48"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/vVaZuX5FRDA?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-1503620481504639332" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vVaZuX5FRDA"></iframe></div></div>  </em></p>
Jun 06, 2018
Weekly Music Roundup: Oneohtrix Point Never, Marcus Miller, and Kanye
<p><strong>Week of June 4:</strong> Yes, there is new Kanye West. But other stuff happened too. Oneohtrix Point Never dropped a new weird pop record; plus new music from bassist Marcus Miller, and electropop band The 1975.</p> <hr> <p><strong>From The Big Expanse of the US West, A Little Album by Kanye West</strong></p> <p><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm1403278544075840f4d62db-9b29-4b24-b679-d612b241e727"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/_twMhgwRoaY?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-7390421000521827652" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_twMhgwRoaY"></iframe></div></div>  </p> <p>Well, you gotta hand it to Kanye West – he sucked all the air out of the music world again this past week, unveiling his new EP-masquerading-as-an-album called <em>Ye</em> at a <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/01/arts/music/kanye-west-album-ye.html" data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://www.nytimes.com/2018/06/01/arts/music/kanye-west-album-ye.html&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1528217838726000&amp;usg=AFQjCNHZUVzpMj_UPbA5qYTRJCpnkbuVYA">star-filled ranch in Wyoming</a>. It feels small in size, but more surprisingly, it feels small musically as well. None of the seven songs look to be crashing anyone’s Top Ten Kanye Songs playlist. Where it does not stint is in scope: West takes on his recent disclosure of his bi-polar diagnosis, the #MeToo movement and its snaring of hip hop mogul Russel Simmons, his own views about women (which this album suggests is evolving from Paleolithic to parental), and his erratic public behavior. One song, “<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=swQWUa5-9TM" data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v%3DswQWUa5-9TM&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1528217838726000&amp;usg=AFQjCNG7i-KB5-ybZlOoAqx_UmWk16iFJQ">Ye Vs. The People</a>,” features the rapper T.I. chiding West for his support of Trump at the apparent expense of the African-American community, and even though West gets to respond, his opponent’s jibes are pretty strong and land hard. It all points to West’s epic sense of self-regard, which works well when it’s one of the spices in his recipes but at times on <em>Ye</em> threatens to become the overwhelming flavor. The song “No Mistakes” might be the one that best balances West’s undeniable production skills and taste in sampling with his need to tell us his story. “It’s been a shaky ass year,” he admits, only to go on to proclaim how he doesn’t “take advice from anyone less successful than me.” Meanwhile, the chorus samples the gospel legend Edwin Hawkins, and Slick Rick’s repeated “believe it or not” samples slyly suggest that we question everything West says. </p> <hr> <p> </p> <p><strong>The 1975 Return, Only A Little Older But Apparently Much Wiser</strong></p> <p><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm1403278579128807834c71a-561c-4086-9a74-98a462d77830"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/zUzBfBqbSmc?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-7564302625889241115" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zUzBfBqbSmc"></iframe></div></div>  </p> <p>The British electropop band called The 1975 released their debut LP in 2013, but really hit their stride here in the States with 2016’s album <em>I Like It When You Sleep, for You Are So Beautiful yet So Unaware of It</em>. Now they’ve announced that their followup, called <em>A Brief Inquiry Into Online Relationships</em>, will be out in October, and have released a single called “Give Yourself A Try.” Lead singer Matt Healy, who has recently revealed that he went through a period of rehab for drug addiction, adopts the role of an older man (he’s all of 29) dispensing the hard-won wisdom of his years (again, all 29 of them). One thing about The 1975 has been a sense of ironic self-awareness in their work – think of the <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QkubQCI4Fxo" data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v%3DQkubQCI4Fxo&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1528217838726000&amp;usg=AFQjCNHox4aamiMFXNmVfhVy75yYXa2d1Q">video for their early hit “Girls,”</a> for example, which starts with Healy complaining that the video looks like a typical pop band video (“we’re not a pop band”), and then pulls out every cliché in the book as the production unfolds. In this song, Healy details things like finding a grey hair “and like context in a modern debate I just took it out,” and hilariously refers to himself as “a millennial that baby boomers like.” </p> <hr> <p> </p> <p><strong>Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Latest “Hamildrop” Features The Regrettes</strong></p> <p><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327847626432719a28d2-1106-4449-a589-a4122d4f7044"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/tK_9hkWigYs?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-6886569561606123653" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tK_9hkWigYs"></iframe></div></div>  </p> <p>As <a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/weekly-music-roundup-dreamer-xenia-rubinos/" data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://www.newsounds.org/story/weekly-music-roundup-dreamer-xenia-rubinos/&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1528217838726000&amp;usg=AFQjCNGpVhDBuJDUfOQBedqgb2taW3QNYw">we’ve mentioned here before</a>, <a href="https://www.wnyc.org/story/39333-way-beyond-broadway/" data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://www.wnyc.org/story/39333-way-beyond-broadway/&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1528217838726000&amp;usg=AFQjCNG9JtHE8g6nErVkty8BE4pgUA3gwQ">Lin-Manuel Miranda</a>, the creator of <em>Hamilton</em>, has been doing a monthly series of audio or video releases of <em>Hamilton</em>-related content, and this month’s <a href="http://www.hamildrops.com/" data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=http://www.hamildrops.com/&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1528217838726000&amp;usg=AFQjCNEjwCANaw8JOKrRpsUzSUSEUVA6PQ">Hamildrop</a>, as the series is known, is an actual cover of one of the hit musical’s songs. “Helpless” has a 90s R&amp;B groove in the original version, but the LA-based band The Regrettes have other things in mind – 60s girl group harmonies, for one, and the classic propulsive sound of garage-rock. Their version of “Helpless” has a great summery sound – perfect for this month’s Hamildrop. </p> <hr> <p> </p> <p><strong>Oneohtrix Point Never Drops Long Awaited LP</strong></p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="380" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/track/5M1QuhhIwEqNXeNooLndH7" width="300"></iframe></p> <p> Composer and visual artist <a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/weekly-music-roundup-june-12/" data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://www.newsounds.org/story/weekly-music-roundup-june-12/&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1528217838726000&amp;usg=AFQjCNFyaPI-jY1dYuWq3-F8f2JWC0YR3w">Daniel Lopatin</a> finally released his album <em>Age Of</em> <span data-term="goog_117130432">on Friday</span> – shortly after presenting the songs in three sold-out performances of his interdisciplinary extravaganza <em><a href="http://www.armoryonpark.org/programs_events/detail/myriad" data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=http://www.armoryonpark.org/programs_events/detail/myriad&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1528217838726000&amp;usg=AFQjCNF1mCv4cWLKfJe96NgE5uH29j14-g">Myriad</a></em> at the Park Avenue Armory. Clearly Lopatin is not hobbled by a lack of ambition, and<em>Age Of</em> has been eagerly awaited since Lopatin’s earlier release of a video for the album track “<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qMQJF-7Y2h0" data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v%3DqMQJF-7Y2h0&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1528217838727000&amp;usg=AFQjCNFbd4JHoGTy0BIuUAOA7aAyteyU5w">Black Snow</a>,” which he directed and which Pitchfork called (pretty accurately) “a head-spinning, cyborg nightmare.” The album turns out to be at once the darkest but also the most songful album that Lopatin has made under the Oneohtrix Point Never banner. Harpsichords share space with heavily processed vocals; some tracks are short enough to almost function like the skits in an old hip-hop record. There’s an impressive amount of sonic territory being mapped, and a good portion of it happens in the song called “The Station.” Its repeating bass line underpins a steadily building array of synthesizers, what sounds like a fuzzed-out guitar, harp samples, and auto-tuned vocals where you hear the auto-tune more than the vocals. An instrumental coda suggests a meeting of electronic music and Philip Glass-style minimalism, with a nod to alternative tunings. Not bad for a 4-minute “song.”</p> <hr> <p> </p> <p><strong>Marcus Miller’s Jazzy Take On Trap Music</strong></p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="380" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/track/1VavHI8bxfg3OH31fuZ7Ps" width="300"></iframe></p> <p>Bassist Marcus Miller is part of the generation of jazz musicians who draw freely from the full range of black American music. Like pianist <a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/188862-robert-glasper-and-bilal-live-in-the-greene-space/" data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://www.newsounds.org/story/188862-robert-glasper-and-bilal-live-in-the-greene-space/&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1528217838727000&amp;usg=AFQjCNFWo4FfJ7HiTNbmC6-u06KTJtWg-Q">Robert Glasper</a> or trumpeter <a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/trumpter-christian-scott-atunde-adjuah-live-in-studio/" data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://www.newsounds.org/story/trumpter-christian-scott-atunde-adjuah-live-in-studio/&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1528217838727000&amp;usg=AFQjCNHgMLIqN_t6EGmKyuJeu8zYkeVgaw">Christian Scott Atunde Adjuah</a>, Miller writes music that incorporates hip hop, funk, soul, and various types of R&amp;B. His new album, called <em>Laid Black</em>, features guests like New Orleans’ Trombone Shorty, vocal group Take 6, and singer Selah Sue, who does a surprising version of “Que Sera Sera.” But it begins with a song called “Trip Trap.” The title refers to the spare Southern hip hop style known as trap, and it starts with the genre’s trademark stuttering hi-hat cymbal and Miller’s funky, almost speech-like bassline. But as the song goes on the whole band gets into the act, with the horns leading the way and framing a number of short but virtuosic bass interjections.  </p>
Jun 04, 2018
Jazz-Looking Chamber Music by Joshua Redman and Brooklyn Rider
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<p>Hear unpredictable and graceful melodic lines traded by sax and strings, as tenor sax superstar Joshua Redman and string quartet Brooklyn Rider, along with all-star rhythm section of Scott Colley (bass) and Satoshi Takeishi (percussion) take over the studio. It's chamber music with swoops, dives, groove and bite in original and newly-arranged music with one foot in the jazz world where sharps are optional. Look for these pieces to appear on a forthcoming record due in fall 2018 via Nonesuch. </p> <p><strong>Watch the full session here</strong>:</p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="349" scrolling="no" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnewsounds%2Fvideos%2F10156336803818180%2F&amp;width=620&amp;show_text=false&amp;height=349&amp;appId" width="620" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;"></iframe></p>
Jun 04, 2018
Art-Rock for a Good Time with the Band Bodega
<p>NYC-based art rock quintet Bodega (previously known as Bodega Bay) are the model of modern tongue-in-cheeky post-punk band. <span>With politically-minded personal commentaries on </span>masculinity, consumerism, the hustle of capitalism, and female pleasure, their staccato guitars and shouty gang vocals make for a potent delivery vehicle. Dance party with them as they play salty new tunes in-studio.</p> <p><strong>Watch here</strong>: </p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="349" scrolling="no" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnewsounds%2Fvideos%2F10156371079188180%2F&amp;width=620&amp;show_text=false&amp;height=349&amp;appId" width="620" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;"></iframe></p>
Jun 01, 2018
Producer and Songwriter Neko Case Unleashes 'Hell-On'
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<p>Resisting gender-specific compliments in print since 2014 (and probably before), producer, songwriter, badass, and musician Neko Case is about to unleash her latest record, <em>Hell-On,</em> into the world. She’s written songs that traverse a lot of ground: folk ballads, radio pop, rock anthems, a little bit of goth moodiness, honky-tonk piano, and swagger of all kinds. Her exceptional and distinct voice, “like garotting wire,” delivers wordplay of the highest order on this gorgeous, daring, won't-be-a-supplicant-ever record. Neko Case brings her touring band to play some of these new tunes in-studio.</p> <p><strong>Watch the full session here</strong>:</p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="349" scrolling="no" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnewsounds%2Fvideos%2F10156345920788180%2F&amp;width=620&amp;show_text=false&amp;height=349&amp;appId" width="620" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;"></iframe>  </p>
May 31, 2018
Weekly Music Roundup: Buddy Guy and The Midnight Hour
<p><strong>Week of May 28:</strong> This week, returns for Jake Shears and Buddy Guy, a benefit song from Hurray For The Riff Raff<strong> </strong>for Puerto Rico, and an expansive hip-hop/orchestral collaboration.</p> <hr> <p> </p> <p><strong>Ali Shaheed Muhammad and Adrian Younge Present The Midnight Hour</strong></p> <p><strong>  </strong></p> <p><em>The Midnight Hour</em> is a project of the producers Ali Shaheed Muhammad, of A Tribe Called Quest, and Adrian Younge. The two have been scoring the Netflix series <em>Luke Cage</em>, and their <em>Midnight Hour</em> collection has a grand, cinematic sound that includes a taut soul/jazz rhythm section and what sounds like a full orchestra. In addition, the album will be full of guest vocalists from the worlds of hip-hop and R&amp;B, including <a href="https://www.wnyc.org/story/41363-raphael-saadiq/">Raphael Saadiq</a>, Bilal, and, on one memorable track, the late Luther Vandross. Ubiquitous drummer <a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/199018-questlove-does-the-shuffle/">Questlove</a> and electrifying trumpeter <a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/trumpeter-keyon-harrolds-vibrant-tunes-offer-strength-courage/">Keyon Harrold</a> also make an appearance. The first single is “Questions,” and features the distinctive voice of CeeLo Green (“Crazy,” “F*** You,” etc.) up front. Both producers look back to old-school hip-hop, and therefore even further back to the soul and jazz of the 70s that provided so much of the samples used in hip-hop in the 80s and 90s. “Questions” may sound familiar to Kendrick Lamar fans – he wanted to use an early version of this song on his Grammy-winning album <em>To Pimp A Butterfly</em>, and it ultimately appeared on his 2016 compilation <em>untitled/unmastered</em> under the title “Untitled 06.” Now, you can hear the final version of the song as part of <em>The Midnight Hour</em>. The album comes out on June 8.</p> <hr> <p><strong>Jake Shears Goes Solo – With A Crowd</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm1403278443230721045dd9d-03bc-4e1e-9fa7-4865519068fb"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/EfPXokHna2M?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a4838467324545444193" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EfPXokHna2M"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>For many years, <a href="https://www.wnyc.org/story/112645-singing-loud-and-proud/">Jake Shears</a> was known as the flamboyant frontman for the dance-pop group Scissor Sisters. Lately he might be better known for his leading role in Broadway’s hit musical <em>Kinky Boots</em>. Soon, though, Shears will also be known as a solo artist: he will release his first solo album in August. The first single is “Creep City,” and its video finds Shears as the Master of Ceremonies at a place that seems like a version of <em>Cabaret</em> set in New Orleans at Mardi Gras. The combination of sexual abandon (unrestrained by gender or apparently by orientation), horn-heavy dance hooks, and Shears’ impish sense of humor make the video eminently watchable, as it somehow stays just this side of NSFW. The music, according a statement from Shears, is acoustic, handcrafted, and slow-cooked, the traditional Southern way. “If it sounds expensive,” he writes, “that’s because it was.”</p> <p>The album, simply called <em>Jake Shears</em>, is due on August 10. </p> <hr> <p><strong>Hurray For The Riff Raff Support Puerto Rican Recovery With “Pa’lante”</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327854245408142b51e0-cc87-47ad-aa7c-bd639d51602a"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/LilVDjLaZSE?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a7345035629596207820" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LilVDjLaZSE"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>For years, the singer and songwriter Alynda Lee Segarra has led her band <a href="https://www.wnyc.org/story/hurray-for-the-riff-raff-in-studio/">Hurray For The Riff Raff</a> through songs that celebrate roots, diversity, and identity, in music that has elements of folk, punk, and echoes of her adopted hometown of New Orleans. (Segarra is a Bronx native.) Now, she’s released a remarkable short film that’s built around her song “Pa’lante,” which means “forwards,” or “onward.” It follows a Puerto Rican family’s struggles in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria (Segarra herself appears briefly in some of the archival footage), and amplifies the song’s original statement of ethnic pride and its suggestion that assimilation should not mean the loss of one’s familial culture. The song is not played continuously all the way through – there is a break in the middle of the film, but give it a minute. Because when the song returns, with Segarra’s simple but affecting chorus and her urgent/raging cries of “pa’lante,” it is a deeply moving experience. </p> <hr> <p><strong>The Legendary Buddy Guy Releases A New Single</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327847678624fc8069b9-b05d-4012-9592-831192133441"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/rZSt3sFk8FA?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-3871134687727705527" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rZSt3sFk8FA"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>Buddy Guy is justifiably famous as a blues guitarist – one of the great exponents of the electric Chicago Blues style. His fans include Eric Clapton, who saw Guy play in 1965 and labeled it a transformative moment in his (Clapton’s) career, the Rolling Stones, Jimi Hendrix, and by extension the countless bands who’ve been influenced by <em>those</em> folks. The 7-time Grammy winner is about to release an album called <em>The Blues Is Alive And Well</em> (a title that English teachers can have some fun with), and has just given us a first glimpse in the form of a single called “Nine Below Zero.”  And the first thing you’ll probably notice is not the guitar playing – there are lots of fine guitarists out there, and this song hews pretty closely to the classic blues format; it’s Buddy Guy’s voice. It’s hard to believe that at 81 he can still sing with the strength and clarity he brings to this old Sonny Boy Williamson song. Oh, and the guitar playing is also pretty great.  </p> <hr> <p><strong>Psychedelic country/rock from Texas’s Israel Nash</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327855189232b5dfb54f-431f-4eec-88e5-d28a8f01afca"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/zeLm6792I4Y?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-3820415709644932456" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=222&amp;v=zeLm6792I4Y"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>Israel Nash has spent the past couple of years creating music that evokes the wide expanses of Texas, seemingly viewed through the dual lenses of Nashville and peyote.  A big sweep of steel-guitar, an even bigger sweep of orchestral sound, an anthemic chorus – all of that comes together in his newest single, called “Rolling On,” but there’s something new too: a kind of 60s pop sheen that just adds to the epic feeling of what is, at heart, an intimate song about perseverance and positivity. </p> <p>Nash’s next album, <em>Lifted</em>, comes out on July 27.</p> <hr> <p><strong>Paul Beaubrun’s Call To “Rise Up”</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm1403278449583688e45b6e4-afc2-468a-98f9-dd6fae725276"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/xLyvCwB_hJI?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a2009072629527345809" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xLyvCwB_hJI"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>In the late 80s/early 90s we had a chance to hear the Haitian band Boukman Eksperyans on several occasions in NY; we even presented some of their live music on the air here at WNYC. It was a family band, and the family in question was the Beaubrun clan. Paul Beaubrun grew up in that family, surrounded by music. He fled Haiti for NY after the 1991 coup, and has released a couple of albums of roots-based music built around the sounds of reggae, blues, and the Haitian <em>rasin</em> style. The latest is called <em>Ayibobo</em>, the Haitian Creole word for “blessings,” and he’s just released the video for the largely acoustic single called “Rise Up.” That sounds like a Bob Marley title, and indeed the song has a definite early reggae quality to it. It’s a call to action, but typically for the younger Beaubrun, it is not rabble-rousing screed but rather an understated, lyrical offering, sung in English. </p>
May 28, 2018
Rival Consoles' Thoughtful and 'Humanised' Electronica
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<p><span>Hear unraveling minimalist electronica with restrained ambient feels from Rival Consoles, aka London-based producer Ryan Lee West, whose music combines warm and human analogue-heavy synthesizers, along with acoustic and electric instruments. On his latest, <em>Persona</em>, which might have taken inspiration from the shoegaze band, Slowdive, West strikes a delicate balance between music for home listening and larger spaces. He’ll perform this shifting palette of drones, melodies, and effects, in-studio.</span></p> <p><span><strong>Watch the full session here</strong>:</span></p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="349" scrolling="no" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnewsounds%2Fvideos%2F10156330446068180%2F&amp;width=620&amp;show_text=false&amp;height=349&amp;appId" width="620" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;"></iframe>   </p>
May 28, 2018
Literary Chamber Rock Quintet Oracle Hysterical Adapts Greek Tragedy
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<p>Part book club, part composer collective, Oracle Hysterical’s works occupy the fluid space between classically-inclined song-cycle and art-rock concept album. The group’s songs take on great literary with text sources from Grimms’ Fairy Tales to Greek tragedy, and falsely-attributed Shakespeare, all in modern settings that might be chamber rock, baroque folk or (staff favorite:) “Alt-classical.”  The chamber band’s latest is "Hecuba," a “savage story of revenge in which the disgraced queen of Troy, Hecuba, with her city razed and her children murdered, descends from nobility to primal violence.” (<a href="https://nationalsawdust.org/event/oracle-hysterical/">National Sawdust</a>) Oracle Hysterical plays songs from it in-studio.</p> <p><strong>Watch the full session below</strong>:</p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="349" scrolling="no" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnewsounds%2Fvideos%2F10156323037993180%2F&amp;width=620&amp;show_text=false&amp;height=349&amp;appId" width="620" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;"></iframe></p>
May 24, 2018
Weekly Music Roundup: Neko Case and Treya Lam
<p><strong>Week of May 21:</strong> This week, Neko Case gets dark, Fantastic Negrito gets darker, and Nine Inch Nails… You get the idea.</p> <hr> <p> </p> <p><strong>Neko Case Takes a Long and Winding Road</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm1403278600427043f6a8fdd-e4b2-4032-af5b-c670ff4e9073"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/67SYzn4lmt8?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-6965611596870849788" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=67SYzn4lmt8"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>In her solo songs, her long-term collaboration with indie rock supergroup <a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/103111-studio-new-pornographers/">The New Pornographers</a>, and her <a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/weekly-music-roundup-mar-08/">trio with Laura Viers and k d lang</a>, <a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/37987-case-logic/">Neko Case</a> has established herself as a great singer… to the point that it has threatened to overshadow her songwriting. But early songs like “<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EBLI9jq6tUY">Things That Scare Me</a>,” which may have seemed dark and pessimistic at first, now seem prophetic. Her latest is a 7-minute epic called “Curse of the I-5 Corridor,” which features guest vocals by <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Lanegan">Mark Lanegan</a>. It’s a slow burner about bad choices, bad luck, and people who may be good but have not been given the chance to show it. The title refers to the interstate that runs through the Pacific Northwest (already immortalized in the Wedding Present’s brilliant “<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZjNeycs0IjI">Interstate 5</a>”). Like the highway after dusk, the song winds its mysterious way to its destination – a dark and dramatic instrumental finale. </p> <p>Neko Case’s new album, <em>Hell On</em>, comes out on June 1.</p> <hr> <p><strong>Fantastic Negrito Returns, And He Ain’t Happy</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm14032784623875244eba57e-72dc-488b-94af-731285ed4128"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/yYjkEoYI3Jk?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-6826606599788663691" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yYjkEoYI3Jk"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>Xavier Dphrepaulezz is a considerate guy: he chose the stage name <a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/fantastic-negrito-in-studio/">Fantastic Negrito</a> so you wouldn’t have to trip over his Somalian last name (de-frep-all-ez). But he is not in a happy place when it comes to the state of our Union. His new single, “The Duffler,” comes from his forthcoming album called <em>Please Don’t Be Dead</em>. In a statement for the release of the single, he writes that the album title refers to his "fear for the life of my black son. I fear for the lives of my daughters. I am uncertain about what kind of future they will face.” The single is about regrets and not realizing what you had until you’ve lost it. It’s a feeling Dphrepaulezz knows well, having signed a lucrative record deal when barely out of his teens (and his strict religious home), only to suffer a near-fatal car accident in 2000 that looked to have ended his career before it had a chance to bloom. But since adopting the Fantastic Negrito moniker in 2015, he’s gone from strength to strength, wielding his urgent R&amp;B, with occasional hard rock riffs, in a way that led to a Grammy award for his debut album in 2016. </p> <p>The new album, <em>Please Don’t Be Dead</em>, comes out on June 15.</p> <hr> <p><strong>Trent Reznor’s Anxious New Prayer</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327845864992deb245f6-bbfc-4316-be1a-367a923c32ad"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/eeJ_DzRJUI4?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a8230372053636512749" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=255&amp;v=eeJ_DzRJUI4"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>“God Break Down The Door” is the plea – or maybe the command? – of singer Trent Reznor on the new Bowie-inflected single by his band, Nine Inch Nails. “God Break Down The Door” finds Reznor in unusually relaxed form, vocally, even as he’s singing enigmatic lines like “you won’t find the answers here/not the ones you came looking for.” But all around him is a confusion of skittering drums, restless synthesizers, ominous blasts of sax, and a sense that maybe you don’t want to see what’s behind that door after all. </p> <p>The album, <em>Bad Witch</em>, comes out on June 22.</p> <hr> <p><strong>Bombay Rickey – Bollywood Funk With A NY Attitude</strong></p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="380" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/track/3u1PoVx3i7IOkebQ5dHDH6" width="300"></iframe></p> <p>Surely we’ve all wondered at some point what it would sound like if an operatically trained singer performed Hindi film music with a funk band in 1960s California… or was that just me?  Anyway, Brooklyn’s Bombay Rickey answers that question with their latest album, <em>Electric Bhairavi</em>, which came out on Friday. (Bhairavi is a raga scale familiar to fans of Indian classical music.) The band features the enormous voice of <a href="http://kamalasankaram.com/bio/">Kamala Sankaram</a>, a singer and contemporary music composer, and a psychedelic surf vibe that spans decades effortlessly. The album is full of good-natured originals (“Megalodon” is apparently based on the singer’s collection of prehistoric shark teeth), and songs that have roots in South Asia. It also features a cover of an old Yma Sumac song, “Gopher Mambo,” here simply called “Gopher” because it’s no longer in a mambo rhythm. I mention this track because Bombay Rickey began as an <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yma_Sumac">Yma Sumac</a> cover band, which sounds like a joke but evidently wasn’t. (Sumac was a Peruvian-American soprano who was a big hit in the 50s but seen as the ultimate in camp by the time I was giggling over her vocal exploits in the 80s.) This song, called “Meri Aankhon Mein Ek Sapna Hai,” is a Bollywood song associated with the famous singer <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mohammed_Rafi">Mohammed Rafi</a>, and the funky guitar-led instrumental opening is pretty true to the original; but Sankaram wastes little time making the song her own, and each time you think, “wow, that’s high,” she somehow finds an even higher note.  </p> <hr> <p><strong>Treya Lam Is Kaki King’s First Artist Signing</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm1403278434549609e8ba378-76a9-48e3-9cae-e43c54873632"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/3LetUlxYEO0?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a3099143197222220206" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3LetUlxYEO0&amp;feature=youtu.be"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>Guitarist and composer <a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/guitarist-composer-kaki-king-plus-string-quartet-live-in-studio/">Kaki King</a> has started her own record label, humorously named Short Stuff Records. (Hey, she may be on the small size, but we’ve learned over the years that she is <a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/3870-new-york-guitar-festival-greene-space-part-1-2/">a big presence on stage</a>.) Her first signing is singer and violinist Treya Lam, whose debut album called <em>Good News</em> will come out on June 8. Lam’s first single is “Sapphire Skies,” in which layers of strings and some beautiful overdubbed vocal harmonies take the song out of the usual singer/songwriter territory and into something closer to art song or chamber music. King plays guitar and other instruments on the album, which, we are told, was entirely performed, recorded, mixed and mastered “using 100% female talent.” Speaking of which, both Treya Lam and Kaki King will be performing at historic Green-Wood Cemetery in Brooklyn on May 29 as part of the Secret Society of the Sisterhood, along with actress Amber Tamblyn, comedian Yamaneika Saunder, and others. </p> <p>Treya Lam also performs on June 8 at Joe’s Pub. Lam and King will also share a bill at Celebrate Brooklyn on July 28.</p>
May 21, 2018
Vijay Iyer Sextet's Hard-Driving Chamber-Funk
46:00
<p>Pianist, composer, <span>MacArthur</span><span> Fellow, </span>and bandleader Vijay Iyer has done imaginative re-workings of pop songs, explored the connections between jazz and the music of India, and veered into the classical realm as well, with electronics. His most recent album, <em>Far From Over</em>, features an all-star lineup of virtuoso jazz improvisers: horn players Graham Haynes, Steve Lehman and Mark Shim alongside rhythm partners Stephan Crump and Tyshawn Sorey. And the rhythms under some these tunes have come from folk music - from West African drumming or Indian classical music – or just straight-up funk. The Vijay Iyer Sextet joins us live in the studio, in advance of their Village Vanguard residency this week. </p> <p><strong>Watch the full session here via <a href="https://www.facebook.com/newsounds/" target="_blank">New Sounds Facebook</a></strong>: </p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="349" scrolling="no" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnewsounds%2Fvideos%2F10156332613233180%2F&amp;width=620&amp;show_text=false&amp;height=349&amp;appId" width="620" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;"></iframe></p>
May 21, 2018
Daring Ambition of The Magnetic Fields: One Song For Every Year of a Life
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<p>Watch Live via Facebook:</p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="315" scrolling="no" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnewsounds%2Fvideos%2F10156320857558180%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=560" width="560" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;"></iframe></p> <p><span>Some folks get a fast car, a tattoo, or a drum set for their mid-life crisis. However, New York singer-songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Stephin Merritt, songwriter of <a href="http://www.houseoftomorrow.com/" target="_blank">The Magnetic Fields</a><span> recorded </span><em><a href="http://www.nonesuch.com/albums/50-song-memoir" target="_blank">50 Song Memoir</a></em><span>: a five-disc, two-and-a-half-hour audio autobiography, featuring one song for each year of his life from conception to teenage years; early explorations of synthesizer to when he founded The Magnetic Fields, and made <em>69 Love Songs; </em>all the way up to 2015, his 50th year. There were certain rules: no more than seven instruments per song (which works well for the live band configuration), and no instrument could be used more than seven times across the album - oh and the song material came from personal life events. </span></span></p> <p><span><span>When the band performs the collection of songs live, it takes two full nights to perform, which they'll do on <a href="https://www.ticketmaster.com/venueartist/6/774536" target="_blank">June 15 &amp; 16 at the Apollo Theater</a>. </span></span>Stephin Merritt and Sam Davol are in the studio to play a few of these story-songs of cartoon pop, club disco, fractured love songs, and beyond, and maybe tell a few stories too. </p>
May 17, 2018
Weekly Music Roundup: Ruen Brothers, Kelsey Lu and Gang Gang Dance
5:58
<p><strong>Week of May 14</strong>: shades of blue from the Ruen Brothers and from Kelsey Lu, and a message from Sioux sacred lands by Gang Gang Dance.</p> <hr> <p><strong>The Ruen Brothers Evoke 60s TV Variety Shows in <em>All My Shades of Blue</em></strong></p> <p><iframe height="348" src="https://embed.vevo.com?isrc=US4BW1800101&amp;autoplay=true" width="620"></iframe></p> <p>Originally from the UK, Henry and Rupert Stansall are now making music in Brooklyn under the name The Ruen Brothers. They appear to have grown up with a steady diet of 60s pop and country – their songs recall Johnny Cash, Paul Revere &amp; The Raiders, The Everley Brothers, and most of all, Roy Orbison. This is largely because of Henry’s soaring vocals, although their forthcoming album has been cleverly produced to sound like one of Phil Spector’s “wall of sound” recordings from the '60s. The producer is none other than Rick Rubin (Run DMC, Beastie Boys, Johnny Cash’s brilliant late albums, need I go on?), and the album will be called <em>All My Shades Of Blue</em>. The title track is out now, and the band has just released a fun video for it which imagines the brothers on some '60s TV variety show – the type where bands would (poorly) lip sync and play along to their hit singles. </p> <p>All My Shades Of Blue<em> comes out on June 1. The Ruen Brothers will play a Facebook Live set on June 5 at 2pm; <a href="https://www.facebook.com/newsounds" target="_blank">like us if you don’t already</a>.</em></p> <hr> <p><strong>All Her <em>Shades of Blue</em>, from Kelsey Lu</strong></p> <p><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327850194480a51eb778-1375-49a3-9eda-cde15bbd1d60"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/W0QVgeUxOjI?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a2626568056013970257" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W0QVgeUxOjI"></iframe></div></div>  </p> <p>Kelsey Lu is a classically-trained cellist who also plays guitar and sings. She was born in North Carolina but has Nigerian roots, a fact that colors some of the imagery (the hair, for one thing) in the new video she’s released for her single “Shades of Blue.” The video is actually a short movie, with the song appearing about five minutes in.  \The title isn’t the only thing that connects this song to the Ruen Brothers, above – like them, Lu harkens back to music of an earlier time. In her case, it’s the slow-burning, soulful R&amp;B style of the late '70s/early '80s known as Quiet Storm. In a statement accompanying the release of the single, Lu referred to the song as “a glimpse of hopefulness and peace” coming from a period of depression (she was squatting in a Hoboken factory at the time). So among the various shades of blue in the song is that ur-text of American pop, the blues. </p> <p><em>Kelsey Lu plays at the Music Hall of Williamsburgh on Wednesday, May 23.</em></p> <hr> <p><strong><span>Nature and Politics Meet in New Song by Gang Gang Dance </span></strong></p> <p><span><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327841663280267ecf4b-b687-4bd6-8619-6ff05efa0e47"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/n8uWfxhdaek?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a4011266775448451757" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n8uWfxhdaek&amp;feature=youtu.be"></iframe></div></div>  </span></p> <p><span>The NY-based experimental rock trio Gang Gang Dance hasn’t released an album since 2011, but that’s about to change with their new album, <em>Kazuashita</em>. It comes out on June 22 but today the band released a new single from it called “J-Tree.” As usual, the focus is on Lizzi Bougatsos’s sometimes otherworldly vocals and the ambient electronics of Brian DeGraw and Josh Diamond; but there is another voice at the center of the song. It’s a sample of one of the leaders of the Standing Rock Sioux tribe, protesting the plan to build the Dakota Access Pipeline through what the Sioux consider to be sacred land. The band states that the track was intended to evoke nature and the wide open spaces of the American West, but the sample makes this a song about a time as well as a place.  </span></p> <p><em>Gang Gang Dance will be performing a record release show at Elsewhere in Brooklyn on June 22.  </em></p> <hr> <p><strong><span>Aisha Devi’s <em>DNA Feelings</em>: A Double Helix of Electronic/Spiritual Sound</span></strong></p> <p><iframe height="150" src="https://bandcamp.com/EmbeddedPlayer/album=1543758105/size=large/bgcol=ffffff/linkcol=0687f5/tracklist=false/artwork=small/track=3651167300/transparent=true/" width="300" style="border: 0; width: 620px; height: 120px;"><a href="http://aishadevi.bandcamp.com/album/dna-feelings">DNA Feelings by Aisha Devi</a></iframe></p> <p><span>The singer and electronic music composer Aisha Devi was born in Switzerland to a Tibetan-Nepalese family, and it shows. Her music occupies a decidedly Western soundworld, but fills it with gestures taken from Eastern spirituality. Her new album, <em>DNA Feelings</em>, is built around her voice, often heavily processed, swooping and gliding over slowly turning electronic tones and bursts of percussion that sound like they were borrowed from a Buddhist ritual. These various pieces sound like they could easily cohere into something danceable and familiar, but they never do. The album is willfully strange and discomfiting, but at the same time it clears a space for thought, and perhaps even contemplation. The track called “Aetherave” has passages that come close to the sound of the classic Euro-electronic music of Tangerine Dream or Jean-Michel Jarre, but even here, the comfort of familiar sounds and rhythms is broken up by what sounds like a traditional Tibetan melody, accompanied by widely-spaced gongs. </span></p> <hr> <p><strong>This Is Why We Love Courtney Barnett</strong></p> <p><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm1403278588379209122dc3d-fc6b-405d-b954-b13d7eefd365"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/rPMvGrSzOCM?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-8960890397295276032" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rPMvGrSzOCM"></iframe></div></div>  </p> <p>The Australian singer, songwriter and guitarist <a href="http://www.thegreenespace.org/events/thegreenespace/2015/may/20/soundcheck-live-courtney-barnett/">Courtney Barnett</a> has become a top attraction in the rock world: touring globally to sold out theaters; garnering critical acclaim for her best-selling solo recordings and her <a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/gig-alert-kurt-and-courtney-continental-breakfast-weekly-music-roundup">duo album with Kurt Vile</a>; and delivering songs that can be witty or withering (or occasionally both) in her <a href="https://www.wnyc.org/story/courtney-barnett-in-studio/">wry, deadpan voice</a>. But what really sets her apart is the unaffected, unpretentious way she presents her work, and herself. Witness, for example, her new single and video. It’s called “Sunday Roast,” the closing track from her forthcoming album <em>Tell Me How You Really Feel</em>. It’s a simple tune about the simple pleasures of sharing a dinner with friends at the end of the week. But the video is pure Courtney: it’s basically a send-up of those YouTube videos where someone teaches you how to play a song on the guitar. It’s a work of gentle, understated humor (among other things, she’s a left-handed guitarist, so trying to learn the song by watching her is a strange experience). The video looks like it was made with a couple of friends and no budget, which may well have been the case – when you finally see the guys who are holding the sheet that provides her backdrop, they are faces that will be familiar to Barnett’s fans. </p>
May 14, 2018
Tuareg Guitarist Bombino's Irresistible Grooves Bring Folks Together
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<p>Bombino, aka guitarist and songwriter Omara Moctar, comes from the nomadic Tuareg people of North Africa. On his latest record, <em>Deran</em>, recorded close to his native Niger in the southern Sahara, he extends best wishes for peace and celebrates his desert home. Bombino’s guitar-based “desert blues” or “desert groove” tunes might have that camel gait-like loping rhythmic feel, or even Bombino’s own style of ‘Tuareggae’ - and are sung in Tamashek, the language of the Tuareg. He plays some of this powerful, hypnotic Saharan guitar music in the studio.</p> <p><strong>Watch the full session here</strong>:</p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="315" scrolling="no" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnewsounds%2Fvideos%2F10156315838923180%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=560" width="560" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;"></iframe></p> <p><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm1403278435087680b6092dc-e0fc-4fcf-ae23-10e607534894"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/boZ71cmI9tE?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-8420929171141396972" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=boZ71cmI9tE"></iframe></div></div>  </p>
May 14, 2018
The California Honeydrops Kick It Old School
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<p>The California Honeydrops play stripped-down rootsy music that might sound like country-blues, Southern soul, New Orleans second-line, and R&amp;B - all at once old school and <em>really </em>old-school. Their origin story is inspirational – Polish-born Lech Wierzynski (vocalist, guitarist and trumpeter) and drummer Ben Malament got their start busking in an Oakland subway station, and 10 years later, have added members, gotten tighter, and played all kinds of major tours, opening for Bonnie Raitt, <span>B.B. King, Allen Toussaint, Buddy Guy and Dr. John</span>. The Honeydrops are, as drummer Ben Malament says “a band that shines because of each other.” They’ll join us in-studio to play new tunes with soulful groove from their double album, <em>Call It Home: Vol. 1 &amp; 2.</em></p> <p><strong>Watch the full session here</strong>:</p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="349" scrolling="no" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnewsounds%2Fvideos%2F10156305861633180%2F&amp;width=620&amp;show_text=false&amp;height=349&amp;appId" width="620" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;"></iframe><em>  </em></p>
May 10, 2018
Weekly Music Roundup: Childish Gambino and Red Baraat
<p><strong>Week of May 7:</strong> This week, the lighter side of Dirty Projectors, Childish Gambino’s dark view of America, and Red Baraat’s color-coded dance music.</p> <hr> <p><strong>Dirty Projectors’ New Single Is For The Birds</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327849980816cf3aa0e3-60c8-42c5-8cc9-5d29d06deb69"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/CYq5Ch-FFcs?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a2840467624878985642" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CYq5Ch-FFcs"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>Singer/composer <a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/listen-strings-ensemble-lpr-premiere-david-longstreth-and-mica-levi/">David Longstreth</a> is preparing to release the next album by his band <a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/261352-dirty-projectors-in-the-studio-harsh-reviews-revisited/">Dirty Projectors</a>, called <em>Lamp-Lit Prose</em>, and the first single, “Break-Thru,” is out now. The sound is trademark Dirty Projectors – a kind of fractured, world-music-inflected art/funk powered by Longstreth’s flexible vocals and (lefty, upside-down) guitar playing. But where many of the band’s songs have been obscure or darkly-colored, “Break-Thru” is sunny, and pretty straightforward about its good mood. That extends to the video, which features Longstreth in the company of an increasingly large, and increasingly improbable, group of birds – several of whom seem to be enjoying the song as much as he is. </p> <p><em>Lamp-Lit Prose</em> comes out on July 13. </p> <hr> <p><strong>Childish Gambino’s Disturbing View of America</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm1403278480775209c261f53-2ee6-4929-acbc-628d835347a9"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/VYOjWnS4cMY?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-4879985667273066773" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VYOjWnS4cMY"></iframe></div></div>   </strong></p> <p>Saturday was a big day for <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donald_Glover">Donald Glover</a>, the actor and comedian who doubles as the rapper and songwriter Childish Gambino. That night, <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0C23p96MI88">he hosted</a> <em>Saturday Night Live</em> (as Donald Glover) and performed as <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H3x-LVkYhlA">the musical guest</a> (as Childish Gambino). After the show, he unveiled the video for his new song “This Is America,” which tackles both racism and gun violence. This ambitious, deeply provocative work juxtaposes uplifting communal tropes of the black American experience – the school dancers, the gospel choir – with startling images of killing and rioting. Similarly, we hear friendly singalong vocals giving way to harsh rapping. It’s deliberately unsettling, but the song is also engaging and catchy, with eccentric Southern rapper Young Thug and others contributing verses. The singer SZA makes a brief cameo in the video as well, and the final shot, of Glover running in a darkened hallway, seems to be an allusion to Jordan Peele’s film <em>Get Out</em> – another creative work that offers an uncomfortable mix of humor, violence, and racism. </p> <hr> <p><strong>Red Baraat: Dance Music From Punjab Via Brooklyn</strong></p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="380" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/track/6WjXvwO1f95TgBwx3hHX5g" width="300"></iframe></p> <p>The band <a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/red-baraat-bhangra-dance-brass-band-street-party-in-studio/">Red Baraat</a>, led by drummer and composer Sunny Jain, has spent the past decade perfecting its irrepressible blend of Punjabi wedding music, Western dance music, and rock energy.  Their next album, <em>Sound The People</em>, comes out on June 29 but the band has just released its first single, called “Kala Mukhra.”  The album title hints at what the band is about – not just celebrating South Asian culture, but asking people to be engaged in what is happening socially and politically.  The choice of the first single is emblematic of that theme: “Kala Mukhra” is based on a Punjabi folk song called “Ghora Mukhra,” which means “white face.”  Jain writes that “there's a fetishization in South Asian culture about being fair-skinned or light-skinned, something that is pressed upon women.” Seeking something a little more progressive, he worked with singer and lyricist Ali Sethi to come up with a new version of the song, and “Kala” (black) replaces “Ghora” (white) in the title.  Of course, you don’t need to know a word of Punjabi to understand the music’s main message: get up and dance. </p> <p><em>Red Baraat plays at Flushing Town Hall on June 8. </em></p> <hr> <p><strong>Tanya Tagaq and Damian Abraham Cover Iron Maiden</strong></p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="380" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/track/7gHvKWWuisYzKNaDlenB2m" width="300"></iframe></p> <p>The Inuk/Canadian singer <a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/inuk-throat-singer-tanya-tagaq-in-studio/">Tanya Tagaq</a> has spent her career railing against patriarchy, sexual abuse of women and children – especially in First Nation communities like hers, and environmental abuse.  Using an array of vocal techniques, including the so-called throat singing of the Inuit people, she has gained a reputation for her powerful, even intimidating, stage presence.  Now, she’s teamed up with Damian Abraham of the Canadian band <a href="https://www.wnyc.org/story/170321-studio-f-d/">Fucked Up</a>, which, in case you hadn’t guessed, is a hardcore punk outfit.  The two of them have done a cover of Iron Maiden’s “Run To The Hills,” perhaps that English metal band’s best-known single.  The choice is an inspired one – with the verses being set in an ominous whisper, you can actually hear that the song is about the white suppression of Native American culture in the US.  This neatly sets up the “death growl”-inspired chorus, and when you hear Tagaq doing some traditional Inuit throat singing at the very end, it suggests that this centuries old style has much in common with metal’s more recent raspy vocal technique. </p> <p><em>Tanya Tagaq plays at Le Poisson Rouge on Friday, May 11.</em></p> <hr> <p><strong>Joseph Arthur + REM’s Peter Buck = Arthur Buck</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm1403278464091521a08783e-dd1c-4337-b776-06f989006397"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/wM--g9BnFT8?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-6588699827909335498" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wM--g9BnFT8"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>Singer, songwriter and guitarist <a href="https://www.wnyc.org/story/43228-joseph-arthur/">Joseph Arthur</a> has teamed up with guitarist <a href="https://www.wnyc.org/story/tired-pony-in-studio/">Peter Buck</a>, of R.E.M., on a series of new songs under the name Arthur Buck.  While their album, otherwise untitled, doesn’t come out until June 15, the two rock veterans have begun releasing a few singles, including the new one called “Are You Electrified?”  The video sees the two guitarists wandering around Portland, Oregon, but the real draw is the song itself, with some beautifully layered voices in the chorus and the chiming of the two guitars imparting a classic 90s indie sound to a song that was only written a few months ago.  Although the collaboration is new, the two are old friends: Joseph Arthur’s peripatetic career saw him touring as the opening act for R.E.M. in their later years, and Peter Buck’s many post-R.E.M. projects have included backing Arthur on several occasions.  The two are apparently making plans for an Arthur Buck tour later this year.  </p> <p> </p>
May 07, 2018
Eleanor Friedberger Is (Goth) Dancing (Mostly) on Her Own
27:47
<p>Eleanor Friedberger, best known as one half of the indie rock duo The Fiery Furnaces, has recently shifted her musical landscape, swapping out live instruments in favor of drum programming and synths for a sound that she can create mostly on her own. (Part of her desire to be more self-reliant, in the wake of the 2016 election.) On her latest record, <em>Rebound</em>, she channels the sound and energy of an experience at a very smoky 80’s goth disco in Athens where they do a “chicken dance.” Lyrical inspiration came to Friedberger from a biography about the poet Edna St Vincent Millay. Eleanor Friedberger brings these dark and smoky, yet groovy and poetic tunes to perform in-studio.</p> <p><strong>Watch the full session here</strong>:</p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="349" scrolling="no" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnewsounds%2Fvideos%2F10156297424628180%2F&amp;width=620&amp;show_text=false&amp;height=349&amp;appId" width="620" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;"></iframe></p> <p><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm14032784705099262d5fee6-10ca-44bb-bc6e-2905b2e83be2"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/wmjcSz8aV1Y?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a5246978267641966761" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wmjcSz8aV1Y"></iframe></div></div>  </p>
May 07, 2018
Speedy Ortiz Delivers Pop Stingers For the Times
29:30
<p>The latest music from American pop band Speedy Ortiz, ‘Twerp Verse,’ speaks smartly to political and social situations of the present from a feminist perspective of truth-telling and is designed, on purpose, to make us uncomfortable lyrically and musically. With songs that airdrop aggressive, unpredictable chord progressions and disorienting rhythms behind enemy lines, this record is music for popping out from the cover of safety, armed with teeth and claws. Speedy Ortiz plays some of these tunes, in-studio.</p> <p><strong>Watch the session below</strong>:</p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="349" scrolling="no" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnewsounds%2Fvideos%2F10156282378968180%2F&amp;width=620&amp;show_text=false&amp;height=349&amp;appId" width="620" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;"></iframe></p> <p><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm1400025250798726a8613ec-7696-4bd3-9864-a8dd25799cb2"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/RNzGH02i8wY?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-1797340464782285468" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RNzGH02i8wY"></iframe></div></div>  </p>
May 03, 2018
Weekly Music Roundup: Van Morrison, Hatchie, and Bulgarian Womens Voices
5:58
<p><strong>Week of April 30:</strong> This week, Van Morrison looks back at the '30s; Hatchie looks back at the '80s; and Lisa Gerrard looks to Bulgaria.</p> <hr> <p><strong>Van Morrison’s Turn To Record An Album Of Standards</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327848845680ab91b784-6d2c-402d-9673-c3fd7cc87819"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/nvqEg9XbwJA?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-1046171589900185034" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nvqEg9XbwJA"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>We’ve seen plenty of aging singers of the rock era dipping into the world of standards, but the new Van Morrison album, <em>You’re Driving Me Crazy</em>, is different. For one thing, Morrison has always had jazz in his musical DNA – it’s been evident in everything from his phrasing to his choices of band members. This is not a complete left turn for him, and the album proves that by combining oldies with Van Morrison originals which sound like they’re cut from the same cloth. The album is a collaboration with the jazz organist and bandleader Joey DeFrancesco, and the overall sound is much closer to mid-century small-ensemble jazz than it is to the lush, romantic pop of crooners like Sinatra and Tony Bennett. A good example is Morrison’s version of Cole Porter’s biting satire of well-mannered society, “Miss Otis Regrets.” It’s almost willfully weird, as Morrison slurs the lyrics together and at times renders them incomprehensible, only to float a long held tone that sounds more like a smoky saxophone than a voice. </p> <hr> <p><strong>Young Fathers’ New Video Asks “Who’s Really In Charge?”</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm1403278442502242bd34f19-ed7d-4e1d-88e2-1d27983fb424"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/4lH1jC9Eb3w?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a3405964182051666040" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4lH1jC9Eb3w&amp;feature=youtu.be"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>The Scottish hip hop/rock band <a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/young-fathers-in-studio/">Young Fathers</a> has often dealt with political subjects, as their 2015 album title <em>White Men Are Black Men Too</em> indicates. (Two of the three members are from West African families.) Their third album, <em>Cocoa Sugar</em>, was released in March, and today they released a brilliant video for the track “Toy.” The conceit is simple enough: today’s dictators are basically just children – emotionally stunted and spoiled rotten. But the video does a great job of integrating the action, and the young actors, into the propulsive, combative song itself. </p> <hr> <p><strong>Lisa Gerrard of Dead Can Dance Meets The Bulgarian Women’s Chorus</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327855129584fc11f92a-d9bb-4f14-9bb2-290d8dd63287"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Rc8QRI6lXb8?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-532378752808192007" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rc8QRI6lXb8"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>In the mid 1980s, a recording of traditional Bulgarian folk songs began sweeping through Europe. It was called <em><a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/65923-balkan-voices/">Les Mysteres des Voix Bulgares</a></em> – “The Mystery of the Bulgarian Voices,” and featured a female choir doing cunning and intense arrangements of old ballads, herding songs, drinking songs and the like. When the album was finally released here in the States it became an unexpected best-seller, and the Bulgarian Women’s Chorus, as they almost inevitably became known, began selling out America’s biggest concert halls. The sound of Bulgarian singing is piercing, nasal, and often with tighter harmonies than Western ears are used to (using intervals of the second rather than the third); Kate Bush, Robert Plant, Drake, and the band Dead Can Dance were among the Western musicians influenced by that sound.  Now, an album is coming out called <em>BooCheeMish</em>, credited to “The Mystery of the Bulgarian Voices, Featuring Lisa Gerrard,” and combining the singer/instrumentalist from Dead Can Dance with the current version of this much-traveled choir. Right now, you can hear the track “Pora Sotunda,” which includes guitar, bass and percussion, bringing the ancient sounds of the Bulgarian women into a setting that, if not exactly modern, at least feels timeless. That feeling is amplified by the stunning black-and-white video that goes with the song. </p> <p><em>The album is due for release on May 25.</em></p> <hr> <p><strong>The 80s Are Alive And Well In Hatchie’s New Single</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327845865120abcb09f1-c560-4fbf-adfa-f5d353181e91"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/icad1HjrmXs?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-378665761045563584" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=icad1HjrmXs"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>Hatchie is a young Aussie singer and songwriter, but everything about her new song “Sleep” screams 1980s. The synth-pop sound, the Bangles-type harmonies, the look of the video – it’s like a long-forgotten relic of the early MTV era. Hatchie – real name Harriet Pilbeam – is from Brisbane, and reached wider success Down Under with last year’s single “<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RiZ8NECETHc">Try</a>,” which was apparently her first release. Now she’s preparing to release her first EP, which promises to be full of colorful bedroom pop. It’s called <em>Sugar And Spice</em> and it comes out on May 25. </p> <hr> <p><strong>Stephen Malkmus And Kim Gordon Collaborate On New Single</strong></p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="380" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/track/5HyXw7O24o7OMvTa155iSv" width="300"></iframe></p> <p>Although he will forever be associated with the beloved 90s indie rock band Pavement, the fact is Stephen Malkmus has spent way more time and recorded more albums with his current band <a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/160966-studio-stephen-malkmus/">Stephen Malkmus &amp; The Jicks</a>. The new album, <em>Sparkle Hard</em>, arrives on May 18, but the band has released a new single called “Refute” which features Kim Gordon, formerly of the groundbreaking band Sonic Youth. Her vocals share storytelling duties with Malkmus’s own, and together they offer a laconic but intriguing take on the classic breakup song. As Malkmus writes, “in this case the ‘wife’ is the cheater, and the omniscient narrator enters at the end to offer cold comfort.” There is, however, plenty of comfort to be found in the band’s country-tinged guitars and the way the two lead singers’ voices fit together. </p>
Apr 30, 2018
Okkervil River's Will Sheff Previews Songs From ‘In The Rainbow Rain’
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<p>Okkervil River excels at wistful, melancholy, intimate songs, yet there’s possibly an undercurrent of happiness to these latest creations on the forthcoming record, <em>In The Rainbow Rain</em>. Somehow singer/songwriter Will Sheff both reflects on this new world we live in and celebrates being alive. The new songs are inviting and soothing, with mellow Motown-style arrangements, controlled electric guitar bursts, <span>ambient background vocals </span>and 80’s-sounding production elements. Okkervil River’s Will Sheff joins us for a stripped-down live performance in the studio.</p> <p><strong>Watch the session here</strong>: </p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="349" scrolling="no" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnewsounds%2Fvideos%2F10156270612368180%2F&amp;width=620&amp;show_text=false&amp;height=349&amp;appId" width="620" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;"></iframe></p> <p><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327838898096966d523d-1e62-49b2-8538-ac72bf1dbdc9"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/YiOJBGjnV04?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a946715086195278284" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YiOJBGjnV04"></iframe></div></div>  </p>
Apr 30, 2018
Fatoumata Diawara: A Traditionalist Who Needs to Experiment
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<p>Some time ago, Malian singer, songwriter, guitarist and actress Fatoumata Diawara did a wonderful and daring thing – inspired by her friend Rokia Traore, she bought an acoustic guitar, and taught herself to play it. Since then, Fatoumata has put out her debut record, <em>Fatou</em>, collaborated with Damon Albarn's Africa Express, and contributed vocals to albums by Cheikh Lô, AfroCubism, and Orchestra Poly-Rythmo de Cotonou. Her forthcoming record, <em>Fenfo</em> translates as “Something to Say”, and she’s here to play some of those new songs, in-studio. </p> <p>Watch Fatoumata Diawara perform "Fenfo" in-studio:</p> <div><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm1403278440799847b8bf966-d101-428c-a929-4991cb022b09"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/WNMUlZZFxSM?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-2635110410322622075" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WNMUlZZFxSM"></iframe></div></div>  </div> <div>Fatoumata Diawara: "Don do" | In Studio: </div> <div><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm1403278388980962c583da6-07e8-4b78-b488-120a824403ce"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/2Ntwnp8gdYE?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-2394659396590063102" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Ntwnp8gdYE"></iframe></div></div>  </div> <div>This video for the album’s first single “Nterini,” was directed by Ethiopian photographer and contemporary artist<strong> </strong>Aïda Muluneh, and filmed in the remote Afar region of Ethiopia, to which archaeologists have traced the origin of humanity.</div> <p><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm1403278432432485697f8dd-4d8e-4367-9bc2-ed8b9020f191"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/4gmGL5SqhaY?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-5847223711060045918" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4gmGL5SqhaY"></iframe></div></div>  </p>
Apr 26, 2018
Weekly Music Roundup: Monsieur Periné, Guitar from Botswana, and Archival Prince
<p><strong>Week of April 23:</strong> This week, a gem from the Prince archives, a throaty tale from Okkervil River, and guitar music from Botswana that has to be seen to be believed.</p> <hr> <p><strong>From Prince’s Archives, A New/Old Version Of “Nothing Compares 2 U”</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm1403278469601283033d4e4-a63f-4105-ba6d-9fa41eeea6bf"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/cpGA0azFdCs?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-3033349830870970236" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cpGA0azFdCs"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>Saturday was the second anniversary of Prince’s untimely death. Fans knew that there were untold hours of sound and video in his archives – but they also knew that the wrangling over his estate would complicate efforts to release any of it. So on Friday, when the Prince Estate put out the previously unreleased, original studio version of “Nothing Compares 2 U,” it was a welcome surprise and a bittersweet reminder of what we lost when he died. The song is best known in the <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0-EF60neguk">hit version by Sinead O’Connor,</a> but Prince’s own version has some subtle differences. Electric guitars wander in and out, sometimes pushing the song towards power ballad territory, but for me, the most striking moment passes quickly: at the end of the first chorus, the chord seems to resolve, to actually end the musical line; this is a contrast to the other choruses, which, like the Sinead version, have an open-ended feel – a question rather than a statement. </p> <p>Confusingly, the estate paired the recording with some previously unseen rehearsal footage, of what is clearly a much faster, funkier song. Prince displays some serious dance moves (this was obviously well before his hips began troubling him), and the band looks to be in great form. Makes me wish we could hear <em>that</em> music sometime…</p> <hr> <p><strong>Okkervil River’s New Song Is Kinda Disgusting, But Kinda Great</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327837655296b84fdb46-839b-487f-9abf-0ffd4f1f9300"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/SG3YIoW_2zs?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-1213148183579249089" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SG3YIoW_2zs&amp;feature=youtu.be"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>Shortly after human beings began to sing, they probably started making “list songs.” You probably know more of them than you realize – “The Twelve Days of Christmas” is one, Pink Floyd’s “Eclipse” (the ending of <em>Dark Side of the Moon</em>) is another – and one of the oldest surviving song texts, the “Hymn to Inanna” from the ancient Sumerians, is just a list of that goddess’s many possessions. Well, add Okkervil River to the list of list song purveyors, but this might be the most unusual list song yet. It’s called “Famous Tracheotomies,” and it delivers exactly what the title promises. Frontman Will Sheff had an emergency tracheotomy when he was a toddler (he has alluded to this before, in the band’s brilliant 2013 album <em>The Silver Gymnasium</em>), and he begins the song with a briefly gruesome description of the procedure. But then the band kicks in and Sheff is off and running, detailing the laryngeal woes of actor Gary Coleman, Motown star Mary Wells, pickled poet Dylan Thomas, and best of all, Ray Davies. I don’t mean that Davies had the best tracheotomy – it’s just that his procedure occasioned the best part of the song, wherein Sheff explains how the young musician’s tracheotomy led directly to the writing of The Kinks’ early hit, “Waterloo Sunset” – whose melody the band then duly quotes. </p> <p>The new Okkervil River album, <em>In the Rainbow Rain</em>, comes out this Friday. Last Friday, Will Sheff performed this and two other new songs in the <em>Soundcheck</em> studio – that podcast will be available on Monday, April 30. </p> <hr> <p><strong>The Incredible “Guitar” Music Of Botswana</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327846939584c33c1ae8-dbc4-43a4-b409-2c1081b628e5"><iframe width="465" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Tx4cRw6TIIg?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a5813148758489319801" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tx4cRw6TIIg"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>There’s a reason I’ve put quotation marks around the word “guitar” in that headline. The musicians in Botswana, in southwestern Africa, play the guitar – but they turn it into a completely different instrument.  Just watch this video, which has been circulating on Youtube and astonishing guitarists for almost 10 years: the first thing you’ll probably notice is that “Ronnie” (only name given) plays the guitar with his left hand on the fingerboard as if were a piano. Watch as he rolls his palm down the frets at one point. But then look at the strings themselves; the first (highest) string is missing, and so is the fifth (second-lowest). This leaves three strings close together for melody and chords; and the low E string (here tuned to an F) functions as a standalone bassline. A simple but brilliantly effective way of turning the guitar into essentially two instruments. </p> <p>Among the people who fell in love with this video years ago was record producer David Aglow. He ultimately went to Botswana determined to bring some of these amazing desert-blues guitarists to a wider audience. This Friday, he’ll release a compilation called <em>I’m Not Here To Hunt Rabbits: Botswana Guitar Music</em>. Find out what Ronnie’s real name is; hear some of the bluesy, raspy vocals of these local musicians; and discover a style of music that developed on the edge of the Kalahari Desert that is unlike anything else you’ll hear.</p> <hr> <p><strong>The Mouse Outfit Is Back In The House</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm1403278518386089f5c8664-d928-416f-bc66-447869210cd0"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/kb-XDzAWY5k?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-8974717425436430767" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kb-XDzAWY5k"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>The Mouse Outfit is essentially a live hip hop band that works with a rotating cast of emerging rappers and producers in and around Manchester, England. The band was founded by keyboardist Chini and bassist Defty, and their music is built on a mix of jazzy riffs and classic soul. Their first two albums were massive in the UK, and they’re about to release a new effort called <em>Jagged Tooth Crook</em>. The first single, called “Repeat,” features guest rapper Dubbul O as well as regular Mouse Outfitters <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ICYPsX1guwg">Ellis Meade</a> (who also edited the video) and <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=693LraXwohc">Sparkz</a>. The song is a good indication of the album’s overall mood: laid-back, breezy, and soulful. </p> <p><em>The album comes out on May 4. </em></p> <hr> <p><strong>Colombian Band Monsieur Periné Wants To Dance With You</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm14032784640915242d854cf-0c3a-4539-8a0c-310acafeb5fc"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/mT7_qIFBa3Y?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a5253571944537343758" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mT7_qIFBa3Y"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>In 2015, <a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/monsieur-perine-in-studio/">Monsieur Periné</a> won the Latin Grammy for Best New Artist, although as often happens in “new artist” categories, they’d been plying their trade for a few years already. That trade is a mix of traditional Colombian rhythm, mid-20<sup>th</sup>-century gypsy jazz, and modern Latin pop. And winning the award seems to have been a tough act to follow, because it’s taken three years for the band to return to the studio. Once again, they invited Eduardo Cabra (half of the all-conquering Puerto Rican band <a href="https://www.wnyc.org/story/39534-calle-13/">Calle 13</a>) to produce, and the new album, to be called <em>Encanto Tropical</em>, is due later this spring. For now, they’ve released the first single, called “Bailar Contigo” (“Dance with You”), and while it skews more to the pop side, it still uses some traditional string and percussion instruments and has strong roots in <em>tipico</em> Latin music – as the video, of the band members cavorting in a lush tropical jungle, suggests. </p> <p>Monsieur Periné plays the <a class="fl" href="https://www.songkick.com/concerts/32948364-monsieur-perine-at-highline-ballroom?utm_medium=organic&amp;utm_source=microformat" ping="/url?sa=t&amp;source=web&amp;rct=j&amp;url=https://www.songkick.com/concerts/32948364-monsieur-perine-at-highline-ballroom%3Futm_medium%3Dorganic%26utm_source%3Dmicroformat&amp;ved=0ahUKEwiRqLf9h9HaAhVkdt8KHbSyAx8Q4wYITygAMAI">Highline Ballroom</a> on Saturday, June 16. </p> <hr> <p><strong>A Song For <em>Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy</em> Fans, From A Perfect Circle</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm1403278382297121c3137a0-5f54-4fb5-89bd-bc633553f934"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/r03V9OEJlgg?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a8859034847519579860" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r03V9OEJlgg"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>“So Long, And Thanks For All The Fish” is the new single from <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Perfect_Circle">A Perfect Circle</a>, the on-again, off-again musical project that features musicians from Tool, Smashing Pumpkins, and Ashes Divide. The album came out on Friday and this track’s title will be familiar to anyone who’s read the <em>Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy</em> series by the late Douglas Adams. It’s the title of the fourth book in the series, and it’s how the dolphins – now revealed to be the most intelligent life-forms on planet Earth – say goodbye to the humans who’ve been cast aside in the name of Galactic Progress. The song has suitably apocalyptic imagery, bemoaning the time and money we spend on things that don’t really matter (a list that includes both plastic surgery and politicians), and nods to the Adams book with the line “all the dolphins have moved on.” But that line is just an alternate version of a line in the rest of choruses that bids farewell to Gene Wilder (“Willy Wonka”), David Bowie (“Major Tom”), Prince, and others. The band is known for more of a hard rock sound, but this song (despite its valedictory mood) has more of an upbeat 80s/alternative rock feel.  </p>
Apr 23, 2018
Party With The Lost Bayou Ramblers, Swinging Cajun-Style
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<p>Louisiana-based <a href="https://www.lostbayouramblers.com/" target="_blank">Lost Bayou Ramblers</a> are a swinging punkass party band who mix Cajun melodies on fiddle, accordion, guitars, and some electric sounds. They just won a regional roots Grammy for their record, <em>Kalenda</em>, but they’ve also done an original score for <a href="http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2877296/" target="_blank">ROUS</a>, a film about Nutria Rats and Louisiana’s coastal land loss, and contributed to the score for <a href="http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2125435/" target="_blank">Beasts of the Southern Wild</a>. Fresh from the French Quarter Festival in New Orleans, the Lost Bayou Ramblers join us in the studio.</p> <p>Watch the full session here: </p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="315" scrolling="no" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnewsounds%2Fvideos%2F10156254370368180%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=560" width="560" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;"></iframe></p>
Apr 23, 2018
Anna & Elizabeth Transform Old Traditions of Mountain Music
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<p>As bands go, Anna &amp; Elizabeth have quite the origin story. Anna &amp; Elizabeth began thanks to a broke down car and a shared desire to explore the traditions of Appalachian roots music. The immersive, intimate combination of Elizabeth LaPrelle’s deep mountain voice (from Virginia), Anna Roberts-Gevalt’s modern one (from Vermont), their sweet harmonies, and minimalist arrangements is striking. The duo’s latest record, <em>The Invisible Comes to Us</em>, co-produced by Anna and Benjamin Lazar Davis (avant-pop outfit Cuddle Magic), draws on old-time traditions of home, porch, and kitchen music, and incorporates experimental pedal steel player Susan Alcorn and drummer Jim White (The Dirty Three), along with electronic elements. It brings Anna &amp; Elizabeth to play some of these sparse, haunting ballads, stories, and lullabies for us, in-studio.</p> <p><strong>Watch the complete live session</strong>:</p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="349" scrolling="no" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnewsounds%2Fvideos%2F10156263434258180%2F&amp;width=620&amp;show_text=false&amp;height=349&amp;appId" width="620" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;"></iframe></p> <p><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327847378576ad0be5e4-bbee-4a4c-8c10-f770f4366531"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/oIuePqMGflQ?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a4753110975965355652" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oIuePqMGflQ"></iframe></div></div>  </p>
Apr 19, 2018
Weekly Music Roundup: Balún, Kamasi Washington, and Jenny Hval
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<p><strong>Week of April 16:</strong> This week, new works by Kamasi Washington and Jenny Hval; a new video from Brooklyn-via-San Juan group Balún, and some musical advice on Making America Great Again.</p> <hr> <p><strong>Balún</strong> <strong>Offer Sunny Glimpse At Their New Record</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm1403278551295848246c0ca-5307-4156-bd77-3c37a61e3e50"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/H5ua3KdJhfw?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a347666618863551694" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=59&amp;v=H5ua3KdJhfw"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>I’ve become a fan of the Puerto Rican-born, NY-based composer <span>Angélica Negrón</span> in recent years. She’s written chamber music and orchestral works that have an element of whimsy and a sense of fun – not things we often associate with “serious” music. (For example, <a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/new-sounds-live-concerts-2015-part-1/">her piece “Me He Perdido”</a> (“I’ve Gotten Lost”) used robotic sound-making contraptions along with the American Composers Orchestra, and <a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/4084-new-sounds-live-merkin-hall-bang-can-all-stars-pcf-2018/">her recent piece “Turistas</a>,” written for the Bang On A Can All-Stars, was built on the rhythms of reggaeton, <em>bomba</em>, and other Puerto Rican popular sounds.)  Angelica is also one of the three core members of Balún, a band that has just released a new single called “El Espanto” (“The Fright,” or “The Ghost”). It’s mostly a languid, sunny number, but just when you think you have the song pegged – “oh, it’s Caribbean-tinged electro-pop” – it changes, as the saxes add a bit of Downtown skronk and the whole thing ends with a breakbeat-driven excursion into what sounds like IDM (intelligent dance music – the style associated with Aphex Twin or <a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/squarepusher-in-studio/">Squarepusher</a>). That’s a lot of ground to cover, but then this band has already covered a lot of geographic ground, as they’ve all left Puerto Rico and taken up residence in Brooklyn. </p> <p><em>Prisma Tropical</em> is due to be released on July 20.  Watch for a live <em>Soundcheck</em> podcast around that time, too.</p> <hr> <p><strong>Now It’s Frank Turner’s Turn To Make America Great Again</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm14032783832147237495442-e655-4d50-8d96-1d479593aedc"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/8KuFU0rWFfk?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a5750548597310675039" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8KuFU0rWFfk"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>The folk/rocker <a href="https://www.wnyc.org/story/191540-frank-turner-studio/">Frank Turner</a> is not nearly as well known here in the States as he is back home in Britain. Which is a shame, because he really loves this country, and if more people knew songs like “<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Je6YnLNpL0">I Am Disappeared</a>,” they might love him right back. Turner’s music often responds to social and political situations, and you won’t be surprised to learn that his next album does just that. It will be called <em>Be More Kind</em>, and while the album doesn’t come out until May 4, the single “Make America Great Again” has just been released, along with a simply wonderful video made by Turner in Austin, TX. From the title, you might be expecting something sardonic, or ironic, but instead you get something as genuine and funny and moving as the people who take part in it.  Frank sets up the video himself – then just enjoy a reminder of what made America great to begin with: Americans. </p> <hr> <p><strong>A Musical Left Turn From Jenny Hval</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327849158544ff997a37-3fed-4981-a35e-5ebaf66a7098"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/azIkBkTK1lU?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a7694642999126012241" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=azIkBkTK1lU "></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>Norwegian singer, songwriter, and soon-to-be novelist <a href="https://www.wnyc.org/story/jenny-hval-in-studio/">Jenny Hval</a> has made her reputation on the back of several albums that take the pop song format and twist, distort, and otherwise disrupt it. She’s become known for her frank and challenging sexual imagery, and her last album, <em>Blood Bitch</em>, made for bracing listening. So her new single comes as a bit of a surprise. “Spells” is a slice of electro-pop that may have a hint of Pink Floyd in it; its repeated line “you will not be awake for long” could, in almost any other Jenny Hval song, evoke a strong feeling of dread. But here, it might just be an invitation to dream. It’s from the forthcoming EP called <em>The Long Sleep</em>, which is due on May 25.</p> <p>Then in October, she reverts to her usual form, if the blurb for her debut novel is any indication: <em>Paradise Rot</em> “presents a heady and hyper-sensual portrayal of sexual awakening and queer desire. A complex, poetic and strange novel about bodies, sexuality and the female gender.” The book will be published on October 2. </p> <hr> <p><strong>Kamasi Washington Drops Two New Singles</strong></p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="380" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/track/1Etl6q0mmPV60TtOCD0uch" width="300"></iframe> </p> <p>Sax player and composer Kamasi Washington has achieved a level of visibility that is unusual for a jazz musician these days.  Much of that is down to his collaboration with Kendrick Lamar on the rapper’s last two albums, <em>To Pimp A Butterfly</em> and the <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/music/commercial-and-critical-darling-kendrick-lamar-wins-pulitzer/2018/04/16/eecd0ca2-41aa-11e8-b2dc-b0a403e4720a_story.html?noredirect=on&amp;utm_term=.f282b573811b">Pulitzer Prize-winning <em>Damn</em></a>. But he also received rave reviews for his 3-disc album called, appropriately, <em>The Epic</em>. Washington is part of a lineage of jazz musicians aiming for a cosmic, spiritual sound (see John Coltrane, Pharoah Sanders, and Sun Ra, for starters), and has been a regular on festival stages, including Coachella in 2016. Now, he’s preparing to release a new album, called <em>Heaven and Earth</em>, and has released two songs, of which “Fists of Fury” seems to be the A-side, and “<a href="http://www.newsounds.org/iframe%20src=%22https:/open.spotify.com/embed/track/3C9Zbwm1AxCMFDqvyuBQQj%22%20width=%22300%22%20height=%22380%22%20frameborder=%220%22%20allowtransparency=%22true%22%20allow=%22encrypted-media%22%3e%3c/iframe">The Space Traveler’s Lullaby</a>” the B-side. The latter track, as the title indicates, might be of a piece with his earlier work -  a sprawling, yes, epic example of orchestral/big band jazz, with wordless chorus and strings and long passages that seem to nod at minimalism, film music, and more. But “Fists of Fury” has a harder edge to it, at least lyrically. The image of helping hands, friendly hands, caressing hands, turning to “fists of fury” is a poetic response to the persistent racial divide in our country; the music, with its classic Latin rhythmic underpinning, is just as poetic.</p> <p><em>Heaven and Earth</em> comes out on June 22.</p> <hr> <p><strong>Damien Jurado’s New Song Stirs Up a Quiet Storm</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327854394512c812879e-cada-4f00-a3f8-b48b2c0725ac"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/xPsgOEZP3zI?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a632815618826444922" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xPsgOEZP3zI&amp;feature=youtu.be"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.wnyc.org/story/41358-damien-jurado/">Damien Jurado</a>’s new single tempers his usual folk/rock leanings with some quiet R&amp;B. “Allocate” sees Jurado surrounding his velvety vocals with bowed strings and a slowly unfolding rhythm section of keyboard and percussion.  “Allocate” is a strange title; it’s a word suggesting logical assignments of things, but the song is full of wisps of often melancholy thoughts – “once I was lost and I never came back,” he sings at one point. The song comes from Jurado’s forthcoming album, <em>The Horizon Just Laughed</em>, which comes out on May 4.</p> <p>Damien Jurado plays at Brooklyn’s Murmrr Theatre on May 24.</p>
Apr 16, 2018
Anbessa Orchestra Plays Music of Ethiopia Straight Outta Brooklyn
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<p>In the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa, during the 1960’s and ‘70s, the sounds of American jazz and James Brown-style funk rocketed through the clubs there, combining with Ethiopia’s own exotic scales to produce the golden age of Ethiopian pop. The New York-based 7-piece band Anbessa Orchestra draws from this era and aims to take the listener on a musical journey from Addis Ababa to Brooklyn, with the loping grooves, buoyant brass lines, moody organ, crisp guitars, and solid percussion. Their new album is called <em>Negastat,</em> which means “Kings,” and it is full of Ethiopian-style, horn-heavy funk. And the Anbessa Orchestra is here to play some of it in-studio. </p> <p><strong>Watch the full session here</strong>:</p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="349" scrolling="no" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnewsounds%2Fvideos%2F10156232655223180%2F&amp;width=620&amp;show_text=false&amp;height=349&amp;appId" width="620" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;"></iframe></p>
Apr 16, 2018
The Lone Bellow Pushes Forward Into Nashville
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<p>The folk-rock outfit The Lone Bellow crafts passionate, acoustic-based Americana that hints at elements of blues, country, and roots music. They’ve recently moved from Brooklyn to Nashville, (let that fact be read into, musically) and the band in their touring configuration, joins us to perform some of their songs built around warm, twangy guitar riffs and beautiful three-part harmonies, from their latest record, <em>Walk Into A Storm</em>.</p> <p><strong>Watch the full session here</strong>:</p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="349" scrolling="no" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnewsounds%2Fvideos%2F10156218280183180%2F&amp;width=620&amp;show_text=false&amp;height=349&amp;appId" width="620" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;"></iframe></p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Watch The Lone Bellow's performances from 2015 in The Greene Space at WNYC/WQXR</strong>:</p> <p><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm1403278395281286898f986-9444-429c-bd38-494aa01c114a"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/2J2ORn4i28Y?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a75783765491433375" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2J2ORn4i28Y"></iframe></div></div>  </p> <p><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327844278000cc16d753-8fcb-48c9-b41d-9cb0ad813188"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Z_JK8bVQeYQ?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a4700395345572847866" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z_JK8bVQeYQ"></iframe></div></div>  </p>
Apr 12, 2018
Mary Chapin Carpenter Re-imagines Her Musical Travels
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<p>Singer, songwriter and guitarist Mary Chapin Carpenter re-imagined and rearranged songs from her 30-year catalog, along with the brand-new title track, for her most recent record, <em>Sometimes Just the Sky</em>. That title comes from a speech given by Patti Smith, where she "touched on both hard and beautiful aspects of life." The country music prize-winning Carpenter, who is now based deep in the Virginia countryside has spent her musical career “exploring depths of language and emotion,” using “compelling chordal voicings and finger-picking that produces unique sounds.” (Peter Cooper, Artist Notes<em>) </em>Mary Chapin Carpenter joins us to perform a few of these songs in-studio.</p> <p><strong>Watch the session live below:</strong></p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="315" scrolling="no" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnewsounds%2Fvideos%2F10156227830168180%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=560" width="560" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;"></iframe></p> <p><em><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm1403278389105928cb5207b-3552-4450-9796-979af4c0edad"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/4cnQF5CrwKE?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-4998980147945949961" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4cnQF5CrwKE"></iframe></div></div>  </em></p>
Apr 09, 2018
Weekly Music Roundup: Abraham Brody, A$AP Rocky, and Sophie
<p><strong>Week of April 9:</strong> This week, new/old music from Lithuania, psychedelia from France, and deep wonderful weirdness from wherever Sophie is from.</p> <hr> <p><strong>PREMIERE: Ancient Lithuanian Folk Meets Modern Production, From Abraham Brody</strong></p> <p><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm14032784332043203cd95dc-ebaa-442e-8b41-8cca6e426c13"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/mZTBsPzeQ_Y?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-579370435822819468" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://youtu.be/mZTBsPzeQ_Y"></iframe></div></div><br>Although he’s American-born, violinist, vocalist and composer <a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/4028-abraham-brody/">Abraham Brody</a> has been living and working Lithuania for several years, immersing himself in the ancient folk song traditions of that Baltic republic. When he performed for us in the studio last Fall, he used a looping station to layer both his voice and his fiddle, but the overall sound remained an organic, acoustic one. Now, he’s employing a more contemporary approach in this video, for his arrangement of the song “Plauke Pylele” (“The Swimming Duck”). He writes that Lithuanian folk tales “often portray the woman as weak, or as the 'prize' of the valiant man.</p> <p>Here the roles are reversed, the man vainly searches for the woman, a kind of other-worldly being, who through struggle gains her freedom and leaves him behind in the desolate landscape.” The song is Lithuanian, but the setting is Icelandic, and the sounds owe something to the repeating structures of the so-called Minimalists like Terry Riley and Philip Glass, as well as the electronic music scene. Layered violins, ominous piano chords, and rustling percussion support Brody’s wistful singing and the video’s ambiguous imagery. <br><br><em>Abraham Brody performs at National Sawdust on Thursday, April 12.</em></p> <hr> <p><strong>Beach House Release Third Single from Next Record</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327847435440e3be2e66-9222-40a1-9424-e37c2ec5a53c"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/2-eBDrE25ec?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a1453047486540732930" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2-eBDrE25ec&amp;feature=youtu.be"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>The Maryland duo known as Beach House has been teasing us all year with <a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/weekly-music-roundup-courtney-barnett-and-howie-lee/">little glimpses</a> of their keenly anticipated seventh album, to be called 7. They’ve just released the third single from the album, a shoegaze-style song called “Dark Spring.” Victoria Legrand and Alex Scally’s vocals are woven into a harmonically simple but texturally dense web of keyboards and atmospheric guitars – there are words, but the mood is entirely created by the song’s dark, dreamy landscape. That landscape is echoed in the track’s video, shot in high-contrast black and white, which goes from startling to sensual. <br><br><em>Beach House plays United Palace Theater in NY on August 22, and a sold out show at Brooklyn’s Kings Theater on August 23. The album 7 comes out on May 11.</em></p> <hr> <p><strong>Sophie’s New Song Is Weird Or Wonderful – Or Both</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm14032784425022403650a7b-6d56-4a17-aaf4-7ca8bda65909"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/es9-P1SOeHU?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a5835906486414390999" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=es9-P1SOeHU&amp;feature=youtu.be"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>How you feel about producer/singer Sophie’s music will depend on how much you like mainstream electronic dance music – and how much you like to see it put through a blender. <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sophie_(musician)">Sophie</a> made her name as a producer for starlets like <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charli_XCX">Charlie XCX</a>, but she has been dropping singles recently that deal with commercialism and identity. The latter is an especially key topic for this Scottish-born, LA-based musician, who shrouded her own identity in mystery for several years and only with her recent video for the song “<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m_S0qCeA-pc">It’s Okay To Cry</a>” presented herself (<span>whether as a transgender woman or as a gender non-conforming person is still deliberately unclear</span>, but the press release revealed her preferred gender pronouns: she/her).  Now she’s dropped a new single called “Faceshopping,” which reminds me of a Billboard interview she once did where she was asked what genre her music was; her answer was “advertising.” This track takes a delightfully dim view of advertising, especially as it preys on people’s worries about their appearance, and it also subverts every trope you might expect to hear in an electronic pop song. The video is deeply weird and unsettling, at least to me – I suspect some people will simply find it weird. But Sophie pulls no punches in getting her message across and isn’t afraid to provoke extreme reactions at either end.</p> <hr> <p><strong>A Short, Strange Trip From Melody’s Echo Chamber </strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327844604608d72f17dd-18ef-4baf-8357-66881192b414"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Uh1fJvNa-o4?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a408775517562769093" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Uh1fJvNa-o4&amp;feature=youtu.be "></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>Melody’s Echo Chamber is the work of the French singer and songwriter Melody Prochet, and it is obvious from her work that 60’s-style psychedelia is alive and well. Working with members of the veteran Swedish prog rock band <a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/swedish-quartet-dungen-in-studio-2017/">Dungen</a>, she is preparing to release her second album, Bon Voyage, on June 15. But the first track has just come out, and it’s a doozy. “Breathe In, Breathe Out” is a trippy number that features Prochet’s whispery vocals and several abrupt changes of sound. The singing here is in English, although other tracks on the album will be in Swedish or French; and the animated video for the song takes us beyond this world entirely.</p> <hr> <p><strong>A$AP Rocky’s Latest Will Sound Familiar To Moby Fans</strong></p> <p><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327845684832bfcddc43-195c-487e-acd0-de9e9ff14dbb"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/BNzc6hG3yN4?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-6300216378668586750" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=BNzc6hG3yN4"></iframe></div></div>  </p> <p>NY rapper A$AP Rocky has just released a song called “Forever,” which will immediately have <a href="https://www.wnyc.org/story/36788-moby/">Moby</a> fans saying “hey, that’s ‘Porcelain,’ only sped up!” Indeed it is, and it serves Lord Flacko’s purposes well (that’s the nickname - the other nickname - that he gave himself, hence the jacket he’s wearing in the video), leaving plenty of room for his boasts about fame and the trappings that come with it. But he also pauses to shout out to Frank Ocean and the late A$AP Yams; and about halfway through, the song turns thoughtful - meaning he raps over essentially an unadulterated recording of Moby’s biggest hit. Watch the video and see if you can pick out Moby himself (hint - if you haven’t seen him by the time you hear him sing, you’ve missed it). </p> <p> </p>
Apr 09, 2018
Get into the Spiritual Trance Music by Innov Gnawa
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<p>The New York-based band <a href="https://www.facebook.com/innovgnawa" target="_blank">Innov Gnawa</a> performs the traditional healing music of Morocco: Gnawa - a trancey, rhythmic music that is<span> played on an array of unique instruments — from the lute-like gimbri (sintir), to the metal qarqaba (castinets) with which the kouyos (chorus) keep time and pound out clattering, hypnotic rhythms. One of </span><a href="https://www.facebook.com/innovgnawa" target="_blank">Innov Gnawa'</a>s innovations is to collaborate with modern electronic acts like Bonobo, but they've just released a new record, <em>Aicha</em>, and they'll be performing at the <a href="http://brooklynfolkfest.com/schedule/" target="_blank">10th Annual Brooklyn Folk Festival</a> this weekend. Innov Gnawa performs in-studio. </p> <p><strong>Watch the full session here</strong>:</p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="349" scrolling="no" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnewsounds%2Fvideos%2F10156230023733180%2F&amp;width=620&amp;show_text=false&amp;height=349&amp;appId" width="620" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;"></iframe></p>
Apr 05, 2018
Weekly Music Roundup: The Weeknd, Sons of Kemet, and Brazilian Girls
5:58
<p><strong>Week of April 2:</strong> This week, new music from The Weeknd, Sons of Kemet, and Brazilian Girls.</p> <hr> <p><strong>A Musical Manifesto From Sons Of Kemet</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140407162222864792ad045-1999-482b-b7fc-1cb639a5aa37"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/OPfjwOMzDwA?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-2999942187263779408" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OPfjwOMzDwA"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>The London saxophonist/composer <a href="http://www.shabakahutchings.com/">Shabaka Hutchings</a> has become an important figure in British music. He leads several bands, including the oddly-built quartet known as <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wmN3vFIukk4">Sons of Kemet</a> (Kemet is the ancient Egyptian name for Egypt), which features his sax, tuba, and two drummers. The music is a kind of jazz creole – a combination of jazz, hip hop, Caribbean music, and social commentary. On Friday, the band released <em>Your Queen Is A Reptile</em>, a seething rebuttal of British monarchy worship in which Hutchings suggests some women who were worthy of the title of queen – queens who were made, not born. A few are familiar names: “My Queen Is Angela Davis,” for example, or “My Queen Is Harriet Tubman.” Many are not: “My Queen Is Mamie Phipps Clarke” celebrates the life of an American psychologist with an infectious New Orleans/Caribbean-flavored rhythm, and some Jamaican-style toasting courtesy of the English MC known as <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rebel_MC">Congo Natty.</a></p> <hr> <p><strong>After Ten Years, Brazilian Girls Return</strong></p> <p><iframe frameborder="no" height="300" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/playlists/483931752&amp;color=%23ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_teaser=true&amp;visual=true" width="100%"></iframe></p> <p>The quartet known as <a href="https://www.wnyc.org/story/38838-brazilian-girls/">Brazilian Girls</a> has no Brazilians in it, and only one girl. But then, the group has always had a perverse streak: when they formed here in NY in 2003, they gave themselves a name that they knew would be almost impossible to google at the time. (That has definitely changed, but in the early years a search returned page after page of… I’ll call them ‘dating sites,’ before you got to the band.) They have also refused to be pinned down musically, drawing on modern electronic dance music but also on traditional dance music of the mid-20<sup>th</sup> century from Latin America and from the ballrooms of Europe. And they haven’t made it easy to work together either – the four members all live in various cities in America and Europe, which helps explain why it’s been ten years since their last record. But on April 13, Brazilian Girls return, with an album called <em>Let’s Make Love</em>. Singer <a href="https://www.wnyc.org/story/sabina-in-studio/">Sabina Sciubba</a> is multilingual, and in the band’s new single, “Balla Balla,” she sings in English and Italian. The song is tons of fun, careening between modern electronically-enhanced dance music and something that sounds like the score to a black-and-white film from the 1940s.</p> <p><em>Brazilian Girls play at the Music Hall of Williamsburg on May 5.</em></p> <hr> <p><strong>The Weeknd’s New… EP?  LP?</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm1404072100279368d5b5791-94c9-460c-85fe-1b2ab29f6618"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/OlStmta0Vh4?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-3936472088692914504" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OlStmta0Vh4"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>Toronto’s Abel Tesfaye, better known to millions as the R&amp;B singer The Weeknd, has created some slickly-produced electropop hits in recent years, like 2016’s “<a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/weekly-music-roundup-sept-26/">Starboy” with Daft Punk</a>. But early on, his music was slower, and darker. This past Thursday, he returned to that sonic world with a 6-song release called <em>My Dear Melancholy,</em> (the title includes that comma, which makes punctuating this sentence a bit of a challenge), which seems a little long to be an EP and too short to be an LP. His record label hedged its bets by referring to it simply as a “project.” The guest list is quite short, and features the French techno producer Gesaffelstein, with occasional cameos by one of the Daft Punk guys and some of Tesfaye’s Toronto associates. “Call Out My Name” seems to be the lead single, but the track that caught my ear was this one, “I Was Never There,” one of the Gesaffelstein collaborations. It has a strong downtempo groove, and the sense of melancholy in The Weeknd’s layered vocals is set in relief by some eerily oscillating electronics. </p> <hr> <p><strong>… But You Were Hearing Sirens: The Strange Lure of Ed Pastorini</strong></p> <p><iframe height="150" src="https://bandcamp.com/EmbeddedPlayer/album=3632191059/size=large/bgcol=ffffff/linkcol=0687f5/tracklist=false/artwork=small/track=1491323601/transparent=true/" width="300" style="border: 0; width: 100%; height: 120px;"><a href="http://edpastorini.bandcamp.com/album/strange-lures">Strange Lures by Ed Pastorini</a></iframe></p> <p>Chances are, you’ve never heard of <a href="https://www.wqxr.org/story/89358-elizabeth-the-catapult-gabriel-kahane-and-ed-pastorini/">Ed Pastorini</a>.  That’s entirely his fault.  Ed has never played the game – you know, the one where you make music and then hustle to make sure people hear it, or pay other people to do that for you.  He leads his occasional band, 101 Crustaceans, and on even rarer occasions, writes solo songs for his voice and piano.  This is the kind of music that passes like a rumor from one obsessive fan (usually a fellow musician) to another.  I fell hard for one of those songs, called “Strange Lures,” when <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chris_Rael">Chris Rael</a> sent me a copy many years ago.  Chris was hustling to make sure I heard <em>his</em> music, but he couldn’t help sharing what Ed was doing.  That must’ve been around 2001 or 2002, but it is only now that Ed Pastorini’s solo piano songs have finally been released.  The album is called <em>Strange Lures</em>, and it is full of lyrics that can be precisely detailed but also elusive, and lyrical chord progressions that nonetheless have a dissonant bite to them.  The title track, for example, uses a gently rocking piano part to support a sad but gripping tale of the fallout from mental illness – “a phase is just a phase to me/a pretty song is just a pretty song/but you were hearing sirens,” he sings in his rough-edged voice (and listen to the fraying in the line “to snap a rope that’s already frayed”).  The song ends with a truly strange sequence of chords which repeats, allowing the strangeness to morph into something weirdly beautiful. </p> <hr> <p><strong>James Bay’s New Video Has A New Sound</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140407047112096663eeaba-9d0b-4f42-9a6e-836920dfbff2"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/qE-gdNIL8WI?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a788772959592661233" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qE-gdNIL8WI"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>The English singer and songwriter James Bay hit it big right out of the gate with his platinum single “<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mqiH0ZSkM9I">Hold Back The River</a>” in 2014.  He made his reputation with a smooth blend of pop and blue-eyed soul, and maybe a touch of Nashville mixed in.  But some of the songs on his new album sport a more guitar-based, rock-oriented sound.  One of them, “Pink Lemonade,” was part of his <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cbwD4DYKs8k">Saturday Night Live</a> appearance, and he’s just released the video for it.  Between the glittery shirt and the sci-fi imagery, I’m getting a vintage David Bowie vibe on this one. </p> <p>The album is called <em>Electric Light</em>, and it comes out on May 18. </p> <hr> <p><strong>A Chilly Soundscape from Birds of Passage</strong></p> <p><iframe frameborder="no" height="300" scrolling="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/392868930&amp;color=%23ff5500&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;show_teaser=true&amp;visual=true" width="100%"></iframe></p> <p>Birds of Passage is essentially a one-woman band: Alicia Merz, from New Zealand, creates slowly unfolding electronic soundscapes inhabited by her own whispery vocals.  This is not your standard voice-up-front/instrumental-background songwriting; it’s closer to the idea behind Brian Eno’s groundbreaking albums of the 1970s, where the distinction between foreground and background is intentionally blurred.  This Friday, she’ll release her first new album in four years.  It’s called <em>The Death of Our Invention</em>, and includes icy, ambient works like this one, “Demons In Our Midst.”  The title is pretty ominous, but the song itself seems pretty chilled out about the whole thing.  In fact, as Merz’s layered vocals accumulate in the second half, the song finds something that might actually be warmth. </p> <p> </p> <p> </p>
Apr 02, 2018
Singer/Producer/Songwriter Charlotte Day Wilson Taps Into Cold Strength And Intimate Beauty
23:18
<p>Toronto-based Charlotte Day Wilson is a singer, multi-instrumentalist (she plays piano, saxophone, bass, and guitar), and producer who draws on her classical background to make bedroom-intimate, yet intensely emotional tunes that are influenced by everything from R&amp;B to electro, to jazz revival. She joins us in the studio to perform songs from her self-released records and hopefully will talk about how she aims to change the entire studio production industry to help younger songwriters and support women.</p> <p><strong>Watch the full session here</strong>:</p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="349" scrolling="no" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnewsounds%2Fvideos%2F10156215475833180%2F&amp;width=620&amp;show_text=false&amp;height=349&amp;appId" width="620" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;"></iframe></p> <p><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327838893120c42ca9da-e076-45e7-a918-be59db22193d"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/EkaL6oLTbkc?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-2119592106323066340" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EkaL6oLTbkc"></iframe></div></div>  </p>
Apr 02, 2018
Squirrel Nut Zippers Sling Some Hot Swing
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<p>The big band jazz and hot swing revivalists Squirrel Nut Zippers from Chapel Hill, North Carolina have always been a guaranteed good time since they broke through in the late 1990’s,with their platinum album <em>Hot</em>. Although they stopped recording around the turn of this century, they have returned to form with a brand new album, <em>Beasts of Burgundy</em>. It’s crammed full of the same swinging hot jazz of the roaring 1920's brass, banjo, explosions of fun! The Squirrel Nut Zippers play some of these new tunes in the studio.  </p> <p><strong>Watch the session live below</strong> (in two parts, due to unforeseen technical difficulties):</p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="349" scrolling="no" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnewsounds%2Fvideos%2F10156205924288180%2F&amp;width=620&amp;show_text=false&amp;height=349&amp;appId" width="620" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;"></iframe></p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="349" scrolling="no" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnewsounds%2Fvideos%2F10156206098323180%2F&amp;width=620&amp;show_text=false&amp;height=349&amp;appId" width="620" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;"></iframe></p>
Mar 29, 2018
Weekly Music Roundup: Angelique Kidjo interprets Talking Heads and Bach @ 333
<p><strong>Week of March 26:</strong> This week, Angelique Kidjo interprets Talking Heads; Bach meets Jookin’; and an ancient Celtic mystery revealed in a wheel of cheese.</p> <hr> <p><strong>VIDEO PREMIERE: Anna &amp; Elizabeth's New Look At An Old Folk Song</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327845769776f6d106c8-acee-408e-acca-f648633b4bfe"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/oIuePqMGflQ?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a4753110975965355652" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://youtu.be/oIuePqMGflQ"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>The duo team of Anna Roberts-Gevalt and Elizabeth LaPrelle released their debut album a couple of years ago, in which they sang their own versions of old Southern and Appalachian folk songs, colored by the sounds of various types of contemporary music. But while Elizabeth is from the South, Anna is a New Englander, so on their forthcoming album, <em>The Invisible Comes To Us</em>, they draw on folk songs from both areas. The song "Ripest of Apples" was collected in the 1930s in Clarksville, New Hampshire, and the duo offer a gently rocking arrangement that acquires an ominous marching drumbeat and a dark sequence of synth chords – making audible the ambiguity that haunts so many of these old ballads. As for the video, it features Anna dancing in a spare, simple room; but as with the song itself, another world begins to intrude…</p> <p>Anna &amp; Elizabeth’s <em>The Invisible Comes To Us</em> comes out on March 30. They will play a live set for our <em>Soundcheck</em> Podcast on April 17 at 2pm ET. They play at Le Poisson Rouge in NY on April 23 as well. </p> <hr> <p><strong>The First Look At Angelique Kidjo’s “Remain In Light” Project</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327857984848d989c980-f12c-4b64-a05a-af237df98eea"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/qR8jgFGmqvU?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a1454463461037188096" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qR8jgFGmqvU"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>As <em>Soundcheck</em> listeners may recall from <a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/angelique-kidjo-reimagines-remain-light-in-studio/">her performances last year in our studio</a> and at Carnegie Hall, the multiple Grammy-winning singer Angelique Kidjo is preparing to release a track-by-track cover of <em>Remain In Light</em>, the trailblazing 1980 album by Talking Heads. It was originally created at a time when frontman <a href="https://www.wnyc.org/story/95758-david-byrne/">David Byrne</a> and producer <a href="https://www.wnyc.org/story/169349-brian-eno-ben-frost/">Brian Eno</a> were deep into the music of Nigeria’s <a href="https://www.wnyc.org/story/88692-fela-live/">Fela Kuti</a> and other forms of African pop; so when Angelique, from the West African nation of Benin, first heard the album (she was living in Paris at the time), she felt the pull of music that was both strange and familiar. Eventually, she decided to reimagine the entire record, at times making explicit the implied Afrocentrism of the original. The album drops on June 8, but the first track, “Born Under Punches,” has just come out. The video is simple enough, although it offers a little social commentary when we see an image of money changing hands at the line “I’m a government man.” For the many admirers of the original album, Angelique Kidjo re-creates the experience <em>she</em> first had with it – the pull of music that is, once again, both strange and familiar. </p> <hr> <p><strong>Okkervil River Release New Video; Album To Follow</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327844375024c2703794-9a97-42c5-bc35-e0c59d6aa3e6"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/PZ7bMUsOu7w?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-6288355881879450902" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PZ7bMUsOu7w"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>Singer/songwriter Will Scheff and his band <a href="https://www.wnyc.org/story/317110-okkervil-river-in-studio/">Okkervil River</a> are putting out their new album, <em>In The Rainbow Rain</em>, next month, and this week they unveiled a new song and video. “Pulled Up The Ribbon” is one of Scheff’s big numbers – the band excels at wistful, intimate songs as well, but when they really get going they find themselves on <a href="https://www.stereogum.com/1824104/obama-shares-vacation-playlists-featuring-florence-the-machine-beyonce-okkervil-river/news/">presidential playlists</a> and the like. It may remind some listeners of earlier songs like “Down The Deep River,” which appeared on that Obama playlist and also had an explosive, anthemic sound. The video is a strange brew: a mix of landscapes – some real, some imagined; some contemporary, and some centuries old. It’s also leavened with a note of deadpan humor, as a group of Revolutionary Era figures struggle to play a giant guitar and its whammy bar. </p> <hr> <p><strong>We Celebrate J.S. Bach’s 333<sup>rd</sup> Birthday – Just Not Sure When</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327843343136d0cbf203-69e5-4de6-8f10-7df60d0febe9"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/R6kmQwh0TYs?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a7585178145285594162" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R6kmQwh0TYs&amp;feature=youtu.be"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>Our classical music station, WQXR, made it sound so simple when they announced <a href="https://www.wqxr.org/story/happy-birthday-composer-johann-sebastian-bach">their daylong celebration of Bach’s birthday:</a> “you only turn 333 once.” That may be, but <em>when</em> did Bach turn 333?  Was it on March 21, the date that appears on his birth certificate? Or is it this Saturday, March 31, which is actually 333 years to the day of his birth? Bach was born in 1685, and his birth date was recorded under the old Julian calendar. But when we changed over to the modern Gregorian calendar (in what were then the American Colonies, that happened in 1750 – the year of Bach’s death), his birthdate suddenly became March 31. Our colleagues at WQXR chose to celebrate on March 21, though they hedged their bets by planning a <a href="https://www.wqxr.org/events">big birthday bash on March 31, now postponed to April 4</a>. For our purposes, either date will do – you can either view this video as a reminder of last Wednesday’s festivities or as a preview to this Saturday’s. It features Johnny Gandelsman, one of the violinists from the string quartet <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oLNP7A-cOxA">Brooklyn Rider</a> and a member of <a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/yo-yo-ma-silk-road-ensemble-in-studio/">Yo Yo Ma’s Silk Road Ensemble</a>, playing the “Gavotte” movement from Bach’s Partita #3 for violin, while the astonishing <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=thnbYi9xoME">Lil Buck</a> and Prime Tyme display some of the moves that have made their style of dance, known as jookin’, so popular. (Johnny even gets into the act, sort of, briefly, at one point… oh just watch the thing.)</p> <hr> <p><strong>Ancient Celtic Mystery Revealed In Gwenno’s New Video</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm14032786269113696b37711-d9cf-44e9-bf57-2457fc280787"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/6_U9yh6ivjc?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a2055871591810461332" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6_U9yh6ivjc&amp;feature=youtu.be"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>Gwenno is the Welsh singer/keyboardist/songwriter Gwenno Saunders, formerly of The Pipettes. She first came on our radar in 2015 with the release of her solo album <em>Y Dydd Olaf</em>, which was notable for its sci-fi inspiration and for the fact that it was sung in Welsh, Gwenno’s first language. (The title is Welsh for “The Last Day.”) Now, she’s released an even more linguistically-challenging album called <em>Le Kov</em> – an album of often woozy psychedelic pop, sung entirely in Cornish. Turns out, Gwenno’s dad is one of a handful of people who still speaks this Celtic language from England’s Cornwall region. So this album explores ideas of cultural and linguistic memory; and in the new video for the track “Eus Keus?” she moves through a landscape populated by hooded figures and mysterious standing stones. What does it all mean? Well, “Eus Keus?” means “is there cheese?” And as Gwenno shows towards the end of the video, raising two wheels of the good stuff in her hands, there is indeed cheese. </p>
Mar 26, 2018
Randy Weston Distills Music's Spiritual Essence
27:54
<p>The American pianist, composer, innovator, and "Legend of Jazz," Randy Weston, joins us to play some of his solo piano works - many of which border on ritual blues with a dash of Ellington stride here and there a crashing note cluster of Thelonious Monk in mind. His latest recording is a two-album set called <em>Sound</em>, which contains many of his own compositions, recorded when he was 75 years old, back in 2001. In advance of his 92nd birthday, he honors our studio once again.</p> <p><strong>Watch the complete session below</strong>:<strong> </strong></p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="315" scrolling="no" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnewsounds%2Fvideos%2F10156189422533180%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=560" width="560" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;"></iframe></p>
Mar 26, 2018
Vicente García's Immersive Collision of Bachata, Merengue, Funk, and Rock
26:17
<p>Coming from a rock and funk place, Dominican singer-songwriter Vicente García has become something of a folk pop revivalist, incorporating his love of Afro-Caribbean rhythms, from acoustic <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bachata_(music)">bachata</a> to reggae on his latest record, <em>A La Mar. </em>Formerly the lead singer of the band Calor Urbano, the winner of Best New Artist at this year’s Latin Grammys has been digging into Dominican folklore, despite his having relocated to Bogotá, Colombia. (He was also up for Best Tropical Song <span>for "Bachata In Kingston,</span>" according to <a href="https://www.npr.org/sections/altlatino/2017/11/15/564266590/a-new-video-from-best-new-artist-nominee-vicente-garc-a" target="_blank">alt.latino</a>.) Vicente García joins us for an acoustic set to play some of these eclectic love songs.</p> <p><strong>Watch live here or on the <a href="https://www.facebook.com/newsounds" target="_blank">New Sounds Facebook page</a>.</strong></p> <p>Set list:</p> <ul> <li>Te Soñe <strong><br></strong></li> <li><span>Dulcito e coco</span></li> <li><span>Juana Mecho </span></li> </ul> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="349" scrolling="no" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnewsounds%2Fvideos%2F10156107780998180%2F&amp;width=620&amp;show_text=false&amp;height=349&amp;appId" width="620" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;"></iframe></p>
Mar 22, 2018
Weekly Music Roundup: Pussy Riot, Tinariwen, and Yo La Tengo
5:58
<p><strong>Week of March 19:</strong> This week, musical reactions to a troubled world from Pussy Riot, Roger Waters, and Yo La Tengo. Plus new videos from Tinariwen and Courtney Barnett.</p> <hr> <p><strong>Russian Music Of Resistance From Pussy Riot</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327855633472e5c71495-45a2-4b99-ae38-2eb0197750b8"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/RIumCYzHzCU?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-7186826317003110793" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RIumCYzHzCU&amp;feature=youtu.be"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>The Russian-based feminist art/punk collective known as Pussy Riot was unimpressed with Vladimir Putin’s re-election bid on Sunday.  “You should not be deceived,” they wrote in a press release accompanying their new single; “this event on 18th of March is not elections.” With the outcome a foregone conclusion, the band released a song called “выборы” (“vybory” in our alphabet – the Russian word for elections), essentially a softly-chanted or rapped incantation over a spare but relentless beat that calls out the corruption, fear, and intimidation of Putin’s reign and promises 6 years of resistance. The video features artwork drawn by Oleg Navalny, “a political prisoner,” they explain; “who was convicted to 3,5 years in jail because he’s a brother of Alexey Navalny, Putin’s fiercest political opponent. We contacted Oleg in prison and he agreed to give his pics for “выборы.” </p> <hr> <p><strong>Pink Floyd’s Roger Waters’ Controversial New Collaboration</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm1403278395281287ff0b735-612b-4868-b724-1002fa9b9f85"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/8i-TMG7k_QM?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-1238628349449576857" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8i-TMG7k_QM"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>“Supremacy” is a work by Palestine’s <a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/64873-new-music-for-arab-lute/">Trio Joubran</a> and Pink Floyd singer/bassist <a href="https://www.wnyc.org/story/37872-roger-waters/">Roger Waters</a>, in which Waters reads some of an epic poem by the late <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mahmoud_Darwish">Mahmoud Darwish</a>, generally considered to be Palestine’s national poet. The story is told from the point of view of a Native American speaking to the white man who is about to take over his lands, but it clearly references the West Bank settlements, and was recorded in the days after President Trump’s declaration that the US would recognize Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. It’s not the first time Waters has used a Darwish text (in an English translation), nor is it the first time he’s waded into the turbulent waters of the Israeli-Palestinian issue. His support of Palestinian causes, including a boycott of Israel by touring bands, cost him some major tour sponsorships a few years back, and drew accusations of anti-Semitism. But this shouldn’t overshadow (though it will, inevitably) the work of both Darwish and Trio Joubran. The trio of brothers from Nazareth play the oud, the classical Arab lute, which is normally a solo instrument. In bringing three of them together, and adding touches of Western production, they’ve created a striking new sound for these old instruments. And Darwish’s lines, especially the closing “where, oh white master, are you taking my people…. And yours?” have a resonance that goes beyond the particular place and time in which they were written. </p> <hr> <p><strong>Yo La Tengo’s New Album Reacts To Troubled Times</strong></p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="380" src="https://open.spotify.com/embed/track/2YmjVaikl30rmZZzlGTwPE" width="300"></iframe></p> <p>The veteran indie rockers Yo La Tengo are not just a band – they are a walking encyclopedia of pop music of the last half century. As fans know, the band will often take requests – not for their own songs, but for <em>any</em> song – and figure out a way to play them on the spot. So when they chose <em>There’s A Riot Going On</em> as the title for their new album, their 15<sup>th</sup>, they were clearly pointing back at Sly &amp; The Family Stone’s classic 1971 album <em>There’s A Riot Goin’ On</em>. That earlier disc was also recorded at a time when America felt divided and uncertain; but where Sly Stone created a dark, challenging album, Yo La Tengo offer us instead something gentler, something that acknowledges dark times but seems to suggest that one way to respond is to just chill out. And so there are tracks like “Ashes,” which come wreathed in a kind of sonic haze that offers a bit of respite from all the noise out there.</p> <hr> <p><strong>Courtney Barnett Needs a Little Time… In Outer Space</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327842473584a2fc32bc-ee1f-4859-b4ee-a558eebd82b9"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/TISIPNpRuoY?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a4114777421088761628" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TISIPNpRuoY&amp;feature=youtu.be "></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>Australian indie-rocker <a href="http://www.thegreenespace.org/events/thegreenespace/2015/may/20/soundcheck-live-courtney-barnett/">Courtney Barnett</a> has become such a popular figure in the last few years that it’s surprising to realize that her next album, called <em>Tell Me How You Really Feel</em>, will only be her second solo LP. Courtney has just released a new track from the album, called “Need A Little Time,” and it finds her in a more inward-looking, emotional vulnerable place. Don’t get me wrong, it still rocks, once the song gets going, but the lyrics reflect on needing a little time away “from me and you.” The video finds her in a very different place – being examined by aliens who look like they just stepped off the cover of the <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Love_This_Giant#/media/File:David_Byrne_and_St._Vincent_-_Love_This_Giant.jpg">David Byrne/St. Vincent album</a> <em>Love This Giant</em>, and then floating off into the cosmos. But Courtney Barnett also hints at more earthly concerns – on the left arm of her jumpsuit is the rainbow flag (I’m pretty sure the female alien at the beginning is her wife, the gifted songwriter <a href="https://www.newsounds.org/story/singer-songwriter-jen-cloher-in-studio/">Jen Cloher</a>), and on the right arm is the Australian Aboriginal flag. </p> <p>The album is due on May 18, and she’s touring to support it, but all of the shows are sold out. </p> <hr> <p><strong>A New Animated Video From Tuareg Rock Band Tinariwen</strong></p> <p><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327837095584b2c5d736-85dc-4c18-8381-44699b7fa6e2"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/H1YIgwPsX5Q?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a6102398261178595354" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H1YIgwPsX5Q&amp;feature=youtu.be"></iframe></div></div>  </p> <p>The musicians in the band <a href="https://www.wnyc.org/story/146925-studio-tinariwen/">Tinariwen</a> were Tuareg rebels in northern Mali who traded in their guns for electric guitars and helped give birth to the “desert blues” that has become such a vital part of the world music scene in the past twenty years.  Marrying ancient Saharan rhythms to modern instruments, Tinariwen has become a globetrotting ensemble that attracts rock royalty from <a href="https://www.wnyc.org/story/robert-plant-lullaby-ceaseless-roar/">Robert Plant</a> to TV On The Radio.  On their most recent album, <em>Elwan</em>, they collaborated with guitarist Kurt Vile and singer Mark Lanegan on a track called “Nannuflay”; now they’re released a lovely but nostalgic animated video that imagines an older musician revisiting the land of his youth – a land that in real life has become a war zone. </p> <hr> <p><strong>This Brian Eno Cover Simply Shouldn’t Be This Good</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327848016384901496d7-3ed4-4481-8ab1-e89e055f7d47"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/LgKyL5ksdn0?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-1708512267063484268" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=16&amp;v=LgKyL5ksdn0"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>Before he moved into ambient music, sound-and-video installations, and the various forms of conceptual art that have occupied much of his time for the past 40 years, <a href="https://www.wnyc.org/story/169349-brian-eno-ben-frost/">Brian Eno</a> – the English producer, singer, synth player, and songwriter – created four “song albums” in the 1970s. The song <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ok5rs1AEzCM">“Julie With…”</a> comes from the last of them, <em>Before And After Science</em>, and is full of layered instruments that somehow sound weightless, and evocative lyrics that somehow sound distant and adrift in time. Its opening, with backwards synth and bell over a steadily approaching piano, seems to materialize out of the ether (and served as the opening theme music of my <em>New Sounds</em> program until the 1990s). There is simply no way that a clarinetist and a pianist could recreate those textures, nor, one would think, that mood. And yet clarinetist Stephen Black and pianist Paul Jones, recording under the name Group Listening, have done it. Using some fairly subtle effects on the clarinet and swapping the repeated piano riff of the original between the two, Group Listening manages to capture the floating, enigmatic quality of Eno’s original. Accompanied by some equally enigmatic video imagery, this Group Listening track is our first glimpse of their forthcoming project called <em><a href="https://grouplistening.bandcamp.com/album/clarinet-piano-selected-works-vol-1">Clarinet &amp; Piano: Selected Works Vol. 1</a></em>, which will also include surprising arrangements of music by Achim Roedelius (half of the krautrock duo Cluster), Arthur Russell, and Robert Wyatt. That album is due on May 4.</p>
Mar 19, 2018
South African Choir Ladysmith Black Mambazo Sings of Peace and Harmony
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<p>The great South African a cappella choir Ladysmith Black Mambazo are a global phenomenon. With their uplifting vocal harmonies and signature dance moves, they’ve been anointed “cultural ambassadors to the world” by no less than Nelson Mandela. (Some listeners might recall them appearing on Paul Simon’s <em>Graceland</em> album back in 1986.) The group was formed in 1960 by Joseph Shabalala, has recorded more than 50 albums, and won five Grammys. Joseph Shabalala is now retired, but his sons and other family members carry on the tradition. As they’re on another world tour, Ladysmith Black Mambazo returns to perform songs in our studio.</p> <p><strong>Watch the entire live session here</strong>:</p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="349" scrolling="no" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnewsounds%2Fvideos%2F10156151175648180%2F&amp;width=620&amp;show_text=false&amp;height=349&amp;appId" width="620" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;"></iframe></p> <p><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327844039920e72dc686-3254-42f0-b764-aa9c716bbbd6"><iframe width="465" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/DxdKYcpGpFo?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a4359248010398553553" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DxdKYcpGpFo"></iframe></div></div>  </p>
Mar 18, 2018
The Oh Hellos Throw a Folk Rock Party for Everyone
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<p>Formed in Texas, the sibling duo The Oh Hellos have embarked on making music for folks wherever the winds carry them. Seriously - their latest  string of EPs are named <span>after one of the four Greek mythological wind deities that bring the seasons. </span>With fiddles, banjo, accordion, and cheerful melodies, the duo expands their musical forces when on tour to an entire ecstatic folk-rock community party. The Oh Hellos and their reinforcements perform their autumnal songs in-studio.</p> <p>Set list: </p> <ul> <li>Eurus</li> <li>On The Mountain Tall</li> <li>Torches</li> </ul> <p><strong>Watch live here or on the <a href="https://www.facebook.com/newsounds/" target="_blank">New Sounds Facebook page</a></strong>.</p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="349" scrolling="no" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnewsounds%2Fvideos%2F10156116276203180%2F&amp;width=620&amp;show_text=false&amp;height=349&amp;appId" width="620" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;"></iframe></p> <p><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327844938320830db289-5093-407a-834b-e67326ac2a99"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/SDH3ZxchrK4?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-298535212667818862" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SDH3ZxchrK4"></iframe></div></div>  </p>
Mar 15, 2018
Weekly Music Roundup: Sade, Jon Hopkins, and Squirrel Nut Zippers
<p><strong>Week of March 12:</strong> This week, a pair of musical returns: Sade (after 8 years) and Squirrel Nut Zippers (after 18), along with new music from Simian Mobile Disco, David Byrne and Jon Hopkins.</p> <hr> <p> </p> <p><strong>Sade Returns After Eight Years – Just A Wrinkle In Time</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327841442032f66c31be-31e5-4e7b-b736-72cf6dfe0368"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/m7b8hitvfoE?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-2222971683855658379" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m7b8hitvfoE"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>Multiple Grammy-winning singer Sade hadn’t released new, original music in eight years… until this past week, when she put out the single “Flower Of The Universe” as part of the soundtrack to the film <em>A Wrinkle In Time</em>.  The song wreaths Sade’s distinctive soulful vocals in a kind of halo created by what sounds like a small choir of male voices, singing very softly.  It’s a magical effect, especially when combined with the chiming harmonics of the acoustic guitar underpinning it all.  Sade’s lyrics from the song actually became part of the dialogue of the movie, courtesy of director Ava DuVernay.  The song itself appears twice in the soundtrack – once in this original form, and once in a <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Dp7Vaky1_w">remix by Grammy-winning producer No I.D</a>. </p> <hr> <p><strong>The Squirrel Nut Zippers Return With “West Of Zanzibar”</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327841453792cd0fc5a3-323a-4747-b46a-50332433dd01"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/XG2PxvLYuOo?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a6275465496613057045" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XG2PxvLYuOo&amp;feature=youtu.be"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>It’s been 18 years since the last time the Squirrel Nut Zippers released a new collection of their fun, cheeky retro-jazz. But Jimbo Mathus and his merry band are about to release an album called <em>Beasts of Burgundy</em>, which apparently was inspired at least in part by New Orleans. The new single, “West of Zanzibar,” rides on a mid-century Latin dance groove, over which we hear the sounds that typified this band at their height in the late 90s, when they sold over three million albums. Those sounds include 30s Hot Club jazz, big band swing, 60s exotica, and some Caribbean elements (which would include New Orleans). </p> <p>The album comes out on March 23 and the band plays City Winery on March 28. In between, watch for their live studio set with us on the <em>Soundcheck</em> podcast on Monday, March 26, at 2pm ET. </p> <hr> <p><strong>Superorganism Turns Out To Be Well Named</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm14032786004270428c98347-702e-4015-8573-037df72a14df"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/AjMCF6P0ESI?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a4336813173890602172" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AjMCF6P0ESI"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p>The East London-based collective called Superorganism currently numbers eight members, all stitched together by their love of fun, unexpected sounds and the deadpan vocals of Orono Noguchi. I hesitate to call her the band’s “lead singer,” simply because there are so many voices – live, sampled, chopped up, slowed down – on the band’s irresistible debut album, also called Superorganism. The album came out last week and it’s taken me a few days to settle on one track to share here, especially since standout tracks “<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RPS-Cq4uMFs">Something For Your M.I.N.D.</a>” and “<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mJQYRzAoErc">Everybody Wants To Be Famous</a>” have been out there for a while; but I’ve come down on the side of “Night Time,” in which Orono’s vocals (which may recall Courtney Barnett) are surrounded by a repeated, whispered “wake up, wake up” that willfully subverts the song’s title. Like most of the album, the song has many – potentially too many – parts that shouldn’t fit together but somehow do, once they’re all snapped to a grid of bouncy indie-pop rhythms. Even the annoying cell phone ring at the end of the track sounds right, both in and out of place at the same time.  </p> <hr> <p><strong>David Byrne’s <em>American Utopia</em> Is Finally Here</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327849394496c19133fe-0ed1-40af-a3d5-55f36ff4b9f6"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/1_sT6kw6aRk?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-6551303555298157663" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1_sT6kw6aRk"></iframe></div></div>  </strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.wnyc.org/story/95758-david-byrne/">David Byrne</a> will spend much of the next half year on tour, and it’s likely that the big singalong number in his concerts this year will be “Every Day Is A Miracle,” a weird little tune with an enormous hook that just begs you to “sing for your supper.” It’s from <em>American Utopia</em>, the much-anticipated album that Byrne released on Friday, and while it’s not the lo-fi jigsaw puzzle of the Superorganism album, it shares with that London crew a sense of play and a tendency to mix disparate parts into a surprisingly coherent whole. In this song, oddball lyrics (one compares God to an old rooster and Jesus to an egg) lead to a chorus comprised of simple-minded sentiments that are somehow transformed into something satisfying and comforting. So raise a quizzical eyebrow all you want during the verses (and you will).  Just get ready to sing along at the chorus. </p> <p>David Byrne’s world tour ends here in NY, on September 15 at Forest Hills Stadium and September 17 at Kings Theater. </p> <hr> <p><strong>Organic Electronica from Simian Mobile Disco</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm140327863153168ee6b0eed-73d7-4799-aa3c-cc1b921ec50c"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/FjcVHpj5Aec?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-7439850295743409919" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=237&amp;v=FjcVHpj5Aec"></iframe></div></div>   </strong></p> <p>The duo known as <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simian_Mobile_Disco">Simian Mobile Disco</a> has a new album due in May, and its sound will be colored by the group’s latest collaborators: the East London collective known as <a href="https://deepthroatchoir.bandcamp.com/">the Deep Throat Choir</a>. This all-female chorus has a kind of rough-hewn, earthy sound that they used to good effect in covers of Björk, Amy Winehouse, and others; here, it serves as an effective foil for Simian Mobile Disco’s clangorous, throbbing electronics. The new single, “Hey Sister,” is a strange combination of 60s pop and 00s techno, but it’s certainly no stranger than the video that accompanies it. </p> <p>The album, <em>Murmurations</em>, comes out on May 11. The duo plays at <a href="https://www.elsewherebrooklyn.com/" target="_blank">Elsewhere</a> on June 8.</p> <p> </p> <hr> <p><strong>Cosmic New Electronica From Jon Hopkins</strong></p> <p><strong><div class="user-embedded-video"><div id="videoplayer_idm1403278388583203c191a1d-9bef-45ae-90a2-8207f8e68118"><iframe width="620" height="349" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/4sk0uDbM5lc?wmode=transparent&amp;autohide=1&amp;rel=0&amp;showinfo=0&amp;feature=oembed&amp;enablejsapi=1" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen" id="a-4184731815479031546" class="youtube_video" mozallowfullscreen="mozallowfullscreen" webkitallowfullscreen="webkitallowfullscreen" data-original-url="https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=2&amp;v=4sk0uDbM5lc"></iframe></div></div>   </strong></p> <p>UK composer/keyboardist/producer <a href="https://www.wnyc.org/story/297202-jon-hopkins-in-studio/">Jon Hopkins</a> stood out from a crowded electronic music field when he released <em>Immunity</em>, his brilliant solo effort, in 2013, after making a name for himself by working with Brian Eno, Coldplay, and King Creosote, among others. Now, after a five-year hiatus, he is readying a new album, to be called <em>Singularity</em>. And he’s released the first single, called “Emerald Rush.” It’s typically full of interesting sounds, that on their own might be glitchy or harsh but which are molded into a deep groove that creates a trance-like effect, underpinning layers of keyboards that soar, stutter, and soar again. The animated video is equally trippy, and at one point it seems to imagine what it might be like to reach the center of a black hole (which is one definition of “singularity”). </p> <p><em>Singularity</em> arrives on May 4. </p>
Mar 12, 2018
Singer, Actress, and Activist Lila Downs Works To Break Down Walls
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<p>Feminist icon and Mexican folklorist Lila Downs’ most recent album <em>Salón, Lágrimas y Deseo </em>(Dancehall, Tears, and Desire), is dedicated to strong women everywhere. Her lyrics, inviting all “dangerous” women to join her, often highlight issues relating to social justice, while spanning blues to cumbia, folk and ranchera music. Inspired by Frida Kahlo, Downs says in an interview with <a href="http://remezcla.com/features/music/ana-tijoux-lila-downs-interview/">Remezcla</a> that she finds being Mexican has “a lot of value, even if the world that surrounds one doesn’t believe it.” She’s joined by her band, and special guest Chilean emcee Ana Tijoux, in-studio.</p> <p><strong>Watch live here or on the <a href="https://www.facebook.com/newsounds" target="_blank">New Sounds Facebook page</a></strong>.</p> <p><iframe frameborder="0" height="349" scrolling="no" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fnewsounds%2Fvideos%2F10156113354383180%2F&amp;width=620&amp;show_text=false&amp;height=349&amp;appId" width="620" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;"></iframe></p>
Mar 12, 2018