ChinaPower

By CSIS | Center for Strategic and International Studies

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A podcast unpacking critical issues underpinning China’s emergence as a global power.

Episode Date
The PLA at 95 and the Current Crisis in the Taiwan Strait: A Conversation with Roderick Lee
2686
In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, Mr. Roderick Lee joins us to discuss the state of China’s People’s Liberation Army (PLA) as it marks its 95th anniversary. He lays out President Xi Jinping’s unique relationship with the military, discussing Xi’s personal affiliation with the PLA early in his career and the reforms of the PLA Xi has enacted as President. Mr. Lee argues that current PLA exercises near Taiwan are part of a “textbook” PLA deterrence strategy meant to demonstrate PLA capabilities and intimidate Taiwan. He notes that despite the unprecedented PLA escalation, Beijing has demonstrated restraint and seeks to avoid a full confrontation. Lastly, Mr. Lee comments on the long-term impacts of the ongoing PLA exercises, believing that they will provide strong insights into the PLA, its strategy, and its capabilities going forward.   Mr. Roderick Lee is Director of research at the China Aerospace Studies Institute (CASI) at Air University. Prior to joining CASI, Mr. Lee served as an analyst with the United States Navy covering Chinese naval forces.   The views expressed are those of the speaker and do not reflect the official policy or position of the U.S. Air Force, the Department of Defense, or the U.S. government.
Aug 05, 2022
The State of Japan-China Relations: A Conversation with Christopher Johnstone
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In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, CSIS Japan Chair Christopher Johnstone joins us to discuss the current state of Japan-China relations. Mr. Johnstone argues that Prime Minister Kishida’s policies have picked up from where his predecessors left off in terms of taking a more hardline China policy. He states that China’s deepening relations with Russia and its assertive behavior in Asia is alarming Tokyo, weighing on Japanese public sentiment toward China, and fueling proposals to increase defense spending. Despite these tensions however, Mr. Johnstone notes that he has not seen significant Chinese economic coercion toward Japan in recent years, which speaks to the close economic relations that persist between the two countries. Lastly, Mr. Johnstone comments on rising Japanese support for Taiwan, discussing the growing Japanese consensus that Japan’s security and Taiwan’s are increasingly linked.  
Jul 21, 2022
Hong Kong 25 Years Later: A Conversation With Daniel Ten Kate
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In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, Daniel Ten Kate joins us to discuss the current state of affairs in Hong Kong. Mr. Ten Kate argues that Hong Kong has changed drastically since its handover to the P.R.C. 25 years ago. The “One Country, Two Systems” framework that governs the territory has allowed Hong Kong to maintain its economic system, but only Chinese “patriots” are allowed to participate in Hong Kong’s political system. He also discusses Hong Kong’s leadership, predicting that John Lee will have to navigate a strained economic climate and onerous Covid restrictions as he seeks to maintain Hong Kong’s status as a major financial hub. Daniel Ten Kate is a Managing Editor at Bloomberg News. Mr. Ten Kate manages a team of reporters for Bloomberg that covers East and Southeast Asia.
Jul 07, 2022
Evaluating U.S. Engagement with China: A Conversation with Dr. Aaron Friedberg
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In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, Dr. Aaron Friedberg joins us to discuss the current state and shortcomings of U.S. engagement with China. Dr. Friedberg argues that U.S. engagement with China has failed in several respects, highlighting China’s shift toward more repressive policies under Xi Jinping and its increasingly contentious relationship with the United States in the Asia-Pacific. He believes that, rather than becoming a “responsible stakeholder,” China has instead evolved into a “revisionist power” that is seeking to surpass American influence in Asia and challenge the global status quo. He offers that if the United States did not embrace the approach of engaging with China, it is possible that China would be more aggressive now, but China would also be a weaker power. Lastly, Dr. Friedberg lays out his view of how the United States can best strategize on China going forward, including offering his evaluation of the Biden Administration’s current policy toward China.
Jun 23, 2022
China’s Economic Woes: A Conversation with Scott Kennedy
2052
In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, Dr. Scott Kennedy joins us to discuss the state of China’s economy and its current challenges. Dr. Kennedy says that Chinese domestic economic policy, including crackdowns in the technology and education sectors, are dampening prospects for China’s long-term growth. He also explains that China’s Zero-Covid policy and the Russian invasion of Ukraine have adversely shaped business sentiment in China. Lastly, Dr. Kennedy argues that China’s current economic difficulties could make it a more unpredictable and volatile actor on the world’s stage.   Scott Kennedy is Senior Adviser and Trustee Chair in Chinese Business and Economics at CSIS. Dr. Kennedy is a leading authority on Chinese economic policy and has been traveling to China for over 30 years. His specific areas of expertise include industrial policy, technology innovation, business lobbying, U.S.-China commercial relations, and global governance. His articles have appeared in a wide array of policy, popular, and academic venues, including the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, and China Quarterly.   
Jun 10, 2022
China’s Strategic Approach to the Solomon Islands: A Conversation with Rory Medcalf
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In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, Professor Rory Medcalf joins us to discuss China’s strategy in the Solomon Islands and the Southwest Pacific. Professor Medcalf explains that the Southwest Pacific, for much of its history, has not been a zone of major power competition and is important because it stands geographically between Australia and the rest of the Indo-Pacific and the US. The Solomon Islands is one of multiple locations in the region that China has expressed military interest in. He also argues that China’s objectives in the region could distort the interests and priorities of governments and societies and could change the region’s balance of power. Lastly, Professor Medcalf recommends that the Australian government and its partners build and maintain a new level of engagement (through both governance and civil society) in the region in order to provide alternatives to China’s influence.
May 27, 2022
China’s Relationship with the Middle East: A Conversation with Dr. Jon B. Alterman
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In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, we are joined by Dr. Jon B. Alterman to unpack the relationship between China and the Middle East. Dr. Alterman begins with an overview of China’s role in the region, detailing China’s varied individual relationships with different countries. He states that China’s growing presence in the region is mostly motivated by Chinese self-interest and China is not willing to commit large sacrifices to deepen its relations with the region or with particular countries like Iran. Dr. Alterman concludes that the future of China-Middle East relations is unpredictable, and the United States should not overestimate China’s power in the region. Dr. Jon B. Alterman is a senior vice president, holds the Zbigniew Brzezinski Chair in Global Security and Geostrategy, and is director of the Middle East Program at CSIS. Prior to joining CSIS in 2002, he served as a member of the Policy Planning Staff at the U.S. Department of State and as a special assistant to the assistant secretary of state for Near Eastern affairs, and from 2009-2019 he served as a member of the Chief of Naval Operations Executive Panel.
May 12, 2022
Taiwan’s View of the Invasion of Ukraine: A Conversation with Dr. Shen Ming-Shih
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In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, Dr. Shen Ming-Shih joins us to discuss Taiwan’s views on the Russian invasion of Ukraine and the potential lessons Taiwan may learn. Dr. Shen begins by exploring what Taiwan’s defense community has learned and the inspiration Taiwan’s people have drawn from Ukraine. He then discusses the ongoing debates in Taiwan over how to reform the island’s defense and build on its relationship with the U.S. Finally, Dr. Shen argues that the most important factor in a potential Taiwan conflict will be the actions of the U.S. and international community, and that the U.S. should embrace “strategic-level clarity” with tactical ambiguity to deter China from aggression.
Apr 27, 2022
China’s Lessons Learned from Ukraine: A Conversation with Dr. Tong Zhao
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In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, Dr. Tong Zhao joins us to discuss China’s views on the Russian invasion of Ukraine and the potential lessons China may learn. Dr. Zhao begins by describing the evolution of Chinese reactions to the invasion, from optimism of its impacts on China to uncertainty. He says that, in China, there is a common perception that Russia and Ukraine are comparable to China and Taiwan. Dr. Zhao then explains that the West’s comprehensive sanctions against Russia and military support for Ukraine reinforce China’s fear that the West seeks to strangle countries with different political systems. Finally, Dr. Zhao discusses how the invasion of Ukraine might change the global geopolitical landscape, and that he thinks the invasion will significantly impact China’s foreign policy going forward.
Apr 13, 2022
Assessing China’s Growing Air Incursions into Taiwan’s ADIZ: A Conversation with Kenneth W. Allen, Gerald C. Brown, and Thomas J. Shattuck
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In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, we are joined by Mr. Kenneth W. Allen, Mr. Gerald C. Brown, and Mr. Thomas J. Shattuck to discuss China’s People’s Liberation Army’s (PLA) flight incursions into Taiwan’s Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ). They first define the PLA’s incursions as a tactic for China to undermine Taiwan’s sovereignty and explain how such actions impact China and Taiwan’s policy goals. They reveal that the PLA launches these incursions to serve as punishment and intimidation when it is dissatisfied with Taiwan’s policies or engagement with the international community. Additionally, they note that these sorties are far from replicating the amount of air power or coordination that China would need to launch an invasion of Taiwan. However, they also point out that it is likely future PLA incursions will grow in sophistication as China sees the importance of air superiority in the Ukraine conflict. Lastly, they assess that there is no evidence so far that China is taking advantage of current US and European attention on the Ukraine crisis to significantly increase military pressure on Taiwan.
Apr 01, 2022
The Evolving Nature of China-Australia Relations: A Conversation with Dr. Charles Edel
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In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, Dr. Charles Edel joins us to unpack the relationship between Australia and China. Dr. Edel begins by navigating key moments of closeness and tension in the China-Australia relationship. In terms of policies towards China, he highlights the moderate approach of the Australian business community versus the more forward-leaning approach from the Australian government and the public. He notes that when faced with great economic pressure, “Australian businesses were able to diversify and find other markets quickly”. Dr. Edel also examines Australia’s participation in AUKUS and the Quad. He explains that Australia believes it needs to build up power projection capabilities, especially as China increases its presence in the Indo-Pacific. He adds that Australia’s response to Chinese coercion demonstrates to China that not all countries will fold to its pressure. Additionally, he explains that China’s closeness to Russia amid the invasion of Ukraine propels an overarching negative sentiment towards China and prompts the Australian government to consider potential responses if China attacks Taiwan. Lastly, Dr. Edel asserts that despite the current downward trend in China-Australia relations, the relationship will eventually stabilize. Charles Edel is the inaugural Australia Chair and a senior adviser at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. He previously taught at the University of Sydney, where he was also a senior fellow at the United States Studies Centre. Prior to that, Dr. Edel was a professor of strategy and policy at the U.S. Naval War College and served on the U.S. secretary of state’s Policy Planning Staff from 2015 to 2017. In that role, he advised the secretary of state on political and security issues in the Indo-Pacific region. 
Mar 15, 2022
China and the International Human Rights Regime: A Conversation with Dr. Rana Siu Inboden
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In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, Dr. Rana Siu Inboden joins us to discuss China’s role and influence in the international human rights regime. Dr. Inboden begins by explaining how China’s views on human rights have evolved starting with Mao, through the Tiananmen Square massacre, and now under Xi Jinping. She argues that, while the West emphasizes civil and political rights, China focuses on and favors economic rights, especially the right to development. In addition, she adds that China believes human rights should be contingent based on a country’s national conditions. Dr. Inboden also describes how, in the 1990s, China joined other countries to form the Like-Minded Group, a group of authoritarian countries that believe human rights are particular to each country and has traditionally acted together to weaken the international human rights regime. Lastly, she breaks down how China has succeeded in diminishing the work of the UN Human Rights Council and suppressing its own activists from participating in the international human rights regime.   Dr. Rana Siu Inboden is a Senior Fellow with the Robert Strauss Center for International Security and Law at the University of Texas-Austin. She serves as a consultant on human rights, democracy, and rule of law projects in Asia for a number of non-governmental organizations and conducts research related to international human rights, Chinese foreign policy, the effectiveness of international human rights and democracy projects and authoritarian collaboration in the United Nations. Her first book, China and the International Human Rights Regime (Cambridge, 2021) examines China’s role in the international human rights regime between 1982 and 2017.
Mar 02, 2022
How India Views China: A Conversation with Dr. Rajeswari Rajagopalan
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In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, Dr. Rajeswari (Raji) Pillai Rajagopalan joins us to unpack the changing relationship between India and China. Dr. Rajagopalan begins by describing India’s view of China, emphasizing India’s continued wish for a stable and normalized relationship with China, despite conflicts that arise. She explains that China’s growing economic power and influence in India’s neighboring countries have heightened India’s insecurity and tension between the two countries. Furthermore, Dr. Rajagopalan discusses the fundamental differences in Chinese and Indian strategic objectives, specifically their goals for power dynamics in Asia. Additionally, she identifies the 2020 Galwan Valley skirmish as a turning point in the India-China relationship, arguing that China’s actions have shown that India can no longer afford to carry out ambivalence in its foreign policy. Lastly, Dr. Rajagopalan cautions India from relying too heavily on Russia for defense capabilities and urges the country to diversify its military capabilities.  Dr. Rajeswari (Raji) Rajagopalan is the Director of the Centre for Security, Strategy and Technology (CSST) at the Observer Research Foundation, New Delhi. Dr. Rajagopalan was the Technical Advisor to the United Nations Group of Governmental Experts (GGE) on Prevention of Arms Race in Outer Space (PAROS) (July 2018-July 2019). She was also a Non-Resident Indo-Pacific Fellow at the Perth USAsia Centre from April-December 2020. As a senior Asia defence writer for The Diplomat, she writes a weekly column on Asian strategic issues.
Feb 15, 2022
The History Behind Growing China-Russia Relations: A Conversation with Dr. Joseph Torigian
2003
In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, Dr. Joseph Torigian joins us to discuss the historic and strategic dimensions of the China-Russia relationship. Dr. Torigian begins by describing the evolution of the China-Soviet relationship from its height as a formal alliance during the Cold War, to ideological disagreement, and then strategic competition. He explains how differences in perception led to mixed signals and Mao Zedong’s distrust of Soviet leadership and intentions. Dr. Torigian also discusses how China and Russia gradually repaired their relationship following the end of the Cold War. He argues that, through the anomalous relationship between President Xi and President Putin, both countries share a common set of perceptions and have aligned themselves strategically and flexibly. Lastly, Dr. Torigian explores how the relationship may evolve, the effects of remaining tensions, and the forces that are pushing both countries towards continued strategic alignment.    Dr. Joseph Torigian is an Assistant Professor at American University’s School of International Service. He studies the politics of authoritarian regimes with a specific focus on elite power struggles, civil-military relations, and grand strategy. Dr. Torigian’s philosophy as a scholar is to select topics based on the widest gap between the under-utilization of available documents and their theoretical and empirical importance, extract broader lessons, and use those lessons to help us to understand two nations of crucial geopolitical importance – Russia and China. His research agenda draws upon comparative politics, international relations, security studies, and history to ask big questions about the long-term political trajectories of these two states. In particular, Dr.Torigian is interested in how leaders in those countries create security against threats from within the elite, their own people, and other states.
Feb 03, 2022
Xi Jinping’s Vision for China: A Conversation with Dr. Elizabeth Economy
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In this episode of ChinaPower Podcast, Dr. Elizabeth Economy joins us to discuss President Xi Jinping’s vision for China. Dr. Economy emphasizes the transformative aspect of Xi’s vision and his goal of not only changing the international system at the margins but also transforming China’s role on the global stage. She discusses the importance Xi places on sovereignty and power, explaining the influence this has on China’s actions in Hong Kong, Taiwan, and the South China Sea. Furthermore, she argues that China’s behavior today and ambitions for the future are a direct result of Xi’s leadership. She points out that while his initiatives echo the ideas of past leaders, Xi has transformed them into policies. His willingness to embrace risk has largely allowed him to achieve his objectives, she says, but in some instances it has instead created international backlash and resistance. Lastly, Dr. Economy explores the integration of public and private sectors that needs to take place to manage competition with China.  Dr. Elizabeth Economy is Senior Advisor to the Secretary of Commerce (for China). She is on leave from Stanford University’s Hoover Institution, where she is a senior fellow. She was previously the C.V. Starr Senior Fellow and Director, Asia Studies at the Council on Foreign Relations for more than a decade. 
Jan 21, 2022
China’s Power: Up for Debate 2021: Debate 4
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This special episode of the ChinaPower Podcast is the sixth of six featuring the audio from the China Power Project’s sixth annual conference. The third debate took place on December 17, 2021 and featured two experts debating the following proposition: “Given China’s growing power, China will have a sphere of influence in the Indo-Pacific by 2027..”   China is increasingly utilizing its growing diplomatic, economic, and military power to shape developments along its periphery. Beijing has pushed in recent years to advance its economic agenda through the Belt and Road Initiative, and it has frequently sought to coerce countries through targeted economic and trade actions. China has also used its growing military power to assert its interests amid sovereignty and territorial disputes with a number of its neighbors. Yet Chinese officials have repeatedly emphasized that China is not seeking to establish a sphere of influence in the region, and instead is seeking to foster stability and economic growth in the Indo-Pacific. Among analysts of China, Beijing’s intentions and capabilities remain hotly debated. Some view Chinese activities as simply defending Beijing’s interests, while others argue that Beijing is actively making progress toward establishing a sphere of influence along its periphery.     Dr. Graham Allison, Douglas Dillon Professor of Government at Harvard University, argued that China will establish a sphere of influence in the Indo-Pacific by 2027. The Hon. David Stilwell, Former Assistant Secretary of State, East Asian and Pacific Affairs at the US Department of State, argued that China will not establish a sphere of influence in the Indo-Pacific by 2027.   This event was made possible by the generous support of the Carnegie Corporation of New York.
Jan 20, 2022
China’s Power: Up for Debate 2021 – Keynote Remarks by US Senator Steve Daines on Congress’ Outlook on China’s Growing Power
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This special episode of the ChinaPower Podcast is the fifth of six featuring the audio from the China Power Project’s sixth annual conference. This keynote took place on December 14, 2021 and featured US Senator Steve Daines’ discussion of Congress’ outlook on the challenges and opportunities posed by China’s growing power.   Senator Daines has served as a U.S. Senator for Montana since 2015. He is currently the Co-Chair of the Senate US-China Working Group, which works to strengthen U.S. dialogue with China through monthly briefings to share expertise from key business, academic, and political leaders. In addition, Senator Daines is a Commissioner on the Congressional-Executive Commission on China, which works to establish a framework of relations with China on a wide variety of issues such as human rights, civil society, and rule of law. He also serves on the Senate Committees on Finance, Banking Housing and Urban Affairs; Energy and Natural Resources; and Indian Affairs.   This event is made possible by the generous support of the Carnegie Corporation of New York.
Jan 19, 2022
China’s Power: Up for Debate 2021: Debate 3
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This special episode of the ChinaPower Podcast is the fourth of six featuring the audio from the China Power Project’s sixth annual conference. The third debate took place on December 14, 2021, and featured two experts debating the following proposition: “Within the next two years, China will establish itself as the most influential external power within Afghanistan.”   Following the United States’ withdrawal from Afghanistan, China has taken measures to support the new Taliban-controlled government, including keeping its embassy open, donating vaccines and aid, and engaging in high-level diplomatic meetings with Taliban officials. Some experts and military strategists believe these actions are signs that Beijing seeks to bring Afghanistan more deeply into its geopolitical orbit. Some envision a future in which Afghanistan stands as a major partner in China’s Belt-and-Road Initiative and the Taliban closely cooperates with Beijing on national security issues such as terrorism. However, others believe China will not be able to secure a significant foothold in Afghanistan due to regional instability, previous failed economic partnerships, and even Beijing’s own concerns about getting too involved in the country.   Senior Colonel Zhou Bo, Senior Fellow for the Center for International Strategy and Security (CISS) at Tsinghua University and China Forum expert, argued that within the next two years, China will establish itself as the most influential external power in Afghanistan. Dr. Seth Jones, Senior Vice President, Harold Brown Chair, and Director of the International Security Program at CSIS, argued that within the next two years, China will not establish itself as the most influential external power in Afghanistan.   This event was made possible by the generous support of the Carnegie Corporation of New York.
Jan 18, 2022
China’s Power: Up for Debate 2021: Debate 2
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This special episode of the ChinaPower Podcast is the third of six featuring the audio from the China Power Project’s sixth annual conference. The second debate took place on December 6, 2021 and featured two experts debating the following proposition: Beijing’s crackdown on technology firms will significantly stifle Chinese technological and scientific innovation.    Over the last year, Beijing initiated a sweeping crackdown and regulatory reform campaign targeting major technology firms. The Chinese government not only intervened to stop Chinese technology companies from listing abroad, but also issued steep fines and put in place new laws and regulations aimed at controlling the flow of data. While some analysts believe these crackdowns will deter technology investors and stifle innovation in China, others forecast that the crackdown may ultimately improve the innovative capabilities of Chinese companies and outweigh any short-term drawbacks.  Mr. Matt Sheehan, a Fellow for the Asia Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, argued that Beijing’s crackdown on technology firms will significantly stifle Chinese technological and scientific innovation. Ms. Rui Ma, a China Tech Analyst and the Main Writer and Co-Host for Tech Buzz China, argued that Beijing’s crackdown on technology firms will not significantly stifle Chinese technological and scientific innovation.   This event was made possible by generous support of the Carnegie Corporation of New York.
Jan 07, 2022
China's Power: Up for Debate 2021 - Keynote Remarks by Secretary Christine Wormuth on the US Army's View of the China Challenge
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This special episode of the ChinaPower Podcast is the second of six featuring the audio from the China Power Project’s sixth annual conference. This keynote took place on December 1, 2021 and featured Secretary Christine Wormuth’s discussion of the US Army’s view of the China challenge.   Secretary Wormuth was sworn into her current position in May 2021, becoming the first woman to serve as the US Army Secretary. Prior to this position, Secretary Wormuth served in numerous leadership roles at the Pentagon, including Under Secretary of Defense for Policy and Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Strategy, Plans, and Force Development. She was also Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Defense at the National Security Council during the Obama administration. Outside of government, Secretary Wormuth was formerly the director of the RAND Corporation’s International Security and Defense Policy Center, as well as a Senior Fellow at CSIS.   This event was made possible by generous support of the Carnegie Corporation of New York.
Jan 06, 2022
China’s Power: Up for Debate 2021: Debate 1
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This special episode of the ChinaPower podcast is the first of six featuring the audio from the China Power Project’s sixth annual conference. The first debate took place on November 19, 2021 and featured two experts debating the following proposition: The Covid-19 pandemic has accelerated the timeline by which China will surpass the United States to become the world’s leading economic power.   The Covid-19 pandemic ended the longest recorded economic expansion in United States history. China suffered its own historic slowdown during the initial Covid-19 outbreak in Wuhan, but the impacts were less severe. As a result, some have argued that the pandemic has sped up the timeline by which China will overtake the United States to become the world’s preeminent economic power. Others have argued that Beijing’s handling of the pandemic’s economic fallout has failed to put China on solid economic footing in the long-term.  Dr. Yao Yang, Professor at the China Center for Economic Research and the National School of Development at Peking University, argued that the Covid-19 pandemic has accelerated the timeline by which China will surpass the United States to become the world’s leading economic power. Mr. Gerard DiPippo, Senior Fellow in the CSIS Economics Program, argued that the Covid-19 pandemic has not accelerated the timeline by which China’s economic power will surpass that of the United States.  This event was made possible by generous support of the Carnegie Corporation of New York.
Jan 05, 2022
The View of China from the US Congress: A Conversation with Rep. Ami Bera
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In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, US Representative Ami Bera joins us to discuss Congress’ view of China’s growing power. Rep. Bera explains that China has been an issue of bipartisan agreement in the US House of Representatives, Senate, and the Biden administration. Specifically, he says there is bipartisan support for Taiwan, the One China Policy, and the Taiwan Relations Act, and notes that there are more varying opinions on issues such as cooperating with China on climate change. Rep. Bera also examines how Congress views Afghanistan, the South China Sea, and Taiwan, and justifies the need to increase Taiwan’s participation in the international community. He argues that the best way for the US to compete with China is to invest domestically, specifically on issues related to infrastructure and immigration. Lastly, Rep. Bera describes a potential rocky future in US-China relations and explains that healthy competition between the two nations could improve both countries.  
Jan 04, 2022
China’s Sharp Power: A Conversation with Kevin Sheives and Jessica Ludwig
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In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, Ms. Jessica Ludwig and Mr. Kevin Sheives join us to discuss China’s sharp power. Ms. Ludwig and Mr. Sheives first define sharp power and contrast it with other forms of influence, such as soft and hard power. They also explain notable differences between China’s sharp power strategy toward mature democracies and developing nations. They argue that a clear line between China’s domestic propaganda and global media projections does not exist, and that China has emerged as a trendsetter in sharp power that can take advantage of younger democracies’ inability to recognize propaganda and disinformation. Ms. Ludwig and Mr. Sheives also analyze the dynamics of China’s sharp power at work through foreign media partnerships and social media disinformation campaigns. They then contrast the sharp power strategies of authoritarian governments, such as Russia and China, explaining that China attempts to buttress its global image while Russia seeks to foment social upheaval abroad. Finally, Ms. Ludwig and Mr. Sheives emphasize the relative strengths of democratic nations in projecting global power and offer potential options for countering Chinese sharp power. Mr. Kevin Sheives is the Associate Director at the International Forum for Democratic Studies at NED. For nearly fifteen years, Mr. Sheives served as a manager and advisor at State Department offices, leading U.S. diplomatic and governmental responses to strategic competition with China, global disinformation, and the Asia-Pacific’s rise, along with assignments elsewhere in Washington at the Defense Department, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, and Congress. Ms. Jessica Ludwig is a Senior Program Officer at the International Forum for Democratic Studies, the research and analytical section of NED. Her research focuses on authoritarian influence in emerging democracies, with a particular interest in China and Russia’s engagement with Latin America. Ms. Ludwig is co-editor of the report, “Sharp Power: Rising Authoritarian Influence”. Her writing has been published in Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, Global Americans, and the Journal of Democracy.
Dec 07, 2021
Analyzing China’s Commitment to Climate Change: A Conversation with Joanna Lewis
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In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, Dr. Joanna Lewis joins us to discuss China’s commitment to addressing climate change. Dr. Lewis provides an overview of major domestic and international policies that China has implemented to combat climate change, including its dual-carbon goals, newly launched emissions trading scheme, and commitment to end new coal-fired financing abroad. She emphasizes that China is a crucial player not just in international climate negotiations, but also in the global effort to keep warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius by the end of the century. Dr. Lewis also assesses China’s role in the COP26 climate conference in Glasgow and discusses how China’s performance impacted international progress in combating climate change and China’s desire to be seen as a global leader on climate issues. Lastly, Dr. Lewis highlights the new joint working group between the U.S. and China as an important step in making meaningful progress on climate change during an era of strategic competition between the two countries. Dr. Joanna Lewis is the Provost’s Distinguished Associate Professor of Energy and Environment and Director of the Science, Technology and International Affairs Program (STIA) at Georgetown University's Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service. Dr. Lewis has two decades of experience working on international climate and clean energy policy with a focus on China. She is also a faculty affiliate in the China Energy Group at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.
Nov 23, 2021
Artificial Intelligence and the People’s Liberation Army: A Conversation with Ryan Fedasiuk
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In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, Mr. Ryan Fedasiuk joins us to discuss the People’s Liberation Army’s (PLA) efforts to adopt artificial intelligence (AI) technology. Mr. Fedasiuk explains the findings of his new report, which analyzes critical AI defense industry suppliers to the PLA and the implications for China’s ability to compete with the US on AI defense technology. Mr. Fedasiuk says AI technology will be central to the PLA’s goal of becoming a “world-class” military force and for preparing the PLA for “intelligentized” warfare. In addition, Mr. Fedasiuk argues that through AI technology, the PLA has the potential to compensate for areas where it has historically been vulnerable, such as undersea warfare. He also discusses PLA’s procurement of different AI technologies, including intelligent autonomous vehicles. Lastly, he explains that only a small portion of identified AI suppliers to the PLA are subject to US export controls or sanctions regimes, and he analyzes the corresponding policy implications for the United States. Ryan Fedasiuk is a research analyst at Georgetown’s Center for Security and Emerging Technology (CSET). His work explores military applications of artificial intelligence, as well as China’s efforts to acquire foreign technology. Prior to joining CSET, Mr. Fedasiuk worked at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, the Arms Control Association, the Missile Defense Advocacy Alliance, and the Council on Foreign Relations, where he primarily covered aerospace and nuclear issues. His writing has appeared in Foreign Policy, Defense One, the Jamestown Foundation’s China Brief, and CFR’s Net Politics.
Nov 09, 2021
US-China Academic Exchanges: A Conversation with William Kirby
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In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, Professor William Kirby joins us to examine the changing dynamics in the US-China educational relationship. Professor Kirby explains that education has been one of the central parts of US-China relations since the 1870s and has internationalized education in the US. Professor Kirby describes the origins of China’s top universities, noting that many were created in partnership with the United States. He also argues that academic exchanges have benefitted American universities by attracting international talent. In addition, Professor Kirby says the United States needs to promote the learning of the Chinese language and study abroad in China to balance the number of Chinese students studying in America. Lastly, Professor Kirby recommends that the Biden administration should restart the Fulbright Program and re-open previously closed Chinese consulates, and highlights the importance of academic exchanges in maintaining connections with China.   Professor William Kirby is Spangler Family Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School and T. M. Chang Professor of China Studies at Harvard University. He is a University Distinguished Service Professor. Professor Kirby serves as Chairman of the Harvard China Fund, the University's academic venture fund for China, and Faculty Chair of the Harvard Center Shanghai, Harvard's first University-wide center located outside the United States. 
Oct 26, 2021
Deciphering the PLA’s New Joint Doctrine: A Conversation with Dr. David Finkelstein
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In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, Dr. David Finkelstein joins us to discuss the PLA’s new joint doctrine and how it will impact China’s military modernization. Dr. Finkelstein describes his research process behind his new report and predicts the major new components of the doctrine. He argues that the concept of an integrated joint force represents a major doctrinal development within the PLA and is a response to a paradigm shift in how warfighting is conducted in an information-centric era. In addition, Dr. Finkelstein emphasizes how the joint doctrine will enhance the PLA’s abilities to engage in all types of military operations, including high-end conventional operations. Lastly, Dr. Finkelstein analyzes the possible internal and external challenges the PLA will face when implementing the new doctrine, and how this timeline aligns with China’s military modernization goals for 2027, 2035, and 2049.   Dr. Finkelstein is a vice president of the Center for Naval Analyses (CNA) and director of CNA’s China & Indo-Pacific Security Affairs Division. He is a long-time student of Chinese military and security issues, serving as a member of the National Committee on US-China Relations (NCUSCR) and the International Institute for Strategic Studies (IISS). A retired US Army Officer, Dr. Finkelstein has spent his career in several tactical assignments, to include in Panmunjom, Korea, and in various China and Asia-related positions at the Pentagon, and has taught Chinese security issues at West Point. He is the author of “The PLA’s New Joint Doctrine: The Capstone of the New Era Operations Regulations System.”
Oct 12, 2021
The Impact of Covid-19 on China’s Economy: A Conversation with Daniel H. Rosen
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In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, we are joined by Mr. Daniel H. Rosen to examine the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on China’s economic power. Mr. Rosen describes the variables that contribute to China’s economic power and recounts how China’s economy was initially impacted by the Covid-19 pandemic. He also discusses the primary measures the Chinese government took to rejuvenate its economy and evaluates which measures were the most significant. In addition, he evaluates the prospects of Chinese economic growth (both quarterly and yearly) and analyzes the various scenarios that may arise. Lastly, Mr. Rosen explains the potential impact of the Chinese Communist Party’s “Common Prosperity” political campaign on China’s economic growth.     Mr. Daniel H. Rosen is a founding partner of Rhodium Group and leads the firm’s work on China, India and Asia. Mr. Rosen has twenty-six years of professional experience analyzing China’s economy, commercial sector and external interactions. He is widely recognized for his contributions on the US-China economic relationship. A native of New York City, Mr. Rosen graduated with distinction from the graduate School of Foreign Service of Georgetown University (MSFS) and with honors in Asian Studies and Economics from the University of Texas, Austin (BA). 
Sep 28, 2021
China’s Tech Crackdown: A Conversation with Adam Segal
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In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, Dr. Adam Segal joins us to examine Beijing’s ongoing crackdown on China’s technology sector. Dr. Segal argues that company blacklists from the Trump administration served as a driver for Chinese technological decoupling and caused an increasing domestic focus within China on data collection and security. He explains how China’s new phase of technology crackdowns closely aligns with the Chinese Communist Party’s (CCP’s) goals on antitrust regulation, social inequality, innovation, cybersecurity, and political stability, and states that new regulations are a means of exerting party control. Dr. Segal then discusses the new competitive landscape between Chinese state regulators and how such a landscape may impact domestic innovation. Lastly, Dr. Segal explores what these new regulations mean for US-China technology exchange and how these new dynamics will shape the future of the Chinese technology sector.
Sep 14, 2021
The Impact of Covid-19 on China’s Military: A Conversation with M. Taylor Fravel
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In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, Dr. M. Taylor Fravel joins us to discuss whether China has become more militarily assertive toward its neighbors during the pandemic. Dr. Fravel argues that, although some expected the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) to halt or reduce its activity during the Covid-19 pandemic, the level of Chinese assertiveness seen prior to the pandemic has continued during the pandemic. He adds that the PLA’s ability to dispatch medical teams within China during the pandemic while maintaining its pace of operations in regional disputes shows that China is reaping the rewards of two decades of PLA modernization. Lastly, Dr. Fravel describes the benefits of increasing US collaboration with countries on the front lines of Chinese disputes. Dr. Fravel is the Arthur and Ruth Sloan Professor of Political Science and Director of the Security Studies Program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Fravel studies international relations, with a focus on international security, China, and East Asia. His books include, Strong Borders, Secure Nation: Cooperation and Conflict in China’s Territorial Disputes, (Princeton University Press, 2008) and Active Defense: China's Military Strategy Since 1949 (Princeton University Press, 2019). His other publications have appeared in International Security, Foreign Affairs, Security Studies, International Studies Review, The China Quarterly, The Washington Quarterly, Journal of Strategic Studies, Armed Forces & Society, Current History, Asian Survey, Asian Security, China Leadership Monitor, and Contemporary Southeast Asia.
Aug 31, 2021
China’s Involvement in Afghanistan: A Conversation with Laurel Miller
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On this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, Laurel Miller joins us to discuss the deteriorating situation in Afghanistan and to assess China’s next steps in the region. Ms. Miller argues that China will continue to be cautiously involved with Afghanistan to fulfill its long-term vision of establishing peace and stability in the nearby region. She also estimates how China may use its influence in Pakistan to boost its political relations with the Taliban. Although Afghanistan was a bright spot for US-China cooperation in peace-process issues, Ms. Miller says that previous collaboration was exaggerated and that the brightness has been dimmed in recent years. Lastly, she weighs the likelihood of US-China cooperation on Afghanistan going forward. Laurel Miller is the Director of International Crisis Group’s Asia Program, where she leads the organization’s research, analysis, and policy advocacy in and about Asia’s regional matters. Prior to joining the International Crisis Group, Ms. Miller was a senior foreign policy expert at the RAND Corporation. From 2013 to 2017, she served as the deputy and then acting Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan at the US Department of State.
Aug 17, 2021
China’s Global Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Conversation with Dr. Yanzhong Huang
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In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, Dr. Yanzhong Huang joins us to discuss China’s response to the Covid-19 pandemic and its impact on China’s power. Dr. Huang assesses how China’s handling of the pandemic is viewed within China and around the world. He also discusses China’s Health Silk Road and its role in advancing China’s interests amid the Covid-19 pandemic. In addition, Dr. Huang analyzes the differences between the countries that have received Chinese vaccines and those that have received Chinese masks and PPE. Lastly, Dr. Huang evaluates China’s influence within international health organizations, such as the World Health Organization (WHO), and provides recommendations for how the United States can work with China to combat the pandemic. Yanzhong Huang is a senior fellow for global health at the Council on Foreign Relations, where he directs the Global Health Governance roundtable series. He is also a professor and director of global health studies at Seton Hall University's School of Diplomacy and International Relations, where he developed the first academic concentration among U.S. professional international affairs schools that explicitly addresses the security and foreign policy aspects of health issues. He is the founding editor of Global Health Governance: The Scholarly Journal for the New Health Security Paradigm. 
Aug 03, 2021
Unpacking the China-Hong Kong Relationship: A Conversation with Kurt Tong
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In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, Ambassador Kurt Tong joins new host Bonny Lin to discuss China’s approach toward Hong Kong. Ambassador Tong describes how the Hong Kong citizenry has responded to China’s recent policies in the city. He argues that Beijing initially prioritized tolerance toward Hong Kong when implementing its “One Country, Two Systems” policy; however, such tolerance has recently declined. Ambassador Tong also explains how China’s foreign relations impact its policies toward Hong Kong. In addition, Ambassador Tong provides predictions for the future of the China-Hong Kong relationship and compares Beijing’s past and current goals in the city. Lastly, he analyzes the Biden administration’s responses to the current situation in Hong Kong and provides recommendations for the administration’s Hong Kong-related policies in the future. Ambassador Kurt Tong is a Partner and member of the Executive Committee at The Asia Group, where he leads the firm’s work in Japan and Hong Kong, and on East Asia regional policy matters. Prior to joining The Asia Group, Ambassador Tong served as Consul General and Chief of Mission in Hong Kong and Macau, leading U.S. political and economic engagement with that important free trade hub. Prior to that role, he served as the Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Economic and Business Affairs at the State Department from 2014 to 2016, guiding the Department’s institutional strengthening efforts as its most senior career diplomat handling economic affairs.
Jul 20, 2021
The Best of ChinaPower: Xi Jinping’s Military-Civil Fusion Project: A Conversation with Greg Levesque
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This special "best of ChinaPower" episode explores China’s efforts to integrate its military and civilian sectors to support its military development and broader national security agenda. Our guest, Mr. Greg Levesque, discusses how Military-Civil Fusion (MCF) fits into China’s grand strategy and evaluates how effectively it has implemented the program to date. Levesque also weighs the risks and rewards of MCF in Beijing’s strategic calculus, and offers a path for how the US and its allies can respond to the growing nexus between military and civil development in China. Greg Levesque is co-founder and CEO of Strider, a technology company enabling organizations to combat intellectual property theft and supply chain vulnerabilities outside of the cyber domain. Greg has advised and supported Fortune 500 companies as well as US and European government agencies on matters of economic statecraft, particularly around China. This episode was first released on May 5, 2020. Listeners can find Bonnie Glaser's new work with her China Global podcast.
Jul 06, 2021
The Best of ChinaPower: Highlights of the 2020 DoD Report on Chinese Military Power: A Conversation with Chad Sbragia
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This special "best of ChinaPower" episode examines the trajectory of Chinese military developments and national strategy, as well as key findings of the 2020 Department of Defense (DoD) annual report to Congress entitled Military and Security Developments Involving the People’s Republic of China. Our guest, Mr. Chad Sbragia, then-Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for China, discusses a wide range of topics, including China’s capacity to launch an amphibious assault on Taiwan, China’s nuclear strategy, and the Belt and Road Initiative. Mr. Sbragia also highlights the growing alignment between the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) and China’s broader national strategy, and he explores the implication of PLA modernization for stability and crisis prevention in the coming years.  Mr. Chad Sbragia is the Former Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for China in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Indo-Pacific Security Affairs within the Office of the Secretary of Defense from 2019-2021. In this capacity, he was responsible for advising senior leadership within the Department of Defense on all policy matters pertaining to the development and implementation of defense strategies, plans, policies, and bilateral security relations for China.  This episode was first released on September 22, 2020. Listeners can find Bonnie Glaser's new work with her China Global podcast. 
Jun 22, 2021
The Best of ChinaPower: Unveiling China’s Digital Currency Goals: A Conversation with Kevin Desouza
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This special "best of ChinaPower" episode unpacks China’s push to develop a Central Bank Digital Currency (CBDC). Our guest, Dr. Kevin Desouza, explains Beijing's motives and compares China’s plans for creating its own national digital currency with those of other countries. Dr. Desouza explores how a national digital currency can be used to bolster China’s finance and technology sectors, as well as its economy as a whole. He also offers his views on what China’s timeline might be for rolling out its own CBDC, particularly in light of the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. Dr. Kevin Desouza is a professor of Business, Technology, and Strategy in the School of Management at the Queensland University of Technology Business School. Dr. Desouza is also a Nonresident Senior Fellow in the Governance Studies Program at the Brookings Institution, and a Distinguished Research Fellow at the China Institute for Urban Governance at Shanghai Jiao Tong University. He has held tenured faculty appointments at the University of Washington, Virginia Tech, and Arizona State University. This episode was first released on May 19, 2020. Listeners can find Bonnie Glaser's new work with her China Global podcast. 
Jun 08, 2021
The Best of ChinaPower: The Implications of China’s Conventional Missile Arsenal: A Conversation with Ankit Panda
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In this special "best of ChinaPower" episode, Mr. Ankit Panda discusses China's growing conventional missile arsenal and associated implications for military strategy and security in the Indo-Pacific region. He touches on the role of China’s ground-based missiles in the projection of military strength, noting that an increased arsenal can hamper US forces in the region and give the People’s Liberation Army increased maneuverability. Mr. Panda specifically highlights the importance of anti-ship ballistic missiles to China’s anti-access/area denial (A2/AD) strategy in areas like the South and East China Seas. He also discusses the consequences of the US withdrawal from the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty and the political obstacles to expanding the US’ arsenal along China’s periphery. In addition, he explains the strategic implications of China's dual-capable missile force, specifically the DF-26 missile’s ability to rapidly convert between nuclear and conventional warheads. Finally, Mr. Panda analyzes the role of hypersonic glide vehicles, noting that, while the underlying technology is not new, advances in materials science have allowed more countries to develop HGV systems. Ankit Panda is the Stanton Senior Fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. An expert on the Asia-Pacific region, his research interests range from nuclear strategy, arms control, missile defense, nonproliferation, emerging technologies, and US extended deterrence. He is the author of Kim Jong Un and the Bomb: Survival and Deterrence in North Korea. This episode was first released on December 8, 2020. Listeners can find Bonnie Glaser's new work with her China Global podcast. 
May 25, 2021
Decoding China's Diplomacy Discourse: A Conversation with Malin Oud
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In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, Malin Oud joins us to discuss the importance of language in understanding China’s diplomatic and international cooperation strategies. Ms. Oud breaks down China’s efforts to both redefine international values and standards, such as “democracy,” “rule of law” and “human rights," and promote its own definitions when interacting with other nations via diplomacy and international cooperation. She argues that China’s efforts to both weaken current international norms and promote its own norms on the global stage indicates that China has growing confidence in itself and its political system. This increased confidence, Ms. Oud explains, has increased China’s desire to build its discursive power, and become a “rule maker” rather than a “rule taker.” Lastly, Ms. Oud states that when Western nations engage with China, they need to not only understand what China means when it uses the language of international values and standards, but also strengthen their own, domestic capabilities so as to meaningfully defend current standards and international norms.  Malin Oud is the Director of the Stockholm Office of the Raoul Wallenberg Institute of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law. She was the founder and Managing Director of Tracktwo, Sweden, and was previously the Programme Manager for the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency. Her most recent report, The Decoding China Dictionary, co-edited with Katja Drinhausen, was published earlier this year by the Raoul Wallenberg Institute of Human Rights and International Law.
Apr 16, 2021
The Impact of Covid-19 on China’s Belt and Road Initiative: A Conversation with Agatha Kratz
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In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, Dr. Agatha Kratz joins us to discuss how the Covid-19 pandemic has affected China’s Belt and Road Initiative (BRI). Dr. Kratz provides background on the history and past successes of the BRI from 2013-2020. She argues that, prior to the pandemic, China’s BRI was at a low point. There were fewer contracts and increased scrutiny on past unsustainable projects and loans. Dr. Kratz contends that those pre-existing trends were further accentuated by the Covid-19 travel restrictions, deteriorated financial conditions, and disruptions in trade. Nonetheless, she explains, new BRI projects have arisen as a result of the pandemic, such as the “Health Silk Road”.    Lastly, Dr. Kratz identifies the core problem with the BRI to be the long-lasting debt – which can lead to debt crises – in recipient countries. China’s common practice of debt renegotiations, rather than debt forgiveness, creates a further disincentive. Together, they slow the appetite for further BRI projects. Alternatively, she explains, recipient countries have begun to seek more sustainable and profitable projects.   Dr. Agatha Kratz is an Associate Director at Rhodium Group, where she coordinates European activities and leads research on European Union-China relations and China’s commercial diplomacy. She also contributes to Rhodium’s work on China’s global investment, industrial policy, and technology aspirations. Dr. Kratz is a non-resident Adjunct Fellow of the Reconnecting Asia Project at the Center for Strategic and International Studies under the Simon Chair in Political Economy.
Mar 30, 2021
A New Era in China’s International Development Cooperation: A Conversation with Stella Hong Zhang
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In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, Stella Hong Zhang joins us to discuss China’s new model of international development cooperation. Ms. Zhang analyzes China’s January 2021 white paper titled “China’s International Development Cooperation in the New Era”, the shift in China’s international development policy, and the implications that this shift has for both China and other nations around the world. She argues that the policy changes reflect China’s goal to be seen as a leader in global governance and its aim to shape discourse on China's domestic governance model and development achievements. Similarly, Ms. Zhang contends that this shift in China’s international development policy must be understood as part of Xi Jinping’s more assertive foreign policy and emphasis on expanding China’s relationships with other developing nations. Lastly, Ms. Zhang explains that China’s decision to frame its international development cooperation policy in moral language plays strongly to a domestic audience that is skeptical of providing resources to other countries while China itself is still developing.  Stella Hong Zhang is a PhD candidate at the Schar School of Policy and Government at George Mason University. She previously served as an international journalist for China’s Caixin media. Her research interests include China’s role in international development, the internationalization of China’s development state, and the overseas expansion of China’s state-owned enterprises.
Mar 16, 2021
China and Myanmar after the 2021 Myanmar Coup: A Conversation with Derek Mitchell
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In this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, Ambassador Derek Mitchell joins us to discuss the implications of the 2021 Myanmar coup for China-Myanmar relations. Ambassador Mitchell analyzes the current state of China-Myanmar relations, describes its historical development, and outlines China’s interests within the region after the coup. Ambassador Mitchell also examines which areas the United States and China can cooperate in Myanmar and which areas they likely cannot. He argues that while China faces widespread public antagonism amongst the population in Myanmar, it still commands significant influence due to the investments that it has made in Myanmar as part of the Belt and Road Initiative, as well as its continued association with communist groups in northeastern Myanmar. Nonetheless, Ambassador Mitchell contends that Myanmar is not without leverage when it comes to interacting with China, as it can make use of its relations with Japan, Europe, the United States, and even Russia to prevent China from developing a monopolizing influence. Ambassador Derek Mitchell is currently the president of the National Democratic Institute. He has previously served as the United States Ambassador to Myanmar, the first U.S. Special Representative and Policy Coordinator for Burma, and the Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Asian and Pacific Security Affairs. Ambassador Mitchell was previously a senior fellow, director for Asia, and director of the Southeast Asia Initiative at the Center for Strategic and International Studies.
Mar 02, 2021
Small and Medium-Sized Powers' Response to China’s Rise: A Conversation with Luke Patey
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In this episode, Dr. Luke Patey joins us to discuss the implications of China’s rise in a dynamic world and how the rest of the world should respond. Dr. Patey challenges the idea that an ascendant China will lead to a world in which small developing countries become a sphere of influence for China. Alternatively, he contends smaller nations are not content to play a subservient role and there is room for pushback when China overreaches. He stresses that middle powers such as Japan and India can play a significant role in shaping global affairs and the global economy. In addition, Dr. Patey contends that in advanced democracies, China’s economic power and its willingness to use that power are often exaggerated. Lastly, Dr. Patey argues national leaders should escape the hawks-and-doves dichotomy, explaining that the importance of China demands more nuance because various countries’ business, political, and security relations with China are interconnected.   Dr. Luke Patey is a senior researcher at the Danish Institute for International Studies and a lead senior research fellow of the Africa oil and gas program at the Oxford Institute for Energy Studies. He is the author of How China Loses: The Pushback Against Chinese Global Ambitions. His current research focuses on China's foreign and security policy and Chinese foreign investment and trade, with a focus on China’s relations in Europe, Africa, and East Asia.
Feb 16, 2021
China’s Wolf Warrior Diplomacy: A Conversation with Peter Martin
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On this episode of the ChinaPower Podcast, Mr. Peter Martin joins us to discuss his recent book, "China's Civilian Army: The Making of Wolf Warrior Diplomacy." Chinese diplomacy in the past several years has become more assertive and its diplomats have used sharper language --hence the name wolf warrior diplomacy which comes from a Chinese film. Peter Martin's research traces the roots of wolf warrior diplomacy to the founding of the People's Republic of China in 1949 and its first diplomat, Zhou Enlai. Martin discusses China's diplomacy today and its impact. He explains that although there are some critics in China of wolf warrior diplomacy, it is popular among the general public amid rising nationalist sentiment in the country. In addition, Mr. Martin discusses how both public opinion and the directives of Xi Jingping have combined to force China’s diplomatic corps to be assertive players in international relations. Lastly, Mr. Martin describes the motivations behind wolf-warrior diplomacy and how diplomats are being rewarded for their aggressive rhetoric and posture.   Mr. Peter Martin is a political reporter for Bloomberg News. Mr. Martin has written extensively about China and U.S.-China relations. His latest book is, “China’s Civilian Army: The Making of Wolf Warrior Diplomacy,” which will be published in April 2021.
Feb 02, 2021
Controlling Advanced Technology Exports: A Conversation with Roslyn Layton and James Lewis
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In this episode, Dr. Roslyn Layton and Dr. James Lewis discuss how to control the proliferation of technologies for military use with a special focus on China. Our guests explain the history of US export policy regarding advanced technology, noting the delicate balance between opportunities for private enterprise and the needs of national security. They describe the Wassenar Agreement and its impact on current US advanced technology exports to China. Dr. Layton argues in favor of US designation of companies as military-end-users in China as one method to prevent US technology from being transferred to China’s military. Dr. Lewis analyzes China’s progress in its semiconductor industry, noting that China is still dependent on Western technology. Our guests also interpret China’s actions in retaliation to international technology export restrictions. Lastly, our guests evaluate how the Trump administration has acted in its approach to China and recommend actions the incoming Biden administration should take.    Dr. Roslyn Layton is a visiting researcher at Aalborg University Center for Communication, Media, and Information Technologies and Senior Vice President at Strand Consult. Dr. Layton focuses on evidence-based policy for the information, communications, and digital technology industries. Dr. James Lewis is a senior vice president and director of the Strategic Technologies Program at CSIS. He has authored numerous publications on the relationship between technology, innovation, and national power.
Jan 19, 2021
China’s Power: Up for Debate 2020: Debate 5
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This special episode of the ChinaPower podcast is the last of five featuring the audio from the China Power Project's fifth annual conference, which comprises five live online debates.    Prior to the debate, Representative Rick Larsen delivered keynote remarks on the challenges and opportunities posed by China’s growing power and the view from Congress, followed by a Q&A conversation hosted by Bonnie Glaser, CSIS senior adviser for Asia and director of the China Power Project.   Representative Rick Larsen represents the Second Congressional District of Washington State. Representative Larsen is a co-chair of the bipartisan US-China Working Group, which educates Members of Congress about bilateral issues through meetings and briefings with academic, business, and political leaders from the US and China. Representative Larsen has visited China eleven times.   Following the keynote remarks, the China Power Project hosted a debate on the proposition: "Selective US-China economic decoupling will set back China’s emergence as a global high-tech leader."    The Trump administration has imposed restrictions on exports to leading Chinese telecom and semiconductor companies. In addition, the US has taken measures to encourage American companies to diversify their production and supply chains in order to reduce reliance on China. Given the interconnectedness of the global economy, these efforts could pose a challenge to the competitiveness of Chinese tech firms and manufacturers.   Matthew Turpin, Visiting Fellow at the Hoover Institution, argued that US-China decoupling will set back China’s emergence as a global high-tech leader. Rebecca Fannin, Founder of Silicon Dragon Ventures, argued that US-China economic decoupling will not set back China’s emergence as a global high-tech leader.   This event is made possible by the generous support of the Carnegie Corporation of New York.
Jan 15, 2021
China’s Power: Up for Debate 2020: Debate 4
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This special episode of the ChinaPower podcast is the fourth of five featuring the audio from the China Power Project's fifth annual conference, which comprises five live online debates. The fourth debate took place on December 9, 2020 and featured two experts debating the following proposition: Within the next five years, China will use significant military force against a country on its periphery. Under President Xi Jinping, China’s military capabilities have continued to grow. China has stepped up military pressure on Taiwan and conducted frequent large-scale military exercises in the South China Sea. In addition, border tensions with India reached the highest level in decades. A skirmish in June 2020 led to fatalities on both sides. China’s last significant uses of force were in the 1980s along the land border with Vietnam, and in the 1988 clash over Johnson South in the South China Sea. Oriana Skylar Mastro, Center Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies at Stanford University, and Foreign and Defense Policy Fellow at American Enterprise Institute (AEI), argued that China will use military force against a country on its periphery within the next five years. M. Taylor Fravel, Arthur and Ruth Sloan Professor of Political Science, and Director of the Security Studies Program at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), argued that China will not use military force on a country on its periphery within the next five years. This event is made possible by generous support of the Carnegie Corporation of New York.
Jan 14, 2021
China’s Power: Up for Debate 2020: Debate 3
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This special episode of the ChinaPower podcast is the third of five featuring the audio from the China Power Project's fifth annual conference, which comprises five live online debates. The third debate took place on December 3, 2020 and featured two experts debating the following proposition: China will exploit the Covid-19 pandemic to shift the geopolitical balance of power in its favor.   As the Covid-19 pandemic spread across the globe, China increased pressure on India, Taiwan, and several Southeast Asian neighbors that have territorial claims in the South China Sea. Chinese officials also lashed out at some foreign governments, which many characterized as “wolf warrior diplomacy.” In addition, China has embarked on a public health-diplomacy campaign, promising personal protective equipment and preferential vaccine access to developing nations and partners of China’s Belt and Road Initiative.   Yan Xuetong, Dean of the Institute of Modern International Relations at Tsinghua University, argued that China will exploit the COVID-19 pandemic to shift the geopolitical balance of power in its favor. Aaron Friedberg, Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University, argued that China will not exploit the COVID-19 pandemic to shift the geopolitical balance of power in its favor.   This event is made possible by generous support of the Carnegie Corporation of New York.
Jan 13, 2021
China’s Power: Up for Debate 2020: Debate 2
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This special episode of the ChinaPower podcast is the second of five featuring the audio from the China Power Project's fifth annual conference, which comprises five live online debates. The second debate took place on November 24, 2020 and featured two experts debating the following proposition: “One country, two systems” in Hong Kong is dead.   When Hong Kong was handed over to China in 1997​, its people were promised that they would continue to enjoy a high degree of autonomy under the “one country, two systems” formula for at least 50 years. However, the Chinese government passed a National Security Law for Hong Kong in June 2020, which granted Beijing unprecedented powers over the city. The passing of this law has led some to question whether “one country, two systems” remains intact.   Daniel Russel, Vice President for International Security and Diplomacy at the Asia Society Policy Institute (ASPI) and former Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs, argued that “one country, two systems” in Hong Kong is dead. Regina Ip, legislator and member of Hong Kong's Executive Council, argued that “one country, two systems” in Hong Kong is still alive.   This event was made possible by generous support of the Carnegie Corporation of New York.
Jan 12, 2021
China’s Power: Up for Debate: Debate 1
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This special episode of the ChinaPower podcast is the first of five featuring the audio from the China Power Project’s fifth annual conference, which comprised five live online debates. The first debate took place on November 19 and featured two experts debating the following proposition: The US-China relationship can best be described as a “new Cold War.” Over the last several years, relations between the United States and China have grown increasingly tense. Both the United States and China have expelled journalists and closed consulates amid heightened trade tensions and rancor about responsibility for Covid-19. Some experts believe Beijing is seeking to export its development model and that US-China competition has spread to the ideological realm. Other experts disagree, arguing that the Chinese Communist Party is more focused on defending against threats to its rule at home. Hal Brands, Henry A. Kissinger Distinguished Professor of Global Affairs at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), argued that the US-China relationship can best be described as a “new Cold War.” Melvyn Leffler, Edward Stettinius Professor of History Emeritus at the University of Virginia, argued that the US-China relationship cannot be described as a “new Cold War.” This event was made possible by generous support of the Carnegie Corporation of New York.
Jan 11, 2021
China’s Coercive Trade Measures toward Australia: A Conversation with Jeffrey Wilson
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In this episode, Dr. Jeffrey Wilson joins us to discuss China's expanding trade restrictions against Australia. Dr. Wilson analyzes China’s trade strategy of targeted geo-economic sanctions and argues that China’s goal is to maximize economic pain without hurting its own welfare. In addition, Dr. Wilson explains how China’s targeted sanctions on Australia’s top 20 exports to China could serve as a precedent for other nations in the Indo-Pacific region. When considering whether China’s trade coercion against Australia is a violation of international law, Dr. Wilson contends that many of China’s actions fall into the grey zone. He discusses Canberra's decision to file a case against China in the World Trade Organization and contends that Australia will be better positioned to fight the case if it has support from the international community. Finally, Dr. Wilson asserts that the future of China-Australia trade tensions may depend on how U.S.-China relations develop, since China views Australia as an ideal proxy for sending a message to the United States.   Dr. Jeffrey Wilson is the Research Director at the Perth USAsia Centre, where he provides leadership and strategic direction in developing the Centre’s research program across its publications, policy and dialogue activities. Dr. Wilson specializes in the regional economic integration of the Indo-Pacific, and has particular expertise in the politics of trade agreements, regional economic institutions, and Australia’s economic ties with Asia. 
Dec 22, 2020
The Implications of China’s Conventional Missile Arsenal: A Conversation with Ankit Panda
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In this episode, Mr. Ankit Panda joins us to discuss China's growing conventional missile arsenal and associated implications for military strategy and security in the Indo-Pacific region. He highlights the role of China’s ground-based missiles in the projection of military strength, noting that an increased arsenal can hamper U.S. forces in the region and give the People’s Liberation Army increased maneuverability. China’s missile arsenal is an important factor in its anti-access/area denial (A2/AD) strategy, Mr. Panda argues, examining the role and efficacy of anti-ship ballistic missiles in projecting force areas surrounding the South and East China Seas. Mr. Panda talks about the consequences of the U.S. withdrawal from the INF treaty and the political obstacles to an increased U.S. arsenal around China’s periphery. Mr. Panda talks about the consequences of the U.S. withdrawal from the INF treaty and the political obstacles to an increased U.S. arsenal around China’s periphery. In addition, he explains the strategic implications of China's dual-capable missle force, and specifically the DF-26 missile’s ability to rapidly convert between nuclear and conventional warheads. Finally, Mr. Panda analyzes the hypersonic glide vehicle, noting that, while the underlying technology is not new, advances in materials science have allowed more countries to develop HGV systems.    Ankit Panda is the Stanton Senior Fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. An expert on the Asia-Pacific region, his research interests range from nuclear strategy, arms control, missile defense, nonproliferation, emerging technologies, and U.S. extended deterrence. He is the author of Kim Jong Un and the Bomb: Survival and Deterrence in North Korea.
Dec 08, 2020
How Should the World Respond to the Humanitarian Crisis in Xinjiang?: A Conversation with Darren Byler
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In this episode, Dr. Darren Byler joins us to discuss China’s policies in Xinjiang and policy options for the international community. Dr. Byler analyzes the portrayal of Uyghur and Kazakh ethnic minorities in Xinjiang in comparison to other minorities in China and in relation to the Han majority. He describes how Chinese policymakers have shifted the discourse on policies towards Uyghur Muslims from concerns of “separatism” to concerns of “terrorism,” and evaluates the appropriateness of these terms to the Uyghur and Kazakh populations in Xinjiang. In addition, Dr. Byler describes the displacement of Uyghurs and Kazakhs in the Xinjiang region following China’s economic development policies in the 1990s. Finally, Dr. Byler discusses the camps in Xinjiang and the responses from the international community towards the camps, and offers suggestions for international policymakers moving forward.    Dr. Byler is a postdoctoral fellow at the Center for Asian Studies at the University of Colorado Boulder, where he researches the dispossession of ethno-racial Muslim minorities through forms of surveillance and digital capitalism in China and the global South. Dr. Byler’s first book project, Terror Capitalism: Uyghur Dispossession and Masculine Violence in a Chinese City, examines emerging forms of media, infrastructure, economics and politics in the Uyghur homeland in Chinese Central Asia. Prior to joining the University of Colorado, Dr. Byler was a lecturer in Anthropology at the University of Washington in Seattle.
Nov 17, 2020
The Genesis of Chinese Thinking on Sovereignty: A Conversation with Bill Hayton
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In this episode, Mr. Bill Hayton joins us to discuss the genesis of China's thinking about sovereignty and how this shapes Chinese foreign policy today. He discusses the influence of Western notions of sovereignty on China during the Qing Dynasty and argues that the dynastic tributary system is still reflected to some extent in China’s current international relations. He further argues that the Qing tribute system was important because of the domestic legitimacy it conferred on the Qing Dynasty. In addition, Mr. Hayton frames the volatile South China Sea situation in terms of sovereignty, describing control of the islands as a deeply emotional issue that is emblematic of national pride for China. He also explains how views of sovereignty could affect China’s approach to arms control, resulting in reluctance to accept third-party inspection of compliance with international treaties. Lastly, Mr. Hayton sheds light on China’s vision of an international stage characterized by relationships between individual and sovereign states rather than coalitions and blocs.     Bill Hayton is an associate fellow with the Asia-Pacific Programme at Chatham House and a journalist with BBC World News. Throughout his career, Bill has focused on a variety of regions, including the Middle East, Central and Eastern Europe, and Asia. He has written three books on Asia: Vietnam: Rising Dragon, South China Sea: The Struggle for Power in Asia, and his latest book, The Invention of China, will be released in early November. 
Nov 03, 2020
Europe and China as Partners or Rivals?: A Conversation with Mikko Huotari
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In this episode, Dr. Mikko Huotari joins us to discuss the evolving relationship between Europe and China. He highlights the multifaceted relationship between China and the European Union, noting that the EU has labeled China as both a strategic partner and a systemic rival. Dr. Huotari argues that while the coronavirus has been a driver of recent tensions in the Europe-China relationship, there has been a longer-term negative trend of worsening ties and a lack of progress on policy agendas between the EU and China. In particular, Dr. Huotari examines China’s human rights record and discusses its impact on relations with European countries. He also evaluates the evolution of European sentiment towards China and security issues regarding China, and assesses the prospect for greater transatlantic cooperation between the United States and Europe on China policy. Lastly, Dr. Huotari analyzes the impact of the US election on Europe-China ties, saying that productive transatlantic collaboration is more likely under a Biden Administration than a second Trump administration.    Dr. Mikko Huotari is the Executive Director of MERICS. His research focuses on China’s foreign policy, China-Europe relations, and global (economic) governance and competition. He has published on China’s rise as a financial power, trade and investment relations with Europe, and geopolitical shifts related to China's emergence as a global security actor.
Oct 20, 2020
China’s Commitments to Fighting Climate Change: A Conversation with David Sandalow
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This episode examines China’s role in the global climate change agenda and Xi Jinping’s commitment at the September 2020 UN General Assembly for China to become carbon-neutral by 2060. Mr. Sandalow argues that this new commitment provides an opportunity for China to present itself as a global leader on climate change policy, in contrast to the United States. Although China is the world’s largest emitter of greenhouse gasses, Mr. Sandalow notes that China has invested heavily in renewable energy infrastructure and technology. He views China’s strength at long-term planning as a benefit in implementing effective strategies to combat climate change. Mr. Sandalow also evaluates the progress China has made since signing the Paris Accords, how technological innovation will help China achieve its climate goals, and the potential impact of a Trump re-election or a Biden presidency on US-China cooperation to address climate change.   David Sandalow is the Inaugural Fellow at the Center on Global Energy Policy and Co-Director of the Energy and Environment Concentration at the School of International and Public Affairs at Columbia University. He founded and directs the Center’s US-China Program and is author of the Guide to Chinese Climate Policy.
Oct 06, 2020
Highlights of the 2020 DoD Report on Chinese Military Power: A Conversation with Chad Sbragia
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This episode examines the trajectory of Chinese military developments and national strategy, as well as key findings of the 2020 Department of Defense (DoD) annual report to Congress entitled Military and Security Developments Involving the People’s Republic of China. Our guest, Mr. Chad Sbragia, discusses a wide range of topics, including China’s capacity to launch an amphibious assault on Taiwan, China’s nuclear strategy, and the Belt and Road Initiative. Mr. Sbragia also highlights the growing alignment between the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) and China’s broader national strategy, and he explores the implication of PLA modernization for stability and crisis prevention in the coming years.   Mr. Chad Sbragia currently serves as the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for China in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Indo-Pacific Security Affairs within the Office of the Secretary of Defense. In this capacity, he is responsible for advising senior leadership within the Department of Defense on all policy matters pertaining to the development and implementation of defense strategies, plans, policies, and bilateral security relations for China. 
Sep 22, 2020
The Impact of China's Dominant Position in Global Supply Chains: A Conversation with Wang Tao
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This episode examines China’s changing role in supply chains and the factors behind recent shifts in global production. Our guest, Dr. Wang Tao, explains why certain companies and sectors are more inclined to move their production outside of China while others choose to stay. Dr. Wang also assesses the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic and US-China trade war on supply chain decisions, as well as how the new Hong Kong national security law (and resulting restrictions imposed by the US) might affect reshoring.  Dr. Wang Tao is a Managing Director, Chief China Economist, and Head of Asia Economic Research at UBS Investment Bank, where she leads a team that covers macroeconomic and policy issues in Asia and China. Prior to joining UBS, Dr. Wang was Head of Greater China Economics and Strategy at Bank of America and Head of Asian Economics at BP plc. She is a member of the Mainland Opportunities Committee of the Hong Kong Financial Services Development Council as well as a member of the Chief China Economists Forum.
Sep 08, 2020
US-China Relations in Free Fall?: A Conversation with Lu Xiang
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This episode examines the increasing friction in US-China relations. Our guest, Dr. Lu Xiang, analyzes the primary factors behind the souring ties, and why the signing of the Phase 1 trade deal was not enough to buoy the relationship. Dr. Lu speaks about the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on bilateral relations, and the role he sees US domestic politics playing in exacerbating tensions. He also looks at the future of US-China relations and what circumstances would allow for the relationship to stabilize moving forward. Dr. Lu Xiang is the Director for Research at the Hong Kong-based Chinese Institute of Hong Kong, an affiliate of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences (CASS). Dr. Lu was previously a senior researcher at the Institute of American Studies and the Institute of World Economics and Politics at CASS. From 2012-2013, Dr. Lu was a visiting fellow at CSIS. His research focuses on national strategic communications, world and US politics, Chinese foreign policy, and Hong Kong-related issues.
Aug 25, 2020
The Galwan Valley Clash and China's Approach to Sovereignty Disputes: A Conversation with M. Taylor Fravel
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This episode explores the dynamics behind the June 2020 China-India border clash, and examines what the episode signifies about the changing nature of China’s approach to territorial and maritime disputes. Our guest, Dr. M. Taylor Fravel, compares the recent clash to past incidents along the Sino-Indian border and discusses whether confidence building measures have the potential to prevent further China-India territorial conflict. Dr. Fravel weighs the potential impact of the incident on India’s relationship with the United States. He also assesses Beijing's broader strategic goals in defending Chinese sovereignty, and how we should understand Beijing’s increasingly assertive policies toward border disputes. Dr. M. Taylor Fravel is the Arthur and Ruth Sloan Professor of Political Science and Director of the MIT Security Studies Program at MIT. Dr. Fravel currently serves on the editorial boards of the International Studies Quarterly, Security Studies, Journal of Strategic Studies, and The China Quarterly, and is a member of the board of directors for the National Committee on US-China Relations. He is also the Principal Investigator of the Maritime Awareness Project.
Aug 11, 2020
What’s Driving China’s Smart City Development?: A Conversation with Alice Ekman
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This episode examines China’s efforts to develop smart city infrastructure. Our guest, Dr. Alice Ekman, analyzes how China is supporting domestic technology industries in critical sectors like telecommunications and surveillance to build smart cities. Dr. Ekman explains how Beijing’s ambitions are aimed at boosting economic development and maintaining political control throughout China’s urban environments. She also assesses the risks of China’s smart cities for the international community, and how the US should respond to China’s growing prowess in smart city technology.  Dr. Alice Ekman is the Senior Analyst in charge of the Asia portfolio at the European Union Institute for Security Studies (EUISS). Dr. Ekman covers foreign policy and security developments in the Asia region, including China, the Korean Peninsula, Japan, India, and ASEAN. She was previously Head of China Research at the French Institute of International Relations, and a visiting scholar at Tsinghua University, National Taiwan Normal University, and the Asan Institute for Policy Studies.
Jul 30, 2020
Strategic Shift Underway in UK Relations with China: A Conversation with Charles Parton
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This episode explores the ups and downs of China’s relationship with the United Kingdom, particularly in the post-Brexit world. Our guest, Mr. Charles Parton, discusses the UK’s changing attitudes toward China and explains how Beijing's approaches to Xinjiang, 5G, Covid-19, and Hong Kong have altered UK strategic thinking. Mr. Parton also assesses the impact that the UK's departure from the European Union will have on its bilateral relationship with China. Finally, he highlights the need for the UK to develop a comprehensive strategy toward China, and offers recommendations for how the government should approach the challenges that China poses to UK interests. Charles Parton is a Senior Associate Fellow at the Royal United Services Institute, and runs his own advisory company called China Ink. In his 37 year diplomatic career, he spent 22 years working in or on China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. Mr. Parton is also trustee of Chinadialogue, a NGO which focuses on China’s environmental issues. His latest report with the Policy Institute at King's College London is titled "Towards a UK strategy and policies for relations with China."
Jul 14, 2020
China’s Standard-Setting Agenda: A Conversation with Emily de La Bruyère
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This episode examines China’s ambitions to lead the world in setting technical standards for emerging technologies. Our guest, Emily de La Bruyère, analyzes how China is advocating for its own technical standards to be adopted worldwide, and its concerted efforts to gain leverage in critical international standard-setting institutions. Ms. de La Bruyère explains Beijing’s China Standards 2035 plan and its close links to Made in China 2025. She also details the risks that China’s standard-setting agenda poses, and how the US and other Western democracies have responded. Emily de La Bruyère is co-founder of Horizon Advisory, a strategic consulting firm focused on the implications of China’s competitive approach to geopolitics. She is also a senior fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies with a focus on China policy. Ms. de La Bruyère has led extensive China research programs and developed novel analysis tools and techniques. Her public commentaries have been published in The New York Times, Bloomberg, and the Wall Street Journal.
Jun 30, 2020
China Courts Closer Ties with Nepal: A Conversation with Gaurab Shumsher Thapa
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This episode examines China’s engagement with Nepal and the trajectory of the China-Nepal bilateral relationship. Our guest, Mr. Gaurab Shumsher Thapa analyzes the impact of Xi Jinping’s 2019 visit to Nepal as well as China’s evolving political, security, and strategic interests in Nepal. Mr. Thapa explains the Nepalese government’s support of the “One-China Policy” and the importance of Nepal’s foreign policy of non-alignment. He also discusses China’s growing investment in Nepal and the ways in which China’s Belt and Road Initiative may improve the two countries’ economic relations in the future and promote the development of Nepal. Mr. Gaurab Shumsher Thapa is the president and managing director of the Nepal Forum of International Relations Studies (Nepal FIRST). Mr. Thapa is a member of the Nepal Council of World Affairs and a regular opinion writer for Asia Times.
Jun 16, 2020
Mounting Tensions Between China and Sweden: A Conversation with The Honorable Carl Bildt
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This episode examines the key challenges in, and future direction of, China-Sweden relations. Our guest, The Honorable Carl Bildt, analyzes the role of the Gui Minhai case and other diplomatic rows as catalysts in the deterioration of the bilateral relationship. Mr. Bildt explains the changing views of China from within the Swedish government and other constituencies, as well as the key takeaways from Sweden's China strategy paper published in late 2019. He also discusses Chinese-Swedish economic relations and outlines what future developments could have the biggest impact on the relationship. The Honorable Carl Bildt was Sweden’s Foreign Minister from 2006 to 2014 and Prime Minister from 1991 to 1994, when he negotiated Sweden’s accession to the European Union (EU). He served as EU Special Envoy to the Former Yugoslavia, High Representative for Bosnia and Herzegovina, UN Special Envoy to the Balkans, and Co-Chairman of the Dayton Peace Conference. He is currently Co-Chair of the European Council on Foreign Relations.
Jun 02, 2020
Unveiling China’s Digital Currency Goals: A Conversation with Kevin Desouza
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This episode unpacks China’s push to develop a Central Bank Digital Currency (CBDC). Our guest, Dr. Kevin Desouza, explains Beijing's motives and compares China’s plans for creating its own national digital currency with those of other countries that have undertaken similar initiatives. Dr. Desouza explores how a national digital currency can be used to bolster China’s finance and technology sectors, as well as its economy as a whole. He also offers his views on what China’s timeline might be for rolling out its own CBDC, particularly in light of the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.  Dr. Kevin Desouza is a professor of Business, Technology and Strategy in the School of Management at the Queensland University of Technology Business School. Dr. Desouza is also a Nonresident Senior Fellow in the Governance Studies Program at the Brookings Institution, and a Distinguished Research Fellow at the China Institute for Urban Governance at Shanghai Jiao Tong University. He has held tenured faculty appointments at the University of Washington, Virginia Tech, and Arizona State University.
May 19, 2020
Xi Jinping’s Military-Civil Fusion Project: A Conversation with Greg Levesque
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This episode explores China’s efforts to integrate its military and civilian sectors to support its military development and broader national security agenda. Our guest, Mr. Greg Levesque, discusses how Military-Civil Fusion (MCF) fits into China’s grand strategy and evaluates how effectively it has implemented the program to date. Mr. Levesque also weighs the risks and rewards of MCF in Beijing’s strategic calculus, and offers a path for how the US and its allies can respond to the growing nexus between military and civil development in China. Greg Levesque is co-founder and CEO of Strider, a technology company enabling organizations to combat intellectual property theft and supply chain vulnerabilities outside of the cyber domain. Greg has advised and supported Fortune 500 companies as well as US and European government agencies on matters of economic statecraft, particularly around China.
May 05, 2020
Examining China's Influence in the World Health Organization: A Conversation with Jeremy Youde
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This episode examines China’s role in the World Health Organization (WHO), and how its relationship with the organization has changed over time. Our guest, Dr. Jeremy Youde, discusses how China has influenced how the WHO responds to global health crises such as the COVID-19 pandemic. Dr. Youde also explores the challenges WHO leadership faces when balancing public health concerns with sensitive geopolitical issues, best illustrated by China’s opposition to Taiwan’s inclusion in the organization.  Dr. Jeremy Youde is Dean of the College of Liberal Arts at the University of Minnesota Duluth. He is a member of the editorial board of Global Health Governance and is the current chair of the Global Health Section of the International Studies Association. Previously, Dr. Youde was an associate professor in the Department of International Relations at the Australian National University.
Apr 21, 2020
Prospects for China's Inclusion in Strategic Nuclear Talks: A Conversation with David Santoro
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This episode explores the potential for China to join a strategic nuclear dialogue with the United States and Russia. Our guest, Dr. David Santoro, details China’s perspective on arms control issues, and underscores the difficulties in forging a trilateral nuclear agreement in today’s strategic environment. Dr. Santoro also discusses how the US can engage China bilaterally to enhance the prospects for a trilateral agreement in the long run. Dr. David Santoro is Vice President and Director for Nuclear Policy Programs at Pacific Forum. He specializes in strategic and deterrence issues, as well as nonproliferation and nuclear security, with a regional focus on the Asia Pacific and Europe. He recently co-authored a report for the Institute for Peace Research and Security Policy at the University of Hamburg titled, Trilateral Arms Control? Perspectives from Washington, Moscow, and Beijing.
Apr 07, 2020
China's Arctic Ambitions: A Conversation with Anne-Marie Brady
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This episode explores China’s efforts to establish itself as a major player in the Arctic region. Our guest, Dr. Anne-Marie Brady, details China’s key interests in the region as they relate to its broader strategic, economic, and political objectives. Dr. Brady also discusses how China has engaged with Arctic countries and Arctic governance, and offers several important insights into how the international community should respond to China’s growing presence in the region.  Dr. Anne-Marie Brady is a professor at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand and a global fellow with the Kissinger Institute on China and the United States’ Polar Initiative at the Wilson Center. Dr. Brady is also founding and executive editor of The Polar Journal (Taylor and Francis Publishers). Her research focuses on Chinese domestic and foreign politics as well as polar politics.
Mar 24, 2020
China's Booming E-Commerce Market: A Conversation with Jacob Cooke
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This episode explores the evolution of the e-commerce market in China, the challenges it presents, and its impact on the Chinese economy. Our guest, Mr. Jacob Cooke, examines fundamental differences between the e-commerce markets in China and the United States, and discusses the shifting consumer landscape toward digital trends. He also analyzes the outlook for e-commerce in China, including the potential impact of outside events like the COVID-19 epidemic and the US-China phase one trade deal. Jacob Cooke is co-founder and CEO of WPIC Marketing + Technologies, a digital marketing and consulting firm based in Beijing. Mr. Cooke started WPIC in 2004 as an alternative for the many Western organizations frustrated by China’s obstacles to brick and mortar sales. He graduated from Beijing Jiaotong University with a bachelor’s degree in computer science and participated in MIT Sloan School of Management’s executive education program focusing on artificial intelligence.
Mar 10, 2020
China's Increasing Engagement with Africa: A Conversation with Joshua Eisenman
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This episode explores China’s key interests and investments in Africa, as well as how China-Africa relations are likely to evolve in the future. Our guest, Dr. Joshua Eisenman, breaks down the political and economic toolkit China is using to achieve its core interests in Africa. Dr. Eisenman offers his insights on the impact of U.S. engagement on China-Africa ties, as well as analyzes the feasibility of African countries following China’s development model. Dr. Joshua Eisenman is an Associate Professor in the Keough School of Global Affairs at the University of Notre Dame, and Senior Fellow for China Studies at the American Foreign Policy Council. Dr. Eisenman’s research focuses on the political economy of China’s development and its foreign relations with the U.S. and the developing world—particularly Africa. He is working with Ambassador David Shinn on their second co-authored book on China-Africa relations, examining the political and security aspects of China's engagement on the continent.
Feb 25, 2020
Water Challenges Inside and Outside China's Borders: A Conversation with Scott Moore
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This episode explores the major challenges that threaten China’s water resources, from scarcity and mismanagement, to pollution and climate change. Our guest, Dr. Scott Moore, describes China’s sweeping attempts to mitigate the negative impacts that growing water challenges pose at home. Dr. Moore also discusses how China’s efforts to secure its water resources have created security challenges with its neighbors, and the ways in which China has exported many of its most ambitious water projects to Belt and Road partner countries.  Dr. Scott Moore is the Director of the Penn Global China Program and senior fellow at the Kleinman Center for Energy Policy at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Moore was previously a Young Professional and Water Resources Management Specialist at the World Bank Group, and an Environment, Science, Technology, and Health Officer for China at the U.S. Department of State. He holds doctoral and master’s degrees from Oxford University and an undergraduate degree from Princeton, and is a Truman, Fulbright, and Rhodes Scholar.
Feb 11, 2020
Wuhan Goes Viral: A Conversation with Yanzhong Huang
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This episode explores how China has responded to the deadly outbreak of a new coronavirus originating in the central city of Wuhan. Our guest, Dr. Yanzhong Huang, compares Beijing’s response to its handling of the 2002-2003 SARS epidemic, analyzing what key lessons the government appears to have learned and where it has fallen short. Dr. Huang also describes the varying local and global reactions to the Chinese government’s response efforts, and assesses how Beijing’s ability to control this outbreak will affect the legitimacy of the Chinese Communist Party.  Dr. Yanzhong Huang is a senior fellow for global health at the Council on Foreign Relations, where he directs the Global Health Governance roundtable series. He is also professor and director of global health studies at Seton Hall University's School of Diplomacy and International Relations. Dr. Huang has written extensively on global health governance, health diplomacy and health security, and public health in China and East Asia.
Jan 29, 2020
Re-calibrating the BRI: A Conversation with Wang Huiyao
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This episode explores the evolution of China’s Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) and the developments that have occurred since it was first introduced in 2013 as One Belt One Road. Our guest, Dr. Wang Huiyao, discusses China’s efforts to generate greater buy-in from the international community and to transform the project into a shared objective for sustainable development. He also addresses the concerns of ‘debt-trap diplomacy’ and China’s push for greater transparency and institutional collaboration. Dr. Wang Huiyao is the Founder and President of the Center for China and Globalization (CCG); Vice Chairman of the China Association for International Economic Cooperation (CAIEC) under the Ministry of Commerce; and Counselor for the State Council of the People’s Republic of China (appointed by Premier Li Keqiang in 2015). He is also the Vice Chairman of China Western (Overseas) Returned Scholars Association; and the Vice Chairman of the China Talent Society under the Ministry of Human Resources and Social Security.
Jan 14, 2020
Friction in China-Czech Relations: A Conversation with Richard Turcsányi
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This episode explores the key challenges and opportunities in the China-Czech bilateral relationship. Our guest, Dr. Richard Turcsányi, describes the impact of the recent cancellation of the sister city agreement between Prague and Beijing as well as divergent views on China within the Czech government. He also addresses the economic and cultural factors that impact public opinion on China in the Czech Republic, and assesses the drivers of Chinese investment in the country. Dr. Richard Turcsányi is a Key Researcher at Palacky University and Assistant Professor at Mendel University, both in the Czech Republic. Dr. Turcsányi is also a Program Director at the Central European Institute of Asian Studies, an independent think tank with branches in Bratislava, Olomouc, and Vienna. In his academic research, he focuses on Chinese foreign policy and China’s relations with Central and Eastern Europe.
Dec 17, 2019
China and the NBA Call a Timeout: A Conversation with Victor Cha
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This episode explores China's retaliatory actions against the NBA after a recent incident, as well as the larger questions surrounding the Chinese government’s treatment of foreign private companies. Our guest, Dr. Victor Cha, discusses how both US and Chinese audiences have reacted to the NBA controversy and weighs in on whether Chinese public opinion might sway Beijing’s handling of the incident. Dr. Cha also addresses the struggles that other foreign companies have faced in China and how Beijing uses “predatory liberalism” to serve its political interests. Dr. Victor Cha is a senior adviser and holds the Korea Chair at CSIS. He is also a Professor of Government and the holder of the D.S. Song-KF Chair in the Department of Government and the School of Foreign Service (SFS) at Georgetown University. In July 2019, he was appointed Vice Dean for Faculty and Graduate Affairs in the SFS. His article, “Flagrant Foul: China’s Predatory Liberalism and the NBA,” will appear in the December issue of the Washington Quarterly.
Dec 03, 2019
Debating China's 5G Infrastructure in Europe: A Conversation with Janka Oertel
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This episode explores Europe’s evolving approach toward including Chinese telecommunications companies in its 5G infrastructure. Our guest, Dr. Janka Oertel, explains the security risks behind allowing Chinese companies like Huawei and ZTE to supply 5G technology to Europe, as well as the potential economic and political risks of shutting them out. Dr. Oertel also describes how Europe’s attitude toward Chinese technology differs from other countries like the US and Japan, and assesses the feasibility of Europe putting forth a uniform policy on 5G security. Dr. Janka Oertel is a senior fellow in the Asia program at the German Marshall Fund of the United States’ Berlin office. Dr. Oertel primarily works on transatlantic China policy, Chinese foreign policy, and security in East Asia. She holds a PhD from the University of Jena, focusing on Chinese policies within the United Nations.
Nov 20, 2019
Taiwan's Close Watch on Hong Kong Protests: A Conversation with Jude Blanchette and Bonnie Glaser
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This episode of the ChinaPower Podcast is a crossover episode with “Hong Kong on the Brink,” hosted by Jude Blanchette. Mr. Blanchette interviews Bonnie Glaser about the protests in Hong Kong and their impact on Taiwan’s own relations with mainland China. Ms. Glaser explains how the continued unrest might affect Taiwan’s upcoming January 2020 presidential election. She also expands on how views in Taiwan have evolved since the November 2018 local elections and the start of the Hong Kong protests in summer 2019. Ms. Glaser then evaluates the potential for rethinking cross-Strait policy if “one country, two systems” appears to have failed in Hong Kong. Jude Blanchette holds the Freeman Chair in China Studies at CSIS, and is also a senior advisor at Crumpton Group, a geopolitical risk advisory based in Arlington, Virginia. Mr. Blanchette serves on the board of the American Mandarin Society and is a public intellectual fellow at the National Committee on United States-China relations.
Nov 05, 2019
Xi-Modi Summit in Chennai, India: A Conversation with Tanvi Madan
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This episode explores the current dynamics between China and India in light of Xi Jinping and Narendra Modi’s second informal summit in October 2019. Our guest, Dr. Tanvi Madan, analyzes the outcomes of this meeting and the key issues impacting the bilateral relationship. Dr. Madan explains India’s views on China’s Belt and Road Initiative and use of detention facilities in Xinjiang, as well as how U.S. policy toward India factors in to China-India relations. She also addresses continued points of contention like the Kashmir region and China-Pakistan Economic Corridor. Dr. Tanvi Madan is director of The India Project and a senior fellow for the Project on International Order and Strategy in the Foreign Policy program at the Brookings Institution. Dr. Madan’s work explores Indian foreign policy, focusing particularly on India's relations with China and the United States. She also researches the intersection between Indian energy policies and its foreign and security policies.
Oct 23, 2019
China's Civilian Space Program: A Conversation with Alanna Krolikowski
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This episode explores the landscape of China’s civilian and commercial space efforts in recent years. Our guest, Dr. Alanna Krolikowski, analyzes China’s recent achievements in space, including the landing of a rover on the far side of the moon and the first successful launch of a satellite by a private Chinese company. She also examines the relationship between the government, state-owned enterprises, and private companies in China’s space industry and how the growing civilian sector fits into China’s larger space ambitions. Dr. Alanna Krolikowski is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the Missouri University of Science and Technology. Her research focuses on global policy efforts relating to activities at technological frontiers, including outer space, U.S.-China trade in high-technology items, and China’s pursuit of national scientific and technological modernization.
Oct 08, 2019
China’s Military Ambitions in Space: A Conversation with Todd Harrison and Kaitlyn Johnson
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This episode explores China’s military developments in space over the last two decades. Our guests, Todd Harrison and Kaitlyn Johnson, discuss some of the findings of their report, “Space Threat Assessment 2019,” and analyze how China has developed and used their growing military space capabilities. They also explain the Wolf Amendment, which forbids any bilateral cooperation between NASA and the China National Space Administration, and how it will affect future US-China cooperation in space. Todd Harrison is the director of Defense Budget Analysis, the director of the Aerospace Security Project, and a senior fellow in the International Security Program at CSIS. His research focuses on defense funding, space security, and air power issues. Kaitlyn Johnson is an associate fellow and associate director of the Aerospace Security Project at CSIS. Her research focuses on space security, military space systems, and commercial space policy.
Sep 24, 2019
China's Growing Presence in the Pacific Islands: A Conversation with Anna Powles
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This episode explores the security dynamics of China’s increasing involvement in the Pacific Islands. Our guest, Dr. Anna Powles, analyzes perceptions of China’s presence in the region and emphasizes the agency that Pacific islands have in navigating geopolitical competition. Dr. Powles also explains China’s investments and interests in the region’s natural resources, concerns over Chinese pressure on countries that maintain diplomatic ties with Taiwan, and the most successful strategies for regional powers’ future engagement with the Pacific. Dr. Anna Powles is a Senior Lecturer at the Centre for Defence and Security Studies at Massey University in New Zealand. Dr. Powles' research focuses on the regional security order of the Pacific Islands region, including the role of non-state actors and China.
Sep 11, 2019
China and the Global Rare Earth Trade: A Conversation with Julie Klinger
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This episode explores the factors that led to China’s dominance in rare earth production. Our guest, Dr. Julie Klinger, analyzes past incidents and WTO decisions that have sustained supply chains of rare earth production in China, and their impact on global production and China’s relations with other countries. Dr. Klinger also describes China’s investments into the development of technologies to mitigate the environmental burden. She further evaluates China’s own interests in diversifying the global supply chain of rare earths, and the potential for increased international cooperation on using rare earth resources more efficiently. Dr. Julie Klinger is an Assistant Professor of International Relations at Boston University’s Frederick S. Pardee School of Global Studies, as well as Associate Director of BU’s Global Development Policy Center’s Land Use and Livelihoods Initiative. Dr. Klinger’s research focuses on the dynamics of global resource frontiers, with a particular focus on social and environmental sustainability.
Aug 27, 2019
Chinese Interests and Policies in the Middle East: A Conversation with Jon Alterman
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This episode examines China’s increasing engagement with countries in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). Our guest, Dr. Jon Alterman, evaluates the main drivers of China’s growing involvement in the region, including its crude oil imports and investment in ports and infrastructure. Dr. Alterman also explains China’s non-interference policy in the region’s disputes, and why China’s relationship with MENA countries has not suffered since China’s mass detention of Uighur populations in Xinjiang. Dr. Jon Alterman is a senior vice president, holds the Zbigniew Brzezinski Chair in Global Security and Geostrategy, and is director of the Middle East Program at CSIS. He previously served as a member of the Policy Planning Staff at the U.S. Department of State and as a special assistant to the assistant secretary of state for Near Eastern affairs. In addition to his policy work, he often teaches Middle Eastern studies at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies and the George Washington University.
Aug 13, 2019
Rough Waters in the South China Sea: A Conversation with Greg Poling
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This episode examines the behavior of China and other claimants in the South China Sea, including recent incidents between China and the Philippines and between China and Vietnam. Our guest, Mr. Greg Poling, analyzes the reactions of the Chinese, Philippines, and Vietnamese governments in light of recent conflicts. He also explains the purpose behind the presence of China’s maritime militia in the South China Sea, as well as the likelihood that a Code of Conduct will be signed between China and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) in the next few years. Mr. Greg Poling is director of the Asia Maritime Transparency Initiative and a fellow with the Southeast Asia Program at CSIS. He oversees research on US foreign policy in the Asia Pacific, with a particular focus on the maritime domain and the countries of Southeast Asia. His research interests include the South China Sea disputes, democratization in Southeast Asia, and Asian multilateralism.
Jul 30, 2019
China and the World Trade Organization: A Conversation with Tu Xinquan
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This episode examines China’s role in the World Trade Organization (WTO), including the economic and political effects of membership since its accession process. Our guest, Dr. Tu Xinquan, discusses the ways in which Beijing has utilized the WTO dispute settlement mechanism and assesses how well it has complied with WTO rulings. He also explains China’s proposed WTO reforms and the overall influence of the WTO as an organization amid anti-globalization sentiments. Dr. Tu Xinquan is Executive Dean and Professor at the China Institute for WTO Studies at the University of International Business and Economics, Beijing (UIBE). Dr. Tu’s research focuses on the WTO, Chinese trade policy, agreements on government procurement, and US-China trade relations.
Jul 16, 2019
China’s Nuclear Strategy and Capabilities: A Conversation with Hans Kristensen
2008
This episode delves into China’s evolving nuclear capabilities and policies. Our guest, Dr. Hans Kristensen, breaks down Beijing’s approach to nuclear weapons and explains the drivers behind China’s nuclear doctrine. Dr. Kristensen also compares China’s nuclear inventory with other major powers like the U.S. and Russia, and China’s stance on the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty and its potential follow-on. Dr. Hans Kristensen is director of the Nuclear Information Project at the Federation of American Scientists. He is co-author of the Nuclear Notebook column in the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists as well as the World Nuclear Forces overview in the SIPRI Yearbook.
Jul 02, 2019
China’s Evolving Role in the United Nations: A Conversation with Courtney Fung
1907
This episode discusses China’s role and actions as a United Nations Security Council permanent member. Our guest, Dr. Courtney Fung, analyzes China’s “status dilemma” and the evolution of its behavior in the UN since being admitted in 1971. She also explains the motivations behind China’s leading role in UN Peacekeeping Operations, as well as how its position in the UN could factor in to China’s push for global governance reform. Dr. Courtney Fung is Assistant Professor of International Relations in the Department of Politics and Public Administration at the University of Hong Kong. Her forthcoming book, China and Intervention at the UN Security Council: Reconciling Status, explains the effects of status on China's varied response to intervention and foreign-imposed regime change at the United Nations.
Jun 18, 2019
Carbon, Climate, and China: A Conversation with Barbara Finamore
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This episode evaluates China’s progress in the global endeavor to combat climate change by reducing carbon emissions and investing in green technology. Our guest, Ms. Barbara Finamore, explains Beijing’s current climate change policies and their role in China’s national priorities like the Belt and Road Initiative. She also looks ahead to how China might continue advancing clean energy at home while playing a growing role in international climate change initiatives. Ms. Barbara Finamore is Senior Strategic Director for Asia and the founder of the China program at the Natural Resources Defense Council, focusing on climate, clean energy, and urban solutions in China. Ms. Finamore also served as president and chair of the Professional Association for China's Environment (PACE) and is the co-founder and president of the China-U.S. Energy Innovation Alliance.  
Jun 05, 2019
The Real Costs of Huawei Technology: A Conversation with James Lewis
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This episode investigates the evolving political and economic circumstances surrounding Chinese telecommunications company Huawei and its attempts to integrate its technology in global markets. Our guest, Dr. James Lewis, explores the growing concerns in the US and some of its democratic allies about Huawei, as well as the decisions by countries like the UK to adopt Huawei technology. Dr. Lewis also discusses Huawei’s relationship with the Chinese government and the diplomatic fallout between Beijing and Washington over the arrest of Huawei CFO Meng Wanzhou.   Dr. James Lewis is a senior vice president and director of the Technology Policy Program at CSIS. Before joining CSIS, he worked at the Departments of State and Commerce as a Foreign Service officer and as a member of the Senior Executive Service. His current research examines the effect of technology on warfare and how the Internet has changed politics.  
May 17, 2019
Charting Progress in China’s Belt and Road Initiative: A Conversation with Jonathan Hillman
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This episode explores current developments in China’s Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) in the lead-up to the second Belt and Road Forum. Our guest, Mr. Jonathan Hillman, discusses the BRI’s current projects and financing, including recent backlash and scrutiny from partner countries. Mr. Hillman also details the approach the U.S. is taking toward the initiative in the face of recent agreements on the BRI between other democratic nations and China. Jonathan Hillman is a senior fellow with the Simon Chair in Political Economy and director of the Reconnecting Asia Project at CSIS. His research focuses on the intersection of economics and foreign policy, including trade, globalization, economic statecraft, and China’s BRI. Prior to joining CSIS, he served as a policy adviser at the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative.  
Apr 30, 2019
China’s Push to Reform Global Governance: A Conversation with Melanie Hart
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This episode explores China’s ambitions to reform and influence global governance, and the resulting effects on the international system. Our guest, Dr. Melanie Hart, discusses the main takeaways from her February 2019 co-authored report titled Mapping China’s Global Governance Ambitions. She analyzes China’s intentions behind its challenges to the liberal international order, and the role that democracies can play in preserving the democratic principles that currently shape global governance. Dr. Melanie Hart is a senior fellow and director of China Policy at the Center for American Progress. Her research focuses on U.S. foreign policy toward China, particularly around issues of energy, climate change, and cross-border investment. Dr. Hart currently serves on the board of the American Mandarin Society, as well as a charter member of the East Coast Advancement Committee of the School of International Relations and Pacific Studies at the University of California, San Diego and a member of the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations.  
Apr 12, 2019
UAV Technology in China: A Conversation with Tate Nurkin
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This episode assesses China’s development of unmanned systems, especially its unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and their role in China’s military capacity and international commercial export markets. Our guest, Mr. Tate Nurkin, analyzes the impact of UAVs on new military and security practices in China. He also provides insight into how Chinese drone manufacturers such as DJI have been able to dominate the commercial UAV market. Tate Nurkin is the founder of OTH Intelligence Group LLC and a Non-Resident Senior Fellow with the Brent Scowcroft Center for Strategy and Security at the Atlantic Council. Mr. Nurkin spent 12 years at Jane’s by IHS Markit and also has previously worked for Joint Management Services, the Strategic Assessment Center of SAIC, and the Modeling, Simulation, Wargaming, and Analysis team of Booz Allen Hamilton. His research and analysis focuses on China’s military modernization and technology development, US-China competition, and the global defense industry.  
Mar 29, 2019
China’s Emerging New-Energy Vehicle Industry: A Conversation with Scott Kennedy
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This episode explores China’s new-energy vehicle (NEV) market and draws from the November 2018 CSIS report entitled China’s Risky Drive into New-Energy Vehicles. We are joined by the author of the report, Dr. Scott Kennedy, who examines the strategic and economic motivations behind Beijing’s prioritization of NEVs. Dr. Kennedy discusses the positive results of China becoming the world’s largest NEV market, as well as issues the industry faces in China, such as overcapacity, environmental ramifications, and the challenges posed by international competitors. He also offers his assessment of how the industry will evolve and China’s role moving forward. Dr. Scott Kennedy is a senior adviser of the Freeman Chair in China Studies and director of Project on Chinese Business and Political Economy at CSIS. Prior to joining CSIS, he was a professor at Indiana University (IU) for over 14 years. His work focuses on China’s economic policy and its global economic relations, including industrial policy, technology innovation, and US-China commercial relations.
Mar 15, 2019
China and Russia’s Converging Interests: A Conversation with Alexander Gabuev
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This episode examines recent developments in Sino-Russian relations and the effects on the United States. Our guest, Mr. Alexander Gabuev, explains the impetus behind the growing geostrategic and military collaborations between China and Russia. He discusses how mutual economic interests and close relations between Xi Jinping and Vladimir Putin have strengthened and diversified the partnership between the two countries. Mr. Gabuev also evaluates critical areas of political and economic friction in the relationship, including the protection of technology and intellectual property, management of influence in Central Asia, and China’s Belt and Road Initiative.   Mr. Alexander Gabuev is a senior fellow and the chair of the Russia in the Asia-Pacific Program at the Carnegie Moscow Center. He is a Munich Young Leader of the Munich International Security Conference as well as a member of the Council on Foreign and Defense Policy (Russia). His research is focused on Russia’s policy toward East and Southeast Asia, political and ideological trends in China, and China’s relations with its neighbors, especially those in Central Asia.
Mar 01, 2019
China’s Relationship with the International Order: A Conversation with Timothy Heath
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This episode explores the relationship between China and the current postwar international order, drawing from the RAND Corporation’s May 2018 report titled China and the International Order. Our guest and the report’s co-author, Mr. Timothy Heath, analyzes China’s perceived challenges to the current order, including the development of multilateral institutions like the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank and Shanghai Cooperation Organization, as well as policies like the Belt and Road Initiative. He also details policy recommendations for US strategy toward China and how China’s approach to the international order may evolve in the future. Mr. Timothy Heath is a senior international defense research analyst at the RAND Corporation in Washington DC. Prior to joining RAND, he served as the senior analyst for the USPACOM China Strategic Focus Group for five years. He has extensive experience analyzing China's national strategy, politics, ideology, and military, as well as Asian regional security developments.  
Feb 15, 2019
Southeast Asia’s Shifting Security Views: A Conversation with Tang Siew Mun
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This episode examines recent developments in Southeast Asian attitudes toward competing great powers in the region, especially China and the US, and what it might mean for the future of ASEAN’s ties with these actors. Our guest, Dr. Tang Siew Mun, explains the factors behind the results of his organization’s recent survey titled “State of Southeast Asia: 2019.” He discusses the respondents’ views on the reemergence of Chinese influence in the region, potential roles for powers such as Japan and the EU, and uncertainty about US commitment to and staying power in the region. Dr. Tang also explores the role of projects such as the Belt and Road Initiative, and how perspectives toward the regional players may change moving forward. Dr. Tang Siew Mun is the Head of the ASEAN Studies Centre and a Senior Fellow at the Regional Strategic and Political Studies program at the ISEAS-Yusof Ishak Institute in Singapore. He was previously Director for Foreign Policy and Security Studies at the Institute of Strategic and International Studies (ISIS), Malaysia and Senior Lecturer at the National University of Malaysia. His primary research interests are Asian security, ASEAN’s relations with major powers, and Japanese foreign policy.
Feb 01, 2019
Results and Ramifications of Taiwan’s Elections: A Conversation with Shelley Rigger
2093
This episode explores the major defeat of the ruling DPP in Taiwan’s recent nine-in-one local elections and what these results mean for the future of cross-Strait relations. Our guest, Dr. Shelley Rigger, explains the current economic and political climate in Taiwan and provides insights into the economic drivers that helped KMT candidates win 15 of Taiwan’s 22 mayoral and county magistrate seats. She also examines Beijing’s response to the election results and how it may use the DPP’s loss to its advantage. Dr. Shelley Rigger is the Brown Professor of East Asian Politics in the Department of Political Science at Davidson College. She was previously a visiting associate professor at Fudan University in Shanghai as well as a visiting research scholar at National Chengchi University in Taipei. Dr. Rigger has written extensively on Taiwan and cross-Strait relations.
Jan 18, 2019
The Slippery Slope of US-China Competition: A Conversation with Wu Xinbo
1902
This episode explores the significant increase in friction between the United States and China since the Trump administration came to power in 2017, and analyzes the implications for both countries and the rest of the world. Our guest, Dr. Wu Xinbo, examines the issues in the bilateral relationship where both sides do not see eye to eye, such as trade, Taiwan, the South China Sea, and the international order. He also offers his views on the essence of US-China competition and the future trajectory of bilateral ties.   Dr. Wu Xinbo is Professor and Dean at the Institute of International Studies, and Director at the Center for American Studies, at Fudan University. He teaches and researches China’s foreign and security policy, Sino-US relations, and US Asia-Pacific policy. Dr. Wu is on the editorial board of The Washington Quarterly and European Journal of International Security, and on the International Advisory Board of International Affairs.
Jan 04, 2019
The PLA Navy’s Growing Prowess: A Conversation with Andrew Erickson
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This episode explores the rapid modernization of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) and its growing naval capacity. Our guest, Dr. Andrew Erickson, explains the motivations behind this effort as well as the most recent capabilities of the PLAN’s expanding naval fleet. He also discusses the synergies between commercial and military shipbuilding in China and revisits the current state of China’s aircraft carrier program, which he discussed with ChinaPower several years ago. Dr. Andrew Erickson is a Professor of Strategy in the U.S. Naval War College’s China Maritime Studies Institute. He is the author of a study published in 2017 titled Chinese Naval Shipbuilding: An Ambitious and Uncertain Course. Since 2008, Dr. Erickson has been an Associate in Research at Harvard University’s John King Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies. He is also a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations.  
Dec 21, 2018
Cross-Strait Ties and the US: A Conversation with Richard Bush
1983
This episode explores the current state of cross-Strait relations between Taiwan and mainland China, as well as the Trump administration’s approach to this complex relationship. Our guest, Dr. Richard Bush, explains how and why the relationship has deteriorated since President Tsai Ing-wen came to power in 2016, as well as how her approach to relations with Beijing differs from that of former President Ma Ying-jeou. Dr. Bush also examines the unique role that the US plays in the present-day relationship, in light of its ongoing trade war with Beijing yet lack of official diplomatic ties with Taiwan. Dr. Richard Bush is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and holds The Michael H. Armacost Chair and Chen-Fu and Cecilia Yen Koo Chair in Taiwan Studies in the Center for East Asia Policy Studies (CEAP). He also holds a joint appointment as a senior fellow in the Brookings John L. Thornton China Center. Dr. Bush is the author of a number of books and articles on China’s relations with its neighbors, particularly Taiwan.  
Nov 21, 2018
China and the 16+1 Mechanism: A Conversation with Dr. Justyna Szczudlik
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This episode explores China’s approach to the Central and Eastern Europe region through its 16+1 mechanism, which brings together eleven EU member states, five Balkan countries, and China. Our guest, Justyna Szczudlik, explains China’s political and economic goals in the region and describes the major outcomes of the recent 16+1 Summit in Bulgaria. She also examines the appeal of the Belt and Road Initiative to different European countries and analyzes the potential effects of China’s “one size fits all” approach to the various 16+1 participants.   Justyna Szczudlik is Head of the Asia-Pacific Programme and a China analyst at the Polish Institute of International Affairs (PISM). She holds a PhD in Political Science from the University of Warsaw, MA in Chinese Studies from the University of Warsaw, and MA in Political Science from the University of Wroclaw. Dr. Szczudlik’s research focuses on China’s foreign policy, especially China-Central and Eastern Europe relations including China-Poland relations.
Nov 07, 2018
Conflict and Compromise in China-India Relations: A Conversation with Jagannath Panda
1989
This episode explores the latest developments in China’s relationship with India, especially how the relationship has evolved since the Doklam border standoff in 2017. Our guest, Dr. Jagannath Panda, explains the lessons each side learned from the Doklam incident and evaluates Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s China policy. He also analyzes how India has attempted to avoid conflict with China, even as contentious issues persist such as border disputes, the Dalai Lama, and China’s expanding presence in the Indian Ocean.   Dr. Jagannath Panda is a Research Fellow and Coordinator of the East Asia Centre at the Institute for Defence Studies and Analyses in New Delhi, India. He has written extensively on East and South Asia as well as India-China relations. Dr. Panda has held fellowships at the Ministry of Unification (Republic of Korea), the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, and the Shanghai Institute of International Studies.
Oct 24, 2018
FOCAC and China-Africa Ties: A Conversation with Chris Alden
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This episode explores the evolving relationship between China and Africa, especially the 53 African states that participate in the Forum on China-Africa Cooperation (FOCAC). Our guest, Professor Chris Alden, joins us to discuss the outcomes of the most recent FOCAC Summit, as well as China’s role as an infrastructure financier on the continent. He also examines the growing importance of security issues in Sino-African relations and envisions how the China-Africa relationship may develop in the future. Professor Chris Alden is a Professor in International Relations at the London School of Economics and Political Science, and is a Senior Research Fellow with the South African Institute of International Affairs (SAIIA). He has written numerous books and articles in internationally recognized journals, and most recently co-edited China and Africa – Building Peace and Security Cooperation on the Continent. Prof. Alden has held fellowships at institutions including Cambridge University, the Institute of Social Science, and the University of Tokyo.
Oct 09, 2018
China-EU Relations: A Conversation with Theresa Fallon
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This episode explores the relationship between China and the European Union’s 28 member states, as well as the impact of the US on China-EU ties. Our guest, Ms. Theresa Fallon, analyzes China’s increased interest in the region amid tension with the US and assesses the efficacy of initiatives such as the 16+1 Summit and Belt and Road Initiative in strengthening China-EU ties. She also predicts where the relationship is headed and how the US should view a closer China-EU relationship.   Ms. Theresa Fallon is the founder and director of the Centre for Russia Europe Asia Studies (CREAS) in Brussels. She is concurrently a member of the Council for Security Cooperation in the Asia-Pacific and a Nonresident Senior Fellow of the Chicago Council on Global Affairs. Ms. Fallon’s current research is focused on EU-Asia relations, Sino-Russian relations, maritime security, global governance, and China’s Belt and Road Initiative. She has testified numerous times to the European Parliament Committee on Foreign Affairs and Subcommittee on Security and Defense, and has been featured in international media including the BBC, CNN, The Wall Street Journal, and The New York Times.  
Sep 25, 2018
China and the 10th BRICS Summit: A Conversation with Duncan Innes-Ker
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This episode explores China’s standing in BRICS, a group of five countries (Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa) with fast-developing economies and growing regional influence. Our guest, Duncan Innes-Ker, explains the major outcomes of the 10 BRICS summit, describes the group’s increasing economic engagement with Africa, and analyzes China’s position as the largest economy in BRICS. He also considers how the BRICS countries may develop over time, both individually and as a group.   Duncan Innes-Ker heads a team of analysts covering Asia in The Economist Intelligence Unit’s Country Analysis division in Hong Kong. He has helped produce customized research and analysis on many topics, and has shared his perspectives on Asia with senior corporate executives, academics, and diplomatic officials. Duncan is also a frequent commentator for news services such as the BBC, CNN, and CNBC.
Aug 29, 2018
China’s Interests and Role in the SCO: A Conversation with Alexander Cooley
1933
This episode explores the ins and outs of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) nearly two decades after its founding, as well as China’s evolving role within the organization. Our guest, Dr. Alexander Cooley, uncovers the current challenges and opportunities for the organization as the SCO’s membership and China’s foreign policy aspirations expand. Dr. Cooley analyzes potential future areas of contention and cooperation between China and other SCO member states. Dr. Alexander Cooley is Director of the Harriman Institute at Columbia University and a professor of political science at Barnard College. He has written extensively on Eurasian and Central Asian politics, including opinion pieces for The New York Times and Foreign Affairs. Additionally, Dr. Cooley serves on multiple international advisory boards and policy committees.
Aug 14, 2018
The Push, Pull, and Purse of Chinese Public Diplomacy: A Conversation with Samantha Custer
1966
This episode explores the latest public diplomacy efforts that Beijing has carried out in the East Asia and Pacific region to boost favorable views toward China. Through the lens of AidData’s ground-breaking report, Ties That Bind: Quantifying China’s public diplomacy and its “good neighbor” effect, our guest Samantha Custer analyzes the methods, objectives, and successes of China’s regional public diplomacy and political influence activities. Custer also delves into the implications of China’s state-sponsored strategies for the greater region and the field of public diplomacy.   Samantha Custer is the Director of Policy Analysis at AidData, a research lab at the College of William and Mary that produced the Ties That Bind report, in partnership with the CSIS China Power Project and Asia Society Policy Institute. She previously co-authored World Bank papers on open data and citizen feedback with the Open Development Technology Alliance and assisted former US Secretary of State Madeleine Albright teach a foreign policy course. Additionally, Ms. Custer has advised multilingual education policy with SIL International and coordinated the advocacy efforts of the Asia Multilingual Education Working Group for UNESCO.
Aug 01, 2018
China’s South China Sea Strategy: A Conversation with Bill Hayton
1893
This episode explores China’s intensified activities and interests in the South China Sea in recent years. Our guest, Bill Hayton, unpacks the history of the various parties’ sovereignty claims, and discusses how China’s actions in the South China Sea have led to greater regional tensions and increased international criticism, including from the United States. He explains China’s militarization and coercive tactics in the South China Sea, assesses the legitimacy of China’s claims, and discusses the current as well as future role of China in the region.   Bill Hayton is an associate fellow with the Asia-Pacific Programme at Chatham House, and has written extensively on Southeast Asian issues and the South China Sea. He has also worked for BBC News for 20 years and is currently a reporter and producer with BBC World News TV in London.
Jul 05, 2018
Exploring China's Security Landscape: A Conversation with Kaiser Kuo and Bonnie Glaser
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This episode of the ChinaPower Podcast is brought to you in conjunction with SupChina’s Sinica Podcast, hosted by Kaiser Kuo. He interviews Bonnie Glaser about China’s security environment, including the significance of the Trump-Kim summit for China, tense US-China trade relations, China’s regional economic and security influence, and the effects of Beijing’s militarization in the South China Sea. Ms. Glaser also expands on the relationship between the US and Taiwan under Tsai Ing-wen and the potential implications for cross-Strait relations.  Kaiser Kuo is the host and co-founder of the Sinica Podcast, a weekly series that unpacks current events in China, and the Editor-at-Large for SupChina.com. Previously, Mr. Kuo worked as the Director of International Communications for Baidu.
Jun 22, 2018
Unpacking U.S.-China Trade Relations: A Conversation with Dan Rosen
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This episode discusses recent tensions in the U.S.-China trade relationship, including the demands from each side as well as the implications of a U.S.-China trade war. Our guest, Dan Rosen, joins us to discuss the Trump administration’s approach to trade relations with China, the significance of the widening bilateral trade deficit, and the ideal outcomes for both countries. He also expands upon the growing intersections between U.S. economic and security policy in regards to China.   Dan Rosen is a founding partner of Rhodium Group with extensive experience analyzing China’s economy and U.S.-China economic relations. He is also an adjunct associate professor at Columbia University and is affiliated with a number of economics-focused U.S. think tanks. Dan was previously Senior Advisor for International Economic Policy at the White House National Economic Council and National Security Council.
Jun 08, 2018
The Erosion of China’s Reform Era: A Conversation with Carl Minzner
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This episode discusses the impact of China’s authoritarian system on its emergence as a great power. Our guest, Carl Minzner, joins us to discuss his book, End of an Era: How China’s Authoritarian Revival is Undermining Its Rise, where he argues that China’s stagnant government system is slowly erasing the positive changes of the reform era. Carl Minzner is a professor at the Fordham University School of Law, where he specializes in Chinese law and governance. He previously served as Senior Counsel for the Congressional-Executive Commission on China. Additionally, he was an International Affairs Fellow for the Council on Foreign Relations and a Yale-China Legal Education Fellow at the Xibei Institute of Politics.
May 22, 2018
Growing Friction in US-China Relations: A Conversation with Da Wei
1969
This episode dissects current dynamics between the US and China, addressing the reasons for increased friction and competition in the bilateral relationship. Our guest, Professor Da Wei, joins us to discuss how both countries view the relationship today and how these perspectives have changed as the US-China power gap has narrowed. He also analyzes the nuances in terminology used to describe China and its relationship with the US, and forecasts the likely future direction of US-China relations. Dr. Da Wei is Assistant President as well as a professor at the University of International Relations in Beijing. He also serves as the director of the University’s Center for International Strategy and Security Studies. Previously, Da Wei was director of the Institute of American Studies at the China Institutes of Contemporary International Relations (CICIR). His research fields include US-China relations, American and Chinese foreign policy, and security policies.  
May 02, 2018
Implications of China’s Government Restructuring: A Conversation with Yanmei Xie
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This episode focuses on the recent restructuring of China’s government, which was announced on March 20, 2018 during the 13 National People’s Congress. Our guest, Yanmei Xie, joins us to discuss the various aspects of this reorganization. She also analyzes the implications of these changes for Chinese foreign policy. Yanmei Xie is a senior China policy analyst at Gavekal, a global investment research firm, where she writes about China’s politics and their impact on the Chinese and global economy. She previously worked at the International Crisis Group as a senior analyst focusing on the Asia Pacific and China’s influence in Africa.
Apr 10, 2018
Chinese Investments in the US Face Growing Scrutiny: A Conversation with Mario Mancuso
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This episode focuses on the proposed changes to the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States’ (CFIUS) review process and what that might mean for Chinese investment in the United States. Our guest, Mario Mancuso, joins us to discuss how CFIUS generally evaluates the national security risk profile of an investment. He also analyzes how Chinese transactions may be perceived against the backdrop of intensifying strategic competition between the two countries.  , which aims to help buyers, sellers, and other interested parties think through the CFIUS review process.of A Dealmaker’s Guide to CFIUSMr. Mario Mancuso is a Partner at Kirkland & Ellis LLP where he leads the firm’s International Trade and National Security practice. Mr. Mancuso has formerly served as the Under Secretary of Commerce for Industry and Security and is the author 
Mar 30, 2018
China’s Tango with Latin America and the Caribbean: A Conversation with Evan Ellis
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This episode focuses on China’s growing trade, investment, and diplomatic activities in Latin America and the Caribbean. Our guest, Dr. Evan Ellis, joins us to discuss China’s interests and influence in the region and the ways in which Beijing interacts with Latin American and Caribbean nations. Dr. Ellis also examines the perceptions of China’s activities in the region, and how the United States is responding China’s increasing involvement in its traditional sphere of influence.   Dr. Evan Ellis is a research professor of Latin American Studies at the US Army War College Strategic Studies Institute. His research focuses on Latin America’s relationships with China and other non-Western Hemisphere actors.
Mar 16, 2018
China’s Polar Push: A Conversation with Marc Lanteigne
1800
This episode focuses on China’s increasing diplomatic and scientific activity in the Arctic, and comes as China has released its first Arctic policy White Paper, which outline an ambitious “Polar Silk Road” plan and defines China as a near-Arctic state. Our guest, Marc Lanteigne, joins us to discuss the history of Chinese involvement in the Arctic and in which areas China is ramping up its activities in the region, particularly in the shaping of norms and economic development. Dr. Lanteigne explains how each of the Arctic Council members views China’s approach and how the United States and others should prepare to manage relations as the Chinese regional presence continues to grow.   Dr. Marc Lanteigne is a Senior Lecturer in Security Studies in the Centre for Defence and Security Studies at Massey University in New Zealand. His research focuses on the foreign and domestic politics of China as well as the international relations and non-traditional security of Northeast Asia, Oceania and the polar regions.
Feb 26, 2018
Great Power Competition in Central Asia: A Conversation with Theresa Sabonis-Helf
1806
In this episode, we discuss China’s growing influence and involvement in Central Asia as it seeks to implement its ambitious Belt and Road Initiative. Professor Theresa Sabonis-Helf joins us to speak about the various development projects currently taking place in the region and how Chinese involvement in the region has affected Chinese-Russian relations, the role of the United States, and the priorities and points of contention for each of these larger powers in the region. Dr. Theresa Sabonis-Helf is a professor of National Security Strategy at the National War College and an Adjunct Associate Professor for the Science, Technology and International Affairs Program of the Georgetown University School of Foreign Service. Dr. Sabonis-Helf advises governments on climate change policies, post-Soviet energy and environmental issues, regional energy trade, and the politics of electricity. The views expressed here are those of Dr. Sabonis-Helf alone. They in no way represent the policies or positions of the U.S. National Defense University, the Department of Defense, or any other organization of the U.S. government.
Feb 12, 2018
Power Dynamics and the “Two Asias”: A Conversation with Evan Feigenbaum
1802
This episode examines the development of two competing conceptions of Asia - an “Economic Asia,” characterized by trade integration and a rising tide of interconnected growth, and a “Security Asia” beset by powerful nationalisms and clashing security concepts. After reviewing the predictions he made in a co-authored 2012 essay about Asia’s trajectory, our guest, Evan Feigenbaum, discusses how China and the United States exert influence and the evolving roles of each in the region. He examines current trends to explore whether the model of two colliding “Asias” remains valid and where he believes the region is headed in the future. Dr. Evan Feigenbaum is Vice Chairman of the Paulson Institute at The University of Chicago and the Co-Founder of its new digital venture, MacroPolo. In October 2012, Dr. Feigenbaum’s essay, co-authored with Robert Manning in Foreign Policy and titled, “A Tale of Two Asias,” attacked the idea of a supposed “Asian Century." Dr. Feigenbaum leads the Paulson Institute’s political economy and investment-related programs, including the Institute’s think tank. He was twice a Deputy Assistant Secretary of State in the George W. Bush Administration.  
Feb 01, 2018
2017 ChinaPower Conference, Proposition 5: Economic Liberalization, Damien Ma v. Anne Stevenson-Yang
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Proposition: Xi Jinping will make economic liberalization a higher priority during his second term   FOR: Damien Ma Fellow and Associate Director, Think Tank, Paulson Institute Adjunct Lecturer of Global Initiatives in Management, Northwestern University   AGAINST: Anne Stevenson-Yang Co-Founder, Research Director, J Capital Research Co. Ltd.   Tuesday, November 14, 2017                                 The challenges and opportunities presented by China’s rise are hotly contested. ChinaPower's 2017 conference featured leading experts from both China and the U.S. to debate core issues underpinning the nature of Chinese power. Watch the videos and find out the poll results of the debates here.
Jan 23, 2018
2017 ChinaPower Conference, Proposition 4, Leadership in Asia, Chen Dingding v. Evan Feigenbaum
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Proposition: Beijing will effectively utilize the uncertainty of the Trump presidency to firmly establish China as the leader of Asia   FOR: Chen Dingding Professor of International Relations, Jinan University Founding Director, Intellisia Institute   AGAINST: Evan Feigenbaum Vice Chairman, Paulson Institute   Tuesday, November 14, 2017   The challenges and opportunities presented by China’s rise are hotly contested. ChinaPower's 2017 conference featured leading experts from both China and the U.S. to debate core issues underpinning the nature of Chinese power. Watch the videos and find out the poll results of the debates here.  
Jan 23, 2018
2017 ChinaPower Conference, Proposition 2: China-U.S. Risk of War, Graham Allison v. Evan Medeiros
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Proposition: There is a growing risk of war between the U.S. and China   FOR: Graham Allison  Douglas Dillon Professor of Government, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University   AGAINST: Evan Medeiros Managing Director for Asia, Eurasia Group   Tuesday, November 14, 2017   The challenges and opportunities presented by China’s rise are hotly contested. ChinaPower's 2017 conference featured leading experts from both China and the U.S. to debate core issues underpinning the nature of Chinese power. Watch the videos and find out the poll results of the debates here.
Jan 23, 2018
2017 ChinaPower Conference, Proposition 1: Belt and Road Initiative, Zhou Fangyin v. Joshua Eisenman
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Proposition: The Belt and Road Initiative will achieve China's desired strategic and economic gains   FOR: Zhou Fangyin Senior Institute of Asia-Pacific Studies Researcher, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences   AGAINST: Joshua Eisenman Assistant Professor of Public Affairs, Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, The University of Texas at Austin   Tuesday, November 14, 2017   The challenges and opportunities presented by China’s rise are hotly contested. ChinaPower's 2017 conference featured leading experts from both China and the U.S. to debate core issues underpinning the nature of Chinese power. Watch the videos and find out the poll results of the debates here.  
Jan 23, 2018
China’s First Overseas Military Base: A Conversation with Erica Downs and Jeffrey Becker
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In this episode, Dr. Erica Downs and Dr. Jeffrey Becker join us to discuss the recent opening of a Chinese military facility in Djibouti, China’s first overseas naval base. Our conversation examines China’s strategic objectives in establishing the base and the missions that it will serve. The conversation then looks more broadly at what this base means for Chinese military strategy, how the base could strengthen China’s economic outreach, and what China’s expanded naval presence means for the United States. Dr. Erica Downs and Dr. Jeffrey Becker are senior analysts at the Center for Naval Analyses’ China Studies Division. Dr. Downs and Becker are the authors of a report titled “China’s Military Support Facility in Djibouti: The Economic and Security Dimensions of China’s First Overseas Base” (2017).
Jan 19, 2018
China’s Approach to the Developing World: A Conversation with Joshua Eisenman
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This episode discusses China’s development policies and engagement with the developing world, particularly examining President Xi Jinping’s Belt and Road Initiative. Our guest, Dr. Joshua Eisenman, joins us to explain why China uses these particular policies and approaches with the developing world, how it differs from the policies of the United States, and how these policies can help further China’s interests. Joshua Eisenman is an Assistant Professor of Public Affairs at the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs at The University of Texas at Austin and a senior fellow for China studies at the American Foreign Policy Council (AFPC) in Washington, DC. He is the co-editor of the upcoming book entitled China Steps Out: Beijing’s Major Power Engagement with the Developing World (Routledge, 2018), which analyses China’s strategies in various regions of the developing world and evaluates their effectiveness.
Dec 21, 2017
China’s Political Influence Activities: A Conversation with Anne-Marie Brady
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This episode focuses on China’s political influence activities beyond its borders, as it seeks to shape both public opinion and domestic policy of countries around the world. Our guest, Anne-Marie Brady, discusses her new report from the Woodrow Wilson Center, titled “Magic weapons: China’s Political influence activities under Xi Jinping,” and how China has sought to influence both New Zealand’s domestic politics and its public perception of China. Professor Brady explores the history of the Chinese Communist Party’s United Front Department, and the various methods it uses to influence policy in various countries. She also discusses how politicians should strive to guard against this type of meddling in the internal politics of their countries. Dr. Anne-Marie Brady is a professor at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand and a global fellow with the Kissinger Institute on China and the United States’ Polar Initiative at the Wilson Center. Dr. Brady is the Executive Editor of The Polar Journal. Her research focuses on Chinese domestic and foreign politics as well as polar politics.
Dec 04, 2017
Implications of the 19th Party Congress: A Conversation with Peter Mattis
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In this episode, we examine what transpired at the Chinese Communist Party’s 19 Party Congress. We discuss the significance of the Party Congress’ outcomes and its implications for Chinese President Xi's authority. What will Xi do with his growing power? Peter Mattis is a Fellow in the China Program at The Jamestown Foundation, where he served as editor of the foundation’s China Brief, a biweekly electronic journal on greater China, from 2011 to 2013. He previously worked in the U.S. Government and the National Bureau of Asian Research. He is the author of Analyzing the Chinese Military: A Review Essay and Resource Guide on the People’s Liberation Army (2015).
Nov 20, 2017