BirdNote

By Tune In to Nature.org

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Category: Natural Sciences

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Description

BirdNote strives to transport listeners out of the daily grind and into the natural world with outstanding audio programming and online content. The stories we tell are rich in sound, imagery, and information, connecting the ways and needs of birds to the lives of listeners. We inspire people to listen, look, and exclaim, “Oh, that’s what that is!”

Episode Date
Roseate Spoonbill
Of all the bold colors nature has bestowed on birds, bright pink may be the most surprising. And just about the hottest pink bird of all lives year round along the Gulf of Mexico — the Roseate Spoonbill. These birds stand out, especially when flying against a blue sky.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/birdnote/OYfP/~4/I6nTURIDVCo" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 18, 2018
Henry David Thoreau and the Wood Thrush
In June 1853, Thoreau wrote of an enchanting encounter with the Wood Thrush: "This is the only bird whose note affects me like music. It lifts and exhilarates me. It is inspiring. It changes all hours to an eternal morning." Wood Thrushes thrive in large expanses of forest.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/birdnote/OYfP/~4/RUIcgi5yBUA" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 17, 2018
Northern Hawk Owl
The Northern Hawk Owl is one of the least studied and least known of all birds in North America. Northern Hawk Owls are owls, but they share several traits with hawks and falcons: A streamlined body shape, daytime hunting habits, and stiff wing feathers for daytime hunting.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/birdnote/OYfP/~4/OwvuuPtux1w" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 16, 2018
The Phoebe and the Pewee
The Eastern Phoebe (pictured here) is one of the most familiar flycatchers east of the Rockies. Because the Eastern Phoebe repeats its name when it sings, it’s a pretty straightforward voice to identify and remember.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/birdnote/OYfP/~4/rZ2XEd4OfU0" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 15, 2018
Voices and Vocabularies - Robin&#039;s Evening Song
During the day, an American Robin, a member of the thrush family, sings a lovely, familiar song of rich phrases. But as the sun begins to set, robin song takes on a different character.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/birdnote/OYfP/~4/uB1QekBjQDE" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 14, 2018
Common Potoo with Nancy Rumbel
The Common Potoo is a nocturnal bird of Central and South America, known for its camouflage plumage and upright perching. Nancy Rumbel, who composed the theme music for BirdNote, improvises here with the call of the Common Potoo.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/birdnote/OYfP/~4/BIEdMY9shrY" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 13, 2018
Where Birds Sleep
All birds need to sleep — or at least snooze — sometime during each 24-hour period. And most sleep at night. A bird (such as this Wood Duckling) may turn its head around and warm its beak under its shoulder-feathers. Songbirds find a protected perch, sheltered from rain and nighttime predators.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/birdnote/OYfP/~4/9dvRsO_Jg2Y" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 12, 2018
Saving Snags for Red-headed Woodpeckers
Red-headed Woodpeckers excavate cavities in large, dead trees called snags. Yet, over much of the Red-head's range, snags are frequently cut down as unsightly, or because they make good firewood. There are ways we can help the Red-headed Woodpecker -- and many other woodpeckers, too.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/birdnote/OYfP/~4/a2ub_33KqEs" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 11, 2018
From Egg-laying to Hatching and Beyond
Waterfowl like this Muscovy duckling spend up to 30 days in the egg, so they’re able to walk, swim, and feed themselves as soon as they hatch. We call these chicks precocial.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/birdnote/OYfP/~4/Jinz5GOZevE" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 10, 2018
Voices and Vocabularies - Great Horned Owls
Great Horned Owls have a lot to say! When a pair of Great Horned Owls calls in a duet, the female usually hoots first, and the male replies at a lower pitch.<img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/birdnote/OYfP/~4/wIe5a181wTs" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
Jun 09, 2018