The Week in Art

By The Art Newspaper

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From breaking news and insider insights to exhibitions and events around the world, the team at The Art Newspaper picks apart the art world's big stories with the help of special guests. An award-winning podcast hosted by Ben Luke, The Week in Art is sponsored by Christie's.

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Episode Date
Kusama x Louis Vuitton: art and luxury. Plus, Michael Rakowitz’s Tate/Iraq gift and photographer Rosy Martin
1:01:12

This week: as robotic figures of the Japanese artist Yayoi Kusama appear in windows of Louis Vuitton stores in New York, London and Tokyo, Ben Luke talks to Federica Carlotto, a specialist in art and luxury, about the latest collaboration between Kusama and the LVMH brand. What does it tell us about what the former creative director of Louis Vuitton, Marc Jacobs, called the “monumental marriage between art and commerce”? Also this week, the artist Michael Rakowitz hopes to give a public sculpture he made for Trafalgar Square in London to Tate Modern and an Iraqi institution. He explains how it prompted Iraq to request the return of one of the lamassu, the ancient Assyrian sculptures that inspired Rakowitz’s work, from the British Museum to its country of origin. And this episode’s Work of the Week is I didn’t put myself down for sainthood (2018), a piece made by Rosy Martin in collaboration with Verity Welstead. The photographic ensemble is in the opening displays of the new Centre of British Photography in London. We speak to James Hyman, the art dealer, collector and co-founder of the centre, about the work.


You can hear our interview with Michael Rakowitz when he unveiled the sculpture in Trafalgar Square in the episode from 22 March 2018 and an in-depth conversation with Michael in the episode of the A brush with… podcast from 9 June 2021.


Headstrong: Women and Empowerment, Centre for British Photography, London, until 23 April.



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Jan 27, 2023
Van Gogh’s Sunflowers legal dispute. Plus, Singapore’s art scene and photographer Grace Lau
40:39

Vincent Van Gogh’s Sunflowers in Tokyo are the subject of a legal claim in the US relating to Nazi loot. The Art Newspaper’s London correspondent and resident Van Gogh expert Martin Bailey tells us why Sunflowers (1888-89) is at the centre of the dispute, 35 years after it was sold for a record price at auction, and why the heirs of the German Jewish banker Paul von Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, who owned it until the 1930s, now value it at a staggering $250m. Our editor-at-large Georgina Adam has just returned from Singapore, where the first Art SG art fair took place last week. How successful was this new event in the art market calendar, and what does it tell us about Singapore’s ambitions to become an art hub? And this episode’s Work of the Week is Portraits in a Chinese Studio, a photographic work by the artist Grace Lau. In the project, which marks Chinese New Year, Lau is subverting the tradition of colonial 19th-century portrait studios in a shopping centre in Southampton on the south coast of the UK.


Grace Lau: Portraits in a Chinese Studio, Marlands Shopping Centre, Southampton, UK, 21 January-12 February



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Jan 20, 2023
The art world in 2023: market predictions, big shows, museum openings
1:14:26

In the first episode of the year, we look ahead at the next 12 months. Anny Shaw, the acting art market editor at The Art Newspaper, peers into her crystal ball and tries to predict the fortunes of the art market this year. Then, Jane Morris, one of our editors-at-large, José da Silva, our exhibitions editor, and host Ben Luke select the museum projects, biennales and exhibitions that they are most looking forward to in 2023.


Events discussed:


The Grand Egyptian Museum: no confirmed opening date. https://www.theartnewspaper.com/keywords/grand-egyptian-museum


The National Portrait Gallery reopens on 22 June. https://www.npg.org.uk/


Factory International, Manchester, also opens in June. Yayoi Kusama’s You Me and the Balloons opens there on 29 June, as does the Manchester International Festival. https://factoryinternational.org/


The Sharjah Biennial: Thinking Historically in the Present opens on 7 February. https://sharjahart.org/biennial-15


The Gwangju Biennial: Soft and Weak Like Water opens on 7 April. https://www.gwangjubiennale.org/gb/intro.do


Celebration Picasso 1973-2023 https://celebracionpicasso.es/en/calendario


Vermeer opens at the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, on 10 February. https://www.rijksmuseum.nl/en/stories/themes/vermeer


Manet/Degas opens at the at the Musée d’Orsay, Paris, on 28 March and then at the Metropolitan Museum, New York, on 24 September https://www.musee-orsay.fr/en/whats-on/exhibitions/manet-degas


Juan de Pareja: Afro-Hispanic Painter, opens at the Met on 3 April https://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2023/juan-de-pareja


Simone Leigh opens at the ICA, Boston, on 6 April, then at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington D.C., on 3 November before travelling to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Californian African American Museum in 2024 https://www.icaboston.org/exhibitions/simone-leigh


Barkley Hendricks: Portraits at the Frick opens at Frick Madison, New York, on 21 September https://www.frick.org/sites/default/files/pdf/press/2022/Hendricks_Release_Final_07_13_22.pdf


Alma Thomas: Composing Colour is at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, in D.C., from 15 September https://americanart.si.edu/exhibitions/alma-thomas


The Culture: Hip Hop and Contemporary Art in the 21st Century opens at the Baltimore Museum of Art on 5 April and the Saint Louis Art Museum on 25 August https://artbma.org/about/press/release/baltimore-museum-of-art-and-saint-louis-art-museum-co-organize-monumental-exhibition-exploring-the-global-significance-and-impact-of-hip-hop


Jaune Quick-to-See Smith opens at the Whitney Museum, New York, on 19 April https://whitney.org/exhibitions/jaune-quick-to-see-smith


Remedios Varo: Science Fictions is at the Art Institute of Chicago from 29 July


Hilma af Klint and Piet Mondrian: Forms of Life opens at Tate Modern in London on 20 April https://www.tate.org.uk/press/press-releases/hilma-af-klint-piet-mondrian-forms-of-life


Marina Abramovic is at the Royal Academy in London from 23 September https://www.royalacademy.org.uk/exhibition/marina-abramovic



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Jan 13, 2023
2022’s biggest art stories—and what they mean
1:14:54
It’s our final podcast of 2022 and so, as ever, we’re looking back at the worlds of art and heritage over the past 12 months. Ben Luke is joined by three members of The Art Newspaper team: Louisa Buck, contemporary art correspondent, Kabir Jhala, acting deputy art market editor, and Ben Sutton, editor in the Americas. Among much else, they discuss the effects of the war in Ukraine, Just Stop Oil’s activism, unionisation in US museums, the restitution of African and Native American (and Greek) objects, and the NFT crash. They also look at the big art shows and, finally, choose a work of the year.

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Dec 16, 2022
Parthenon Marbles: breakthrough in sight? Plus, Afghan culture in crisis and Kiki Smith’s New York murals
47:33
This week: the Parthenon Marbles; it has emerged that George Osborne, the former UK chancellor and now chair of the trustees of the British Museum, has been holding talks with the Greek government about the ancient sculptures. So might this lead to a breakthrough in the long-running dispute over their ownership? Ben Luke speaks to Yannis Andritsopoulos, the reporter for the Greek newspaper Ta Nea who broke the story. In Afghanistan, it is more than a year since the Taliban reclaimed power—so what has become of the heritage projects and art community in the country, which is consumed by a devastating humanitarian crisis? We hear from Sarvy Geranpayeh, who has regularly reported from Afghanistan for The Art Newspaper, about art and archeology under the Taliban. And this episode’s Work of the Week is a group of five murals by the German-born US artist Kiki Smith. The works are about to be unveiled at Grand Central Madison, the new Long Island Rail Road terminal below Grand Central on Madison Avenue, Manhattan. Smith tells us about the origin and development of her series of vast mosaics.

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Dec 09, 2022
Feast and famine: Miami millions and UK arts cuts. Plus, Ukrainian Modernism in Madrid
57:48

As Art Basel returns to Florida for the 20th anniversary of its Miami Beach art fair, Aimee Dawson, the acting digital editor at The Art Newspaper, talks to Anny Shaw, the acting art market editor, about the sales, news and talking points at the event that has become most synonymous with art-world excess. Meanwhile, after Arts Council England announced its funding allocation in November, arts organisations across the country, and especially in London, are reeling. Ben Luke talks to Jenni Lomax, the former director of the Camden Art Centre—the north London non-profit gallery whose funding has been cut by more than 30%. They discuss the effect of the cuts, and why the response from the visual arts community is relatively quiet compared to the uproar in the worlds of theatre and opera. And this episode’s Work of the Week is Oleksandr Bohomazov’s Sharpening the Saws (1927), a work from the National Art Museum of Ukraine in Kyiv. The painting is among a host of works moved from the war-torn country to the Thyssen-Bornemisza National Museum in Madrid for the exhibition In the Eye of the Storm: Modernism in Ukraine, 1900-1930s. Katia Denysova, the co-curator of the show, tells us about the picture, and the extraordinary journey it took from Kyiv to the Spanish capital.


Art Basel in Miami Beach until 3 December.


In the Eye of the Storm: Modernism in Ukraine, 1900-1930s, Thyssen-Bornemisza National Museum, Madrid, until 30 April 2023.



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Dec 02, 2022
Pussy Riot and Ragnar Kjartansson; Shirin Neshat on Iran; Puerto Rican art after Hurricane Maria
1:07:46

This week: as the exhibition Velvet Terrorism: Pussy Riot’s Russia opens at the Kling & Bang gallery in Reykjavik, Ben Luke talks to Masha Alekhina, one of the founding members of Pussy Riot, and the artist Ragnar Kjartansson, one of the co-curators of the show. As protests continue across Iran, Aimee Dawson, The Art Newspaper’s acting digital editor, speaks to Shirin Neshat, the artist whose work expressing solidarity with women in Iran was recently installed outside the Neue Nationalgalerie in Berlin. And this episode’s Work of the Week is by the Puerto Rican artist Gabriella Torres-Ferrer. Their 2018 sculpture—called Untitled (Value Your American Lie)—is part of a major new show at the Whitney Museum in New York, exploring art in Puerto Rico in the five years since the devastation wreaked by Hurricane Maria in 2017.


Velvet Terrorism: Pussy Riot’s Russia, Kling & Bang, Reykjavik, until 15 January 2023. Pussy Riot: Riot Days, National Theatre of Iceland, Reykjavik, 25 November. Proceeds from the concert and the exhibition go to supporting Ukraine. You can hear an in-depth interview with Ragnar Kjartansson from 2020 on our sister podcast A brush with… on the usual podcast platforms.


No existe un mundo poshuracán: Puerto Rican Art in the Wake of Hurricane Maria, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, until 23 Apr 2023.



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Nov 25, 2022
Art at Qatar’s World Cup; New York auctions; Mozambican artist Luis Meque
56:04

Ben Luke talks to Hannah McGivern, a correspondent for The Art Newspaper who has just been to Qatar, about the vast number of public art projects that will accompany the FIFA Men’s World Cup that begins there on Sunday 20 November. She also discusses the museums that Qatar plans to open by 2030. How does this explosion of cultural initiatives sit with Qatar’s record on human rights and treatment of low-paid migrant workers in the building of its cultural venues and World Cup stadia? It has been a heady fortnight of auctions in New York. Ben speaks to Georgina Adam, an editor-at-large at The Art Newspaper, about the highs and lows, and whether we can expect even more sales of blockbuster collections in the coming years. And this episode’s Work of the Week is an untitled painting by Luis Meque, an artist born in Mozambique who came to fame in the 1980s and early-1990s in Zimbabwe. Tandazani Dhlakama, the curator of the exhibition When We See Us: A Century of Black Figuration in Painting at Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa in Cape Town, tells us about Meque’s painting and his brief and brilliant life.


When We See Us: A Century of Black Figuration in Painting, Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa, Cape Town, South Africa, 20 November-3 September 2023



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Nov 18, 2022
Artists and climate action; US National Gallery of Art’s women artists fund; Paula Modersohn-Becker
52:33

This week: as the UN’s climate emergency summit, Cop27, continues in Egypt, Ben Luke talks to Louisa Buck, The Art Newspaper’s contemporary art correspondent—and the author of our online column about art and climate change—about international art initiatives responding to the crisis. Kaywin Feldman, the director of the National Gallery of Art (NGA) in Washington, DC, tells us about the museum’s new $10m endowment fund for purchases of works by women artists. The historic gift, from the family of the gallery’s first female president, Victoria P. Sant, will help the NGA fill gaps in its collection. And this episode’s Work of the Week is Mother with Child on her Arm, Nude II (1906) by the German painter Paula Modersohn-Becker. The work is a highlight of Making Modernism, a show of German women artists that opens this weekend at the Royal Academy in London. The exhibition’s curator, Dorothy Price, discusses this late painting in Modersohn-Becker’s short but productive life.


Making Modernism: Paula Modersohn-Becker, Käthe Kollwitz, Gabriele Münter and Marianne Werefkin, Royal Academy of Arts, London, 12 November-12 February 2023.



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Nov 11, 2022
National Gallery building row; contemporary art in Lagos; Chagall’s Falling Angel
1:08:27

This week: uproar over the National Gallery in London’s building plans—is it a sensitive makeover or like “an airport lounge”? We talk to the director of the National Gallery, Gabriele Finaldi, about the gallery’s controversial plans for changes to its Sainsbury Wing, and to Rowan Moore, architecture critic at the Observer, about his views on the designs by the architect Annabel Selldorf, and how they respond to Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown’s original Post-Modern building. Tokini Peterside-Schwebig, the director of Art X Lagos, tells us about the contemporary art scene in Nigeria’s most populous city, and how the fair is addressing the climate emergency, as devastating floods wreak havoc in West Africa. And this episode’s Work of the Week is Marc Chagall’s The Falling Angel (1923/1933/1947), the centrepiece of a new exhibition at the Schirn Kunsthalle in Frankfurt, Germany.


Art X Lagos, Federal Palace, Lagos, Nigeria, 5-6 November


Chagall: World in Turmoil, Schirn Kunsthalle, Frankfurt, Germany, until 19 February 2023



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Nov 04, 2022
Edward Hopper controversy; The Horror Show in London; a masterpiece in Bruges
1:01:50

This week: the recent opening of Edward Hopper’s New York at the Whitney Museum has reignited a controversy over the provenance of some of his works. We talk to the leading Hopper scholar Gail Levin about the story of Arthayer R. Sanborn, a Baptist Minister who befriended the Hopper family and eventually amassed a vast collection of memorabilia and art, some of which is in the Whitney Museum’s exhibition. In London, Iain Forsyth and Jane Pollard tell us about The Horror Show!, their exhibition looking at British culture over the past 50 years, and how artists, film-makers and musicians have used horror and fantasy as a means of exploring the political and social realities of the UK in that time. And this episode’s Work of the Week is the newly restored Death of the Virgin by the Flemish primitive painter Hugo van der Goes, which is the centrepiece of a new exhibition in Bruges.


Edward Hopper’s New York, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, until 5 March 2023.


Gail Levin’s website: gaillevin.commons.gc.cuny.edu


The Horror Show! A Twisted Tale of Modern Britain, Somerset House, London, until 19 February 2023


Face to Face with Death: Hugo van der Goes, Old Masters and New Interpretations, Sint-Janshospitaal, Bruges, Belgium, until 5 February 2023.



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Oct 27, 2022
Art attack: Just Stop Oil and iconoclasm; Art Basel’s Paris+ fair; Frank Bowling
1:06:00

This week: we talk to Emma Brown of Just Stop Oil about why the group targeted Vincent Van Gogh’s Sunflowers in the National Gallery, London, for its climate emergency protest. Stacy Boldrick, assistant professor of museum studies at the University of Leicester, discusses the climate protests in the context of the long history of iconoclasm and attacks on works of art. The first version of Paris+, Art Basel’s fair in the French capital, opened this week, and we ask Melanie Gerlis, a columnist for the Financial Times and The Art Newspaper, how it compares to Paris’s previous fair, Fiac, and to the Frieze fairs in London last week. And this episode’s Work of the Week is Frank Bowling’s Suncrush (1976), which features in an exhibition of the Guyana-born artist’s work at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. Reto Thüring, the curator of the show, tells us about the painting and Bowling’s 10-year stay in America in the 1960s and 1970s.


Links:


juststopoil.org


Stacy Boldrick, Iconoclasm and the Museum, Routledge, 212pp, £27.99, $35.96 (pb)


Paris+, until 23 October.


Melanie Gerlis, The Art Fair Story: a Rollercoaster Ride, Lund Humphries, 104pp, £19.99, $34.99 (hb)


Frank Bowling’s Americas, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 22 October-9 April 2023; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, 13 May-10 September next year. Related shows: Equals 6: A Sum Effect of Frank Bowling’s 5+1, University Hall Gallery, UMass Boston, 14 November-18 February 2023; Revisiting 5+1, Paul W. Zuccaire Gallery, Staller Center for the Arts, Stony Brook University, 10 November-23 February 2023.



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Oct 20, 2022
Art boom as the UK busts; Cecilia Vicuña; C20th women at Frieze; Modigliani in Philadelphia
1:14:29

This week: Ben Luke talks to Anny Shaw, a contributing editor at The Art Newspaper, about the atmosphere at the Frieze London and Frieze Masters fairs amid the UK’s economic struggles and the strong US dollar. They also discuss the booming market for so-called “ultra-contemporary” art, and a shift in the artists being bought by collectors. We then talk to Cecilia Vicuña, the Chilean artist and poet who, this year alone, has won the Golden Lion at the Venice Biennale, had a major exhibition at the Guggenheim Museum in New York and is the latest artist to take on the Turbine Hall commission at Tate Modern, where we caught up with her. Our acting digital editor, Aimee Dawson, talks to Camille Morineau, founder of the Paris-based organisation AWARE (Archives of Women Artists, Research and Exhibitions), about Spotlight, the section of Frieze Masters dedicated this year to women artists of the 20th century. And this episode’s Work of the Week is Boy in Short Pants (1918) by Amedeo Modigliani. We talk to Simonetta Fraquelli, the consulting curator for a new exhibition of Modigliani’s work at the Barnes Foundation in Philadelphia, about the painting.


Frieze London and Frieze Masters, Regents Park, London, until 16 October.


The Hyundai Commission: Cecilia Vicuña: Brain Forest Quipu, Tate Modern, London, until 16 April 2023; A Quipu of Encounters, Rituals and Assemblies, Tate Modern, from 14 October. Works by Cecilia Vicuña are at Lehmann Maupin, Frieze London, stand F2.


Modigliani Up Close, Barnes Foundation, Philadelphia, 16 October-29 January 2023.



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Oct 13, 2022
Multimillion Old Master upgrades; Monet and Joan Mitchell; Tudors in New York
1:00:53

This week: Georgina Adam joins Ben Luke to discuss the intriguing story of the bankrupt entrepreneur and art collector, the museum scholar and a host of Old Master paintings given new attributions. We talk to Suzanne Pagé, the curator of Monet-Mitchell, an exhibition bringing together the Impressionist Claude Monet and the post-war American abstract painter Joan Mitchell, at the Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris. And this episode’s Work of the Week is a 1583 painting of Elizabeth I of England, known as the Sieve Portrait, which is one of the highlights of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York’s exhibition The Tudors: Art and Majesty in Renaissance England. The show’s curators, Elizabeth Cleland and Adam Eaker, tell us about this richly layered picture.


Monet-Mitchell, Joan Mitchell retrospective, Fondation Louis Vuitton, Paris, until 27 February 2023. Joan Mitchell: Paintings, 1979-85, David Zwirner, New York, 3 November-17 December.


The Tudors: Art and Majesty in Renaissance England, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 10 October-8 January 2023



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Oct 06, 2022
Lucian Freud special: new perspectives, the artist’s letters and a horse painting
1:06:04

As a host of new exhibitions of the work of Lucian Freud opens across London to mark his centenary, this episode is all about this leading figure in post-war British painting. Ben Luke takes a tour of the major show at the National Gallery, which promises new perspectives on his work, with its curator, Daniel Herrmann. Martin Gayford discusses Freud’s little-explored letters, gathered in Love Lucian, a new book that Gayford has co-edited with Freud’s former assistant David Dawson. And this episode’s Work of the Week is the painting Mare Eating Hay (2006). The gallerist Pilar Ordovas, who worked closely with Freud in his later years, discusses the centrepiece of her new exhibition, Horses and Freud.


Lucian Freud: New Perspectives, National Gallery, London, 1 October– 2 January 2023


David Dawson and Martin Gayford (eds), Love Lucian: The Letters of Lucian Freud 1939-1954, Thames & Hudson, 392 pp, £65/$95 (hb)


Freud and Horses, Ordovas, until 16 December.


Other Freud exhibitions in London this autumn:

Lucian Freud: The Painter and His Family, Freud Museum, until 29 January 2023; Lucian Freud: B.A.T, Lyndsey Ingram, until 4 November; Lucian Freud: Interior Life, with photographs by David Dawson, Hazlitt Holland-Hibbert, 6 October-16 December; Lucian Freud: Plant Portraits, Garden Museum, 14 October-5 March 2023; Friends and Relations: Lucian Freud, Francis Bacon, Frank Auerbach, Michael Andrews, Gagosian Gallery, 18 November-28 January 2023



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Sep 29, 2022
Italy’s far right weaponises culture; Carnegie International; Maria Bartuszová
52:52

Amid growing support for hard-right parties in Europe, Ben Luke speaks to James Imam, The Art Newspaper’s Italian correspondent, about the far-right party Brothers of Italy, whose leader Georgia Meloni looks set to win power in the general election on 25 September. The party has given culture unusual prominence in its election campaign. The longest-running contemporary art exhibition in the US, the Carnegie International, opens this weekend in Pittsburgh, and Ben talks to its curator, Sohrab Mohebbi about the show and the institution. And this episode’s Work of the Week is Endless Egg (1985) by Maria Bartuszová. Juliet Bingham, co-curator of a new show of Bartuszová’s work at Tate Modern in London, tells us about this enigmatic sculpture.


The 58th Carnegie International: Is it morning for you yet?, Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, 24 September-2 April 2023.


Maria Bartuszová, Tate Modern, London, until 16 April 2023.



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Sep 22, 2022
Art and the British Royal Family; museums’ energy crisis; Fuseli’s The Nightmare
54:04

Following the death of Queen Elizabeth II and the proclamation of King Charles III, Ben Luke speaks to the former Surveyor of the Queen’s Pictures, Desmond Shawe-Taylor. They discuss the Royal Collection, the late Queen’s taste in art, the new King’s commitment to art education, and how the modern era compares to the past in terms of Royal patronage of visual art. As lights in museums and on monuments are turned off across Europe, UK institutions are facing soaring energy bills that could prove an existential threat. Lisa Ollerhead, director of the Association of Independent Museums, discusses how they can respond. And this episode’s Work of the Week is The Nightmare by Henry Fuseli—the Swiss-born artist’s most famous work. Two versions of the painting are in Fuseli: the Realm of Dreams and the Fantastic, a new show at the Musée Jacquemart-André in Paris.


Association of Independent Museums: aim-museums.co.uk


Fuseli: the Realm of Dreams and the Fantastic, Musée Jacquemart-André, Paris, until 23 January 2023



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Sep 15, 2022
Art and censorship; Diane Arbus; Guggenheim Bilbao at 25
1:07:49

This week: is art censorship on the rise? The Art Newspaper’s chief contributing editor, Gareth Harris, joins Ben Luke to discuss his new book, Censored Art Today. We look at the different ways in which freedom of expression is being curbed across the globe and at the debates around contested history and cancel culture. This episode’s Work of the Week is Diane Arbus’s Puerto Rican woman with a beauty mark, N.Y.C., 1965, one of the 90 images that feature in Diane Arbus: Photographs, 1956-1971, which opens at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Canada, on 15 September. Sophie Hackett, the exhibition’s curator, discusses Arbus’s remarkable eye and technical brilliance. As the Guggenheim Bilbao celebrates its 25th anniversary, Thomas Krens, the director and chief artistic officer of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation from 1988 to 2008, reflects on the genesis and development of a museum that had a dramatic impact on contemporary art and museums’ role in the cultural regeneration of cities across the world. 


Gareth Harris, Censored Art Today, Lund Humphries, 104pp, £19.99 or $34.99, out now in the UK, published in December in the US


Diane Arbus: Photographs, 1956-1971, Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, 15 September-29 January 2023


Sections/Intersections: 25 Years of the Guggenheim Museum Bilbao Collection, Guggenheim Bilbao, 19 October-22 January 2023



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Sep 08, 2022
Brazil turns 200; a £50m Reynolds painting; Michael Heizer’s City
54:01
Ben Luke talks to Alexander Kellner, the director of the National Museum of Brazil, about how he plans to mark Brazil’s bicentennial and to restore the museum in the wake of the devastating 2018 fire, which destroyed most of the building and millions of objects. The Art Newspaper’s London correspondent Martin Bailey tells us about the National Portrait Gallery’s ambition to acquire the £50m Portrait of Omai (1776), arguably the greatest work by the 18th-century British artist Joshua Reynolds—the latest installment in a long-running saga relating to the painting. And this episode’s Work of the Week is City, the land artist Michael Heizer’s magnum opus in the Nevada desert, which is complete and open to the public after more than 50 years. Our editor in the Americas, Ben Sutton, discusses this monumental piece with Kara Vander Weg, a member of the board of the Triple Aught Foundation, which manages the work.

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Sep 01, 2022
Summer of Seoul: why the South Korean capital is a new art world hub
58:23

On 29 June, Frieze announced the details of the first edition of its art fair in Seoul, South Korea. So for this last episode of the current season, we’re exploring the art scene and market in the Korean capital. Ben Luke talks to the art historian and curator Jiyoon Lee about contemporary art in Seoul and beyond, and the origins of the current art scene in 1990s globalisation. The Art Newspaper’s associate editor, Kabir Jhala, speaks to two gallerists—Joorhee Kwon, deputy director at the Kukje Gallery and Emma Son, senior director at Lehmann Maupin, about the growing market and collector base, and the effect Frieze may have on the existing scene. And this episode’s Work of the Week is Dahye Jeong’s A Time of Sincerity, a basket made with horsehair that this week won the Loewe Foundation Craft Prize. Kabir talks to the creative director at the fashion brand Loewe, Jonathan Anderson, about Jeong’s piece.


Frieze Seoul, COEX, Seoul, 2-5 September.


The Space Between: The Modern in Korean Art, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 11 September-19 February 2023.


The 2022 Loewe Foundation Craft Prize, Seoul Museum of Craft Art, until 31 July.



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Jun 30, 2022
Documenta 15: scandal and legacy. Plus, the Warhol-Prince copyright dispute, and Juan Muñoz
1:06:17

This week: our associate editor, Kabir Jhala, and editor-at-large, Jane Morris, have been in Kassel, Germany, to see Documenta, the quinquennial international art exhibition. They review the show and respond to the escalation of a long-running row over antisemitism and broader racism, which has resulted in a work being removed from the exhibition. Virginia Rutledge, an art historian and lawyer, discusses the dispute over Andy Warhol’s appropriation of a photograph by Lynn Goldsmith of the pop icon Prince. The case will be heard in the US Supreme Court this autumn and has potentially huge implications for artistic freedom. And this episode’s Work of the Week is An Outpost of Progress (1992), a drawing by the late Spanish artist Juan Muñoz, inspired by Joseph Conrad’s short story of the same name.


Documenta 15, Kassel, Germany, until 25 September.


Juan Muñoz: Drawings 1982-2000, Centro Botín, Santander, Spain, 25 June-16 October.



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Jun 23, 2022
Francis Bacon: Tate archive controversy; NY photographer Alice Austen; Michel Majerus in Basel
1:08:58

This week: why is Tate rejecting an archive of material relating to Francis Bacon, 18 years after acquiring it? Our London correspondent Martin Bailey tells us about his recent scoop that Tate is returning a thousand documents and sketches said to have come from the studio of Francis Bacon to Barry Joule, a close friend of the artist, who donated them to Tate in 2004. We then discuss the material with Martin Harrison, the pre-eminent Bacon scholar and editor of the catalogue raisonné of Francis Bacon’s work published in 2016, and to Sophie Pretorius, the archivist at the Estate of Francis Bacon, who went through the Barry Joule archive item by item. Victoria Munro, the director of the Alice Austen House Museum in New York, discusses this still too-little-known photographer, and her documentation of immigration to the United States and the lives of queer women in the 19th and early 20th centuries. And this episode’s Work of the Week is Weißes Bild (1994), a painting by the late Luxembourg-born artist Michel Majerus, now on view at Art Basel—Aimee Dawson, acting digital editor, is at the fair and talks to Giovanni Carmine, curator of the Unlimited section, in which the painting appears.


Sophie Pretorius’s essay Work on the Barry Joule Archive is in the book Francis Bacon: Shadows published by the Estate of Francis Bacon and Thames and Hudson. 


For more on the Alice Austen House Museum, visit aliceausten.org. The podcast My Dear Alice is out in the autumn.


Art Basel, until 19 June.





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Jun 16, 2022
Crypto crash: what now for NFTs? Plus, Norway’s mega-museum and a Spanish-American screen
52:30

We talk to the writer and critic Amy Castor about what effect the tumbling crypto markets might have on the until-now booming world of non-fungible tokens or NFTs. As Norway’s vast new National Museum opens, we speak to its director Karin Hindsbo. And this episode’s Work of the Week is Folding Screen with Indian Wedding, Mitote, and Flying Pole, made in Mexico in the late 17th century. It is one of the major pieces in a new show at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, called Archive of the World: Art and Imagination in Spanish America, 1500–1800. Ilona Katzew, the curator of the exhibition, talks in depth about the meanings and purpose of the work.


You can read Amy Castor’s thoughts on crypto and NFTs at amycastor.com.


The National Museum in Oslo opens on 11 June.


Archive of the World: Art and Imagination in Spanish America, 1500–1800, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 12 June-30 October.



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Jun 09, 2022
Picasso and the Old Masters; the Queen by Chris Levine; political interference in museums
1:02:42

This week, Picasso and the Old Masters: as shows pairing the Spaniard with Ingres and El Greco open in London and Basel respectively, Ben Luke talks to Christopher Riopelle (curator of Picasso Ingres: Face to Face at the National Gallery) and Carmen Giménez (curator of Picasso-El Greco at the Kunstmuseum in Basel) about the profound influence of historic artists on Picasso’s rupturing of tradition. In this episode’s Work of the Week, The Art Newspaper’s contemporary art correspondent, Louisa Buck, talks to Chris Levine, the creator of Lightness of Being, one of the best known recent portraits of Queen Elizabeth II, as the British monarch celebrates 70 years on the throne. And as the Polish government replaces yet another museum director, what can be done about political interference in museum governance? Ben talks to Goranka Horjan, director of Intercom, the International Committee for Museum Management, and Bart De Baere, chair of the Museum Watch programme at the International Committee for Museums and Collections of Modern Art (Cimam).


Picasso Ingres: Face to Face, National Gallery, London, until 9 October. Picasso-El Greco, Kunstmuseum, Basel, 11 June-25 September.


You can read the Museum Watch report at cimam.org.



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Jun 02, 2022
The hunt for looted Cambodian heritage; the dark truth of the Marcos family’s extravagance; Ruth Asawa
1:09:48

This week: are stolen Cambodian statues hidden in the world’s great public collections? We discuss Cambodia’s looted heritage with Celia Hatton, Asia Pacific editor and presenter at the BBC World Service, whose documentary for BBC TV and radio Cambodia: Returning the Gods exposes the connections between looters, smugglers and, allegedly, some of the world’s most famous encyclopaedic museums. Plus, the dark truth behind the art and antiques assembled by the Marcos family in the Philippines as they return to power. We talk to the Filipino artist Pio Abad—who’s made art about Ferdinand and Imelda Marcos and their collections for more than a decade—about Bongbong Marcos’s presidential election victory in the Philippines and what that means for the country and the art and antiquities seized by its government after the Marcoses were deposed in the 1980s. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, we discuss a sculpture by Ruth Asawa—Untitled (S.266, Hanging Seven-Lobed, Multi-Layered Interlocking Continuous Form within a Form) (1961)—a highlight of a new exhibition at Modern Art Oxford in the UK, with Emma Ridgway, the show’s co-curator. Remarkably, the solo exhibition is the first in a European institution dedicated to the Japanese-American artist.


You can read Celia’s report on Cambodian antiquities online at bbc.co.uk. Cambodia: Returning the Gods (radio version) is on the BBC website and the BBC Sounds app—under The Documentary Podcast stream for the World Service and the Crossing Continents podcast stream in the UK—and on other podcast platforms.


Cambodia: Returning the Gods (television version) is on iPlayer in the UK and will be shown again on the BBC World news channel, broadcast date tbc—check listings.Pio Abad: Fear of Freedom Makes Us See Ghosts, Ateneo Art Gallery, Ateneo de Manila University, until 30 July, pioabad.com.


Ruth Asawa: Citizen of the Universe, Modern Art Oxford, UK, 28 May-21 August; Stavanger Art Museum, Norway, 1 October-22 January 2023.



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May 26, 2022
New York: Frieze and auction bonanza. Plus, the Albers Foundation in Senegal, and a golden Indian manuscript
1:00:55

This week, as Frieze New York takes place at The Shed in Hudson Yards, and we come to the end of two weeks of huge auction sales, we talk to The Art Newspaper’s editor in the Americas, Ben Sutton, about the New York market. Nicholas Fox Weber, the executive director of the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, tells us about Bët-bi, a new museum the foundation hopes to open in Senegal in 2025, with a building designed by Mariam Issoufou Kamara, the Niger-based architect. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, Annabel Gallop, one of the co-curators of Gold, a new exhibition at the British Library in London, discusses a shimmering golden farman, or decree, from Shah ’Alam II, issued to a British woman, Sophia Plowden, in India in 1789.


Frieze New York, The Shed, New York, until 22 May.


Bët-bi, near Kaolack, Senegal, opens in 2025, www.betbi.orgwww.ateliermasomi.com.


Gold is at the British Library in London until 2 October.



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May 19, 2022
Saving Ukraine’s heritage; Cezanne blockbuster; Nicola L.’s Gold Femme Commode
1:04:56

This week: is heritage in Ukraine being attacked and looted, and what can be done to protect it? Ben Luke talks to The Art Newspaper’s museums and heritage editor, Tom Seymour, who has been to the Ukrainian-Polish border with the International Council of Museums (ICOM), to witness museum materials being sent into Ukraine to help institutions there. Then, Tom talks to Sophie Delepierre, the head of heritage protection at ICOM, about the organisation’s efforts in Ukraine and elsewhere. As a major exhibition of the work of Paul Cezanne opens at The Art Institute of Chicago, ahead of its journey to Tate Modern later in the year, Ben talks to Gloria Groom and Caitlin Haskell, the curators of the Chicago exhibition. And for this episode’s Work of the Week, our acting digital editor, Aimee Dawson, asks Oliver Lanzenberg, the grandson of the artist Nicola L., about his grandmother’s work Gold Femme Commode (1969/1993). The piece is part of a show at Alison Jacques, one of a number of exhibitions opening to coincide with the second edition of London Gallery Weekend.


Tom’s full report into ICOM’s work for Ukraine is in the next print edition of The Art Newspaper and online soon.


The organisation Sophie mentions is NEMO, the Network of European Museum Organisations, ne-mo.org.


Cezanne, The Art Institute of Chicago, 15 May-5 September; Tate Modern, London, 5 October-12 March 2023.


Nicola L., Alison Jacques, London, until 23 July.


London Gallery Weekend, 13-15 May.



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May 12, 2022
Philip Guston Now opens, revamped. Plus, Queer Britain museum and Caterina Angela Pierozzi rediscovered
1:05:11

This week, Philip Guston Now is unveiled at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston after its controversial postponement in 2020; Ben Luke talks to Kate Nesin and Megan Bernard, two of the four curators on the team assembled by the museum to revise the exhibition, which was postponed by four museums in the wake of George Floyd’s murder. We discuss how the show and its interpretation have changed in the last two years. As Queer Britain, the UK’s first national LGBTQ+ museum opens its doors, Gareth Harris, chief contributing editor at The Art Newspaper, speaks to Matthew Storey, the curator of the museum’s inaugural exhibition, Welcome to Queer Britain. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, our acting digital editor, Aimee Dawson, talks to Candida Lodovica de Angelis Corvi, global director at the Colnaghi gallery, about a rediscovered work by the 17th-century artist Caterina Angela Pierozzi, on display at Colnaghi in London.


Philip Guston Now, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, until 11 September; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, 23 October-15 January 2023; the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, 26 February-27 August 2023; and Tate Modern, London, 3 October 2023-25 February 2024. To hear an in-depth discussion about Philip Guston with the curator Robert Storr, author of the book Philip Guston: A Life Spent Painting, listen to the episode of this podcast from 18 September 2020.


Queer Britain is open now and Queercircle opens on 9 June.


Forbidden Fruit: Female Still Life, Colnaghi, London, until 24 Jun.



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May 05, 2022
French election: what now for the art scene? Plus, Walter Sickert and Gordon Parks
54:12

This week, now that the pro-European centrist Emmanuel Macron has defeated the far-right candidate Marine Le Pen in the French presidential election, we speak to Anaël Pigeat, editor-at-large at The Art Newspaper France, about the Macron government’s cultural record so far and what we can expect from his second term. Tate Britain has opened an exhibition of work by the late 19th- and early 20th-century British painter Walter Sickert; we take a tour of the show with one of its curators, Thomas Kennedy. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, The Art Newspaper’s associate editor, Tom Seymour, talks to Dan Leers of the Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh, US, about A workman lifts a drum from a boiling lye solution, March 1944, a photograph in the museum’s new exhibition, Gordon Parks in Pittsburgh, 1944/1946.


Walter Sickert, Tate Britain, London, until 18 September; Petit Palais, Paris, 14 October-29 January 2023.


Gordon Parks in Pittsburgh, 1944/1946, Carnegie Museum of Art, Pittsburgh, 30 April-7 August.



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Apr 28, 2022
Venice Biennale special: four artist interviews, main show review and a Bellini masterpiece
1:26:58

A Venice Biennale special: we give you a flavour of the 59th edition of the Biennale which, as ever, brings a deluge of contemporary art to the historic Italian city. We talk to four artists in the national pavilions – Francis Alÿs in the Belgian pavilion, Sonia Boyce in the British pavilion, Shubigi Rao in the Singapore pavilion and Na Chainkua Reindorf in the Ghana pavilion – about their presentations and how, if at all, they relate to the idea of nationhood. Louisa Buck and Jane Morris join host Ben Luke to review the main exhibition, The Milk of Dreams, curated by Cecilia Alemani, and pick their highlights of the Biennale so far. And while most visitors to Venice this week are immersed in contemporary art, for this episode’s Work of the Week, we take a look at a masterpiece that remains exactly where it was intended to hang. The art historian Ben Street joins Ben Luke in San Giovanni Crisostomo, a church near Venice’s Rialto bridge, to look at Saints Christopher, Jerome and Louis of Toulouse, a late painting by the Venetian Renaissance artist Giovanni Bellini.


Venice Biennale, 23 April-27 November.


Ben Street, How to Enjoy Art: A Guide for Everyone, Yale University Press, £14.99/$20.



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Apr 21, 2022
Photographer Edward Burtynsky on his Ukrainian heritage; Winslow Homer; China-Russia: a new cultural boycott?
51:11

This week: Tom Seymour talks to the photographer Edward Burtynsky as he is recognised for his Outstanding Contribution to his medium in the Sony World Photography Awards. He discusses the Russian invasion and his Ukrainian heritage. In this episode’s Work of the Week, we look at Winslow Homer’s most famous work, The Gulf Stream (1899, reworked by 1906), which is at the heart of a new show at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Sylvia Yount and Stephanie Herdrich, the curators of the exhibition, discuss the making, reception and legacy of the painting. And we talk to Lisa Movius about the decision by the Nord regional government in France to suspend plans for the exhibition Matisse by Matisse—a collaboration between Musée Matisse le Cateau-Cambrésis and the private Beijing museum UCCA—over China’s supposedly neutral position on Russia’s invasion. Will other Western authorities or arts organisations follow suit?


Sony World Photography Awards Exhibition 2022, Somerset House, London, until 2 May. Edward Burtynsky’s multimedia project In the Wake of Progress is at the Luminato Festival, Toronto, 11-12 June.


Winslow Homer: Crosscurrents, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, until 31 July. Winslow Homer: Force of Nature, National Gallery, London, 10 September-8 January 2023.



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Apr 14, 2022
Whitney Biennial review, Afro-Atlantic Histories in Washington, Raphael's late self-portrait
57:52

This week: Quiet as It’s Kept, the 80th edition of the Whitney Biennial, is now open to the public at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York. The Art Newspaper’s associate editor Tom Seymour, Americas editor Ben Sutton and staff reporter Gabriella Angeletti gather to discuss it. As the latest incarnation of the show Afro-Atlantic Histories is unveiled at the National Gallery of Art in Washington DC, we speak to its curator, Kanitra Fletcher, about the gallery’s approach to this complex subject. And the National Gallery in London’s long-planned Raphael blockbuster, postponed due to the pandemic, is finally open, so for this episode’s Work of the Week, we speak to Tom Henry, one of the curators of the show, about the Self-Portrait with Giulio Romano (1519-20), one of the Renaissance master’s final paintings.


Whitney Biennial 2022: Quiet as It’s Kept, Whitney Museum of American Art, until 5 September.


Afro-Atlantic Histories, National Gallery of Art, Washington DC, 10 April-17 July.


Raphael, National Gallery, London, 9 April-31 July. To hear an in-depth discussion with Hugo Chapman, keeper of prints and drawings at the British Museum, about Raphael’s wider career, his precocious brilliance, his rivalry with Michelangelo, and his influence and legacy, listen to the episode of this podcast from 22 May 2020. (https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/the-week-in-art/id1280469178?i=1000475387725)



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Apr 07, 2022
Has the art market recovered? Plus, surviving the Holocaust and Mondrian’s Victory Boogie Woogie
51:54

This week: the Art Basel and UBS Global Art Market Report 2022 is out—is the market’s recovery as good as it sounds? We talk to Melanie Gerlis, art market columnist for The Art Newspaper and the Financial Times, about the sixth edition of the market report, what the headline figures tell us and what we can read between the lines. As the exhibition Hideouts: The Architecture of Survival, opens at the Zacheta National Gallery of Art in Warsaw—focusing on the spaces in Poland and Ukraine used by Holocaust survivors to escape Nazi persecution—we talk to the artist behind it, Natalia Romik. Though long planned, the show has gained a troubling topicality as the Russian invasion and destruction of Ukraine continues. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, coinciding with the 150th anniversary of Piet Mondrian’s birth, we discuss his painting Victory Boogie Woogie (1942-44). Caro Verbeek, the co-curator of Mondrian Moves, an exhibition opening this week at the Kunstmuseum den Haag in the Hague, the Netherlands, tells us about the feverish creation and unfinished nature of the Dutch artist’s final work.


Natalia Romik’s exhibition, Hideouts: The Architecture of Survival, Zachęta National Gallery of Art, Warsaw, until 17 July; TRAFO Center for Contemporary Art, Szczecin, Poland, 4 August-6 November


Mondrian Moves, Kunstmuseum den Haag, the Hague, Netherlands, 2 April-25 September. Mondrian Evolution, Fondation Beyeler, Basel, Switzerland, 5 June-9 October; K20, Düsseldorf, Germany, 29 October-10 February 2023



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Mar 31, 2022
The Met: Max Hollein’s vision for the future, Beiruti art in the 1960s, Meret Oppenheim
1:10:18

We talk to Max Hollein, director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, about the new plans for the museum’s wing of modern and contemporary art, including the appointment of the architect Frida Escobedo in place of David Chipperfield. As The Art Newspaper is about to publish its annual museum attendance survey, showing that visitors are beginning slowly to return to museums after the height of the pandemic, we ask Hollein how the vision for the museum has changed following the events of the past two years. Plus, Aimee Dawson talks to the curator Sam Bardaouil about the exhibition Beirut and the Golden Sixties: A Manifesto of Fragility at the Gropius Bau in Berlin. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, as the Menil Collection in Houston, Texas, opens a major Meret Oppenheim survey, the show’s curator Natalie Dupêcher discusses Oppenheim’s Surrealist object Ma gouvernante – My Nurse – Mein Kindermädchen (1936): a pair of white heels on a silver platter, trussed like a chicken.


The Art Newspaper’s visitor attendance survey is in the April print edition, and online next week at theartnewspaper.com, or on our app for iOS and Android, which you can get from the App Store or Google Play.


Beirut and the Golden Sixties: A Manifesto of Fragility, Gropius Bau, Berlin, until 12 June.


Meret Oppenheim: My Exhibition, Menil Collection, Houston, until 18 September; Museum of Modern Art, New York, 30 October-4 March 2023



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Mar 25, 2022
Donatello in Florence, the Biennale of Sydney and Eduardo Navarro’s seed installation
1:10:16

Donatello in Florence, the Biennale of Sydney and Eduardo Navarro’s seed installationThis week, as the Palazzo Strozzi and Museo Nazionale del Bargello in Florence present a survey of Donatello, one of the greatest of all Italian Renaissance masters, we talk to Arturo Galansino, the Strozzi’s Director General, and Paola D’Agostino, Director of the Bargello museum, about the show. The Biennale of Sydney in Australia has just opened, with the theme of rīvus, meaning stream in Latin. José Roca, the Biennale’s artistic director, and Alessandro Pelizzon, co-founder of the Global Alliance for the Rights of Nature, discuss the Biennale’s concept, bringing rivers and other “aqueous beings”, as Roca and his curatorial colleagues call them, into dialogue with artists, architects, designers, scientists, and communities. What does it mean if you grant rivers and other natural forms rights? And this episode’s Work of the Week also explores nature, ecology and the relationship between humans and natural phenomena. We speak to curator Bárbara Rodriguez Muñoz about Photosynthetics, an installation by Eduardo Navarro in Rooted Beings, the latest exhibition at London’s Wellcome Collection.


Donatello: The Renaissance, Fondazione Palazzo Strozzi and the Museo Nazionale del Bargello in Florence, 19 March-31 July. Gemäldegalerie, Berlin, 2 September-8 January 2023. The Victoria and Albert Museum in London will stage its variation of the exhibition in 2023


The Biennale of Sydney: Rīvus continues until 13 June. And José and Alessandro will take part in a panel discussion on 10 May titled Reclaiming Rivers’ Rights. Find out more at biennaleofsydney.art


Rooted Beings, Wellcome Collection, London, 24 March-29 August



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Mar 18, 2022
Refugees and art, NFTs and more in Dubai, Felix Gonzalez-Torres’s golden curtain
1:01:18

This week: as more than two million refugees leave war-torn Ukraine, what can the arts do? Counterpoints Arts is a charity that works with refugee artists and creates programmes in a range of artforms on the subject of migration and displacement in the UK and beyond. Their mission is underpinned by a belief that arts can inspire social change and enhance the inclusion and cultural integration of refugees and migrants. We talk to a producer at Counterpoints Arts, Tom Green. The Art Newspaper’s deputy digital editor Aimee Dawson is at the Art Dubai fair, and talks about its new digital section, focusing on NFTs, virtual reality and more, with the artist Gretchen Andrew and Anna Seaman, a curator at Morrow Collective, an NFT curatorial platform that is participating in the fair. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, as Summer, an exhibition dedicated to the work of the late Cuban-American artist Felix Gonzalez-Torres, opens at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Toronto, its curator Rui Mateus Amaral discusses "Untitled" (Golden) (1995), a key work in the show and one of the last pieces Gonzalez-Torres created before his death in 1996.


Counterpoints Arts | Together with Refugees | Refugee Week


Art Dubai, until 13 March


Article on the Metaverse by The Art Newspaper’s XR panel


Felix Gonzalez-Torres: Summer, Museum of Contemporary Art, Toronto, until 31 July


Felix Gonzalez-Torres’s "Untitled" (Golden) (1995) at the Felix Gonzalez-Torres Foundation


A brush with… Roni Horn, in which Roni Horn discusses her relationship with Felix Gonzalez-Torres



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Mar 11, 2022
Ukraine: the art community and photojournalism. Plus, Chris Burden and F.N. Souza
1:09:35

This week: following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, we talk to Svitlana Biedarieva, a Ukrainian art historian, artist and curator, about the community of artists in her home country, their work since the Maidan, or Revolution of Dignity in 2014, and how they are responding to the events of recent days. Also on Ukraine, Tom Seymour talks to the photographer Mark Neville, who has been based in the Ukrainian capital Kyiv for the past 18 months and left the city last week, about a photojournalistic series he made in Ukraine, about ethical approaches to reportage and about the effects of documenting war-torn countries. As a book is published featuring Chris Burden’s unrealised projects, we talk to Jori Finkel about the American performance and installation artist’s extraordinary imagination. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, Jane Alison, curator of Postwar Modern: New Art in Britain 1945-65 at the Barbican Art Gallery, London, discusses one of the key works in the show: the Goa-born artist F.N. Souza’s Mr Sebastian (1955).


The Art Newspaper’s reporting on the Russian invasion of Ukraine


Svitlana Biedarieva, art historian, artist and curator


The artists mentioned by Svitlana:

Piotr Armianovski

Yevgenia Belorusets

Alevtina Kakhidze, instagram: @truealevtina


Razom for Ukraine


Mark Neville’s Stop Tanks With Books, published by Nazraeli Press, £50 /$60


Eight photographers you need to follow in Ukraine by Tom Seymour


Poetic Practical: The Unrealized Work of Chris Burden, published by Gagosian, $120


Postwar Modern: New Art in Britain 1945-65, Barbican Art Gallery, London, 26 June



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Mar 04, 2022
Artists’ studios: the fight for space in New York, the Whitechapel show, photographing Paula Rego at work
1:04:56
As an exhibition opens at the Whitechapel Gallery in London focusing on artists’ studios over the last century, we take an in-depth look at the subject. The artist, critic and activist William Powhida discusses the Artist Studio Affordability Project in New York and how developers and gentrification have forced artists’ communities to breaking point. We take a tour of the Whitechapel exhibition with the gallery’s director Iwona Blazwick, and explore works by Kerry James Marshall, Paul McCarthy, Laboratoire Agit’Art, Alina Szapocznikow, Tehching Hsieh and Egon Schiele, among others. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, the photographer Eamonn McCabe, who has made a series of photographs of artists in their studios, talks about his visit to Paula Rego’s space in Camden Town, London, in 2004.

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Feb 25, 2022
Warhol and Basquiat on the stage, the Faith Ringgold retrospective and Betye Saar remakes a mural
59:48

This week: The Collaboration, a new play dramatising the relationship between Andy Warhol and Jean-Michel Basquiat has opened at the Young Vic theatre in London. It looks at the period between 1983 and 1985 in which they worked together on a group of paintings, many of which were shown to critical derision and commercial failure at the Tony Shafrazi gallery in New York in 1985. Ben Luke talks to the playwright Anthony McCarten and the director Kwame Kwei-Armah about bringing these complex characters to life, and the issues, including race and class, that their relationship brings into focus. In today’s New York, a Faith Ringgold retrospective has opened at the New Museum; Ben talks to Massimiliano Gioni, the exhibition’s curator, about the astonishing breadth of the now 91-year-old artist’s work. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, Helen Stoilas is at the Frieze Art Fair in Los Angeles, where she talks to Julie Roberts, the co-founder of the gallery Roberts Projects, about Betye Saar’s mural LA Energy—created and quickly destroyed in 1983, and now repainted for Roberts Projects’ stand at the fair.




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Feb 18, 2022
Louise Bourgeois, Saudi soft power and Gerhard Richter at 90
53:54
As a show looking at Louise Bourgeois’s late-career obsession with textiles opens at the Hayward Gallery in London—ahead of other exhibitions of her work in Basel and New York—we look at the French-American artist’s fabric-related creations with Jerry Gorovoy, who worked with Bourgeois for 30 years and is now President of the foundation that manages her legacy. A host of contemporary art shows have just opened in Saudi Arabia. But does this, as some commentators have said, mark a new era in the country’s approach to culture, or is it “artwashing” the country’s record on human rights abuses? We ask The Art Newspaper’s chief contributing editor, Gareth Harris, who has travelled to the Middle Eastern country to find out. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, Dietmar Elger, the curator of the Gerhard Richter Archive in Dresden, Germany, discusses Fels, a three-metre-tall abstract painting from 1989, which is at the heart of a new show curated by Richter at the Albertinum in the eastern German city.

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Feb 11, 2022
Venice Biennale, Van Gogh’s self-portraits, Dalí and Freud
1:02:16
This week, we talk to Cecilia Alemani, the artistic director of the Venice Biennale for art, which opens in April, about her show, The Milk of Dreams. She discusses the story by the Surrealist artist Leonora Carrington that gives the Biennale its title, the “time capsules” of historic art that punctuate the exhibition, the thematic structure, and the fact that it is the first Venice Biennale featuring a majority of women artists. For this episode’s Work of the Week, Martin Bailey visits the Courtauld Gallery, where 15 of Vincent van Gogh’s self-portrait paintings have been gathered for a once-in-a-generation show. He talks to the curator Karen Serres about Self-Portrait with Bandaged Ear (1889). And at the Belvedere in Vienna, a new exhibition explores the relationship between Salvador Dalí and Sigmund Freud—Ben Luke talks to Stephanie Auer from the museum about Dalí’s obsession with the father of psychoanalysis, his attempts to meet Freud in Vienna, and what happened when they finally encountered each other in London.

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Feb 04, 2022
Bacon and beasts, Botticelli in New York, gender in Asian art in San Francisco
53:49
This week, we visit the Royal Academy in London, where a new show looking at Francis Bacon’s use of animal imagery, Man and Beast, is about to open. The RA’s director, Axel Rüger sheds light on Bacon’s means of transposing the animal into the human figure. We talk to our editor-at-large, Georgina Adam, about The Man of Sorrows, the Botticelli painting sold at auction this week—and we find out if it went beyond its guaranteed sale price of $40m. We also talk about the big art market news of the week: that MCH Group, the owner of the Art Basel fairs, is to take over Fiac's slot at the Grand Palais in Paris to host a new contemporary art fair in October. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, Aimee Dawson talks to Megan Merritt of the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco, about a pair of works in Seeing Gender, a new exhibition that explores the museum’s collection through the lens of gender for the first time: a contemporary piece on paper by the Chinese artist Wilson Shieh and a 20th-century carved sculpture by the Indonesian artist Ida Bagus Putu Taman.

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Jan 28, 2022
Artists’ monuments, the €471m Caravaggio villa auction flop, Michael Armitage on Sane Wadu
50:49
This week, our contemporary art correspondent Louisa Buck visits the exhibition Testament at Goldsmiths CCA in London, where 47 artists have been invited to make proposals that ponder the idea of tearing down and erecting monuments and what it might mean to rethink them. Louisa talks to Sarah McCrory, the director of Goldsmiths CCA, and to Adham Faramawy, one of the artists in the show. In Rome, a villa with ceiling paintings by Caravaggio and Guercino with a price tag of €471m failed to attract any bids. The Art Newspaper’s founder Anna Somers Cocks, who’s based in Turin, tells us why. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, the artist Michael Armitage tells us about Sane Wadu’s painting Black Moses (1993), a work in Wadu’s retrospective at the Nairobi Contemporary Art Institute in Kenya, co-founded by Armitage, which opened last week.

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Jan 21, 2022
The art world in 2022: big shows and market predictions
1:11:10

In this first episode of 2022, The Art Newspaper’s contemporary art correspondent Louisa Buck and the novelist and columnist at The Art Newspaper Chibundu Onuzo preview the year’s biennials, exhibitions and art fairs and our editor-at-large Georgina Adam has a stab at predicting the art market’s fortunes. 


Events discussed: 


Venice Biennale


Documenta 15


Biennale of Sydney


Berlin Biennale 


Whitney Biennial 2022


Carnegie International


Donatello: the Renaissance


Steve McQueen


Charles Ray: Sculpture Fiction


Worlds of Networks


The World of Stonehenge


Testament


Hew Locke: Tate Britain Commission 2022


Cornelia Parker


Surrealism Beyond Borders


In the Black Fantastic


Anthea Hamilton


Faith Ringgold: American People


Philip Guston: Now


Cézanne


50 Monuments in 50 Voices


Matisse: The Red Studio



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Jan 14, 2022
2021's biggest art world stories—and what they mean
1:11:59
It’s the final episode of 2021 and so, as always, it’s our review of the year. Joining Ben Luke to look at 2021’s biggest stories are three members of The Art Newspaper team: Martin Bailey, a correspondent in London, Anna Brady, art market editor, and Jane Morris, editor-at-large.

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Dec 17, 2021
Walt Disney at The Met. Plus, Matisse in Baltimore and Josef Albers's lithographs
1:10:41

This week: the French decorative art that inspired Walt Disney, Henri Matisse’s collaboration over 40 years with the Baltimore art collector Etta Cone, and Josef Albers’s prints.


The Art Newspaper’s deputy digital editor, Aimee Dawson speaks to Wolf Burchard, a curator at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, about Inspiring Walt Disney: The Animation of French Decorative Arts, which opens today, 10 December and travels next year to the Wallace Collection, London. As the Baltimore Museum of Art opens its new Ruth R. Marder Center for Matisse Studies, with around 2,500-square-feet of space dedicated to the research and display of the art of Henri Matisse, on 12 December, Ben Luke discusses the French artist’s special relationship with the Baltimore-based collector Etta Cone, which is the foundation of the museum’s huge collection of Matisse’s works in all media. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, the gallerist Alan Cristea talks about Josef Albers’s Graphic Tectonic lithographs, and their relationship to his wider printmaking activity and his celebrated Homage to the Square series, as a show of Albers’s early- and mid-career prints opens at Cristea Roberts in London.


Inspiring Walt Disney: The Animation of French Decorative Arts, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 10 December-6 March 2022; Wallace Collection, London, 6 April-16 October 2022. Our Work of the Week featuring The Swing by Fragonard, from 5 November.


The Ruth R. Marder Center for Matisse Studies opens on 12 December. A Modern Influence: Henri Matisse, Etta Cone, and Baltimore, Baltimore Museum of Art, until 2 January 2022. 


Josef Albers: Discovery and Invention, The Early Graphic Works, Cristea Roberts, London 10 December-22 January (gallery closed 20 December-3 January). Anni and Josef Albers: Art and Life, Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris (MAM), Paris, until 9 January.



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Dec 10, 2021
Art Basel in Miami Beach and the story of art fairs. Plus, Caribbean-British art, and Marco Brambilla's VR work
1:09:25

This week, as Art Basel in Miami Beach opens, we discuss a new book, The Art Fair Story: A Rollercoaster Ride, with its author Melanie Gerlis, art market columnist at the Financial Times and editor-at-large at The Art Newspaper. Melanie ponders the past, present and future of art fairs. A huge new show, Life Between Islands: Caribbean-British Art 1950s-Now has just opened at Tate Britain in London, and we talk to its curators, Alex Farquharson, the director of Tate Britain, and David A Bailey, the artistic director of the International Curators Forum and the organiser of numerous seminal exhibitions on diaspora and Black representation in art. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, we’re back in Miami—our deputy digital editor Aimee Dawson talks to the artist Marco Brambilla about Heaven’s Gate, his new virtual reality work at the Pérez Art Museum.


The Art Fair Story: A Rollercoaster Ride by Melanie Gerlis is published by Lund Humphries and priced £19.99 in the UK, $34.99 in the US and $46.99 in Canada.


Life Between Islands: Caribbean-British Art, 1950s-Now is at Tate Britain until 3 April 2022. David A Bailey’s book with Allison Thompson, Liberation Begins in the Imagination—an anthology of writings on Caribbean-British art and culture—is also published by Tate and priced £30.


Marco Brambilla: Heaven’s Gate is at the Pérez Art Museum Miami until 1 February next year. An in-depth review of Heaven’s Gate by The Art Newspaper’s XR Panel can be found at theartnewspaper.com or on our apps for iOS and Android.



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Dec 03, 2021
Fraud: how corrupt is the art world? Plus, Warhol’s Catholicism and Moscow’s new museums
59:12

This week, we look at the case of the art dealer Inigo Philbrick, who pleaded guilty to fraud in a New York court last week: is the art world, as his attorney claimed, “corrupt from top to bottom”? Georgina Adam, editor-at-large at The Art Newspaper gives her response. For this epsiode’s Work of the Week, we talk to Carmen Hermo, the curator of the exhibition Andy Warhol: Revelation at the Brooklyn Museum, about a painting in the show, New York Post (Judge Blasts Lynch) (1983), and what it tells us about Warhol’s Catholicism. And as GES-2 House of Culture, the V-A-C Foundation’s huge cultural centre in a former power station transformed by architect Renzo Piano, opens in Moscow next week, and the Garage Museum in the Russian capital announces its expansion into a landmark Modernist building in Gorky Park, we talk to Anna Bronovitsksya, architectural historian and professor at the Moscow Architecture School about these museums and the wider political situation in which they are being constructed.




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Nov 26, 2021
New York auctions: big money, new collectors. Plus, Fabergé in London and a rediscovered Dürer
1:08:23
This week, record-breaking auction sales in New York—are we in a new boom? Anna Brady discusses the big lots in New York over the last two weeks, and what they tell us about the market and the world of collectors. In London, Aimee Dawson visits the Victoria and Albert Museum to hear about Carl Fabergé’s shop in London, the subject of a new exhibition, with the show’s co-curators Kieran McCarthy and Hanne Faurby. And for this episode’s Work of the Week, Martin Bailey, our London correspondent, goes to the Agnews gallery to talk to Clifford Schorer of Agnews and Giulia Bartrum, former prints and drawings curator at the British Museum, about Albrecht Dürer’s rediscovered drawing Virgin and Child with a Flower on a Grassy Bench, which is about to go on view at Agnews gallery in London as part of an exhibition, Dürer and His Time.

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Nov 19, 2021
Is M+ in Hong Kong censoring its displays? Plus, the Courtauld Gallery and Black American Portraits in LA
1:14:14
In Hong Kong, the long-awaited M+ Museum opens this week, amid accusations of censorship by the Chinese artist Ai Weiwei. Ilaria Maria Sala joins us to tell us about her visit to the museum. The Courtauld Gallery, one of London’s great collections, is re-opening after a three-year renovation, and we take a tour of the gallery with its director Ernst Vegelin van Claerbergen. And in this week’s Work of the Week, Christine Y Kim tells us about Samella Lewis’s Bag Man, a key work in the Los Angeles County Museum of Art’s exhibition Black American Portraits.

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Nov 12, 2021
Cop26: how can the art world respond? Plus, the Depot: storage as spectacle, and Fragonard's The Swing
1:08:14

This week, as talks continue at Cop26, the UN’s climate charge conference in Glasgow, we talk to Lucia Pietroiusti of the Serpentine Galleries about climate justice and how the art world can go beyond sustainability to "thriveability". As the spectacular Depot Boijmans Van Beuningen opens to the public, we talk to Sjarel Ex, the museum's director, and Sandra Kisters, its head of collections and research, about the building they’re calling the world's first publicly accessible art storage facility. And, for this episode's Work of the Week, we discuss Jean-Honoré Fragonard’s The Swing as it goes back on display at the Wallace Collection in London after conservation treatment. Yuriko Jackall, the Curator of French Paintings at the Wallace Collection, and Martin Wyld, the conservator, tell us about the French Rococo artist’s most famous painting.


Related climate crisis discussions on The Week in Art:


The Gallery Climate Coalition

Venice's climate emergency

Fossil-fuel sponsors and activism at the Science Museum in London

Artist Richard Mosse on environmental crime in the Amazon rainforest



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Nov 05, 2021
Art among the Egyptian pyramids. Plus, the New Museum Triennial and Édouard Manet
1:10:48
This week, Aimee Dawson, deputy digital editor at The Art Newspaper, is in Giza in Egypt for Forever is Now, where works by Egyptian and international artists are shown along a trail around the Giza plateau, among the pyramids (until 7 November). She talks to its curator, Nadine Abdel Ghaffar, as well as two of the artists involved, Gisela Colón and Lita Albuquerque. The New Museum in New York’s latest triennial exhibition, this time called Soft Water Hard Stone, has just opened (until 23 January 2022), featuring 40 artists from across the world. Ben Luke talks to Margot Norton and Jamillah James, the two curators behind the show, about planning a major triennial during a pandemic. In this episode’s Work of the Week, Dorothee Hansen, a curator at the Kunsthalle Bremen in Germany, discusses Édouard Manet’s remarkable depiction of the poet, critic and artist Zacharie Astruc, who was a central figure in Manet's milieu yet has been rather forgotten. The painting is the centrepiece of Manet and Astruc: Friendship and Inspiration, a show at the Kunsthalle (until 27 February 2022).

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Oct 28, 2021
Is Paris on the rise? Plus, Marlene Dumas at the Musée d'Orsay and Christian Boltanksi remembered
58:24
This week, Paris’s resurgence: is the French capital stealing London’s thunder? As established and up-and-coming galleries open branches in Paris and the Fiac art fair opens there, we ask Melanie Gerlis if this is indeed a shift of power from the UK to the French capital. For this episode’s Work of the Week, Donatien Grau, curator of contemporary programmes at the Musée d’Orsay discusses Lady of Uruk, a painting from one of the two shows of the work of the South African artist Marlene Dumas that have just opened at the museum. And as the Château de Versailles, and the Louvre and the Centre Pompidou in Paris all pay tribute to Christian Boltanski, who died in July, Annalisa Rimmaudo, curator at the Pompidou, discusses the three displays and remembers this leading figure in French art over the past 50 years.

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Oct 21, 2021
Rothko’s late paintings, galleries respond to the climate crisis and Nicolas Poussin
44:10
This week, as the Frieze art fairs open and the international art world descends on London, we talk about Mark Rothko’s late paintings, now on view at Pace’s new space in the British capital, with his son Christopher. He also reflects on Rothko’s Seagram Mural paintings, which are now back at Tate Britain, close to JMW Turner’s works, as Rothko had hoped when he gave them to the Tate. Louisa Buck talks to Heath Lowndes, managing director of the Gallery Climate Coalition (GCC), a charity founded by galleries across the world in response to the climate emergency—the GCC has a booth at the Frieze London fair. And, for this episode’s Work of the Week, Ben Luke visits Poussin and the Dance, a show at the National Gallery in London that travels to the Getty Center in Los Angeles next year. There, Francesca Whitlum-Cooper, the show’s curator, tells us about Poussin’s obsession with the Borghese Dancers, an ancient Roman bas-relief now in the Louvre, and how the French artist responded to it in his painting.

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Oct 14, 2021
Jasper Johns: the retrospective in depth. Plus, Venice's tourism problem and Finnish artist Outi Heiskanen
1:02:23

This week: Jasper Johns. Carlos Basualdo of the Philadelphia Museum of Art and Scott Rothkopf of the Whitney Museum of American Art talk to Ben Luke about their simultaneous shows of the 91-year-old artist, and taking a radical approach to a retrospective of a radical artist. Also this week: Venice’s tourist problem. Are Venetian authorities subjecting tourists in Venice to unprecedented surveillance? We talk to Anna Somers Cocks, founder of The Art Newspaper and former chair of Venice in Peril. And in our Work of the Week, Aimee Dawson asks Marja Sakari, director of the Ateneum in Helsinki, about the Finnish artist Outi Heiskanen's Dream Play: Fleeting Virginity (1984), a key work in her retrospective at the Ateneum.




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Oct 07, 2021
The rise of private museums. Plus, the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures and Renaissance portraits at the Rijksmuseum
59:15

This week: is the burgeoning phenomenon of private museums, founded by billionaires and corporations, undermining our public cultural institutions? We talk to Georgina Adam about her new book, The Rise and Rise of the Private Art Museum. Also, Nancy Kenney explores a huge new museum that has just opened in Los Angeles, the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures, and hears from its curators Doris Berger and Ana Santiago, who have sought to question and expand the traditional Hollywood narrative by highlighting some painful film industry stories—including systemic racism—and incorporating an international array of creators, including the Studio Ghibli lynchpin, Hayao Miyazaki. And in this week’s Work of the Week, as the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam opens Remember Me, an extraordinary exhibition of Renaissance portraits, Matthias Ubl, the show’s curator discusses one of the many highlights: Piero di Cosimo’s portraits of the architect Giuliano da Sangallo and his father Francesco Giamberti, made around 1482–85.




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Sep 30, 2021
Art Basel: are the buyers back? Plus, Mary Beard on images of power, and Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s L’Arc de Triomphe, Wrapped
1:07:09
This week: the Art Basel fair has opened in Switzerland, but are the collectors back and are they buying? We talk to Jane Morris, an editor-at-large at The Art Newspaper, about the art on show and whether the galleries’ jitters ahead of the fair have proved founded. Also, we hear from the classicist Mary Beard about her new book, Twelve Caesars, looking at representations of power across 2,000 years of art history, from Roman coins and busts, to 18th-century fakes, lost Titian masterpieces and Tudor tapestries. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, we focus on Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s L’Arc de Triomphe, Wrapped—the last ever wrapping project by the late duo. Vladimir Yavachev, Christo’s nephew, who has overseen the final stages of the project in Paris, describes the technical challenges of cloaking one of Paris’s most famous monuments.

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Sep 23, 2021
Uyghurs: human rights abuses in China; Van Gogh's final months and death; master printer Kenneth Tyler on Helen Frankenthaler
1:13:13

This week: as a tribunal in London hears of human rights atrocities against the Uyghur community and other Muslim groups in China, how will museums, galleries and other cultural institutions working with government-supported institutions in China respond? We talk to The Art Newspaper’s editor-at-large Cristina Ruiz, who has heard many hours of disturbing evidence at the tribunal, and to Sir Geoffrey Nice, the tribunal’s chair.


Also, this week, Martin Bailey tells us about his latest book, Van Gogh's Finale, looking at his final months, his death and his legacy. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, we talk to Kenneth Tyler, the master-printmaker who has collaborated on some of the great prints of the post-war era, about his collaboration on a group of six woodcuts by Helen Frankenthaler, The Tales of Genji (1998), now on view in an exhibition at the Dulwich Picture Gallery in London.




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Sep 16, 2021
Painting special: artists Doron Langberg, Mohammed Sami and Vivien Zhang, art advisor Lisa Schiff, Vermeer’s cupid
1:07:11

As a huge survey of contemporary painting opens at the Hayward Gallery in London, we ask: is the time-honoured medium of painting the art form best suited to exploring the complexity of our age?


We look at the thriving and diverse contemporary painting scene in the UK and explore the Hayward director Ralph Rugoff’s suggestion that this ancient medium “seems like the best technology there could possibly be for reflecting on what it's like to live in a culture where image is the primary currency it is”. We talk to two emerging artists in that show: Baghdad-born Mohammed Sami and Beijing-born Vivien Zhang, who are both based in London. We meet Doron Langberg, the Brooklyn-based painter, and discuss his latest work reflecting on queer desire and identity and landscape as a space of mourning. And we ask art advisor Lisa Schiff, founder of SFA advisory, about paintings and collectors.

And in this episode’s Work of the Week, we explore a newly restored canvas by one of the greatest of all painters, Johannes Vermeer—Girl Reading a Letter at an Open Window (around 1657-59) has just been unveiled in its full glory for the first time in centuries at Dresden’s Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister, fully revealing a hidden image of Cupid, painted by Vermeer but painted over by someone else. And we hear about new research on the painting. Plus, the latest big stories in the world of art and heritage.



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Sep 09, 2021
Afghanistan: the threat to its artists and heritage. Plus, artist Bill Fontana records Notre Dame's bells
57:29

We're back with a new season of The Week in Art, which takes us right up to the holidays.


In this episode, we reflect on events in Afghanistan in recent weeks. We hear from an anthropologist and an Afghan artist about the country's people, art and heritage as the Taliban assume power again. Melissa Chiovenda, an assistant professor of anthropology at Zayed University in Abu Dhabi, discusses the sixth-century Bamiyan Buddhas that were destroyed by the Taliban in 2001 in the context of the Hazara people that live in Bamiyan city and province, and reflects on what the return to power of the Taliban means for that community. The artist Yama Rahimi addresses the implications for artists in Afghanistan and reflects on the contemporary art scene there over recent years. He also talks about the situation facing those people, including artists, that are able to leave Afghanistan and seek asylum in the West—a situation whose complexities he is familiar with as an asylum-seeker living in Germany.


We also hear about a work being made in Notre Dame in Paris by the sound artist Bill Fontana, who is recording the cathedral's bells as they resonate to the sounds of the city. Fontana's project is the first to be made in Notre-Dame since the catastrophic fire in 2019.



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Sep 03, 2021
Great women in art history make a comeback: the New Woman at the Met and Aware in Paris
1:04:47
It's an all-woman line-up on this week's podcast. Nancy Kenney speaks to Andrea Nelson, the curator of The New Woman Behind the Camera, an exhibition opening at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York and touring later to the National Gallery of Art in Washington. Aimee Dawson talks to Camille Morineau, a former Centre Pompidou curator, about the Archives of Women Artists, Research and Exhibitions (Aware), an organisation she founded in order to rewrite art history from a more gender-equal perspective. And in this week’s Work of the Week, Helen Stoilas interviews Orin Zahra, a curator at the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, DC, about a group of photographs in the series SHE (2019) by Rania Matar.

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Jul 01, 2021
Activists protest Shell museum sponsorship. Plus, artists Michael Landy and Shahzia Sikander
1:01:23
This week: should the Science Museum in London stop taking money from the oil company Shell? We talk to a student activist, Anya Nanning Ramamurthy of the UK Student Climate Network, who held a protest at the Science Museum over the weekend of 19 and 20 June, and Chris Garrard, co-director of the ethical sponsorship campaigners Culture Unstained, about fossil-fuel sponsorship and the increasing pressure on the museum. Louisa Buck talks to the British artist Michael Landy about his exhibition Michael Landy's Welcome to Essex at Firstsite in Colchester in the southeastern English county of Essex. And in this week’s Work of the Week, Pakistani American artist Shahzia Sikander, who has a new exhibition at the Morgan Library and Museum in New York, talks to Helen Stoilas, our editor in the Americas, about Kṛṣṇa and Rādhā beneath a flowering tree, a manuscript miniature in the Indian Nathadvara style, painted between 1825 and 1850, which is in the Morgan’s collection. Sikander discusses the way she has brought a contemporary perspective on this work and the broader tradition of manuscript painting in South and Central Asia in her own practice.

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Jun 24, 2021
Slavery at the Rijksmuseum, Leonora Carrington and a Rubens Reunion
1:00:13
This week, we look at a much anticipated exhibition, Slavery at the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. The Rijksmuseum is the Netherlands’ national art and history museum and the curators of the exhibition state in the catalogue that the country’s colonial past has been "insufficiently examined in the national history of the Netherlands, including at the Rijksmuseum”. Ben Luke talks to Valika Smeulders, head of history at the Rijksmuseum and one of the four curators of the exhibition, focusing on several works in the show and exploring the people—from enslaved men and women to wealthy Amsterdam denizens who benefit from slavery—who feature in the exhibition. Also in this episode: as next year’s Venice Biennale is named after The Milk of Dreams, a children’s book by the Surrealist artist Leonora Carrington, Ben talks to Joanna Moorhead, a relative of Carrington’s and the author of The Surreal Life of Leonora Carrington, about the stories, what they tell us about the author, and what they might mean for the next Venice Biennale. And this episode’s Work of the Week is actually two works: Peter Paul Rubens’s two landscape masterpieces The Rainbow Landscape and A View of Het Steen in the Early Morning, which have been reunited for the first time in 200 years at the Wallace Collection in London.

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Jun 18, 2021
Guerrilla Girls: corrupt museum boards, the female nude and NFTs
1:09:02
This week: two festivals of art. Aimee Dawson talks to Frida Kahlo and Kathe Kollwitz of the Guerrilla Girls about their ongoing activism and their new billboards for Art Night, while Ben Luke discusses Glasgow International with its director, Richard Parry, and then reviews the work in the festival with The Art Newspaper’s contemporary art correspondent Louisa Buck. And in this week’s Work of the Week, Ben talks to Samantha Friedman, co-curator of the Museum of Modern Art in New York’s Cézanne Drawing show, about a study sheet of pencil sketches by the French artist, with an apple, a self-portrait, a bather and a portrait of Francisco Goya.

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Jun 11, 2021
Mary Beard on Roman emperor Nero
1:09:42

This week: Mary Beard on Nero, one of the most infamous Roman emperors. Was he the sadistic murderer of legend, the emperor who fiddled as Rome burned, or has he been a victim of spin and myth? As well as getting Mary’s take on this infamous figure and Nero: the man behind the myth, the exhibition about him that’s just opened at the British Museum in London, Ben Luke also talks to the exhibition's curator Thorsten Opper.


Also this week, as the first London Gallery Weekend begins—with 140 galleries from Mayfair to Mile End taking part—The Art Newspaper's editor-at-large Georgina Adam speaks to Jeremy Epstein, co-founder of Edel Assanti gallery and one of the founders of London Gallery Weekend initiative. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, we talk to the artist Nina Katchadourian about a very personal piece of embroidery, created by her adopted grandmother, which has inspired a new work by the artist in her show at Pace in New York.



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Jun 04, 2021
Viking-age treasure: new insights into life 1,000 years ago
58:59

This week: Viking-age treasures—what the medieval gold, silver, textiles and even dirt in a hoard found in 2014 in Scotland can tell us about the Viking age, its people, its art and its international networks.

Ben Luke talks to the curator Martin Goldberg about the Galloway Hoard, which has just gone on view at the National Museum of Scotland in Edinburgh.


Also this week: six proposals for the highest-profile public art commission in London, the Fourth Plinth in Trafalgar Square, have gone on view at London’s National Gallery. We discuss the proposals and the current climate for public art in London with Ekow Eshun, Chair of the Fourth Plinth Commissioning Group, and Justine Simons, London’s Deputy Mayor for Culture and the Creative Industries.


And in this episode’s Work of the Week, we talk about Nike Air Force 1s, the design that changed the face of global sneaker culture, with Ligaya Salazar of London’s Design Museum.




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May 28, 2021
"Art is our spiritual oxygen": new shows in London and New York
56:08
Ben Luke talks to Ralph Rugoff, artistic director of the last Venice Biennale and director of the Hayward Gallery, London, about Matthew Barney and Igshaan Adams, two very different artists exploring autobiography, social issues and dance, among much else, at the Hayward; Louisa Buck talks to the curator Laura Smith as the Whitechapel Gallery unveils two shows about Surrealism and women artists: a solo show of Eileen Agar’s work and an archival show about women’s role in the movement. And for this week’s Work of the Week, Philip Larratt-Smith discusses Passage Dangereux (2007) by Louise Bourgeois, a work in his new show, Louise Bourgeois, Freud’s Daughter, at the Jewish Museum in New York.

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May 21, 2021
New York auctions: has the art market roared back to life?
1:11:48
It's a big week in the New York salerooms: Scott Reyburn, art market expert for The Art Newspaper and The New York Times, discusses the big sales and notable trends at Christie’s and Sotheby’s New York auctions. Meanwhile, as museums in England get ready to open for the first time in five months, we talk to Heather Phillipson about her new exhibition in the Duveen Galleries at Tate Britain. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, to mark the centenary of the birth of the German artist Joseph Beuys, we talk to the artist duo Heather Ackroyd and Dan Harvey about Beuys’ seminal late work 7000 Oaks and their response to it, Beuys’ Acorns.

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May 14, 2021
Climate disaster: Richard Mosse on environmental crime in the Amazon
56:07
This week: ecocide in Brazil. In a special in-depth interview marking a retrospective at Fondazione MAST in Bologna, Italy, and an exhibition at the Jack Shainman Gallery in New York, the artist Richard Mosse discusses his photographs and forthcoming film installation picturing the scale of the destruction of the Amazonian rainforest. Mosse also talks about his earlier photographic and film series on the themes of war, displacement and migration. And in this episode's Work of the Week, the artist Rachel Maclean talks about her new work for Jupiter Artland, the sculpture park near Edinburgh, in the context of Hieronymus Bosch's The Garden of Earthly Delights.

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May 07, 2021
Return to La La Land: art is back in California
50:11
This week: Los Angeles has finally opened its museums after more than a year. When New York's galleries have been open since August, what took California so long? We talk to Jori Finkel about LA's slow emergence from lockdown. Also: DB Burkeman tells us about his new book Art Sleeves, a trawl through 40 years of artist-designed record covers. And in this episode's Work of the Week, as Scottish museums re-open after a long lockdown, Kirsty Hassard, the curator of V&A Dundee's exhibition Night Fever: Designing Club Culture, talks about Volker Hinz's photograph of the singer and fashion model Grace Jones, in the Area nightclub in New York in 1984.

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Apr 30, 2021
Kusama-rama: Yayoi in London, New York and Berlin
1:01:31

This week on the now award-winning The Week in Art: Kusamarama. We take a deep dive into Yayoi Kusama’s polka dots, pumpkins and infinity rooms as shows open in New York, Washington, London and Berlin. We’re joined by three curators: Frances Morris, the director of Tate Modern in London, talks about Kusama’s Infinity Rooms; Mika Yoshitake, the curator of an exhibition at the New York Botanical Garden, explains the fundamental role of plants and nature in Kusama’s art; and Stephanie Rosenthal, director of the Gropius Bau in Berlin, discusses the huge Kusama retrospective that’s just opened there.


Yayoi Kusama: Infinity Mirror Rooms will open to Tate Members from 18 May and then to the wider public from 14 June. It will continue until June 2022.


Two of the Infinity Mirror Rooms, will feature in One with Eternity: Yayoi Kusama in the Hirshhorn Collection, an exhibition soon to open at the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington. The museum's currently closed but do visit its website to check for announcements.


KUSAMA: Cosmic Nature is at The New York Botanical Garden until 31 October. 


Yayoi Kusama: A Retrospective continues at the Groipus Bau in Berlin until 1 August. And Stephanie Rosenthal has created a reading list on Kusama for our Book Club, visit theartnewspaper.com to read more. Later this year, the retrospective will travel to the Tel Aviv Museum of Art later this year. 


New My Eternal Soul paintings by Kusama will be shown in London, Tokyo, and New York this summer—at Victoria Miro in London from 4 June as part of exhibition of new paintings and sculptures, then at David Zwirner, New York, from 17 June and Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo, from 19 June.





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Apr 23, 2021
Let loose after lockdown: London’s best gallery shows
1:00:03
This week: after four long months, commercial art galleries are open again in England. We discuss some of the London shows with Louisa Buck, The Art Newspaper’s contemporary art correspondent, and take a tour of Rachel Whiteread’s exhibition at the Gagosian Gallery in Grosvenor Hill, London. And we talk to the artist Idris Khan, who has a new exhibition at the Victoria Miro gallery, about his oil, watercolour and collage works made in the English countryside and using sheet music from Vivaldi's The Four Seasons. And in this episode’s Work of the Week we talk to the artist James Welling, whose latest photographic projects stem from direct encounters with ancient Greek objects, about Kore 674, an ancient Greek sculpture from 500 BCE in the Acropolis Museum, Athens.

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Apr 16, 2021
Can Netflix help solve the Isabella Stewart Gardner art heist?
1:13:51
On this week's podcast: the world’s greatest art heist. As a new Netflix documentary hits our screens, who stole the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum’s paintings by Rembrandt, Vermeer and Manet, among other items, and are we any closer to finding them? We talk to Jeff Siegel, producer of the new Netflix series This is a Robbery about the 1990 heist at the Gardner museum, in Boston, Massachusetts. As Denmark brings in the "coronapas", a form of vaccine passport, we talk to Axel Rüger of the Royal Academy of Arts in London about whether such a scheme could work in the UK's museums and galleries, and to Tania Coen-Uzzielli of the Tel Aviv Museum of Art in Israel, where they have a “green pass” scheme, from which museums are exempt. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, Susan Foister, deputy director of the National Gallery in London, discusses Jan Gossaert’s Adoration of the Kings—the subject of a show at the gallery which has now been developed into an experience for smartphone users.

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Apr 09, 2021
Has the drop in visitors changed museums forever?
58:12

The Art Newspaper’s annual survey of museum attendance is out: just how many visitors and how much money have museums lost in the pandemic? And how have digital initiatives helped?


José da Silva, exhibitions editor at The Art Newspaper, and one of the editors of our annual visitor figures survey, talks about the 77% global fall in visitor numbers and the huge losses in self-generated income in museums. And we talk to Chris Unitt, the founder of One Further, a digital consultancy for the arts industry, about museums’ work in the digital field, how effective it has been and how it might be used in the future.


And, in excerpts from our sister podcast, A brush with... we hear Michael Armitage and Julie Mehretu discussing Titian and Velázquez.



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Apr 02, 2021
Benin bronzes: looted treasures will return to Nigeria at last
56:00
This week: Germany announces that its museums will send the Benin bronzes back to Nigeria: will other nations follow? We talk to Catherine Hickley, who broke the story of Germany’s planned restitution of the bronzes in The Art Newspaper this week, and to Dan Hicks, whose book The Brutish Museums tells the story of British colonial destruction and looting that led to the bronzes’ collection by museums across the world. Also: a Van Gogh painting which had never been exhibited has just been sold at auction. We ask The Art Newspaper’s Martin Bailey about the painting and discuss his latest Van Gogh blog, about the tragic lives of Vincent’s sisters. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, the artist Rana Begum talks about Always Now (1981), by the painter Tess Jaray.

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Mar 26, 2021
The results are in: the real impact of Covid on the art market
1:05:06

On this week's podcast: the most influential annual art market report has just been published—so what does it tell us about the effects of a year of Covid-19 on the market? We talk to Clare McAndrew, the author of the The Art Basel and UBS Global Art Market Report.

Also in this episode, we talk to the scholar of Dada and Surrealism, Dawn Ades, about her book on Marcel Duchamp—and we address the debate about who made Fountain (1917), the famous upturned urinal. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, Jakob Fenger, a member of Danish artist collective Superflex, discusses a work by the Brazilian artist Cildo Meireles, Insertions into Ideological Circuits: Coca-Cola Project (1970).



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Mar 19, 2021
UK culture war: how should museums confront colonialism?
1:08:20
This week, we focus on two books: Aimee Dawson talks to Alice Procter about the debate over contested heritage in the UK and her book The Whole Picture, a strident call for colonial histories to be told in museums. Jori Finkel speaks to Glenn Adamson about Craft: An American History, a radical reappraisal of craft's role in forging American identity. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, Ben Luke talks to the critic Michael Peppiatt—curator of an exhibition uniting Frank Auerbach and Tony Bevan at Ben Brown Fine Arts in London—about Auerbach's EOW Sleeping IV (1967), in the Israel Museum in Jerusalem.

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Mar 12, 2021
Old Masters meet Brutalism: inside Frick Madison in New York
1:14:07

This week: the Frick Collection in New York has moved temporarily from its Gilded Age Mansion on Central Park to Marcel Breuer’s 1960s building created for the Whitney Museum. So what happens when the Old Masters meet Brutalism? We talk to Xavier Salomon, deputy director and chief curator of the Frick about this remarkable change of setting for one of the world’s great collections. We talk to Vincent Noce about his new book L'Affaire Ruffini, following an Old Master forgery scandal, involving works by artists including Cranach, Hals and Orazio Gentileschi and some of the world's most august institutions. And for this episode’s Work of the Week the artist Collier Schorr talks about the photographer August Sander's Young Soldier, Westerwald, in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York (and various other museum collections).




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Mar 05, 2021
WTF are NFTs? Why crypto is dominating the art market
1:05:34
This week: NFTs or Non-Fungible Tokens. What are they? Are they a fad or do they represent the future of the art market? We talk to two people in the world of crypto commodities about the explosion of NFTs on the art market. We hear from the artist Beeple, whose piece Everydays: The First 5000 Days is the first standalone NFT work of art to be sold at auction, and to Jason Bailey, the founder of the analytical database artnome. And for this episode’s Work of the Week, the artist Doug Aitken talks about the minimalist composer Terry Riley’s 1968 piece You’re No Good.

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Feb 26, 2021
'Black grief and white grievance' at New York’s New Museum
1:13:28
This week: the curator Naomi Beckwith and artist Okwui Okpokwasili discuss Grief and Grievance: Art and Mourning in America, a major show at the New Museum in New York—the final project conceived by the late curator Okwui Enwezor. Also, we explore the effect of Covid-19 on artists with disabilities: we talk to the artist Cara Macwilliam and to Hannah Whitlock and Laura Miles from the UK charity Outside In. And Goya’s Graphic Imagination has opened at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, so for this episode’s Work of the Week we talk to Goya specialist Francisco Chaparro, who contributed to the exhibition’s catalogue, about one of the prints in his series The Disasters of War (1810-15), One can’t look (No se puede mirar).

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Feb 19, 2021
Stonehenge: could a road tunnel ruin the ancient site?
1:00:55
This week: excavations have revealed new archaeological finds at Stonehenge but the UK government has approved a road tunnel through this iconic World Heritage Site—will it ruin it? We talk to Mike Pitts, an archaeologist, about the debate over the tunnel and its effect on the ancient stones and their surrounding landscape. Plus: museums in France are urging their government to let them reopen; we talk to Jean-François Chougnet of Mucem, a museum in Marseille. And for this episode’s Work of the Week, Aimee Dawson speaks to the artist Crystal Fischetti about Wish List, a sculptural installation by Karla Black.

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Feb 12, 2021
The fight against Putin: artists on the frontline
1:08:13
On this week's podcast: the artist-activists at the heart of Russia’s biggest protests in a decade and how the Indian government is using heritage and museums to re-write the history of the country. We talk to Lölja Nordic, an artist, DJ and activist in Saint Petersburg, who appeared in a video released this week by Pussy Riot, Russia’s most famous cultural activists, in support of "political prisoners" arrested in the protests across Russia. And we talk to the academic Sarover Zaidi about the Indian government's approach to the country's heritage. In this episode’s Work of the Week, the artist Navid Nuur talks about Walter De Maria’s New York Earth Room (1977).

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Feb 05, 2021
Botticelli and Leonardo: the new normal for Old Masters
53:45

This week, the Old Masters in the digital age. We look at the $92m live-streamed auction sale (with fees) of a major Botticelli in New York and new research, including a study using artificial intelligence, into Leonardo’s Salvator Mundi.


While a prize Botticelli sold for a record price for the early Renaissance master at Sotheby's, a Rembrandt, expected to fetch $20m-$30m, was withdrawn from the auction at the last minute. So as the coronavirus crisis continues, is this really a good moment to sell Old Masters? Scott Reyburn, who writes for The Art Newspaper and the New York Times, reflects on the results of the sale and the Old Masters market more generally.


Then, Alison Cole, the editor of The Art Newspaper, explains the latest scientific findings about Salvator Mundi, the Leonardo painting that sold at Christie’s in 2017 for $450m—including a study using neural networks.


And for this episode’s Work of the Week, the artist Gerard Byrne talks about a diorama in the Biological Museum, in Stockholm, which inspired Byrne’s series of photographs, Beasts, and a film installation, Film Inside an Image, both now showing in an online viewing room at kerlingallery.com.




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Jan 29, 2021
What will Biden-Harris do for the visual arts?
51:19

This week: as Joe Biden and Kamala Harris are sworn in as the president and vice president of the United States, what might their administration do for the visual arts? We talk to Jori Finkel, a regular contributor to The Art Newspaper and The New York Times from Los Angeles. We explore an extraordinary story linking QAnon, the far-right conspiracy theory and hate group, and how its origins may lie in the activities of a collective of radical Italian artists in the 1990s, the Luther Blisset Project, with Eddy Frankel, the Culture editor of Time Out and founder of the art and football magazine OOF. And in this week’s Work of the Week, we actually look at 20 works: Alphonse Mucha’s Slav Epic, with Mucha’s grandson, John.




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Jan 22, 2021
The white supremacist art in the US Capitol
1:02:38

This week, we look at white supremacist art in the Capitol in Washington and discuss the legacy of Hannah Arendt. Plus, we look at a record-breaking auction sale of a Batman comic. 


Sarah Beetham, chair of liberal arts and assistant professor of art history at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, discusses the statue of the Confederate General Robert E. Lee that was removed from the Capitol building two weeks before right-wing mobs, incited by President Donald Trump and other Republican lawmakers, attacked the Capitol and filled it with white supremacist imagery like the Confederate flag. A further eight Confederate statues remain in the Capitol's National Statuary Hall today.


With the riots in Washington as a backdrop, we talk to two artists, Peter Kennard and Vivienne Koorland, who feature in an exhibition programme dedicated to Hannah Arendt at Richard Saltoun in London this year. They discuss the the political theorist's legacy and her affect on their work.


And as a copy of the first ever comic featuring Batman sells for $2.2m at auction, we ask Ed Jaster, the Senior Vice President at Heritage Auctions, what makes this item so special.




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Jan 15, 2021
2020: The year in review
1:16:31
It’s the final episode of 2020 and so, as we always do as the year comes to an end, we’re reviewing the last 12 months in the art world. And what a year it’s been. Host Ben Luke was joined by three of The Art Newspaper’s correspondents on the frontline reporting the huge events of the year and their effects on the art world. Anna Brady is our art market editor, Louisa Buck is our contemporary art correspondent, and Gareth Harris is our chief contributing editor. Inevitably, as we tackled the year’s events, two major global events dominated the discussions: the coronavirus pandemic and the death of George Floyd, Black Lives Matter and the fight for racial justice.

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Dec 18, 2020
Brexit: how will it change the art market?
54:30

The Brexit deadline is imminent and the UK and the European Union are desperately seeking an agreement. But what are the implications either way for the art trade? We asked the writer and art market specialist Ivan Macquisten and former Conservative MEP and current chief executive of the British Chamber of Commerce in Brussels, Daniel Dalton. And for this episode’s Work of the Week, the curator Neville Wakefield tells us about the planks made by John McCracken, who’s suddenly gained a new audience because he was initially rumoured to be the artist behind that shiny monolith in the Utah desert.




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Dec 11, 2020
Contemporary public art: who is it for?
57:42

This week, we look at contemporary public art, as debate has raged about various works in recent weeks. Who is public art for and why does it continue to provoke such strong reactions? Host Ben Luke talks to Louisa Buck, The Art Newspaper’s contemporary art correspondent, and James Lingwood from the visionary producers of public works, Artangel, about art by Christoph Büchel, Jeremy Deller, Maggi Hambling, Rachel Whiteread, Marc Quinn and Mark Wallinger; the artist Olaf Breuning tells us about a public work he has made for a hospital in Miami; and for this episode’s Work of the Week, the artist Tom Sachs talks about Mondrian's Broadway Boogie-Woogie in the Museum of Modern Art, New York.




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Dec 04, 2020
Is the future of museums in Africa?
1:15:17
This week we look at museums and Africa: we explore the future of museums and African institutions’ central role in it and we look at the 19th-century looting of the Benin Bronzes and what it tells us about museums and colonialism, then and now. We talk to Sonia Lawson, the founding director of the Palais de Lomé in Togo, and András Szántó, the writer of the new book The Future of the Museum: 28 Dialogues. We also speak to Dan Hicks, professor of contemporary archaeology at the University of Oxford and curator at the Pitt Rivers Museum there, about his book The Brutish Museums, focusing on the Benin Bronzes. And for our Work of the Week, Christopher Riopelle of the National Gallery in London talks about a painting of Copernicus by the Polish artist Jan Matejko, which is coming to the National for an exhibition next year.

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Nov 27, 2020
Rewriting the Thanksgiving myth: the Mayflower and the Wampanoag, 400 years on
1:00:04
It’s Thanksgiving on 26 November, so this week, we look at the myths behind this American holiday, and particularly the story of the Mayflower, the ship that landed in Plymouth Bay, Massachusetts, 400 years ago. We talk to Jo Loosemore, the curator of the exhibition Mayflower 400: Legend and Legacy at The Box in Plymouth, about the voyage, the settlement and decolonising the story. And then we get the in-depth perspective of Steven Peters, the co-founder of the creative agency Smoke Sygnals and a member of the Wompanoag nation, the native inhabitants of the region around Plymouth Colony, who along with other tribes, had lived there for 10,000 years before the Europeans arrived. Steven curated the exhibition Our Story: The Early Days of the Wampanoag Tribe and the Pilgrims Who Followed at the Provincetown Museum in Massachusetts. For this episode’s Work of the Week, the painter Chantal Joffe explores Paula Modersohn-Becker’s Self-Portrait, Age 30, 6th Wedding Day.

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Nov 20, 2020
Where art fairs still happen: the Shanghai buzz
49:54
This week: we speak to our China correspondent Lisa Movius in Shanghai about the fairs and other events opening in the city this week. And we look at a rare museum event opening in Europe: Tate Britain’s Winter Commission, which—because it’s on the facade of the building—opens to the public this week; Louisa Buck meets the latest artist to take on the commission, Chila Kumari Singh Burman. And for this week’s Work of the Week, we focus on Art is… by Lorraine O’Grady, a performance made in 1983 that inspired the video made for the triumphant candidates in the US election, Joe Biden and Kamala Harris.

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Nov 13, 2020
US election: How Trump’s presidency has affected the arts
1:09:44

As the ramifications of the US election are set to continue for weeks, where do we stand in the art world? We look at the economics and the response of artists and art communities over the last four years and into the future. We talk to Felix Salmon, the chief financial correspondent at Axios, about the economic situation and its potential effects; Carolina Miranda of the Los Angeles Times reflects on individualism and collective action in the cultural sphere; and the Mexican artist Pedro Reyes talks about his project in New York City, Mañanaland, timed to coincide with the election. For this week’s Work of the Week, Martin Rowson, a cartoonist for the Guardian and the Daily Mirror, among others, talks about William Hogarth’s Gin Lane (1751), drawing President Trump, and the power of satire to address moments of crisis.




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Nov 06, 2020
Has coronavirus helped unmask the real prices of art?
1:07:29

This week: like the rest of the art world, the market has been upended by the pandemic. But has the turmoil forced it to be any more transparent? Do we know any more about the actual price of art? Ben Luke is joined by Georgina Adam, an editor-at-large at The Art Newspaper and art market specialist, to discuss transparency and the market. Also this week, we talk to David Blayney Brown, the curator of Turner’s Modern World, a new show at Tate Britain in London. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, the artist John Stezaker talks about a grisaille painting, Christ and the Woman Taken in Adultery, by Pieter Bruegel the Elder, in the Courtauld collection but currently on display at the National Gallery in London.




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Oct 30, 2020
The great museum sell-off: should public collections deaccession to survive Covid-19?
1:06:06
Following a historic relaxation of deaccessioning laws in the US, we probe the moral quandaries faced by museums forced to sell-off parts of their collections to stay afloat. We speak to Christopher Bedford, the director of the Baltimore Museum of Art in Maryland, which has announced it is to sell three works; to Georgina Adam about what this all means for the art market, and to James H. Duff, a former director of the Brandywine River Museum and chair of the Professional Issues Committee of the Association of Art Museum Directors, for an overview of the history of deaccessioning. Plus, in our latest work of the week, artist Jennifer Packer discusses a Buddhist mural in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

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Oct 23, 2020
What does the Philip Guston delay tell us about museums and race?
1:11:03
This week, we talk to the critics and curators Barry Schwabsky and Aindrea Emelife about the four-year delay to the show Philip Guston Now at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, the museums of fine arts in Houston and Boston and Tate Modern in London. What does the postponement of a big show of the American artist’s work tell us about museums’ response to art and race in the wake of Black Lives Matter? Also, Louisa Buck meets Maggi Hambling as a new show of her work opens at Marlborough Gallery in London. And in our Work of the Week, the artist Martha Tuttle talks about a medieval Visitation in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

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Oct 16, 2020
Frieze: the show goes on. Plus, Theaster Gates
59:36

It’s Frieze Week in London, yet there’s no big art fair at its heart. Can galleries create the usual excitement—and is anyone still buying?


There’s no Frieze London or Frieze Masters but there are plenty of exhibitions and events being staged across the city, the now customary online viewing rooms and digital sales platforms and a big New York auction. We talk to The Art Newspaper's contemporary art correspondent Louisa Buck about the art around town and to our editor-at-large and FT columnist Melanie Gerlis about how the market is faring without the fairs. And Linda Yablonsky talks to Theaster Gates about his shows at Gagosian in New York and White Cube in London.



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Oct 09, 2020
Artemisia and Frida: great art, turbulent lives
1:03:03

This week, we look at two great women artists: at last, we visit the postponed Artemisia exhibition at the National Gallery in London, taking a tour with its curator Letizia Treves, and picking out some of the extraordinary highlights of the show. And we also explore a new biography of Frida Kahlo with its author, Hettie Judah.




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Oct 02, 2020
Sell the Michelangelo or lose 150 staff? The RA’s Covid-19 conundrum
57:04

With UK museums and galleries in crisis, might the Royal Academy of Arts be forced to sell its Michelangelo? We look at the story that has emerged in recent days that some Royal Academicians—the artists and architects that run the RA—are suggesting selling the Taddei Tondo to prevent huge job losses and keep the Academy afloat.

Also this week: Margaret Carrigan speaks to Legacy Russell, the author of a new book, Glitch Feminism: A Manifesto, about how her ideas relate to the world of art and museums. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, Imma Ramos of the British Museum chooses 19th-century figure of the goddess Kali, which features in the Tantra exhibition she has curated at the museum, which has just opened.



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Sep 25, 2020
Grayson Perry on race and class in the US; Philip Guston; Jacolby Satterwhite on Manet
59:54
This week: the artist Grayson Perry has a new exhibition and documentary series about the United States. What can a British artist and broadcaster tell us about the faultlines in American culture? Louisa Buck talks to him in his show at Victoria Miro in London. Ben Luke talks to the curator and art historian Robert Storr, the author of a huge new book about the painter Philip Guston. And in this episode’s Work of the Week, Margaret Carrigan talks to the artist Jacolby Satterwhite about Édouard Manet’s masterpiece Le déjeuner sur l’herbe (Luncheon on the grass).

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Sep 18, 2020
Berlin: still a magnet for artists?
42:01
It’s Berlin Art Week, and unusually for 2020, art fairs, a biennale, and a range of exhibitions are all opening at once in the German capital. But is Berlin still the thriving art centre it’s been over the last two decades? We talk to the Canadian artist and adoptive Berliner AA Bronson about participating in one of the big shows opening this week, at the legendary Berghain nightclub, and about his experience of living in the city. We hear from the veteran art dealer Thomas Schulte about Berlin’s return to normality. And, in this episode’s Work of the Week, we talk to the artist Jadé Fadojutimi about an Untitled painting by Laura Owens in the Tate Collection.

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Sep 11, 2020
Cancelled: should good artists pay for bad behaviour?
53:36
In this first episode of the new season, we talk to Erich Hatala Matthes, associate professor of philosophy at Wellesley College, Massachusetts, US—who’s writing a book on immoral artists—about how useful the notion of “cancelling” may be. With The Art Newspaper’s correspondent Tom Seymour and the photographer and lecturer Lewis Bush we explore the cases of Martin Parr and David Alan Harvey, two photographers whose activities have recently come under scrutiny. And, In this episode’s Work of the Week, the artist Tavares Strachan talks about Robert Smithson’s seminal earthwork from 1970, the Spiral Jetty.

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Sep 04, 2020
Trailer: The Week in Art
1:30

The Week in Art, sponsored by Christie’s, is The Art Newspaper’s topical news podcast, released every Friday.

 

Each week, we look at the big stories in the art world, from museums and the major exhibitions to heritage and the art market. We talk to the top artists and museum directors; we take tours of the essential shows; and our experts analyse the latest events and trends across the art scene.

 

Plus, in every episode we ask a leading art-world figure—from artists and curators to critics and art historians—to choose a favourite piece of art in our Work of the Week.

 

Join us every Friday, wherever you get your podcasts.



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Sep 02, 2020
New series in September. Meanwhile…
3:20
A new series of The Week in Art podcast will begin on 4 September; expect all the latest art world news, exclusive interviews, exhibition tours and much more. In the meantime, why not subscribe to A brush with..., the brand new podcast from The Art Newspaper, which we launched this week. You can hear the trailer in this podcast. The first episode, A brush with... Michael Armitage, is out now, and three more in-depth conversations with painters are released in the coming weeks. There are also details of the next event in The Art Newspaper Live series on our YouTube channel: on 13 August, our host Ben Luke will talk to Russell Tovey and Robert Diament from the art podcast Talk Art.

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Aug 07, 2020
Ready to see some art? The top exhibitions of the summer
1:26:33

This week, in our last episode of this series, we look at the top exhibitions you can see this summer in the UK, Europe and the US, with Anna Brady and Gareth Harris joining Ben Luke in London, and Helen Stoilas, Nancy Kenney and Jillian Steinhauer in New York. We also reflect on the anxieties and ethics of visiting galleries as Covid-19 remains widespread.


And we have our usual Work of the Week, this time chosen by the artist Hassan Hajjaj, who looks at an album cover, Doctor Alimantado’s 1978 debut The Best Dressed Chicken in Town, and discusses how it influenced his own photography.



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Jul 31, 2020
What will culture be like in the next decade?
1:01:25

We explore the Serpentine Galleries’ new report into Future Art Ecosystems: with existing art industry models under threat, can new ones emerge in the post-coronavirus era? We talk to Ben Vickers, the Serpentine Galleries’ chief technology officer, about art and advanced technologies. As his BBC radio series Great Gallery Tours continues, we hear from a Simon Schama, who is marooned in Trump’s America yet yearns for a sunlit morning on the Thames in London: his choice for our Work of the Week is J.M.W. Turner’s Mortlake Terrace: Early Summer Morning in the Frick in New York. And as unemployment in the US surges past Great Depression-era levels, we look at a historic cultural programme that may have pointers for this moment: the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act or CETA, a response to the economic crisis of the 1970s.


Links:


The Art Newspaper: theartnewspaper.com


The Serpentine Galleries' Future Art Ecosystems report: https://www.serpentinegalleries.org/whats-on/future-art-ecosystems/


Simon Schama's BBC radio series Great Gallery Tours: https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m000kw4t


Turner's Mortlake Terrace: Early Summer Morning: https://collections.frick.org/objects/267/mortlake-terrace-early-summer-morning


CETA: ceta-arts.com



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Jul 24, 2020
Staff cuts: are museums protecting their workers?
1:14:45

This week, as the effects of the coronavirus pandemic and the lockdown hit museums, we’re seeing unprecedented layoffs on both sides of the Atlantic. We ask: are museums doing all they can to save their staff? We look at the latest developments in the UK and US, where hundreds of museum workers are losing their jobs.


Our museums editor, Hannah McGivern sets the scene in the US and Europe, our senior editor Margaret Carrigan speaks to Dana Kopel, the New Museum Union’s unit chair, and Frankie Altamura, one of the union’s stewards, both of whom lost their jobs at the museum this week, about the growing movement for museum workers’ rights across the US and whether institutions can care for their workers. And we speak to Steven Warwick of the Public and Commercial Services union about the effect of the job cuts in UK museums on his members.


This week’s Work of the Week is chosen by Emily Butler, a curator at the Whitechapel Gallery in London, about Rhea Storr’s film Junkanoo Talk (2017). You can see the full film here.



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Jul 17, 2020
Hong Kong: has the new law "destroyed" the art scene?
1:02:52

What is the future of the art world in Hong Kong now that a new national security law curbs human rights and threatens freedom of expression? We look at the effects on artists and the wider art scene with two people based there: the artist Kacey Wong and the commentator Alexandra Seno.


And in our Work of the Week Alyce Mahon, the author of the new book The Marquis de Sade and the Avant-Garde, explores one of Leonor Fini’s illustrations for Story of O by Pauline Réage.



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Jul 10, 2020
The destruction of Australia’s Aboriginal heritage
1:03:50

This week, we look at the destruction on 24 May of sacred Aboriginal sites in Western Australia by a mining company. We talk to Sven Ouzman, an archeologist and activist at the University of Western Australia about the most recent events and the wider context. Can anything be done to better protect Aboriginal country and Australia’s ancient heritage? 


Also, this week, as a Russian referendum approves Vladimir Putin’s new constitution—a foregone conclusion, of course—we look at the Russia's alarming crackdown on artists.


And in the latest in our series Lonely Works, in which explore art behind the doors of museums closed due to Covid-19, we look at a work that will soon be lonely no more. The artist George Shaw tells us about Thomas Jones’s A Wall in Naples, which will be seen for the first time in more than three months at the National Gallery in London when it re-opens on 8 July. 


Links:


Our full guide to gallery openings in UK, Europe and the US


Thomas Jones's A Wall in Naples at the National Gallery


The University of Western Australia's Centre for Rock Art Research and Management



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Jul 03, 2020
Art and social media: do museums need memes?
1:03:50
Plus, artist Rita Keegan on her postponed show and Julia Peyton-Jones on Leonardo

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Jun 26, 2020
What to do about problematic statues?
1:02:57

This week we address the toppling of statues around the world amid the Black Lives Matter protests: is this an airbrushing of history as some claim or a long overdue corrective to historic prejudices?


We explore what happens now: we talk to Richard Benjamin, the director of the International Slavery Museum (ISM) in Liverpool, UK, about the events which saw the pulling down of the statue of the slaver Edward Colston in Bristol and how museums like ISM can respond to the increased focus on histories of the transatlantic slave trade. We speak to Astrid de Bruycker, the alderwoman for equal opportunities in Ghent, Belgium, where a bust of Leopold II, the king responsible for one of the most brutal of all the colonial regimes, in what is now the Democratic Republic of the Congo, is being removed. And Hew Locke, the artist who has made works about problematic statuary in various parts of the globe for many years, tells us about his work as some of the statues he has addressed become flashpoints for a new movement. Hew also chooses the latest in our series Lonely Works, looking at art behind the doors of museums that are closed because of the coronavirus pandemic—a painting in the Tate Collection by Agostino Brunias, depicting slaves in the Caribbean.



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Jun 19, 2020
How to visit a gallery during a pandemic
53:02

On this week's podcast, as galleries in London re-open amid a pandemic, we ask: what does the new normal look like for the art world?

Ben Luke takes his first steps in an art gallery for three months and talks to Stefan Ratibor and Millicent Wilner at the Gagosian Gallery in London as they plan to re-open on the 15 June. We look at the ways that galleries across the British capital have joined together to share information and plan for the future. Is this a new, kinder era for commercial galleries? Jo Stella-Sawicka from the Goodman Gallery offers her views. And in the latest in our series of Lonely Works behind the doors of closed museums, the artist Deborah Roberts explores Benny Andrews’s No More Games in the Museum of Modern Art, New York. 



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Jun 12, 2020
Let’s talk about race: museums and the battle against white privilege
53:33

This week, in the aftermath of the killing of George Floyd, we talk about the history of black resistance in the US and how the art world can respond to this latest tragedy. As protests grow throughout the country, Margaret Carrigan, one of The Art Newspaper’s senior editors in New York, speaks to Spencer Crew, the interim director of the National Museum of African American History and Culture, about the museum’s Talking About Race online portal. 


Also this week, we pay tribute to Christo, who died earlier this week. With his collaborator and wife Jeanne-Claude, Christo most famously wrapped the Pont Neuf in Paris and the Reichstag in Berlin in coloured fabric.


And in the latest in our series of Lonely Works behind the doors of closed museums, Caro Howell, the director of the Foundling Museum in London, explores William Hogarth’s portrait of Thomas Coram, the painting that is the cornerstone of the Foundling’s collection—which she now hasn’t seen for months because of the coronavirus lockdown.



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Jun 05, 2020
Houston, do we have a problem?
58:25
As cultural institutions across the world are faced with deciding if and when to re-open, we look at two extremes: we hear from Brandon Zech, the publisher of the Texas-based art publication Glasstire, about a visit to the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, one of the first museums in the US to re-open. And we discuss the Southbank Centre in London’s announcement that it’s at risk of closure until April 2021, with Ralph Rugoff, the director of the Hayward Gallery, one of the centre’s venues. And in the latest in our series Lonely Works—about objects in museums that are closed due to the virus—the artist Michael Rakowitz tells us about some ancient Sumerian figurines in the Oriental Institute in Chicago.

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May 29, 2020
Raphael: as great as Leonardo and Michelangelo?
1:06:01

This episode begins by celebrating good news: that the once-in-a-lifetime exhibition of works by Raphael at the Scuderie del Quirinale in Rome—which only opened for three days before being closed due to Covid-19 in March—will re-open on 2 June and run for three months until 30 August. The show, which begins with Raphael’s death and moves back in time, is the jewel in the crown of the celebrations across Europe and the US marking the 500th anniversary of Raphael’s death. Hugo Chapman, the Keeper of Prints and Drawings at the British Museum and a Raphael specialist, heralds the genius of an artist whose fame has somewhat unfairly been eclipsed by Leonardo and by his great rival Michelangelo.


Also this week: the renaissance of mail art. Margaret Carrigan looks at the radical history of art in the post with Mariam Kienle, assistant professor of art history at the University of Kentucky, and about its revival as the US postal service is under threat from the Trump administration.


And in the latest in the series Lonely Works, the artist Mark Dion discusses the American Museum of Natural History and its profound effect on his work.



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May 22, 2020
Is the future of the art market online?
1:06:21

This week would have been so-called "gigaweek", with the major auctions of Impressionist, Modern and contemporary art in New York. The events have, of course, been postponed. But are collectors buying art online instead? An explosion of digital initiatives and online galleries or viewing rooms followed the cancellation of fairs and the closure of auction houses and galleries over recent months due to the coronavirus. So this week, we’re looking at the implications of going digital for the art market.


We talk to Scott Reyburn, who writes on the art market for The New York Times as well as The Art Newspaper, and our art market editors Anna Brady and Margaret Carrigan take us through some of the initiatives including their experience of the viewing room for Frieze New York. Also this week, in the latest in our Lonely Work series, exploring art behind closed doors in museums… Rebecca Salter, the president of the Royal Academy in London, tells us about Cemetery (1900-02) by the Belgian artist Léon Spilliaert, and gives us an update on the RAs exhibition programme.


UPDATE: A new version of this episode was uploaded on 21 May to rectify an incorrect statement made by Scott Reyburn that the Frieze Viewing Rooms were only accessible to VIPs. After the initial VIP days, the Viewing Rooms were in fact open to all from 8-15 May. 



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May 15, 2020
Exclusive: Marina Abramovic interview
55:37
This week, we have an exclusive interview with Marina Abramovic: what's the future of performance in the post-pandemic art world? Also, as the lockdown steadily eases in Germany, we ask Catherine Hickley, The Art Newspaper's correspondent in Berlin, how it feels to step foot in a museum again. And in the latest in our Lonely Works series, the painter Ian Davenport tells us why he’s made a new body of work inspired by Pierre Bonnard’s Nude in the Bath (1936).

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May 08, 2020
Can tech recreate the hand of an Old Master?
1:05:03

This week, we look at how technologies like digital scanning and artificial intelligence (AI) are being used to create facsimiles of historic paintings. We talk to Adam Lowe of the Factum Foundation, leaders in the field of digital heritage preservation, ahead of three live discussions about technology and heritage on The Art Newspaper's YouTube channel on 1,2 and 3 May.


Also this week, we talk to Sophie Matisse, the great-granddaughter of Henri, about following in his—and her great-grandmother Amélie’s—footsteps for a new BBC film. And in a slight twist on our Lonely Works series, the painter Lisa Yuskavage tells us about missing the great Van Eyck exhibition in Ghent because of the coronavirus.




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May 01, 2020
The end of the blockbuster? Museums in a post-pandemic world
1:07:52

This week, we look at museums in different parts of the globe: what’s their future in a world changed by the coronavirus?


The doors of museums have slammed shut over recent weeks as Covid-19 has locked down countries across the world. So this week, we’re asking key figures in museums in the UK, the US and China: what happens next? We speak to Frances Morris, the director of Tate Modern, to Dan Weiss, the president and chief executive officer of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and to Philip Tinari, the director of the UCCA Center for Contemporary Art in Beijing—leaders within different museum cultures, with different challenges ahead. We also have the latest in our Lonely Works series, in which the Turner Prize-winning artist Mark Wallinger explores Jackson Pollock’s Autumn Rhythm (Number 30), in the Met. You can see an image of Autumn Rhythm as we discuss it at theartnewspaper.com/podcasts.



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Apr 24, 2020
Donald Judd 101: the great artist in depth
1:09:52
A veritable Juddaganza: we focus on an artist who, before the coronavirus (Covid-19) forced museums and galleries to close, was set to be the subject of three exhibitions in New York this spring, Donald Judd. We talk to Ann Temkin, curator of the big survey at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the online version of which opens at moma.org on 23 April. We meet Flavin Judd, the artist’s son, to discuss the exhibition of his dad’s work at David Zwirner, which Flavin curated, and Judd’s artistic legacy. And in a special contribution, Roberta Smith, co-chief art critic at the New York Times reads the eulogy she gave at Judd’s memorial service in 1994 for the first time since that day. Meanwhile, in the latest of our series exploring lonely works in museums that have closed due to the coronavirus, Donna De Salvo senior adjunct curator of special projects at the Dia Foundation, chooses Marcel Duchamp’s Étant Donnés, in the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

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Apr 17, 2020
Art theft: are museums safe under lockdown?
59:03
We explore how safe museums are from theft now that they are closed and cities are under lockdown due to the coronavirus. We talk to Martin Bailey about the recent theft of a Van Gogh in the Netherlands, the history of stolen Van Goghs and who steals art and why. We also talk to Vernon Rapley, the director of cultural heritage protection & security at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, about how safe the museum is as London’s streets remain deserted. Plus, Laura Cumming picks the latest Lonely Work behind closed doors in a museum: Pieter Bruegel the Elder’s Landscape with the Fall of Icarus from the Royal Museums of Fine Arts in Brussels. And we have a special contribution from the artist—and cartoonist for The Art Newspaper—Pablo Helguera.

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Apr 10, 2020
Can the art market weather the coronavirus storm?
1:02:40
We discuss the present and future of the art market, first with Rachel Pownall, a Professor of Finance at Maastricht University School of Business and Economics, in the Netherlands, who specialises in the art market, and then with our market editors, Anna Brady and Margaret Carrigan. And in the latest in our series of lonely works, focusing on artworks behind the doors of museums that have closed due to the coronavirus, we talk to the artist Sean Scully about Matisse's 1915-16 painting The Moroccans, in the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

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Apr 03, 2020
Saving the art world’s self-employed
56:50

This week, we explore the devastating effects of the coronavirus (Covid-19) on art communities, and particularly the wealth of self-employed workers in the art world. We hear about the support packages for people working in the visual arts in Germany, we discuss the precarious position of artists in the UK and we hear about a petition highlighting the fact that galleries in New York and their teams of workers may not benefit from the relief initiatives for small businesses recently announced by the New York mayor Bill de Blasio. Plus, we have the latest in our new series in which focus on works behind the doors of museums that have closed due to the coronavirus, this week with Zoe Whitley, the new director of the Chisenhale Gallery in London. Whitley discusses a springtime gem from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Alma Thomas's Wind and Crepe Myrtle Concerto (1973).




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Mar 27, 2020
Coronavirus: dispatches from Italy and China
44:54

We speak to our journalists in the two epicentres of the Covid-19 pandemic thus far: Anna Somers Cocks in Italy and Lisa Movius in China. We hear about their experiences of lockdown, the response of museums and galleries and the effect on the art community, as the two countries enter contrasting moments in the coronavirus crisis.


And we begin a new feature, turning the spotlight on works of art normally enjoyed by millions of visitors in museums across the world that are suddenly hanging unseen in empty galleries closed because of the coronavirus pandemic. In the first of the series, we asked the art historian and broadcaster Bendor Grosvenor to choose his "lonely work": Anthony van Dyck’s masterpiece Martin Ryckaert (about 1631), in the Prado Museum in Madrid, which closed indefinitely last week.



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Mar 20, 2020
Titian’s poesie: an in-depth tour of “the most beautiful pictures in the world"
1:03:49
As the National Gallery opens its show dedicated to Titian's great mythological paintings made for Philip II of Spain, we talk to the gallery's director, Gabriele Finaldi, about making a once impossible curatorial dream a reality, and we take an in-depth tour of the seven paintings in the exhibition with its curator, Matthias Wivel. As museums around the world close, Finaldi also discusses the latest advice from the UK government on COVID-19: business as usual. Plus, the latest art-world news.

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Mar 13, 2020
Remembering Ulay
51:17
We pay tribute to the performance art trailblazer Ulay, who died on 2 March—and discuss his years of collaboration with Marina Abramović— with Catherine Wood, Tate Modern’s senior curator of performance art. And we talk to Marc Spiegler, Art Basel’s global director, about the decision to cancel the Hong Kong fair due to the coronavirus outbreak, and the implications of the cancellation. Plus, this week’s top art world stories.

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Mar 06, 2020
Surrealism: what was Britain's role?
47:38
Plus, Independent Art Fair's director on the New York's changing gallery landscape

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Feb 28, 2020
Who owns the Parthenon Marbles?
1:02:26
Is the dispute between Greece and the British Museum about the Parthenon Marbles about to escalate? A leaked draft of the EU mandate for talks with the UK about the post-Brexit relationship suggests it might. We look at the history of the marbles and what this new development means. Plus, we talk to Shirin Neshat as she unveils her new work at Goodman Gallery in London, and update you on the top art stories of the week.

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Feb 21, 2020
Does Los Angeles want a big art fair?
47:45
As Frieze Los Angeles opens, we look at the LA art scene, its artist-run galleries and grassroots spaces and ask: does the city need the art-market juggernaut? We also pay tribute to the late LA-based artist John Baldessari. We look at Frieze Projects and its unique Hollywood film-set location. And we explore the latest show at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, Sahel: Art and Empires on the Shores of the Sahara.

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Feb 14, 2020
Tschabalala Self and radical figurative painting
45:51
We visit the Whitechapel Gallery in London to explore their show Radical Figures: Painting in the New Millennium, with the curator Lydia Yee, and talk to one of the ten artists, Tschabalala Self. And we look at the Foundling Museum’s exhibition Portraying Pregnancy: From Holbein to Social Media with the curator Karen Hearn.

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Feb 07, 2020
A fake Gauguin at the Getty
48:37
We look at the story behind the front-page article in our February issue: the discovery that a multi-million dollar Gauguin sculpture purchased by the Getty Museum in Los Angeles is actually not by the artist at all. Plus, we talk to the Canadian First Nations artist Kent Monkman about his monumental paintings at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York; and we look at an exhibition about art and food at the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge, UK.

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Jan 31, 2020
2020: art market issues and big shows
1:04:05
We look at the year ahead for galleries, art fairs and auctions, and seek out the big shows in the UK, Europe and the US.

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Jan 24, 2020
2019: the Year in Review
1:15:10
2019: the Year in Review by The Art Newspaper Podcasts

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Dec 20, 2019
Bananaman: who is Maurizio Cattelan? Plus, art and comedy
52:54
We take an in-depth look at Maurizio Cattelan, the creator of the banana-and-duct-tape work which caused a sensation at Art Basel in Miami Beach last week, with the critic and broadcaster Ben Lewis. And we talk to three UK comedians—Rob Auton, Jenny Eclair and Annie McGrath—about their contributions to the exhibition Art is the Best Medicine at Fiumano Clase in London, featuring works by a wealth of the UK's top comedy talent. The works are on sale and will raise money for the charity Mental Health UK.

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Dec 13, 2019
Turner Prize shocker: what next? Plus, Teresita Fernández in Miami
51:30
The art world has been up in arms this week as Lawrence Abu Hamdan, Helen Cammock, Oscar Murillo and Tai Shani were all announced as the winner of the Turner Prize. We talk to Louisa Buck about the decision and how it might change the award in the future. Plus, we talk to the Miami-born artist Teresita Fernández about her homecoming show at Pérez Art Museum Miami.

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Dec 06, 2019
Troy: the show and the problem with BP sponsorship
52:56
We talk to Lesley Fitton, the co-curator of the British Museum's blockbuster show on the myth and reality of Troy. And we talk to Jess Worth of Culture Unstained about ongoing protests relating to fossil-fuel companies' sponsorship of arts organisations.

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Nov 29, 2019
Dora Maar and Jann Haworth: acclaim at last
54:24
As a huge exhibition of Dora Maar's work opens at Tate Modern, we take a tour of the show with the curator, Emma Lewis. Finally, Maar is escaping the shadow of her lover between 1936 and 1945, Pablo Picasso. We also talk to Jann Haworth, the US-born artist who was a key figure in the 1960s pop art scene in Swinging London and was, with Peter Blake and Michael Cooper, the creator of the cover for The Beatles' Sgt Pepper album—though she is often ignored when that seminal image is discussed. Haworth has a retrospective show at the Pallant House Gallery in Chichester, UK.

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Nov 22, 2019
Anselm Kiefer interview. Plus, New York auction "gigaweek"
37:54
As he opens a new show at London's White Cube gallery, we talk to the German artist about the themes of the exhibition in the context of his art over several decades. And we explore the results of the New York auctions with Scott Reyburn of the New York Times: why is the market treading water?

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Nov 15, 2019
Tutankhamun in London: Tutmania returns. Plus, Duchamp in the US
1:00:24
This week, we review Tutankhamun: Treasures of the Golden Pharaoh, which has just opened at the Saatchi Gallery in London. The show includes 150 objects from Tutankhamun’s tomb, 100 more than the British Museum’s show in 1972, which attracted almost 1.7m visitors. Sixty of the objects in the new show have never left Egypt before. We also look at Marcel Duchamp: the Barbara and Aaron Levine Collection, a new show at the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington DC, and at the homecoming of perhaps the greatest collection of Duchamp's work, which is at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, following a three-venue tour of museums in Asia and the South Pacific.

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Nov 08, 2019
Fireworks! Picturing pyrotechnics with professor Simon Werrett
30:40
To mark Bonfire Night in the UK, this bonus episode of The Art Newspaper takes a look at the history of pyrotechnics in art and wider visual culture. We talk to Simon Werrett, the author of the book Fireworks: Pyrotechnic Arts and Sciences in European History, and he talks about the variety of uses of fireworks over the centuries and the differing ways that artists have depicted them. You can see some of the art discussed in the podcast by visiting theartnewspaper.com/podcast.

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Nov 05, 2019
Dread Scott’s slave revolt reenactment. Plus, Pre-Raphaelite Sisters
48:51
We talk to the artist Dread Scott about his extraordinarily ambitious two-day performance in Louisiana where he and 500 Louisianans in 19th-century dress will reenact a slave rebellion from 1811. And we visit an exhibition of the women connected to the Pre-Raphaelites at the National Portrait Gallery, London.

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Nov 01, 2019
Leonardo at the Louvre: the spectacular show and the Salvator Mundi no-show
44:22
As the exhibition of the year opens at the Louvre, we talk to Ben Lewis about the latest developments in the Salvator Mundi saga. Vincent Delieuvin, the co-curator, tells us about the 13 years he has been working on the show and explains its key themes and ideas. And we explore the Mona Lisa in virtual reality with Dominique de Font-Réaulx, Director of the Interpretation and Cultural Programming Department at the Louvre.

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Oct 25, 2019
MoMA special: the verdict on the museum opening of the year
56:46
After a $450m expansion overseen by the architects Diller, Scofidio and Renfro, the Museum of Modern Art in New York reopens its doors on 21 October with 47,000 sq ft of additional gallery space and a more expansive story to tell about the history of modern art. Nancy Kenney, our senior editor in New York met this week with Sarah Suzuki, the drawings and prints curator who’s in charge of the reopening, and Rajendra Roy, the museum’s chief curator of film, to talk about these major changes in the museum. Then, three editors from The Art Newspaper's New York office—Helen Stoilas, Margaret Carrigan and Nancy Kenney—and our Insider correspondent, Linda Yablonsky, sat down to compare notes.MoMA reopens on 21 October. And you can read a wealth of reporting on the building and the displays on our website theartnewpsaper.com, on our app for iOS which you can find in the App Store, and in the November print edition of The Art Newspaper, which is out at the end of the month.

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Oct 18, 2019
Agnes Denes: environmental art pioneer. Plus, Rembrandt-Velázquez and De Hooch
48:34
We talk to Agnes Denes, best known for her extraordinary Wheatfield, a two-acre field of wheat that she planted, tended and harvested in 1982 on landfill in Lower Manhattan, as the Shed opens a retrospective of her work. And we visit two new shows in the Netherlands: Rembrandt-Velázquez at the Rijksmuseum and Pieter De Hooch in Delft at the Museum Prinsenhof.

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Oct 11, 2019
Frieze week: Ai Weiwei, Mark Bradford, Peter Doig, Melanie Gerlis, Hettie Judah
1:33:59
In this bumper edition of the podcast we interview three of the world's leading artists, all of whom have shows timed to coincide with the Frieze art fairs: Ai Weiwei at Lisson Gallery, Mark Bradford at Hauser & Wirth and Peter Doig at Michael Werner Gallery. We also get all the latest news of sales and trends at the Frieze fairs from Melanie Gerlis, as another Brexit deadline approaches. And Hettie Judah tells us about her new book, Art London, billed as "a guide to places, artists and events" across the city.

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Oct 04, 2019
Special: is art education in crisis? Featuring Bob and Roberta Smith
1:07:43
As art schools start their new term in the UK, this week’s episode is an education special. We talk to the artist Patrick Brill, or Bob and Roberta Smith, about his campaign for art’s place at the centre of the curriculum, often expressed directly in his art. We look at the National Art and Design Saturday Club, an initiative offering a free Saturday learning programme, founded by the designers Frances and John Sorrell. We talk to two professors at Goldsmiths College about the pressures and realities of art schools today. In the US, we talk to the co-author of a study on the benefits of art education in schools.

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Sep 27, 2019
Museum ethics. Plus, the Chicago Architecture Biennial
59:27
We discuss the dilemmas facing museums as the focus intensifies on ethical sponsorship and governance in the UK and US. And we hear about the latest edition of the Chicago Architecture Biennial, which addresses, among other things, the erasure of the history of indigenous settlements in Chicago and its region.

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Sep 20, 2019
Tate's William Blake blockbuster. Plus, Pace and the New York gallery boom
51:46
We take an in-depth tour of the huge new William Blake exhibition at Tate Britain and explore the life and art of this brilliant yet complex visionary. And in New York, we talk to Marc Glimcher about Pace's eight-floor gallery in Chelsea and what this and the glut of other expanding galleries tell us about the market in New York.

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Sep 13, 2019
Tim Spall plays Lowry, artists in movies, Chris Ofili and Jasmine Thomas-Girvan
1:01:11
New season! In this first episode, we talk to Timothy Spall about the new film Mrs Lowry and Son and to Jacqueline Riding who worked closely with Spall as an art consultant on Mike Leigh's Mr Turner. Plus, Chris Ofili and Jasmine Thomas-Girvan give an exclusive interview about their show at David Zwirner in London and their lives and work in Trinidad.

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Sep 06, 2019
Top of the Pods: David Hockney and other modern British mavericks
43:58
In the last of our summer series of podcasts looking back over 200 interviews, we talk to David Hockney about a record-breaking auction sale, printmaking and Van Gogh. Plus, Martin Gayford sets Hockney in the London scene, along with Lucian Freud, Francis Bacon and others.

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Aug 30, 2019
Top of the Pods: The best of the Venice Biennale
47:34
In the latest podcast featuring highlights from our first 200 interviews on The Art Newspaper podcast, we feature three conversations about May You Live in Interesting Times, the main event at this year's Venice Biennale, curated by Ralph Rugoff. Jane Morris and Ben Luke review the exhibition, Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster discusses her virtual reality work for the show, and Rugoff describes the thinking behind the show, its major themes, and the playful nature of much of the work.

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Aug 23, 2019
Top of the Pods: Leonardo—the Salvator Mundi saga
37:46
We look back at three interviews about the most expensive painting ever sold at auction. In a short clip from a November 2017 chat, Judd Tully tells us about the atmosphere at Christie's as the Salvator Mundi sold. The Leonardo scholar Martin Kemp explains his view that the painting is a true Leonardo, in an interview from March 2018. And in a wide-ranging conversation from April 2019, Ben Lewis explores the painting's history and the continuing debates about its provenance, attribution and present whereabouts.

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Aug 16, 2019
Top of the Pods: video art in the spotlight
41:16
In this latest episode looking back at the 200 interviews we've done over the past two years, we bring together discussions with three masters of video art: Ragnar Kjartansson, John Akomfrah and Chris Marclay.

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Aug 09, 2019
Top of the Pods: Artemisia Gentileschi and the forgotten female Old Masters
46:53
In our latest look back at the 200 interviews we've done over the past two years, we focus on Artemisia Gentileschi with Letizia Treves from the National Gallery in London and Lavinia Fontana and Sofonisba Anguissola, among others, with Jordana Pomeroy, the director of the Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum at Florida International University in Miami. We also discuss women composers of the Baroque period, who like those painters were written out of history, with the contemporary artist Helen Cammock—her current Whitechapel Gallery exhibition is in part a response to those composers.

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Aug 02, 2019
In Memoriam: Karsten Schubert in conversation with Michael Landy
29:29
In this special podcast, we publish an archive interview with the London-based dealer and publisher Karsten Schubert, who died this week after a long illness. The artist Michael Landy spoke to Karsten in September 2018 about his life as a collector.

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Aug 01, 2019
Top of the Pods: climate crisis with Olafur Eliasson, Justin Brice Guariglia and Anna Somers Cocks
47:57
As many parts of the world record their highest ever temperatures, and the art world begins to take more urgent action on the climate emergency, we look back on three interviews, from 2018 and earlier this year, focusing on climate change and the anthropocene. Olafur Eliasson, whose retrospective at Tate Modern has just opened, talks about his project Ice Watch and his climate activism, and another artist, Justin Brice Guariglia, argues that responding to the climate crisis is the moral imperative of our age. Finally, Anna Somers Cocks, the founder of The Art Newspaper, discusses the grave threat posed by rising sea levels to heritage in Europe and particularly around the Mediterranean.

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Jul 26, 2019
Top of the Pods: the world of Warhol as told by Jeremy Deller and Donna De Salvo
58:13
In the second episode of our summer season of curated podcasts, it's all about Andy. With the major retrospective of the Pop artist on at the San Francisco Museum of Modern art, we bring together two interviews: one with the British artist Jeremy Deller on meeting Warhol, his life-changing trip to the Factory, and Warhol’s legacy, and the second with the curator Donna De Salvo, who takes us through all the key Warhol landmarks.

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Jul 19, 2019
Top of the Pods: experts on Van Gogh in the asylum and his early life
49:51
While we're on our summer break, we're looking back over the 200 interviews we've done for the podcast and putting together highlights in a weekly themed episode. First up are two conversations about Van Gogh, from September 2018 and earlier this year, with Martin Bailey of The Art Newspaper and Martin Gayford, critic and writer of books on Michelangelo, Freud and Hockney, among others.

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Jul 12, 2019
Ibrahim Mahama's ghosts of Ghana. Plus, China's epic Picasso show
49:48
We speak to the leading Ghanaian artist as he unveils a major new commission about the forgotten history of his homeland, on show at the Whitworth as part of the Manchester International Festival. Plus, we find out about the Picasso blockbuster at the UCCA Center for Contemporary Art in Beijing.

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Jul 05, 2019
Vermeer's hidden cupid, the Prado's Dutch-Spanish show, plus Helen Cammock
58:15
We hear about how a painting of Cupid in one of Vermeer's greatest masterpieces, in Dresden, was long thought to have overpainted by the master himself, but was in fact covered by a later artist. It's now in the process of being revealed, as Vermeer intended. We also learn about the Prado's show where Vermeer appears alongside Velázquez and Rembrandt, among many others. And we talk to Helen Cammock about her Whitechapel show and her nomination for this year's Turner Prize.

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Jun 28, 2019
David Smith in Yorkshire. Plus, the works that inspired leading artists
38:26
The great American sculptor's work comes to Yorkshire Sculpture Park as part of the Yorkshire Sculpture International festival, and we talk to Clare Lilley, the park's director, and to Smith's daughters Rebecca and Candida. And Jori Finkel tells us about her new book, in which she has interviewed 50 artists about works of art in their home-town museums that inspired them.

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Jun 21, 2019
Art Basel and William Kentridge
56:13
As his show opens at the Kunstmuseum Basel to coincide with the Art Basel fair, we talk to the South African artist about his latest works, his complex methods and his extraordinary family history. We also look at the 50th edition of the fair with Melanie Gerlis, an editor-at-large at The Art Newspaper.

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Jun 13, 2019
Painting, identity and injustice: Howardena Pindell and Oscar Murillo
54:12
We talk to two artists of different generations as they open new London shows. Howardena Pindell discusses the use of the circle in her abstract paintings, its origins in segregation in the US and the resistance to her art that she encountered among her peers. And Oscar Murillo reflects on his journey from rural Colombia to the UK, its effect on his multifarious art and why it's only now that he's doing a pure painting show for the first time.

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Jun 07, 2019
The rise of the mega-dealers, plus artists take over the Guggenheim
59:47
We talk to Michael Shnayerson about his book Boom, following the big art dealers from the 1940s to now. Plus, we speak to Nancy Spector, the organiser of Guggenheim in New York’s Artistic Licence: Six Takes on the Guggenheim Collection, and Paul Chan, one of the six artist-curators invited to mine the museum’s collection.

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May 31, 2019
Manga and Camp: the art of going over the top
47:20
We talk to Nicole Coolidge Rousmaniere of the British Museum about Manga, the museum's huge new show exploring the Japanese cultural phenomenon. And we explore the Metropolitan Museum of Art's Camp: Notes on Fashion with Valerie Steele, the director of the Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology.

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May 24, 2019
Should museums sell works of art? Plus, activism at the Whitney Biennial
56:31
As a Mark Rothko painting is sold by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, we talk to Christopher Bedford from the Baltimore Museum of Art about deaccessioning works by white male artists in order to diversify museum collections. And we speak to Marz Saffore, an organiser for Decolonize This Place, and Adam Weinberg, the director of the Whitney Museum of American Art, about the protests that have greeted this year’s Whitney Biennial. They relate to Safariland, a company owned by the museum’s vice-chairman Warren Kanders, which manufactures tear gas canisters and other military products that have been used against asylum seekers along the US-Mexico border.

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May 17, 2019
Venice Biennale special: our review plus, how much longer will the city survive?
1:06:24
Ben Luke and Jane Morris review the main exhibition and we speak to the artists Laure Prouvost and Dominique Gonzalez-Foerster about their works in the show. Plus, we talk about climate change and the challenges Venice is facing as the surrounding waters rise.

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May 10, 2019
Ralph Rugoff on his Venice Biennale concept. Plus, Bernar Venet and Berlin Gallery Weekend
47:55
The artistic director of this year's main show at the Biennale tells us how he is creating two playful but serious shows in one, each featuring the same 79 artists. We then talk to Venet, the veteran French artist, about his work and his own collection, and ask the director of the Berlin Gallery Weekend if criticism of its gender imbalance is fair.

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May 03, 2019
How did Salvator Mundi go from $1000 to $450m? Plus, the tragic story of Van Gogh’s only love
50:59
We talk to Ben Lewis about his book The Last Leonardo, the story of the world’s most expensive painting. And Martin Bailey tells us about his latest book Living with Vincent Van Gogh, exploring the Dutch master’s search for a home.

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Apr 26, 2019
The Notre Dame fire and Cold War Steve
50:23
We talk to Jonathan Foyle about the effects of the fire at Notre Dame, the building’s history, including moments of neglect, and what happens next. And as a book of his photomontages is published, we speak to Christopher Spencer, the man behind the Cold War Steve about his extraordinary journey from a cult Twitter collagist to Britain’s favourite satirical artist.

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Apr 18, 2019
Edvard Munch and The Shed
50:00
We talk to Giulia Bartram at the British Museum about her exhibition of Munch’s prints, Love and Angst. And we look at the new shapeshifting cultural centre in New York, The Shed.

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Apr 12, 2019
Sackler sponsorship: take it or leave it? Plus, museum attendance
44:33
We examine the growing unease amongst British museums to accept money from Sackler family members involved in the sale of the opioid painkiller OxyContin, and look at 2018's most visited shows and museums with Met director Max Hollein

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Apr 05, 2019
Art Basel Hong Kong, Richard Lin and the Met’s World Between Empires
57:25
We talk to Marc Spiegler, global director of Art Basel, about the latest fair in Hong Kong, the Asian market and supporting smaller galleries. We look at Bonhams’s show in Hong Kong of Richard Lin’s work – Lin achieved great fame in the West in the 1960s, but later was largely forgotten, especially in the West; only now is he being rediscovered. Finally, we talk to the curators of The World Between Empires at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, focusing on the period between the first century B.C.E and the third century A.D., when the Middle East was the meeting point between two powerful empires, the Parthian and the Roman. We also discuss the troubled recent history of the region and its heritage.

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Mar 29, 2019
David Bailey in focus, plus John Richardson remembered
43:04
We meet David Bailey at his London studio to discuss his new book: the latest SUMO from Taschen. And we remember the Picasso biographer John Richardson, who died aged 95 last week, with Gijs van Hensbergen, who worked with Richardson on the as-yet-unpublished fourth volume of his magisterial A Life of Picasso.

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Mar 22, 2019
Wham! The George Michael auction and the YBA market. Plus, Shezad Dawood
43:06
As George Michael's collection of contemporary art, dominated by Young British Artists, goes under the hammer in London, we speak to Paola Saracino Fendi from Christie's about the collection and then report on the sale immediately after the final fall of the gavel. What does it tell us about the YBA market and the pull of celebrity auctions?Plus, we speak to the artist Shezad Dawood about Encroachments, his new installation for the Sharjah Biennial, featuring a virtual reality work.

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Mar 15, 2019
Carolee Schneemann, the Armory Show and Venice Biennale curators
56:22
We pay tribute to the pioneering painter, performance artist and film-maker, ask what on earth is going on with the New York fairs this week, and discuss what it’s like to curate a Venice Biennale national presentation with the curators of the British pavilion, Scotland + Venice and Wales in Venice.

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Mar 08, 2019
Rembrandt special: the complete artist
54:51
As numerous exhibitions open marking the 350th anniversary of the Old Master's death, we speak to Taco Dibbits, the director of the Rijksmuseum about the museum's blockbuster shows and its imminent public restoration of The Night Watch. We also look closely at a masterpiece in the Dulwich Picture Gallery and at his prints and drawings in the British Museum.

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Mar 01, 2019
Ruskin and Gombrich: revisiting two art historical heavyweights
53:06
Amid a wealth of events celebrating the bicentenary of John Ruskin’s birth we reconsider the breadth of this Victorian polymath’s achievements, and we talk to two experts in E.H. Gombrich, writer of The Story of Art and Art and Illusion.

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Mar 01, 2019
Bonus podcast: Dorothea Tanning at Tate Modern
19:52
As the female Surrealist’s exhibition arrives in London following its stint in Madrid, this is the full, unedited discussion from last year with Alyce Mahon, the show’s curator. Contains previously unreleased material.

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Feb 26, 2019
Antony Gormley at the Uffizi, plus portrait miniatures
1:06:28
We talk to the British artist as he shows his sculptures with ancient works in the Florentine museum, and we zoom in on the tiny art works made in Elizabethan and Jacobean times that are the subject of a major show at the National Portrait Gallery in London.

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Feb 22, 2019
Can artists live off art alone? Plus, Los Angeles
1:00:56
Two-thirds of artists in the UK earn less than £5,000 per year from their art, according to a new survey. We speak to the art advisor James Doeser who worked on the study and the artist Tai Shani about the bleak reality of working as an artist in Britain today. Then, as the inaugural Frieze Los Angeles gets underway, our correspondent Jori Finkel discusses whether Frieze will succeed where other fairs have failed. This year's Desert X exhibition in Palm Springs is also reviewed.

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Feb 15, 2019
Tracey Emin on mourning and #MeToo; George Shaw on realism and Rembrandt
1:00:04
We talk to Tracey Emin as A Fortnight of Tears, her exhibition at White Cube, opens. And we visit Bath to talk to George Shaw, whose show A Corner of a Foreign Field has arrived at the Holborne Museum after its stint at the Yale Center for British Art in the US.

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Feb 08, 2019
Mapplethorpe at the Guggenheim, Bill Viola at the Royal Academy
49:23
We talk to the people behind major exhibitions on both sides of the Atlantic: Ben Luke meets Kira Perov, Bill Viola's wife and collaborator, at the Bill Viola / Michelangelo show at the Royal Academy of Arts in London, while Nancy Kenney talks to the curator of the new Robert Mapplethorpe show at the Guggenheim.

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Jan 25, 2019
Female old masters — prominence at last. Plus, Condo
57:19
We speak to curators Letizia Treves and Jordana Pomeroy about the growing trend to bring historical female artists to the fore. Plus, Kate MacGarry tells us about participating in the collaborative gallery exhibition programme Condo London.

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Jan 18, 2019
2019: Market predictions and the best events
1:23:21
A bumper podcast featuring two roundtable discussions. First, art market specialist Georgina Adam ponders the current situation in the market and considers its future with Victoria Siddall, the director of the Frieze fairs, Francis Outred, the former head of postwar and contemporary art at Christie’s, and the art dealer Thaddaeus Ropac. Then, our correspondents Louisa Buck and Jane Morris join our host Ben Luke to look ahead at the museum openings, biennials, anniversaries and exhibitions coming up this year.

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Jan 11, 2019
The Year in Review
1:15:14
Our London and New York teams ponder 2018's biggest art stories

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Dec 21, 2018
Should looted African art be returned?
1:02:51
In the wake of the Savoy-Sarr report commissioned by French President Emmanuel Macron, we discuss the pros and cons of returning colonial artefacts to Africa with the campaigner Vicky Ngari-Wilson and Nicholas Thomas, Director, Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, Cambridge. Curator of African art at the Cleveland Museum of Art Ugochukwu-Smooth Nzewi tells us about his innovative solutions.

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Dec 14, 2018
Olafur Eliasson on climate change and the threat to heritage. Plus, Art Basel in Miami Beach
55:09
We talk to the Danish-Icelandic artist about the urgent threat to the environment as his work Ice Watch, featuring chunks of glacier, go on show outside Tate Modern and Bloomberg’s HQ in London. We also discuss the potentially catastrophic effects of sea level rise to Mediterranean and European heritage with Anna Somers Cocks. And we talk to David Castillo, the Miami gallerist, as Art Basel makes its annual return to Florida.

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Dec 07, 2018
Edmund de Waal exclusive interview, plus Roma persecution
45:19
We speak to Edmund de Waal, the ceramic artist and author of the Hare with Amber Eyes, about the incredible journey of his netsuke collection and the current state of nazi-loot restitution. Plus, on occasion of his show in London, artist Krzysztof Gil describes the tragic history of “Roma hunting” and the continued plight of the community today.

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Nov 30, 2018
The Beatles' White Album: the band, the artist, the dealer. Plus, art in Dubai
1:00:52
We talk to Andrew Wilson at the Tate and Harriet Vyner, Robert Fraser's biographer about one of the greatest albums, and album covers, of all time. And we visit the new Jameel Arts Centre in Dubai.

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Nov 23, 2018
David Hockney: exclusive interview with the world's most expensive living artist
44:51
We talk to Hockney about Van Gogh, printmaking and the Bayeaux Tapestry but also about Portrait of an Artist (Pool with Two Figures), which broke auction record this week. We also look at the personal heartbreak behind the painting with Lawrence Weschler and analyse the trends of the New York auctions so far with Melanie Gerlis.

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Nov 16, 2018
Warhol (part two): Jeremy Deller and Shadows
43:29
In the second part of our Andy Warhol special, we talk to the British artist about meeting Warhol, his life-changing trip to the Factory and Warhol’s legacy. We also discuss Dia’s vast installation of the Shadow paintings (1978-79): are they "disco decor” as Warhol remarked, or one of the central bodies of work in his career, unifying many key themes and strands?

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Nov 13, 2018
Warhol (part one): the Whitney retrospective, in depth
53:58
An in-depth interview with Donna De Salvo, organiser of the vast Andy Warhol show at the Whitney Museum of American Art. De Salvo takes us through all the key Warhol landmarks, from his early life as a commercial artist through his 1960s Pop art breakthrough and his films and celebrity portraits, to his late appropriations of Leonardo’s Last Supper and the catholicism that underpinned his interest in that work. We also hear about his relationship with a certain Donald Trump.

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Nov 09, 2018
Don’t call me a woman artist: overlooked Surrealists. Plus, Klimt/Schiele
45:49
We talk to Alyce Mahon, the curator of the Dorothea Tanning exhibition now in Madrid, and curatorial adviser for the Leonor Fini show in New York about the art and life of the two surrealist artists. Meanwhile, in New York, we discuss how Klimt and Schiele compare, with curator and art dealer Jane Kallir, as a spate of shows open in Europe and the US.

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Nov 02, 2018
Bruce Nauman’s New York takeover. Plus, the British Museum’s new Islamic art galleries
36:09
We discuss the vast Bruce Nauman retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1 New York and chart the British Museum's Islamic collection's journey from dusty back rooms to grand light-filled spaces.

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Oct 26, 2018
The Gainsborough murders. Plus, RoseLee Goldberg on performance
43:03
We talk to the researchers who uncovered the grisly murders in the family of the young Thomas Gainsborough. Plus, RoseLee Goldberg tells us all about her new book on performance art.

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Oct 19, 2018
Banksy self destructs at Sotheby’s, plus Bauhaus pioneer Anni Albers
1:08:32
We go behind the scenes of one of the most publicised stunts in auction history with our correspondent Anny Shaw, who was there that evening. Then we get a tour of Tate Modern's Anni Albers retrospective with its curator Briony Fer, speak to her biographer Charles Darwent and the head of the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation, Nicholas Fox Weber.

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Oct 12, 2018
Frieze special: the fair and the top shows, with Doris Salcedo and Ragnar Kjartansson
1:03:48
We talk to the art market specialist Melanie Gerlis about Frieze London and Frieze Masters, to Doris Salcedo about her White Cube show, to the artist Ragnar Kjartansson and the curator Massimiliano Gioni about Strange Days, the New Museum’s video-art pop-up in London, and to the artist Ipek Duben about Social Work, Frieze London’s radical new section.

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Oct 05, 2018
Special: the rise and rise of contemporary African art
1:03:09
On the eve of the 1-54 fair for contemporary African art, we talk to an artist, a curator, an art fair founder, a gallerist and an auctioneer about the long overdue recognition of the diverse art of a continent. Produced in association with Bonhams, auctioneers since 1793.

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Sep 28, 2018
Courtauld’s Impressionists. Plus, Armenian treasures at the Met
43:59
How Samuel Courtauld’s collection ignited Britain’s passion for Impressionists. Plus, New York’s Metropolitan Museum looks at Armenia, the first country to convert to Christianity. Produced in association with Bonhams, auctioneers since 1793.

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Sep 21, 2018
Van Gogh in the asylum. Plus, Christian Marclay on The Clock
47:56
We speak to our long-standing correspondent and expert on Van Gogh Martin Bailey on his new book, which tells the story of the artist’s life at the asylum at Saint-Paul-de-Mausole in Provence, southern France. He is joined by the art historian Martin Gayford, author of the Yellow House, a book on Van Gogh’s time in Arles. Later, Christian Marclay tells us about his ground-breaking work The Clock returns to London where it was created eight years ago. Produced in association with Bonhams, auctioneers since 1793.

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Sep 14, 2018
Episode 39: All about biennials
39:23
We talk to Sally Tallant, the artistic director of the Liverpool Biennial, about the 10th edition, which opens next week. And Jane Morris, an editor-at-large of The Art Newspaper, joins Ben Luke to discuss whether we’ve reached “peak biennial”.

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Jul 06, 2018
Episode 38: Marina Abramovic and Michael Jackson
31:13
We speak to the queen of performance art about casting herself in stone and to the National Portrait Gallery’s director Nicholas Cullinan about the king of pop’s influence on artists.

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Jun 29, 2018
Episode 37: Art and football plus John Akomfrah interview
37:51
With the World Cup in full swing, we look at a London show exploring football as a cultural phenomenon with its co-curator Eddy Frankel, and talk to the British film-maker John Akomfrah about his exhibition at the New Museum, New York.

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Jun 22, 2018
Episode 36: Berlin Biennale and Art Basel
34:43
We explore the two big European art world events of the past week: Arsalan Mohammad is in Berlin with the curator Serubiri Moses and the critic and curator Annika von Taube, and Ben Luke speaks to Melanie Gerlis, writer for the Financial Times and The Art Newspaper, on the line from Basel.

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Jun 15, 2018
Episode 35: Freud, Bacon, Hockney and the post-war London scene; and Signals gallery
41:32
We talk to Martin Gayford about his book Modernists and Mavericks and sitting for portraits by Freud and Hockney. And we explore Kurimanzutto and Thomas Dane Gallery’s collaboration on a show celebrating the Signals gallery, where Latin American and European avant-gardes converged.

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Jun 08, 2018
Episode 34: Venice Biennale for architecture, and the Brutalist social housing debate
36:20
Edwin Heathcote of the Financial Times reviews the Biennale, and Christopher Turner on his controversial exhibition focusing on Alison and Peter Smithson’s Robin Hood Gardens housing estate.

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Jun 01, 2018
Episode 33: Absent friends: Howard Hodgkin's final paintings; Robert Indiana remembered
33:19
We talk to Antony Peattie, the music writer and partner of the late Howard Hodgkin and to Barbara Haskell, curator of Robert Indiana's 2013 retrospective at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York.

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May 25, 2018
Episode 32: The Royal Academy’s new project unveiled: David Chipperfield interview
44:55
The Academy’s £56m project opens, with subtle additions and revamps by the British architect. Chipperfield talks about the subtleties of architecture, the RA’s chief executive Charles Saumarez Smith discusses funding and the quirks of the institution and we review the buildings and its displays with Jane Morris.

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May 18, 2018
Episode 31: The $646m Rockefeller sale. Plus: should big galleries subsidise smaller ones?
45:56
We drill down into the big numbers from the Post-Impressionist and Modern sale in New York, talk to Professor Rachel Pownall about the wider market and look at a small gallery housed in Piccadilly Circus Tube station.

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May 11, 2018
Episode 30: All about Berlin
42:25
Our guest host Arsalan Mohammad takes us behind the scenes of Gallery Weekend Berlin and beyond, speaking to dealers and artists about the changing face and enduring appeal of one of the world's most creative cities.

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May 04, 2018
Episode 29: Taryn Simon interview, and restoring a Renaissance masterpiece at the Met
51:26
We talk to the American artist about her acclaimed work staged in New York and now London, An Occupation of Loss. We hear from a curator and conservator at the Metropolitan Museum of Art about resurrecting Moretto da Brescia’s final great painting. And Louisa Buck and Ben Luke appraise the Turner Prize shortlist.

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Apr 27, 2018
Episode 28: The battle over Ethiopia’s treasures
34:14
We speak to Hailemichael Aberra Afework, Ethiopia’s ambassador to the UK, about the treasures looted by the British army at Maqdala, go behind the scenes of the Sony Photography Award with judge Gareth Harris and speak to Richard Parry about his plans for Glasgow International.

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Apr 20, 2018
Episode 27: The enduring appeal of enigmatic Beuys. Plus, lost masterpieces reborn
50:21
We hear from Adam Lowe of Factum Arte about a new TV series in which seven lost paintings are recreated using digital means, and speak to Norman Rosenthal and Thaddaeus Ropac about the enigmatic German artist Joseph Beuys

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Apr 13, 2018
Episode 26: Christo interview, plus museum visitor figures
46:42
We speak to the Bulgarian-born artist about his grand project for the Serpentine, and look at our annual survey of visitor figures

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Apr 06, 2018
Episode 25: Living with Leonardo da Vinci
41:03
Leonardo specialist Martin Kemp on decades spent in the company of the Renaissance master, plus the 300th edition of The Art Newspaper

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Mar 28, 2018
Episode 24: Mural-gazing with the Dalai Lama, plus Michael Rakowitz
43:50
We speak to Thomas Laird about his new sumo-sized book on Tibetan murals, and to the artist creating the new work for the Fourth Plinth commission in London's Trafalgar Square.

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Mar 23, 2018
Episode 23: The death of Venice?
35:27
Salvatore Settis talks about his new book, plus Tacita Dean on her three London shows

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Mar 16, 2018
Episode 22: The genius of Picasso
37:06
We take a tour of Tate Modern's blockbuster and explore the strength of Picasso's market

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Mar 09, 2018
Episode 21: Photography special: from Victorian pioneers to 2018 prize contenders
42:11
We meet the men and women behind three fascinating but very different exhibitions of lens-based art

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Mar 02, 2018
Episode 20: Yes to Picasso, no to Van Gogh: the Rockefellers’ collection
42:05
We talk to the American dynasty’s historian about David and Peggy Rockefeller’s tastes, and explore the funding crisis at Glasgow’s Transmission Gallery

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Feb 23, 2018
Episode 19: Klimt and Schiele plus Songs for Sabotage
37:32
A look at the life and art of the two Austrian greats as shows open marking the 100th anniversary of their deaths. And the New Museum Triennial is reviewed.

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Feb 16, 2018
Episode 18: Talking politics with Cornelia Parker and the future of ivory
35:36
We meet the 2017 Election Artist. Plus, what do new ivory regulations mean for the art world?

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Feb 09, 2018
Episode 17: Real or fake? The suspicious Russian avant-garde show in Ghent
37:24
Expert on Russian art Simon Hewitt discusses developments in The Art Newspaper's current cover story, plus we explore an unusual collaboration at Hauser & Wirth Somerset

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Feb 02, 2018
Episode 16: Charles I at the Royal Academy—an exhibition fit for a king
32:02
We pick apart the latest smash hit show to open in London with art historian Bendor Grosvenor, then complete our 2018 preview with a look at the big exhibitions coming to the US this year

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Jan 26, 2018
Episode 15: What will 2018 hold for the art world?
34:23
We are at the London Art Fair speaking to Georgina Adam about her art market predictions and to Louisa Buck about the top shows and artists to keep on your radar this year

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Jan 19, 2018
Episode 14: The top stories of 2017
51:01
From Louvre Abu Dhabi to Leonardo, Documenta to Trump, we look back at the year in art with our journalists Louisa Buck, Gareth Harris and Anny Shaw

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Dec 22, 2017
Episode 13: The dark side of the art market
41:37
Former editor of the The Art Newspaper Jane Morris speaks to Georgina Adam about her new book Dark Side of the Boom and the art world's less savoury side

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Dec 15, 2017
Episode 12: Old Masters after the Leonardo and Art Basel Miami Beach
33:30
We talk Titian, Constable, Veneziano, Wright of Derby, Van Dyck and, yes, Leonardo, with art historian Bendor Grosvenor. And our deputy art market editor Anna Brady gets Judd Tully’s views on Miami’s annual art fair.

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Dec 08, 2017
Episode 11: Antiquities now and Rose Wylie
32:03
How is the antiquities trade coping with increased focus on Middle East looting and new approaches to collecting? And Rose Wylie on the pleasures and struggles of painting.

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Dec 01, 2017
Episode 10: Restoring Iraq’s heritage, plus the complex politics of First Nations art
32:10
John Darlington of the World Monuments Fund discusses projects to train local people in craft traditions and the curator Victor Wang on the work of Lawrence Paul Yuxweluptun, whose first European solo show opens in London next week

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Nov 24, 2017
Episode 9: $450m! The Leonardo breaks all records
28:57
How the art sale of the century happened, with Judd Tully, our man in the salesroom. Plus, a new museum in Indonesia.

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Nov 17, 2017
Abu Dhabi Focus episode two: How Saudi artists are driving political change
22:09
As Abu Dhabi Art fair opens, we speak to the Saudi artists Manal Al Dowayan and Ahmed Mater about their role in recent changes to their society. Plus: Iraq's Dia Azzawi on creating the Arab world's Guernica.

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Nov 10, 2017
Abu Dhabi Focus episode three: How the UAE art scene became a force to be reckoned with
25:29
Art dealer Thaddaeus Ropac and curator Maya Allison tell us how the nation’s creative ambitions have blossomed. Plus: Silver Lion-winning musician and artist Hassan Khan on his Abu Dhabi Art performance.

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Nov 10, 2017
Abu Dhabi Focus episode one: Louvre Abu Dhabi and Abu Dhabi Art
18:35
With all eyes on Abu Dhabi this week, we speak to the architect Jean Nouvel on designing the Arab world's first universal museum. Plus: a preview of Abu Dhabi Art fair.

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Nov 08, 2017
Episode 8: How hackers are attacking the art world
31:33
Galleries are losing huge sums to cybercrime, what makes them vulnerable? Plus: the dubious restoration along the Camino di Santiago.

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Nov 03, 2017
Episode 7: The Tale of an Old Master forgery scandal
40:17
The 'masterpieces' that fooled the art world. Plus: a review of London's latest shows, from Cezanne to Soutine.

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Oct 27, 2017
Episode 6: Trouble at Unesco, plus Art and Terror
32:45
Why did the US and Israel pull out of the organisation and what will happen next? Plus: 9/11 and its impact on art is explored at London’s Imperial War Museum.

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Oct 20, 2017
Episode 5: What’s the story behind the $100m Leonardo?
30:31
As the only painting in private hands by the Renaissance master heads to auction, The Art Newspaper's founder wonders what might happen to it. Plus, we speak to the people behind the New Museum's big new show about gender, and The Art Newspaper's literary editor talks eighteenth-century princesses.

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Oct 13, 2017
Episode 4: Frieze special with Peter Blake
42:18
As the art world descends on London, we take the pulse of the city's art scene with an art market specialist, a collector and two artists, Peter Blake and Ed Fornieles.

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Oct 06, 2017
Episode 3: How the Getty is shaping southern California’s art scene
30:13
The story behind Pacific Standard Time in Los Angeles; Ming Wong on the historic queer art show in Taipei. Plus: an exclusive audio work by Zardulu the Mythmaker

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Sep 29, 2017
Episode 2: Zeitz Mocaa and London autumn preview
41:19
The lowdown on the new Thomas Heatherwick-designed museum in Cape Town, plus a look at some of the most enticing shows opening in London around the Frieze art fairs.

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Sep 22, 2017
Episode 1: Nazi Loot and Rachel Whiteread
30:16
Nazi-loot conference at London’s National Gallery and how The Art Newspaper’s journalist returned a stolen treasure to its cathedral. Plus: Rachel Whiteread on “mummifying the air” at Tate Britain.

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Sep 15, 2017
The Art Newspaper Weekly – coming soon!
1:03
Introducing The Art Newspaper Weekly – a new podcast in which the team at The Art Newspaper pick apart the art world's big stories, with the help of special guests. First episode coming soon.

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Sep 07, 2017