WSJ’s The Future of Everything

By The Wall Street Journal

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Subscribers: 4697
Reviews: 4

A Podcast Republic user
 Sep 7, 2018

Maxim BY
 Aug 2, 2018
wonderful, insightful and interesting for even the knowledgable

Anne
 Aug 2, 2018

A Podcast Republic user
 Jul 18, 2018

Description

What will the future look like? The Future of Everything offers a kaleidoscope view of the nascent trends that will shape our world. In every episode, join our award-winning team on a new journey of discovery. We’ll take you beyond what’s already out there, and make you smarter about the scientific and technological breakthroughs on the horizon that could transform our lives for the better. Hosted by Janet Babin.

Episode Date
Designing the Office of the Future: Building Serendipity
1125
The pandemic has changed the way we work and where we work. Now, as companies try to coax their employees back to the office, they are encountering new demands and shifting expectations. In this episode, we bring you a conversation from WSJ’s CEO Council Summit between world-renowned designer Thomas Heatherwick, who has spearheaded huge office complexes including Google’s new Charleston East headquarters in California, and London Business School professor Lynda Gratton, who studies how people and organizations interact. They detail why office spaces must be flexible, but also encourage “serendipity” to facilitate vibrant and productive work. 2022 WSJ CEO Council  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 13, 2022
The Human Genome “Rosetta Stone” and The Future of Health
1249
One person’s junk is another person’s treasure. Sometimes it’s even true in science. Nearly 20 years ago, researchers said they had completed a groundbreaking project, sequencing the human genome. But they were missing about 8%. Some researchers at the time called the missing pieces “junk.” Still, a team of about 100 researchers kept going and has now finished a truly complete sequence. It’s a genomic “Rosetta Stone,” a reference guide capable of revealing what makes humans, human. One of the lead authors, Dr. Evan Eichler, tells us how filling in the gaps will improve the way we understand disease and advance personalized medicine. Full research article from the Telomere-to-Telomere (T2T) Consortium: The complete sequence of a human genome Read more from the Wall Street Journal: First ‘Gapless’ Human Genome Map Is Unveiled, Years After Prior Effort  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 15, 2022
Introducing ‘As We Work’
1851
“As We Work” is a new podcast from the Wall Street Journal about the changing workplace and what you need to know to navigate it. Every week, we’ll speak with experts, Journal reporters, and you about how our jobs intersect with everything else. In season one, we break down how our relationship to work has evolved in the wake of the pandemic and other social phenomena. Hosted by Tess Vigeland. For further reading on pay transparency, check out WSJ reporter Chip Cutter's January article "You'll Soon Get to See Pay on NYC Job Postings," as well as Dr. Jake Rosenfeld's book "You're Paid What You're Worth – and Other Myths of the Modern Economy." Questions? Story ideas? Want to tell us how much you make? Email us at AsWeWork@wsj.com. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 01, 2022
After Higgs Boson: Physics’ Next Move to Understand the Universe
1898
It’s been more than a decade since the European Organization for Nuclear Research (known as CERN) discovered the Higgs Boson, using their gigantic particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider. After three years of upgrades, they’re turning the world’s largest machine back on. What secrets of the universe are they hoping to discover? Will there be another “God Particle” moment? And are these expensive, high-energy colliders the best way forward in physics? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 18, 2022
Dark Matter, Public Enemy and the Future of Physics
1389
Physicist Stephon Alexander was born in Trinidad and grew up in a working class household in the Bronx. Now he’s a professor at Brown University and president of the National Society of Black Physicists. Speaking with host Janet Babin, Alexander discusses how his latest book, "Fear of a Black Universe: An Outsider's Guide to the Future of Physics" was inspired by cultural icons like the hip hop group Public Enemy and artist Jean-Michel Basquiat and why being an "outsider" could help the world answer some of the most pressing questions for the future of physics. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 25, 2022
Migratory Birds Struggle and Adapt to a Challenging Future
1591
Long-time naturalist and writer Scott Weidensaul has spent decades tracking migratory birds and studying their habits. But there's still a lot science doesn't know. In this episode of The Future of Everything, we talk to Weidensaul about the findings of his latest book, "A World On The Wing”, including the risks facing migrators and why unraveling their mysteries might have implications for the future of mankind. To read Weidensaul's "A World On The Wing: The Global Odyssey of Migratory Birds" visit: https://bit.ly/3rtvUJq Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 04, 2022
Historical Soundscapes Reveal Quieter Future For Natural World
1853
A group of researchers reconstructed historical soundscapes using bird data to hear the impact of dramatic declines in birds throughout the world. Host Janet Babin and former WSJ science writer Robert Lee Hotz explore how these declines in our natural soundscapes could have negative impacts on avian evolution, as well as humans in the future. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 21, 2022
Why Finding the Origins of Covid-19 Matters for the Next Pandemic
2004
It's been more than two years since the global pandemic started, and the search for the origin of the virus continues. Scientists, government agencies and the World Health Organization-as well as our own Wall Street Journal reporters-have tried to nail down whether the pandemic began when an animal transferred the virus to humans, or if it came out of a laboratory accident. But the hunt has been marred by secrecy and confusion. In this episode: why it's so important to find answers, and what new monitoring systems are being developed to ease identification of future viral outbreaks. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 31, 2021
How Psychedelic Drugs Are Making A Comeback To Treat Depression
2235
The hallucinogenic compound psilocybin is undergoing a renaissance-not as a recreational drug but as a potential treatment for mental health conditions. We follow the journey of one participant of a scientific study into the psychedelic drug's effect on depression. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 17, 2021
Superconductivity: One Step Closer
1957
Superconductivity means zero wasted electricity; perfectly conducted energy. Typically it's been made using either super high pressure or extremely low temperatures. This makes it inefficient and expensive for practical use. But in an incremental first, researchers have managed to create a superconducting material that works at room temperature and with less pressure. If we could create this technology large-scale, it would completely revolutionize our energy grid and the way we travel. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 26, 2021
Zero Carbon Future 4: Adaptation and the Future of Climate Modeling
2166
While world leaders and businesses are making pledges to mitigate climate change by reducing their greenhouse gas emissions, many parts of the world are already struggling to adapt to a warming planet. The Far North - places like Siberia and Alaska, parts of which are warming three times faster than the global average - are ground zero. In this episode, we look at how they are dealing with thawing permafrost; the struggle to pay for adaptation in other U.S. cities; and why scientists say future climate models need to become more granular, to help communities prepare. Ann Simmons weighs in from Russia and Georgi Kantchev joins from Germany. Emily Schwing reports from Alaska. With science writer Robert Lee Hotz. Janet Babin hosts Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 12, 2021
Zero Carbon Future 3: Suck it Up - Capturing Carbon from the Air
1454
Experts agree that removing carbon from the atmosphere will be necessary, regardless of increases in clean energy production and storage. The process can be done both naturally and mechanically. Climate scientists say all types of carbon capture will be needed to bring down the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. We explain what methods are being used now, explore the challenges of the technology, and how carbon pricing might impact innovation and the business of carbon capture. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 29, 2021
Introducing Bad Bets
1840
Bad Bets is a new podcast series from The Wall Street Journal that unravels big-business dramas that have had a big impact on our world. This season, we're delving into Enron. In 2001, energy company Enron was at the height of its power. Then, out of the blue, CEO Jeffrey Skilling resigned-just six months after he took the reins of a company he had helped turn into an innovation machine. Why? In this episode, we dive into the first cracks in the Enron facade. John Emshwiller is the host of this season of Bad Bets. John and his Journal colleague Rebecca Smith did the original reporting on which this season is based. Bad Bets is a production of The Wall Street Journal. This season was produced in collaboration with Neon Hum Media. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 23, 2021
Zero Carbon Future 2: How to Store Renewable Energy For a Rainy Day
1582
One of the challenges of clean energy like wind or solar is that they fluctuate. And they're unreliable. So finding a better way to store this energy for dark seasons and doldrum days is the next hurdle to reaching goals for decarbonization. In this episode, we explore options that are already being used, and some new methods still in beta. WSJ Senior Energy Correspondent Sarah McFarlane joins host Janet Babin. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 15, 2021
An Archipelago Leads the Way on Clean Energy
1992
A small Scottish community is perfecting new technologies that could help to power the green energy industry. Advances in wind and tidal power have turned the Orkney Islands into an exporter of renewable energy, instead of a fossil fuel importer. Rochelle Toplensky reports, Janet Babin hosts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 01, 2021
Paying for College and Curbing Student Debt
2069
Student loan debt is now around $1.6 trillion. Some economists fear that debt is irreparably harming the U.S. economy. But over the past 50 years, the availability of federal student loans has changed higher education. It's led to higher attendance rates, but also higher tuitions and higher expectations from the college experience. In this episode of The Future of Everything: what structural changes could improve the lending program going forward - and how that could change what college looks like in the future. With WSJ reporters Melissa Korn and Josh Mitchell. Janet Babin hosts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 28, 2021
Outhacking the Hackers: The Future of Cybersecurity
1498
A recent surge in high-profile cyber attacks has companies playing defense. Some are turning to ethical hackers to find software bugs before the bad guys do. But as Ava Sasani reports, researchers are also developing new hardware - to try and stop hackers in their tracks. Janet Babin hosts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 30, 2021
No More Noise 2: Metamaterials Can Make the World a Quieter Place
1423
Materials scientists are getting creative in the quest to quiet our increasingly noisy world. Using metamaterials - man made materials with special properties not found in nature - researchers could soon reduce or eliminate unwanted industrial sounds. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 02, 2021
No More Noise: Turning Down The Volume on Cities - Part 1
1745
The battle against noise has been waged, rather quietly, for decades. And yet, urban noise pollution is getting worse. A growing body of evidence indicates that it is more than a nuisance- persistent exposure to noise can cause chronic health issues. Anyone can be impacted, but marginalized communities most often live closer to sources of unwanted noise. In this episode, we look at the impacts of urban noise, new efforts to understand and track it and consider design solutions that can help mitigate unwanted sound. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 11, 2021
Grammy Award Winner Jacob Collier on Evolving in Place
1125
Singer-songwriter and producer Jacob Collier grew up producing music in his bedroom. After years of touring the world, the pandemic allowed him to return to that space - to continue developing his genre-bending music. In this episode, the five-time Grammy Award winner shares with host Janet Babin how the pandemic impacted his creative process, and how participatory music along with social media kept him connected to his audience. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 14, 2021
Grammy-Award Nominated Music Producer Oak Felder Shares His Vision
1324
The pandemic forced artists and musicians to learn how to collaborate remotely. Some of these newfound methods were so successful, they'll likely influence the future of music creation and performance in the post-pandemic world. In this episode we talk with record producer Oak Felder about what the pandemic year taught him and how it will continue to influence his creative process. He'll be leading a workshop at the up-coming Future of Everything Festival. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 07, 2021
How NFTs Could Disrupt the Art Market
1963
After years of being a museum novelty, digital art is starting to sell like hotcakes--and in some cases for millions of dollars--because of a crypto asset called nonfungible tokens, or NFTs. And it isn't just art--sales of digital collectibles of all kinds are benefiting from these blockchain-based certificates of authenticity. NFTs are making the market more accessible for artists, but in the future, they also could disrupt the entire economy of the art market. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 16, 2021
What We Can Learn From 'Long Covid'
1583
Millions of people worldwide who survived an initial Covid-19 infection continue to struggle with debilitating symptoms months later. Physicians are unable to explain their illness. But there's now a name for it: Long Covid. The medical community is hoping that the data trove from Long Covid survivors can not only help them understand their conditions, but also how to treat illnesses with similar symptoms. In a previous version of this podcast released on March 26, we said that Body Politic published survey results in December. The Patient-Led Research Collaborative for Covid-19 published the paper. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 26, 2021
How Psychedelic Drugs Are Making a Comeback to Treat Depression
2210
The hallucinogenic compound psilocybin is undergoing a renaissance-not as a recreational drug but as a potential treatment for mental health conditions. We follow the journey of one participant of a scientific study into the psychedelic drug's effect on depression. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 05, 2021
Metals That Work Like Magic
1895
Trains that run from New York to California in a few hours, laptops that never overheat, and rockets that fly to Jupiter: These are some of the possibilities of superconductivity. After decades of failed experiments, a new discovery may have just gotten us a step closer. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 12, 2021
How the Pandemic Fueled Scientific Discovery and Collaboration
2115
When Chinese researchers published the draft genome of the virus that causes Covid-19 early last January, it altered the course of the pandemic--and possibly changed science forever. Will this spirit of information-sharing and collaboration persist beyond the current crisis? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 15, 2021
E-Ternal: New Technology and the Quest to 'Live' Forever
1742
In this episode, we feature a short documentary by Wall Street Journal senior personal technology columnist Joanna Stern that explores how we can use technology to tell our stories long after we die. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 18, 2020
Making a Home on the Moon
1850
For the vast majority of humans, earth is our home. But that could soon change. Global efforts are underway to build sustainable habitats on the moon within the next decade or two. But beyond covering the necessities in an otherwise uninhabitable environment, we'll also need to consider the psychological effects of living in space, and what it will take to make the moon feel more like home. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 04, 2020
Teacher's New Assistant: Artificial Intelligence
1833
Schools around the world are slowly adopting artificial intelligence to better tailor teaching to individual kids. One program maps a student's mastery of math; another assesses literacy and screens for dyslexia. Critics are skeptical that this technology is as effective as promised. Could surveilling students in this way do more harm than good? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 06, 2020
Mobile Voting's Future
1631
As the U.S. gets ready for an election during a pandemic, we report on in-person voting options and review the security threats inherent in mobile or blockchain assisted voting. In a previous version of this podcast released on Oct. 2, we said that Bradley Tusk was funding mobile voting apps, including the Voatz app. Tusk Philanthropies has given funding to voting precincts to launch mobile voting pilot programs - not to the apps themselves. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 03, 2020
The Blood of the Future Could be Made in a Lab
1686
The coronavirus pandemic led to blood-donation shortages across the world, outlining the fragility of the pipeline. That has brought fresh urgency to research that has been decades in the making but is only now starting to become a reality: The production of artificial blood. Last year, researchers began a pioneering clinical trial, and more are on the way, bringing us closer to a world where blood factories augment supplies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 04, 2020
How to Talk to Animals (and Know What They're Saying Back)
1758
What if we could alert whales to stay away from oil spills? Or hear from dolphins directly when they want treats? Seamless conversation between animals and humans is still a far-off goal. But scientists think that machine-learning tools could open the door to communication with marine mammals. Listen to the first part of this two-part series, Google AI Tries to Save the Whales. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 28, 2020
Google AI Tries to Save the Whales
1982
In the Pacific Northwest, an increase in shipping traffic is further threatening the orca population, which has already seen its numbers drop in the face of food shortages and climate change. One of the biggest threats from the boats is noise pollution, which interferes with the whales' ability to communicate. Engineers at a unit of Google may have an answer: An alert system that relies on artificial intelligence. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 14, 2020
Traveling With Tech Made for the World's Fastest Sailboats
1511
The America's Cup, the world's oldest sailing competition, has a reputation for fostering innovation. In 2013, contestants began to use hydrofoils-underwater wings on the hull-to lift their boats out of the water during the race, allowing them to reach highway speeds and revolutionizing the sport. An Olympic sailor and a billionaire oil trader are now reimagining the technology to make passenger ferries faster and more eco-friendly. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 17, 2020
Technology Helps Train Police Officers
1573
In recent weeks, protests have erupted in response to police violence against citizens - specifically communities of color - forcing departments to reconsider how officers do their jobs. Police forces have been using tech - like Tasers and body cameras - to try and reduce the use of lethal force and improve accountability. In this episode, we'll explore how emerging technology - like virtual reality training - could improve police training by boosting empathy and tackling racial bias. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 03, 2020
The Super Powers of Bats and the Fight to Stop Deadly Viruses
1459
The tiny, flying creatures carry all sorts of viruses but don't get sick. How do they do that? We meet the researchers who are mapping bat genomes and studying the animal's ability to fend off inflammation. What they find could help humans better combat the next pandemic. Special thanks to Bradley Klein for allowing us to use his bat call sounds. He's given bat walks in New York's Central Park and surrounding areas for more than a decade. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 05, 2020
How Polio Research is Helping in the Hunt for a Vaccine
1433
Research on a vaccine for the new coronavirus is progressing swiftly because of the legacy of scientists working on past diseases. Some of society's most devastating viruses ended up improving the way we study illness and search for cures. We explore the thread that connects research on polio and the new virus, SARS-CoV-2, and consider whether the pandemic will inform future generations of virologists. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 22, 2020
Dead or Alive, Viruses are Everywhere, and Here to Stay
1119
Viruses are ubiquitous, found in every crevice on earth. Some, like SARS CoV 2, can end up killing their hosts. But researchers credit ancient viruses with helping us form long term memories. As parts of the world reopen for business, we consider how these little packets of genetic material are not just our enemy, but helped us to evolve. Viruses, it turns out, shaped our genome, and will like be part of our evolutionary future. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 08, 2020
Covid-19 and AI: Tracking a Virus, Finding a Treatment
1435
Artificial Intelligence can speed up research and improve accuracy. Those qualities are also key to suppressing the spread of Covid-19. With the globe clamoring for solutions to the pandemic, institutions, governments, universities and startups are turning to AI to shave precious time off the quest for a Covid-19 cure. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 17, 2020
China is Ready for CBD. But Regulators Might Not Be.
993
The market for hemp-based CBD products is exploding. And China wants in on the potential profits. But CBD is highly regulated in China, and THC is illegal. Will China make room for this lucrative product? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 29, 2020
AI Hiring, Never Retiring: Working in the 21st Century
1707
The nature of work is evolving. Technology is already an integral part of most jobs, but new developments are changing the way we navigate the workplace. From hiring managers using artificial intelligence and virtual reality, to apps that help workers find their way through maze-like mega offices, the office of tomorrow is already being tested. And lots of people are wondering if technological advancements will keep them working forever. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 15, 2020
Family Secrets: DNA Tests and the Future of Family
1924
The clues to heredity hidden in our DNA have long been the purview of scientists. But in recent years, commercial DNA tests have made unlocking those secrets cheaper and easily accessible for millions of people. While most just find out about their ancestry, for some, the tests have opened Pandora's box. WSJ's Amy Dockser Marcus introduces us to three different stories of DNA tests with unexpected consequences. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 18, 2019
On The Alert: The Next Generation Of Earthquake Early Warning Systems
1556
For the past few decades, governments in earthquake-prone regions have built up early warning systems. Now, private tech companies are getting into the earthquake business. (Reporters Daniela Hernandez and Robbie Whelan) Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 04, 2019
WSJ Tech Live: The State of Play
1441
The global videogame industry is worth an estimated $150 billion-and it's rapidly growing and evolving. As part of the WSJ Tech Live conference, columnist Jason Gay spoke with Andrew Wilson, chief executive of Electronic Arts, the maker of 'Apex Legends,' 'Need for Speed,' 'FIFA' and 'The Sims,' about how esports, mobile gaming on social networks and mixed-reality games are changing the way people play. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 20, 2019
WSJ Tech Live: Where AI Is Headed Next
1603
Artificial intelligence has been compared to electricity, meaning that it will soon be integral to the world as we know it. There's an arms race for global dominance in AI, especially between the U.S. and China. But what do experts in the field have to say? Where are they optimistic, where do they see challenges-and where are they raising red flags? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 06, 2019
WSJ Tech Live: The Next Big Thing
1256
What will keep the engine of tech innovation running in an era of skeptical users and wary regulators? From driverless cars to outer-space colonies, two moonshot thinkers talk about their cutting-edge work and how calculated risks may spark the next giant leap for mankind. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 23, 2019
Custom Parts: The Future of Transplanted Organs
1080
Demand for donated organs far outstrips supply. But researchers are working to remedy the crisis using everything from gene-edited pigs to 3D-printed tissue. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 09, 2019
Customized Kids: Are Designer Babies on the Way?
1084
Advances in gene editing and DNA analysis are allowing parents unprecedented control over the traits their children will inherit. We explore the science-and ethics-behind the movement. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 25, 2019
Get Ready for Gene-Edited Food
961
Vegetables engineered with the gene-editing technology Crispr are moving closer to supermarket shelves. The U.S. Department of Agriculture has decided these genetically altered foods won't require a special label. But will they curry favor with consumers? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 11, 2019
Can Gene-Edited Mice Solve the Lyme Crisis?
1148
Lyme disease is rampant on Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket. MIT scientists believe that releasing genetically altered mice on the islands could curb-and even wipe out-the disease. A close look at an unprecedented environmental intervention. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 28, 2019
The De-Extinction Movement Comes to Life
933
In labs around the world, scientists are using gene-editing technology to revive species that disappeared from the face of the Earth long, long ago. In this episode, we talk to the researchers working on a project straight out of science fiction. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 14, 2019
How Robots Will Feed Our On-Demand Culture
883
For decades, we've dreamt of an all-purpose robot that can cater to our every need. Silicon Valley is trying to catch up with that vision. One company is starting with a task already consuming our economy: home delivery. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 31, 2019