Let's Go To Court!

By Let's Go To Court!

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Category: True Crime

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Subscribers: 312
Reviews: 7


 Dec 2, 2021


 Aug 8, 2021

Star
 Feb 13, 2021
If you're coming in just to listen to stoic retellings of court cases, you're better off just watching Dateline. But, if you want to enjoy yourself, and have fun listening to 2 charming women, I can't recommend it enough.


 Jun 13, 2020

Redblues
 Jun 7, 2020
The continual giggling and joking is obnoxious. I kept having to forward through inane commentary waiting to hear them discuss the actual crimes. It was not worth the effort. Unsubscribe.

Description

The Let’s Go To Court podcast brings together two of the greatest legal minds of our time. Just kidding. We’re your hosts Brandi Egan and Kristin Caruso. What we lack in legal training we more than make up for in being completely obsessed with lawsuits. Every week, we discuss two juicy legal battles. Each episode is peppered with Brandi’s booming laugh and Kristin’s Olympic-level talent for putting the word “so” into every sentence. The podcast started in 2018, but we’ve been having these conversations for years. What can we say? We’re just a couple of lifelong friends who love the drama of a trial. Our other interests include: liquid eyeliner, Fresca, and begging Noodles and Company to bring back the spicy chicken caesar wrap.

Episode Date
229: The Murders of Savanna LaFontaine-Greywind & Rachel Hoffman
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Savanna Lafontaine-Greywind had no reason to suspect her neighbor, Brooke Crews, was up to something. Brooke claimed she just needed a quick favor. Would Savanna come upstairs and try on a dress she’d been making? Savanna was eight months pregnant and about to sit down to dinner, but she told Brooke she’d help her out. It was the last thing she ever did.

Then Kristin tells us a story that illustrates the dangers of becoming a confidential informant. When police discovered marijuana and ecstasy in 23-year-old Rachel Hoffman’s apartment, they leveled with her. She could go to prison for up to four years. Or she could become a confidential informant. Rachel chose the latter and soon found herself at the center of a very dangerous drug bust.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“The Throwaways,” by Sarah Stillman for The New Yorker
“Rachel’s timeline,” The Rachel Morningstar Foundation
“Botched sting: killed with the gun she was supposed to buy,” by Brian Ross and Vic Walter for ABC News
“Hoffman’s attorneys release statement critical of TPD,” Tallahassee Democrat
“Lieutenant who OK’d Hoffman drug buy has ‘sustained’ investigation on record,” by Corey Clark for the Tallahassee Democrat
“City commission approves $2.6M deal with parents of slain police confidential informant Rachel Hoffman,” by Jennifer Portman for the Tallahassee Democrat
“Lance Block bio,” lanceblocklaw.com
“A decade later, Rachel Hoffman’s tragic death helps make police informants safer,” by Jennifer Portman and Karl Etters for the Tallahassee Democrat
“Transcripts released in Hoffman investigation,” by Nic Corbett and Jennifer Portman for the Tallahassee Democrat
“TPD: We shouldn’t have blamed Rachel Hoffman,” by Jennifer Portman for the Tallahassee Democrat
“Parents stand behind son on trial for murder,” by Donna Koehn for the Tampa Tribune
“Murder-trial testimony begins,” by Jennifer Portman for the Tallahassee Democrat
“Shooters frantic, testimony alleges,” by Donna Koehn for the Tampa Tribune
“Bradshaw seen buying bleach, witness says,” by Jennifer Portman for the Tallahassee Democrat
“Expert: Hoffman killed in her car,” by Jennifer Portman for the Tallahassee Democrat
“State rests in murder trial,” by Jennifer Portman for the Tallahassee Democrat
“Closing arguments today in murder trial,” by Jennifer Portman for the Tallahassee Democrat
“Murder case stymies jurors,” by John Frank for the Miami Herald

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“A Killer Upstairs” episode Killer Motive
“Fargo woman lured pregnant neighbor to her apartment, killed her and took her unborn baby” by Kyle Swenson, Washington Post
“Pregnant Woman's Killer Cut Out Her Baby with Small Blade Then Smuggled Her Body Out in a Dresser” by KC Baker, people.com
“Man Found Not Guilty After Girlfriend Lured Pregnant Neighbor to Their Apartment and Cut Out Her Baby” by KC Baker, people.com
“Slain Mom’s ‘Miracle Child’ — Who Was Cut From Her Belly — Thrives 2 Years Later” by Daniel Egitto, oxygen.com
“State Supreme Court Tosses Life Sentence For Man Whose Girlfriend Cut Baby From Neighbor’s Womb” by Dorian Geiger, oxygen.com
“Man acquitted in pregnant woman’s slaying in North Dakota” by Dave Kolpack, Associated Press
“North Dakota court overturns life term in cut from womb case” by Dave Kolpack, Associated Press
“North Dakota v. Hoehn” justia.com

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 35+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  

Sep 28, 2022
228: The San Antonio Four & Michele Neurauter
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When Liz Ramirez’ nieces came to visit her for a week in 1994, they had a nice time. They went to the pool. They played basketball. They ate hot dogs. Liz’s roommate, Kristie Mayhugh met the girls. So did Liz and Kristie’s friends, Cassandra Rivera and Anna Vasquez. At the end of the week, the girls hugged their aunt goodbye and went back to their dad’s house. Later, the girls came forward with a shocking allegation. They said that their aunt and her three friends had gang raped them. There’d been drugs. Weapons. Satanic overtones. The most disturbing part? It was all made up.

Then Brandi tells us about Michele Neurauter, whose death inside her upstate New York home was designed to look like a suicide. But something about it seemed off. Michele had an odd rope mark on her chin. Then there was the timing. Michele had recently won a long-fought, bitter custody battle for her youngest daughter. Why would she do this now? 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“The Mystery of the San Antonio four,” by Maurice Chammah for the Texas Observer
The documentary, “Southwest of Salem”
“San Antonio Four to host fundraiser for Innocence Project of Texas,” for Henry Ramos for KENS5
“What it’s like to be falsely branded a satanic child molester,” by Chase Madar for Vice
“How junk science and anti-lesbian prejudice got four women sent to prison for more than a decade,” by Linda Rodriguez Mcrobbie for Slate
“Inside case behind wrongful conviction doc ‘Southwest of Salem’” by Bridgette Dunlap for Rolling Stone
“Sex assault case,” Associated Press
“Remaining women in abuse case freed,” by Will Weissert for the Associated Press
“San Antonio Four exonerated in child rape case,” by Emanuella Grinberg for CNN
“Judge clears records of wrongfully convicted San Antonio 4,” by Tim Fitzsimons for NBC News

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Karrie’s Choice” episode 48 Hours
“Family Values” episode Mastermind of Murder
“Man Coerces Daughter To Help Him Kill His Ex-Wife And Stage Crime As A Suicide” by Joe Dziemianowicz
“Man pleads guilty to killing ex-wife, conspiring with daughter in Corning murder” by Jeff Murray, Star Gazette
“Life without parole: Lloyd Neurauter killed ex-wife with help from their daughter” by Jeff Murray, Star Gazette
“Karrie Neurauter, manipulated into helping kill mother, released from prison” by Jeff Smith, Star Gazette

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 35+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  

Sep 21, 2022
227: Insurance Fraud!
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Linda Leedom and Lula Young had been best friends for years. They were like sisters. So when Lula developed cancer, and later died in a fire, Linda was overwhelmed with grief. Then she read Lula’s obituary. She was appalled! The obituary hadn’t referred to Linda as Lula’s sister!! Naturally, Linda confronted Lula’s mother at the funeral. Things got weirder from there. A few days later, someone spotted Lula shopping at the local Wal-Mart.

Then Kristin tells us about Steven Ver Woert, whose murder shocked his family and friends. People weren’t sure who would want the fun-loving, generous man dead. But after a while, Steven’s brother spoke up. Could Steven’s ex-wife, Marty Malone be responsible for his death? Steven’s family had never liked Marty, but they were hesitant to think she was capable of murder. But when detectives knocked on Marty’s door, she acted like a total sketchball. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Too Many Hit Men,” by Gary Boynton for Crime Magazine
I Went Undercover episode, “Flirting with Murder”
Jeff Zeleny’s seven-part investigative series, which ran in 1998 in The Des Moines Register

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Dead Woman Walking” episode Mastermind of Murder
“Woman Manipulated Arsonist Into Killing Her ‘Best Friend’ For Life Insurance Payout” by Joe Dziemianowicz, Oxygen
“From the Ashes of a Friendship, Charges of Fraud and Murder” by Donald P. Baker, Washington Post
“Jury chosen for murder trial” by William C. Bayne, The Commercial Appeal
“State rests in Leedom case; Dunn credibility questioned” by William C. Bayne, The Commercial Appeal
“Linda Leedom v. State of Mississippi” findlaw.com

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 35+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  
Sep 14, 2022
226: CoolSculpting & the Disappearance of Michele Harris
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Supermodel Linda Evangelista was feeling insecure about her body. Her thighs weren’t quite as slim as they used to be. Her jawline wasn’t quite as hard. A new cosmetic procedure called CoolSculpting seemed like the answer to her problems. The procedure was marketed as a non-invasive method for shrinking areas of stubborn fat. So imagine Linda’s surprise when the areas where she received CoolSculpting began to grow.

Then Brandi tells us about Michele Harris, a mother of four who went missing on September 11, 2001. In the months leading up to her disappearance, Michele and her husband Cal were in the middle of a contentious divorce. She’d begun dating other men. She got a part-time job. When she went missing, people suspected that Cal was to blame.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Linda Evangelista is the latest to go to war against this fat-freezing company,” by Andrea Marks for Rolling Stone 
“Back in bloom: The rebirth of the indomitable Linda Evangelista,” by Sarah Harris for British Vogue 
“Linda Evangelista shares first photos of her body since fat-freezing nightmare: I’m done hiding,” by Jason Sheeler for People.com
“Linda Evangelista says she ‘looks forward to the next chapter’ after CoolSculpting lawsuit settles,” by Arielle Weg for Prevention
“What to know about CoolSculpting,” by Rachel Ann Tee-Melegrito for Medical News Today
“Linda Evangelista covers British Vogue after CoolSculpting procedure: ‘Miss my work so much,” by Edward Segarra for USA Today

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“A Time To Kill” episode 48 Hours
“Disappearance of Michele Anne Harris” wikipedia.org
“9/11 horror limited investigation into upstate N.Y. mom’s disappearance”by David Krajicek, New York Daily News
“Michele Anne Harris” charleyproject.org
“Cal Harris Says Acquittal After 4th Murder Trial Was 'Total Relief,' How He and Kids Are Moving Forward” by Matt Gutman, Marc Dorian, Mike Repplier, and Lauren Effron, ABC News

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 37+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  

Sep 07, 2022
225: This One's So Bad We Invented a Strip Club
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Tynesha Stewart was exceptionally bright and beautiful. She studied civil engineering at Texas A&M University. But a few years earlier, when she was still in high school, Tynesha met Timothy Wayne Shepherd. Timothy was 25, but that didn’t stop him from pursuing Tynesha romantically. Their relationship soon turned abusive. 

Then Kristin tells us about a case of racial profiling that’s so scummy it’s almost hard to believe. (But believe it, sister.) On September 4, 1992, an elderly white woman was attacked in her bed. She later told police that her attacker had been a black male. With little to go on, police decided to question every black male in Oneonta, New York. (And a few black women, because… why not?) The administration of SUNY at Oneonta aided the investigation by providing the names and addresses of all their black male students. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
The documentary “Brothers of the Blacklist” 
“Brown, Black and the persistence of profiling,” by Sherrilyn A. Ifill for The Root
“Brown v. City of Oneonta,” NYCLU.org
“The story of Brown v. City of Oneonta: The uncertain meaning of racially discriminatory policing under the equal protection clause,” by R. Richard Banks for Stanford Public Law and Legal Theory Working Paper Series
“Brown v. City of Oneonta,” entry on Wikipedia

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Tynesha Stewart, 19, Was Murdered & Dismembered By Ex-Boyfriend In 2007” by Erika Marie, ourblackgirls.com
“Solved: The brutal murder of Tynesha Stewart” by Mary Hallberg, maryhallbergmedia.com
“Tynesha DeVonna Stewart” thecharleyproject.org
“Police: Student was killed, then burned on grill” by Associated Press, NBC News
“Officials: No landfill search for A&M student” by Paige Hewitt, Houston Chronicle
“Houston man accused of cooking woman's body goes to trial” by Brian Rogers, Houston Chronicle
“Harris County man takes stand, tells of killing A&M student” by Brian Rogers, Houston Chronicle
“Mom of abuse victim wants others to see signs” by Paige Hewitt, Houston Chronicle
“Murder of Tynesha Stewart” wikipedia.org
“Timothy Wayne Shepherd v. The State of Texas” justia.com

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 38+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  

Aug 31, 2022
224: The Kidnapping of Adolph Coors III & a Disappearance
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Adolph Coors III was in an enviable position. His grandfather had founded the Coors Brewing company, and by 1960, Adolph Coors III was the company’s CEO. He had a wife and four children. He was one of Colorado’s most influential business people. But that also made him a target. So when Adolph’s car was discovered abandoned on Turkey Creek Bridge, just two miles from his home, the FBI quickly stepped in.

Then Brandi tells us about the disappearance of Gail Katz. When Gail met Robert Bierenbaum, she thought she’d found the perfect guy. He was studying to become a doctor. He spoke multiple languages. He even flew planes. Their dates were incredibly romantic. But over time, Gail came to see that Robert was far from perfect.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“The case of Adolph Coors” by Mara Bovsun for The New York Daily News
“On the run from one murder, he accidentally committed another – and joined the FBI’s “Most Wanted” list,” by Cheryl Eddy for Gizmodo
“How an escaped convict terrorized the Coors beer dynasty,” by Seth Ferranti for Vice
Forensic Files “Bitter Brew”
“A look back at the Coors kidnapping case,” FBI.gov
“Court upholds conviction of Joseph Corbett,” Associated Press
“Corbett faces life in prison, accepts fate in cold silence,” Associated Press
“Corbett attorneys complete defense,” by James D. Harpster for The Daily Sentinel
“Jury starts study of Coors evidence,” Associated Press
“Anatomy of a murder,” by Robert Sanchez for Denver’s Mile High Magazine

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Do No Harm” episode 20/20
“Ex-surgeon confesses he took wife's 'body out of the airplane over the ocean’” by Joseph Rhee, Keren Schiffman, Gerry Wagschal, and Lauren Effron, ABC News
“Gail Katz” chillingcrimes.com
“Gail Katz Bierenbaum Murder: Her Cause of Death” by Alyssa Choiniere, heavy.com
“Ex-Plastic Surgeon Finally Admits To Murdering Wife At 20-Year Parole Hearing: Report” by Megan Carpentier, oxygen.com
“People v. Bierenbaum” casetext.com

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 35+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  

Aug 24, 2022
223: Threatening Messages & an Airplane Pooper
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Being the head of security for a televangelist can be pretty scary… apparently. In late 2008, Chris Coleman received a threatening email. The writer was upset with his boss, Joyce Meyer. They wrote that if Joyce didn’t stop preaching the “bullshit,” they would kill Chris. If not Chris, they might kill his wife, Sheri and their sons Garett and Gavin. Chris had no idea who could have sent the message. Like, literally no idea. And he was the head of security.

Then Kristin tells us about Gerard Finneran, who boarded a flight from Buenos Aires to New York City, eager to knock back some drinks. He drank several, then got up to serve himself even more. The flight attendants informed him that passengers weren’t allowed to serve themselves drinks. (Duh.) Later, they cut Gerard off. He didn’t take it well.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Boorish biz flier rode no class,” by Linda Stasi for the Daily News
“Passenger accused of defecating on airliner pleads guilty to making a threat,” by Larry Neumeister for the Associated Press
“United Airlines Flight 976,” entry on Wikipedia
Gerard Finneran’s obituary 

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Writing on the Wall” episode 48 Hours
“A Family Erased: The Chris Coleman Story” by Jeanette Cooperman, St Louis Magazine
“The Conflicted Christian” by AJ Wiseman, Medium
“Shocking messages: An Illinois man’s secret life ended in the 2009 murder of his family” by Kevin S. Held, Fox2 News
“People v. Coleman” findlaw.com

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 35+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  


Aug 17, 2022
222: The Hell House & a Normal Death
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Kristin really did the Lord’s work this week by bravely sitting through an entire episode of Obsession: Dark Desires. (Please clap.) Between the terrible reenactments and over-the-top Southern accents, the Grace Kelly of podcasting nearly lost her will to live. But she couldn’t stop watching the story of a new homeowner named Kisha Kelly, who was harassed for years by her home’s former owner.

Then Brandi tells us about a… totally normal death. When Randy Baker was discovered dead in his home, it looked like perhaps he’d died from a heart attack. But this is a Brandi case, so we all know that can’t possibly have been true.  

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Home Sweet Hell” episode of Obsession: Dark Desires
“Obsession with house he lost was death of Dallas man,” by Selwyn Crawford and Tanya Eiserer for The Dallas Morning News

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Secret Keepers” episode Dateline
“Follow That Car” episode On the Case with Paula Zahn
“Did A Substance Abuse Counselor's Troubled Past Lead To His Murder?” By Jill Sederstrom, Oxygen
“Police: Greeley man's family conspired to kill him” by Cassa Niedringhaus, The Coloradoan
“All in the family: Greeley man’s murder featured on Dateline” by Janet Oravetz, NBC 9 News
“Greeley Woman Gets 30 Years in Prison for Plotting Brother's Murder” Weld County DA
“Woman Sentenced to Life in Prison for Plotting Husband's Murder” Weld County DA

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 37+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  

Aug 10, 2022
221: We're Terribly Sorry for this Terrible Episode
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If you’re looking for a light-hearted episode that’ll leave you feeling warm and tingly, this ain’t it.

Brandi starts us off with the story of a toddler whose body was discovered in the woods of Kansas City. For years, the unidentified girl was known as “Precious Doe.” Police said they were dedicated to the case, but it took outside intervention and relentless advocacy by the girl’s great grandfather for her to be identified.

Then Kristin tells us about the infuriating fight for justice following the murder of Jennifer Laude. Jennifer was a trans Filipina woman who was killed by an American Marine named Joseph Scott Pemberton. Jennifer’s murder didn’t just outrage LGBT+ advocates – it outraged anyone who was sick of American servicepeople getting special treatment in the Philippines. 

Kristin (the tattooed one who is engaged to David) ends this episode with a bang.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
The documentary “Call Her Ganda”
“How the Killing of a Trans Filipina Woman Ignited an International Incident” by Meredith Talusan for Vice 
“Philippines Events of 2018,” Human Rights Watch
“9 of Rodrigo Duterte’s Most Controversial Quotes,” by Megan Trimble for US News and World Report
“Revisiting the Jennifer Laude murder case,” by CNN Philippines Staff for CNN

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“‘Precious Doe’ — Toddler Erica Green Was Killed By Her Parents In 2001” by Erika Marie, ourblackgirls.com
“Solved: The brutal murder of Erica Green” by Mary Hallberg, maryhallberg.com
“Mystery child’s slaying still haunts, stirs resolve” by Christine Vendel, The Kansas City Star
“Precious Doe Case: Lessons learned” by Christin Vendel, The Kansas City Star
“Mother, stepfather charges in ‘Precious Doe’ killing” CNN
“Precious Doe Born In Prison” CBS News
“Missouri: Letters were sent by ‘Precious Doe’ killer to wife” The Joplin Globe
“Mom at ‘Precious Doe’ trial says she waited for girl to die’ The Associated Press
“Activist Continues Work for ‘Forgotten’ Missing Persons” by Bryan Robinson, ABC News
“State of Missouri, Respondent, v. Harrell L. Johnson” findlaw.com
“Murder of Erica Green” wikipedia.org
Aug 03, 2022
220: Dippin' Dots & the Disappearance of Jennifer Rothwell
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In the year of our Lord 1987, a microbiologist named Curt Jones blessed us with the invention of Dippin’ Dots. The nation’s theme parks were never the same. But with success comes thievin’ bitches. (Or just… regular competition, depending on how you look at it.) Curt decided to protect his patent. In doing so, he found himself in a lengthy and costly legal battle. T’was a rocky road. 

Then Brandi tells us about Beau Rothwell, who is somehow even douchier than his name suggests. Beau was unhappy in his marriage, but didn’t bother communicating that to his wife, Jennifer. Instead, he had an affair while simultaneously trying to get Jennifer pregnant. When Jennifer became pregnant, Beau was stunned. What was a douche to do?

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
An episode of the podcast How I Built This, titled, Dippin’ Dots: Curt Jones
“Is Dippin’ Dots still the ice cream of the future?” by K. Annabelle Smith for Smithsonian Magazine
“How Dippin’ Dots went from bankruptcy to $330M in annual revenue,” by Dave Schools for Entrepreneurs Handbook
Mini Melts, inc v. Dippin’ Dots, inc
“Things you didn’t know about Dippin’ Dots,” by Becki Ledford for Mashed.com
“What are Dippin’ Dots, really? The history of cryogenic ice cream,” by Juliet Izon for Serious Eats
“In the lab with the ice cream makers,” by Jennifer A. Kingson for the New York Times
“Jury says Dippin’ Dots erred on patent request,” Associated Press
“Ice cream maker hot on issue,” Associated Press

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Husband faces charges in woman’s disappearance” by Kim Bell, St. Louis Post-Dispatch
“Husband now charged with killing his wife” by Christine Byers and Kim Bell, St. Louis Post-Dispatch
“Warrants shed light on woman’s death” by Christine Byers, St. Louis Post-Dispatch
“Jury to decide if woman’s death was premeditated” by Joel Currier, St. Louis Post-Dispatch
“Murder suspect Beau Rothwell brings unexpected defense at trial” by Chris Hayes, Fox2 Now
“Rothwell’s list of ‘pros and cons’ shared during murder trial” by Joe Millitzer and Chris Hayes, Fox2 Now
“Beau Rothwell found guilty of first-degree murder after explaining how he killed his wife” by Elizabeth Barmeier, Spectrum News
“Beau Rothwell found guilty of murdering his pregnant wife” by Joel Currier, St. Louis Post-Dispatch
“Beau Rothwell sentenced to life in the killing of his pregnant wife” by Sara Bannoura, KMOV4 News
“Beau Rothwell sentenced to life in prison for killing wife who had searched online "what to do if your husband is upset you are pregnant”” CBS News

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 35+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  

Jul 27, 2022
219: 48 Hours!
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In this episode, we both covered cases from 48 Hours. Did we plan for this to be a themed episode? Yes. Yes we did. We are professionals.

Brandi starts us off, as she often does, with a story about a staircase. (No, not that staircase.) When Lana Clayton flagged down a passing motorcyclist, she said that her husband, Steve Clayton, had fallen down the stairs. She feared he was dead. When emergency crews arrived on the scene, they initially thought that Steve had died from a heart attack. But Lana’s behavior indicated otherwise.

Then Kristin tells us about Nikki Kuhnhausen. From a very early age, Nikki embraced her gender identity. As a pre-teen, Nikki boldly opted to be exactly who she was — a confident trans girl who aspired to become a makeup artist. But her dreams were cut short when she met a transphobic man named David Bogdanov.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
An episode of 48 hours, titled “The Life and Death of Nikki Kuhnhausen”
The podcast, “Should be alive”

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Eye Drop Homicide” episode 48 Hours
“Everyone’s Favorite Uncle” episode American Monster
“S.C. nurse who fatally poisoned husband with eye drops: "I just wanted him to suffer”” by Peter Van Sant, CBS News
“Nurse Gets 25 Years For Fatally Poisoning Her Husband With Eye Drops” by Jill Sederstrom, Oxygen
“Officials said he died in a fall. Then his wife admitted to poisoning his water with eye drops” by Hannah Knowles, The Washington Post
"Woman sentenced to 25 years in prison for poisoning husband's drinking water with eye drops” by Ivan Pereira and Karma Allen, ABC News

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 30+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  

Jul 20, 2022
218: A Victory for Gay Rights & Terrible Friends
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When Sharon Kowalski and Karen Thompson fell in love, they knew they needed to be careful. It was the 1970s, and they lived in a conservative Minnesota town. They feared that if they came out of the closet, they would lose their jobs — or worse. The couple exchanged rings and bought a house together, but they didn’t come out to their families. Then one day, Sharon got into a terrible car accident. When Karen rushed to her side, Sharon’s family explained that they’d be the ones caring for Sharon.

Then Brandi tells us about sixteen-year-old Jason Sweeney, who worked hard doing construction jobs with his father and hoped to one day attend a military academy. But those dreams were dashed by a group of kids who Jason considered his friends. Justina Morley, 15, lured Jason into the woods near the Delaware River, where Edward Batzig, 16, Nicholas Coia, 16, and Domenic Coia, 17, were lying in wait.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
WEST 57TH: "Bitter Quarrel: A Test of Love" - 3/4/1989, CBS
“The Minnesota legal fight that changed the course of the gay rights movement,” by Benjamin Kwan for Minnesota Lawyer 
“In Re Guardianship of Kowalski,” Justia.com
“It happened to us, 1983,” video on YouTube by Karen Thompson
“A bitter fight for control,” by Joyce Murdoch for the Washington Post
“Gay rights victory,” by Mark Hansen for the ABA Journal
“Gay groups are rallied to aid 2 women’s fight,” by Nadine Brozan for the New York Times
“Woman’s hospital visit marks gay rights fight,” by Nadine Brozan for the New York Times
“Two sides are bypassed in lesbian case,” by Nadine Brozan for the New York Times
“Disabled woman’s care given to lesbian partner,” by Tamar Lewin for the New York Times
“Karen Thompson’s role in the movement for marriage equality,” by D. Kelly Weisberg for Hastings Women’s Law Journal

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Friend Fatale” episode, Murder Among Friends
“The Twisted Murder of Jason Sweeney” by Nicole Henley, Medium
“Manson Echo in Philly Teen Murder Case” ABC News
“Slaying of a Teen Leaves City Stunned” by David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
“Murder of Jason Sweeney” wikipedia.org

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 30+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  

Jul 13, 2022
217: A Chilling 911 Call & a Murder "Mystery"
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Keyona Griffin needed help. Terrified, she dialed 911 and whispered to the dispatcher that she was in grave danger. She told the dispatcher her address and said, “he’s trying to kill me. He already killed my auntie. Can you hurry up, please?” Minutes later, police arrived on the scene. They didn’t do shit. 

Then Kristin tells us about a world-class asshole named James Sullivan. Over the course of their marriage, James cheated on his wife Lita McClinton multiple times. The marriage took its toll on Lita, but after several years, she decided she’d had enough. Just when it looked like she was free, a stranger rang her doorbell.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Hitman freed 31 years after shooting millionaire’s estranged wife in her doorway in murder-for-hire,” by Adam Carlson for People
“Social Disgraces,” by Debra Miller Landau for Atlanta Magazine
Murder in the Thirst episode, titled: “Palm Beach Princess”
“Flower delivery turned murder,” by Victoria Corderi for NBC News
“Sullivan pleads not guilty to killing wife,” by Bill Montgomery for The Atlanta Constitution

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Keyona Griffin 911 Call” by @ominousposts, TikTok
“Mother and Child: Jory Worthen/Derrell Brown” episode In Pursuit with John Walsh
“‘Please hurry’: Victim’s haunting 911 call released as feds hunt suspected killer” by Susan Samples, Target 8 News
“Double-murder suspect had ‘Jekyll and Hyde’-like anger, says witness” by Susan Samples, Target 8 News
“Police 'beating themselves up’ after 911 caller found dead hours later” by John Agar, mlive.com
“Charges filed in Grand Rapids double homicide” by Justin P. Hicks, mlive.com
“US Marshals: Kent Co. double murder suspect added to Top 15 Most Wanted list” by Karie Herringa, Fox 17 News

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 30+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  
Jun 01, 2022
216: A Hollywood Scandal & the Disappearance of Annie Le
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Patricia Douglas had been misled. She, like all the other girls and young women who’d answered MGM’s casting call, thought she’d been hired to dance in a movie. Instead, she was taken to a wild party, held in honor of MGM’s salesmen. Patricia did her best to avoid a creepy salesman named David Ross, but he followed her into the parking lot and attacked her. 

Then Brandi tells us about the disappearance of Annie Le. Annie had a lot going on. She was a busy doctoral student at Yale School of Medicine’s Department of Pharmacology. In a few days, she was set to marry the love of her life. But then she disappeared. Surveillance footage showed her entering a Yale building, but never leaving. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“It happened one night…. At MGM,” by David Stenn for Vanity Fair
The documentary, “Girl 27”
“Visiting film salesman freed of ‘haymow’ party charges,” San Bernardino Daily Sun, June 18, 1937
“Figures in the probe of film party scandal,” the Kansas City Times, June 17, 1937
“Movie colony party trial starts today,” The Cushing Daily Citizen, June 17, 1937

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Vanishing Bride-To-Be” episode A Wedding and A Murder
“Lab Murder: The Brutal Slaying of Yale University Student Annie Le” by Kym L Pasqualini, soapboxie.com
“Annie Le: The Yale Lab Murder” by Kristal Hawkins, The Crime Library
“Annie Le couldn't wait to get married. On her wedding day she was found murdered” by Nama Winston, mamamia.com.au
“Annie Le: Yale grad student touted as 'next Einstein' was murdered by lab technician days before her wedding” by Pritha Paul, meaww.com
“Raymond Clark III "Control Freak"; Did It Lead to Annie Le's Murder?” By Edecio Martinez, CBSNews
“Read the full statement Raymond Clark III made about killing Annie Le” New Haven Register
“Murder of Annie Le” wikipedia.org

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May 25, 2022
215: Wrongfully Convicted People With The Last Name Brown
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We’ve got a theme! …. A weird, totally accidental theme! This week, we’re talking about wrongfully convicted people who also happen to have the last name Brown. 

Brandi starts us off with the story of Sabina Kulakowski, a social worker who was discovered dead near her home. Her home had been set on fire and Sabina had been stabbed, bitten and strangled. Investigators had another suspect in their sights, but eventually locked in on Roy Brown. Roy was a decent enough suspect – he’d been recently released from jail when Sabina was murdered. He also had a history of threatening social workers. 

Then Kristin tells us about a robbery at a Dallas furrier. May 6, 1980, was supposed to be a typical day at Fine Furs by Rubin. Then two women walked in. One had a gun. The other held empty trash bags. One of the women shot and killed the store owner, Rubin Danziger, as the other filled the bags with valuable furs. The women fled, leaving behind Ala Danziger as an eyewitness to their crime. It didn’t take long for investigators to locate the women’s getaway car. It had been abandoned, with rental paperwork in the front seat. The paperwork indicated that it had been rented by a woman named Joyce Ann Brown.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
The “Joyce Ann Brown” episodes of Vindicated
“Joyce Ann Brown, shackled by her name to another’s crime, dies at 68,” by Margalit Fox for the New York Times
“Joyce Ann Brown,” entry on The National Registry of Exonerations
“Joyce Ann Brown, exonerated after nearly a decade in prison, dies at 68,” by Emily Langer for the Washington Post
“Joyce Ann Brown, exoneree who championed justice, dies at 68,” the Dallas Morning News
“Wrongful conviction charges haunt Dallas prosecutors,” by Paul Weingarten for the Chicago Tribune
“Joyce Ann Brown,” entry on Bluhm Legal Clinic’s Center on Wrongful Convictions

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Freedom Fighter” episode Forensic Files
“Quest for Freedom: The True Story of Roy Brown” by David Lohr, The Crime Library
“With DNA From Exhumed Body, Man Finally Wins Freedom” by Fernanda Santos, The New York Times
“Roy Brown, who spent 15 years in prison for murder he did not commit, dies at 58” by Sarah Moses Buckshot, syracuse.com
“Roy Brown” innocenceproject.org

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 30+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  
May 18, 2022
214: A "Victim" & a Fire
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Michael Dunn pulled into a gas station parking lot, peeved. The teenagers in the car next to him were playing their music too loud. Michael told his fiance, Rhonda, “I hate that thug music.” When Rhonda was in the gas station, Michael asked the boys to turn their music down. They did. But one of the boys, 17-year-old Jordan Davis was annoyed by Michael’s request. So he told his friend to turn the music back up. Michael Dunn flew into a rage. 

Then Brandi tells us about Brett Seacat. Brett was a pretty big deal in Kingsman, Kansas. (Just ask him! He’d tell you!) So when his wife, Vashti, said she wanted a divorce, Brett was outraged. He threatened to take the kids from her. Then, on April 30, 2011, Brett called 911 to report that Vashti had set their house on fire and died by suicide.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
The documentary, “3 ½ minutes, ten bullets”
“The Case of Michael Dunn” by JCS Criminal Psychology on YouTube 

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Burning Suspicion” episode Dateline
“In The Fire” episode Accident Suicide or Murder
“Former Sheriff's Deputy Covers Up Wife's Murder With Fire, Forged Suicide Note” by Sharon Lynn Pruitt, Oxygen
“Questions linger after Kingman fire” by Tim Potter, The Wichita Eagle
“Vashti Seacat’s friends testify at trial” by Darcy Gray, The Wichita Eagle
“In appeal, Seacat claims trial unfair without look at wife’s private side” by Amy Renee Leiker, The Wichita Eagle
“Kansas man convicted of wife’s killing still fighting to overturn verdict” Hays Post
“Seacat v. State” casetext.com

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May 11, 2022
213: A Murder Mystery & the Central Park Karen
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Brandi is back at it again with another Johnson County murder mystery. How does she keep finding these? Is it because she’s the one committing all these murders? Is that why she knows so many details?? (Don’t look at me! I’m just asking questions!)

Barbara Haddock’s death was staged to look like an accident. Barbara lay dead in her garage, under a large amount of firewood. It looked as though she’d been crushed by the firewood. But a closer look revealed a different story. Barbara had been killed by several blows to the back of her head. 

Then Kristin tells us about the Central Park Karen. On May 25, 2020, Christian Cooper was birdwatching in an area of Central Park known as the Ramble. The Ramble is home to wildlife and delicate plants, and several signs that state that dogs must be kept on a leash. Amy Cooper figured the rules didn’t apply to her. When Christian asked her to put her dog on a leash, she got offended. Then she decided to weaponize her white womanhood.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Rescue organization returns dog to Amy cooper, one week after “Central Park Karen” video went viral,” by Sophie Lewis for CBS News
“Christian Cooper on being racially targeted while birdwatching in Central Park,” video on YouTube from CBS News
“Amy Cooper faces charges after calling police on Black bird-watcher,” by Jan Ransom for the New York Times
“Case against Amy Cooper lacks key element: Victim’s cooperation,” by Jan Ransom for the New York Times
“Why I have chosen not to aid the investigation of Amy Cooper,” by Christian Cooper for The Washington Post
“Amy Cooper, who falsely accused Black bird-watcher, has charged dismissed,” by Jonah E. Bromwich 
“Amy Cooper was fired after calling 911 on a Black birdwatcher. Now she’s suing her ex-employer,” by Jaclyn Peiser
“Amy Cooper sues ex-employer for racial discrimination after viral Central Park incident,” by Meredith Deliso for ABC News
“Franklin moves to dismiss Amy Cooper’s wrongful termination suit,” by Nicole Piper for citywireusa.com
“How two lives collided in Central Park, rattling the nation,” by Sarah Maslin Nir for the New York Times
“Central Park birdwatching incident,” entry on wikipedia

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“State v. Haddock” anylaw.com
“Haddock v. Roberts” leagle.com
“Olathe Man Charged in Wife’s Death” by Max Evans, Olathe Daily News
“Insurance policies offered as possible murder motive” by Max Evans, Olathe Daily News
“Haddock tries to build alibi defense in wife’s murder” by Andy Hoffman, Olathe Daily News
“Shocking tape played at trial” by Tony Rizzo, The Kansas City Star
“Police questioned suspect about cuts on his hand” by Tony Rizzo, The Kansas City Star
“Haddock draws life sentence, continues to dispute verdict” by Andy Hoffman, Olathe Daily News
“Man sentenced to life for killing wife is seeking appeal” by Andy Hoffman, Olathe Daily News
“Fighting for their father” by Shaun Hittle, Lawrence Journal-World

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May 04, 2022
212: An Australian Catfish & Domestic Violence
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Kristin starts us off with a catfish…. AUSTRALIAN STYLE!

When Davine Arckens was 24-years-old, she set off on the adventure of a lifetime: A year in Australia. She had such a good time that she decided to extend her stay for an additional year. But in order to do that, she had to find work. It didn’t take long for Davine to connect online with a farmer named Max. He claimed he owned a remote farm and he needed a farmhand to help him raise cattle. 

Then Brandi tells us a story of domestic violence. Camia Gamet crouched down in the bushes outside her boyfriend’s apartment and called 911. She asked the dispatcher to send help to her boyfriend’s apartment. Except, she didn’t admit that it was her boyfriend’s apartment. And when the dispatcher asked who she was, Camia ended the call.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Backpacker kidnapped and shackled in abandoned pig shed by madman,” episode of 60 Minutes Australia
“Backpacker rapist Gene Charles Bristow, who kept kidnap victim in pig shed, jailed,” by Rebecca Opie for ABC Australia
“European backpacker says she felt like a ‘slave’ during two-day rape ordeal in ‘dirty pig shed’” by Rebecca Opie for ABC Australia
“Australian farmer Gene Charles Bristow guilty of raping backpacker,” BBC News
“Alleged rapist Gene Charles Bristow admits to using fake name,” by Rebecca Opie for ABC Australia
“Lawyer for alleged ‘pig shed’ rapist Gene Bristow accuses backpacker of making up evidence,” by Rebecca Opie for ABC Australia
“Farmer who kidnapped and raped a Belgian backpacker he kept prisoner in pig shed loses appeal against his convictions,” Australian Associated Press

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Camia Gamet” episode Snapped
“Broken glass, dented frying pan, busted lamp found near body of Marcel Hill, allegedly beaten, stabbed to death by girlfriend” by Danielle Salisbury, mlive.com
“Case manager testifies she warned Marcel Hill of Camia Gamet, the woman accused of killing him” by Danielle Salisbury, mlive.com
“The Domestic Abuse and Brutal Murder of Marcel Hill” by Anita Durairaj, Medium
“The Camia Gamet Murder Case” Jim Fisher True Crime
“State of Michigan v. Camia Tiffany Gamet” justia.com
“Camia Gamet” murderpedia.org

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 30+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  

Apr 27, 2022
211: A Creepy Manager & Balloonfest '86
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Alisha Bromfield wasn’t interested in being Brian Cooper’s wedding date. But Alisha didn’t have much of a choice. Brian was her boss, and he was a vindictive creep. If she rejected his invitation, he might cut her hours, or worse, fire her. So Alisha told Brian she’d go to his sister’s wedding with him, as a friend. 

Then Kristin tells a story that’s light on court stuff, but brimming with balloons! In 1986, the city of Cleveland wanted to reinvent itself. They figured out exactly how to do it. They’d host the biggest simultaneous balloon release, ever. It would be so fun! They’d be in the Guinness Book of World Records! They’d raise a ton of money for the United Way of Cleveland! What could go wrong?? 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Balloonfest” short film 
“How Cleveland’s Balloonfest ‘86 became a public disaster,” by Corey Irwin for ultimateclassicrock.com
“Balloonfest ‘86: 35 years since downtown Cleveland event turned disastrous,” by Suzanne Stratford for Fox8
“When the balloons inflated, so did a man’s career,” by John Rogers for NBC News

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Postmortem Depravity: The Murder of Pregnant Mother Alisha Bromfield” by Kym L. Pasqualini, Medium
“Horrific crimes against Alisha Bromfield spur law change in 32 states” True Crime Daily
“Alisha Bromfield” chillingcrimes.com
“Seventh Circuit Slams Home Depot in Employee Murder Case” by Lorraine Bailey, Courthouse News
“Sherry Anicich v. Home Depot Inc.” findlaw.com


YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 30+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  

Apr 20, 2022
210: A Cool Teacher & Teenaged Love
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PSA: If you haven’t Googled that “cool” teacher from high school, go ahead. We’ll wait. 

Douglas Le had a reputation for being the cool teacher at Gilroy High School. He was young and highly educated. He could relate to his students! He told hilarious, edgy jokes! He joked about the size of his students’ genitals. He joked about having sex with their moms. In the fall of 2014, one mother alerted the school district to Douglas Le’s behavior. They didn’t listen. 

Then Brandi tells us a very on-brand story. It was September 2, 2003. Sarah Johnson ran to a neighbor’s house in a panic. Her parents, Diane and Alan Scott Johnson were dead in their bedroom. When investigators arrived on the scene, they got there just in time to stop a garbage truck from taking evidence from the crime scene.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
The Web of Lies episode “The Enemy Within”
“Ex-Campbell teacher who catfished students arrested again on teen sex allegations,” by Robert Salonga for the Mercury News
“Gilroy sex offender teacher set free,” by Jack Foley for the Gilroy Dispatch
“At school, he was the ‘cool’ teacher. Online, police say, he was a student-seducing porn star,” by Peter Holley for the Washington Post

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Disrobed” episode Forensic Files
“Love Interrupted- Diane and Alan Johnson Murders” episode 20/20
“Couple’s killer wore bathrobe backwards, says” by Patti Murphy, The Times-News
“Conflicting evidence brought at Johnson Trial” Associated Press, South Idaho Press
“Family gets day in court” by Patti Murphy, The Times-News
“Bellevue, Idaho” wikipedia.org
“Teen Charged With Parents’ Gruesome Murder” by Elizabeth R. Grodd and Jeffrey L Diamond, ABC News
“The Johnson Family Murders” by Emily Thompson, Morbidology
“Sarah Marie Johnson” murderpedia.org
“Sarah Marie Johnson v. State of Idaho” findlaw.com


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Apr 13, 2022
209: A Durham Staircase & the Transy Book Heist
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Brandi starts us off with a story about a staircase in Durhan, North Carolina. To clarify: That’s a staircase in Durham – not the staircase in Durham. Turns out, there’s more than one staircase in Durham. Hmm. 

It was January of 2007, and Corey Smith was on his way to work when he spotted a woman lying at the base of a staircase near his apartment. The woman was unresponsive, so he called 911. He checked her ID and learned that her name was Denita Smith. Denita was working on her master’s degree at North Carolina Central University. She’d recently completed a prestigious fellowship with the New York Times. She had no known enemies, and yet, someone had killed her. 

Then Kristin tells a story that’s so stupid it’s delightful. (Unless you ask Brandi. Brandi is very anti-heist.) During a tour of the special collections library at Transylvania University, freshman Spencer Reinhard perked up when the tour guide showed off the library’s set of John Hames Audubon’s “Birds of America.” The librarian told the group that a set had recently sold for $12 million. Spencer was intrigued. The special collections room evidently held valuable books, guarded by almost no security.  

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Majoring in Crime,” by John Falk for Vanity Fair
“Secrets of the Transy Book Heist,” episode of Super Heists
“Four charged in Transy book heist,” by Andy Mead and Cassondra Kirby for the Lexington Herald-Leader
“Librarian: Emotional scars remain,” by Beth Musgrave for the Lexington Herald-Leader
“Wrong-way gang,” by Gary Thompson for the Philadelphia Inquirer
“Transy thieves took names from film,” by Beth Musgrave for the Lexington Herald-Leader
“College caper appeal backfires, robbers to get even more time,” by Martha Neil for the ABA Journal
“Sentence stands in Transy book theft,” by Brandon Ortiz for the Lexington Herald-Leader

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Internal Affairs” episode Dateline
“Shannon Crawley” episode Snapped
“Denita Smith” chillingcrimes.com
“Shannon Elizabeth Crawley” murderpedia.org
“State of North Carolina v. Shannon Elizabeth Crawley” findlaw.com

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 30+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  
Apr 06, 2022
208: Easter Sunday Massacre
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Brandi really outdid herself this week by covering the most horrifying crime… ever???

James Urban Ruppert had a rough life. As he grew into adulthood, his struggles continued. He couldn’t hold a job. He couldn't maintain relationships. He had paranoid delusions. That all came to a head on Easter Sunday of 1975, when his entire extended family celebrated the holiday at his mother’s house.

Also, please cue the Golden Girls theme song for Brandi. She told our only case this week so that Kristin could spend time with her grandma.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The 1975 Easter massacre: Uncle Jimmy Ruppert kills his family” by David J. Krajicek, New York Daily News
“CRIME HUNTER: Easter Sunday massacre of Ohio family stunned U.S.” by Brad Hunter, Toronto Sun
“James Ruppert” murderpedia.org
“Easter Sunday Massacre” wikipedia.org
“Mother, Brother Among James Ruppert’s Victims” by John R. Clark, The Cincinnati Enquirer
“Grandmother Still Haunted By Memory” by Janet C. Wetzel, The Cincinnati Enquirer
“Parole Hearing Not Due Til 95” by John R. Clark, The Cincinnati Enquirer
“Officials Share Bitter Memories Of Ritter Case” by John R. Clark, The Cincinnati Enquirer
“Ruppert Chronology” The Cincinnati Enquirer
“Living in a murder house: Hamilton mom copes with her home's dark past” by Maxim Alter, WCPO 9 News

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 30+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  

Mar 30, 2022
207: An Abduction & a Surgeon
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The out-of-work supermodels really struggled with this episode. Brandi’s case gave her nightmares and Kristin’s case is infuriatingly stupid.

Brandi starts us off with the story of Brianna Denison, who was home from college, hanging out with friends when she was abducted from her friend’s house. Investigators were able to get touch DNA off of a doorknob, which led them to other unsolved crimes in the area.

Then Kristin tells us about Dr. David Stephens, who had an affair with a young nurse named Stephanie Kennedy. When David’s wife, Karen, discovered the affair, she was beside herself. The couple argued. He got in his car to leave, and she grabbed a gun. She ran after him, holding the gun to her head. When she tripped, the gun went off. Karen died a few months later. About a year after that, David and Stephanie wed.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“The Doctor’s Wife” episode of American Justice
“The Other Woman” episode of 48 Hours

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Night Brianna Vanished” episode Dateline
“College Student Staying With Friends Mysteriously Disappears From Their Living Room Couch” by Jill Sederstrom, oxygen.com
“The Murder of Brianna Denison” by Gary C. King, trutv.com
“Biela’s fate now in hands of jury” by Martha Bellisle, Reno Gazette-Journal
“Being Brianna’s Brother” by Siobhan McAndrew, Reno Gazette-Journal

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 30+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  

Mar 23, 2022
206: Vincent Chin & a Johnson County Mystery
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Kristin starts us off with the story of a hate crime that galvanized Asian Americans. 

On the night of his bachelor party, Vincent Chin was brutally attacked by Michael Nitz and his stepdad, Ronald Ebens. Vincent died four days after the attack. He’d never regained consciousness. It was a horrific crime, but people in power didn’t see it that way. Michael and Ronald were sentenced to three years of probation and ordered to pay a little more than $3,000 in fines. The judge explained his decision, saying, “these weren’t the kind of men you send to jail.”

Then Brandi tells us a story from her very own Johnson County bubble. 

Right off the bat, William Jennings’ death looked suspicious. He was discovered in his home, beaten so badly that his veneers had come off. He’d been strangled with the bars of a decorative bird cage. A suicide note specifically mentioned that his longtime partner, David Stagg, was not to be blamed. Naturally, investigators wondered if he was.  

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
The documentary, “Who Killed Vincent Chin?”
The book, “Asian American Studies Now,” by Helen Zia
“Vincent Chin’s family never got the justice they wanted. But his case changed things for those who came after him,” by Harmeet Kaur for CNN
“The Killing of Vincent Chin” trial reenactment by UC Hastings Law, on YouTube
“The Killing of Vincent Chin” entry on Wikipedia

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Former Westmar Professor Charged In Slaying” Associated Press, Sioux City Journal
“Professor charged in killing reported a suicide” by Diane Carroll, The Kansas City Star
“Murder suspect wins legal round” by Diane Carroll, The Kansas City Star
“Defense asks judge to throw out murder charge against professor” Associated Press, Lawrence Journal-World
“Trial begins for Missouri professor of music charged with killing lover” Associated Press, Lawrence Journal-World
“Professor’s trial ends in hung jury” Associated Press, The Manhattan Mercury
“Mo. professor faces new murder trial” Associated Press, The Wichita Eagle
“Prof on trial again in death of partner” Associated Press, The Manhattan Mercury
“Source of DNA is disputed” by Diane Carroll, The Kansas City Star
“Jurors unable to reach verdict in trial” Associated Press, Colby Free Press
“Murder trial ends with 2nd hung jury” by Caroline Boyer, Shawnee Dispatch
“No 3rd trial in 2004 Shawnee murder, judge rules” by Caroline Boyer, Shawnee Dispatch

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 30+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  
Mar 16, 2022
205: A Charlatan & a Family Annihilator
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Is this the twilight zone? Perhaps it is. We’re wearing top hats on our tits, we’re putting Jello in our salads, and Brandi’s covering a charlatan while Kristin covers a family annihilator. What has this world come to?

Brandi starts us off with a story about a Georgia pastor named William Pounds, who loved proposing to women, but hated staying loyal to them. On June 12, 2015, he called 911, claiming that his fiance Kendra Jackson had shot herself in the head. The scene didn’t quite match his story.

Then Kristin tells us about Arlene and Seymour Tankleff, who were attacked in their Long Island home. The next day, their 17-year-old son Marty discovered his dad clinging to life, and his mother dead. Detectives immediately zeroed in on the boy, and who could blame them? This smelled like a Brandi case!

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
An episode of American Justice, titled, “Wrongly Convicted Marty Tankleff Finally Freed” 
“Wrongful Conviction” podcast #84 Jason Flom with Marty Tankleff
An episode of The Real Story with Maria Elena Salinas, titled, “Confessions of an innocent man”
“The names stay linked: ‘Bagel King’ and Tankleff,” by Bruce Lambert, Paul Vitello and Nate Schweber for the New York Times
“Martin Tankleff,” The National Registry of Exonerations

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“’Jekyll And Hyde’-Like Pastor Shot His Fiancée In The Head And Claimed It Was Suicide” by Joe Dziemianowicz, oxygen.com
“Perry pastor on trial for fiancee's shooting death” by Tavares Jones, WGXA News
“Perry pastor indicted in fiancee’s death” by Amy Leigh Womack, The Macon Telegraph
“Bond revoked for midstate pastor charged with murder” by Amy Leigh Womack, The Macon Telegraph
“Minister testifies in own defense at trial for 2015 slaying of woman” by Joe Kovac Jr., The Macon Telegraph
“Former pastor sentenced to life in lover’s murder” by Joe Kovac Jr., The Macon Telegraph

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 30+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  
Mar 09, 2022
204: Wells Fargo Robbery & a Mysterious Illness
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It’s tough to rob an armored car. But on November 28, 1994, a group of men did exactly that. Their crime was brazen. They took control of the vehicle in a mall parking lot, in broad daylight. They exercised unnecessary violence, too. They shot the Wells Fargo van driver, John Magoch, in the head and left him slumped over in the front seat. When the armored car was discovered abandoned in a church parking lot a few hours later, the money — and the criminals — were long gone.  

Then Brandi tells us about a mysterious illness. Janet Overton hadn’t been feeling well. She turned to doctors for answers, but couldn’t get any. Whatever plagued her was tough to identify. And then, one day, Janet collapsed in her driveway. The 46-year-old woman, who’d been healthy until recently, was now dead.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“The Wells Fargo Heist” episode of American Justice
“Convict says manhunter framed him” by Dennis Wagner for the Arizona Republic
“New questions in  ‘94 armored-car murder,” by Michael Kiefer for the Arizona Republic
“Ring v. Arizona,” Oyez.org
“Timothy Stuart Ring,” Murderpedia.org
“Former Falls resident still denies role in murder,” by Bob Dyer for the Akron Beacon Journal
“Three arrested in slaying in armored car heist,” by Richard Robertson and Susan Leonard for the Arizona Republic

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Janet Overton” chillingcrimes.com
“A Slow Death” episode The Real Murders of Orange County
“Every morning, Janet Overton applied eyeliner. It was slowly killing her.” By Helen Vnuk, MamaMia
“O.C. man convicted of fatally poisoning his wife” by Rong-Gong Lin II, Los Angeles Times

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 30+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  


Mar 02, 2022
203: A Stalker & a Deeply Stupid Heist
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Get ready to be infuriated. 

Tiana Notice wanted nothing to do with her ex-boyfriend, James Carter. He’d seemed perfect at first, but it didn’t take long for Tiana to see his true colors. So she dumped him. But like a true shithead, James refused to take no for an answer. He called her constantly. He stalked her. Tiana went to the police for help several times. In fact, over the course of six weeks, she visited her local police station 33 times. But the police never took Tiana seriously. 

Then Kristin lightens the mood with the story of a hilariously stupid heist. David Ghantt worked as a vault supervisor for Loomis Fargo in Charlotte, North Carolina. David made very little money, but was surrounded by so much of it that he went home every night reeking of cash. It was annoying, to say the least. So when his crush, Kelly Campbell, came to him with an idea to steal all the money from the vault, David went along with the plan. He’d steal $17.3 million dollars from the vault, and he’d keep one third of it. But he wouldn’t get the money right away. He’d need to hide out in Mexico for a while. Kelly and the rest of the money would *definitely* join him later.   

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
An episode of the FBI Files, titled “The Unperfect Crime”
An episode of Super Heists, titled “A Van Full of Dollars”
Reporting by Jeff Diamant for the Washington Post in 1999
“October 1997 Loomis Fargo robbery,” entry on Wikipedia

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“If I Can’t Have You” episode Deadline: Crime with Tamron Hall
“Valentine's Day murder: Stalker violates restraining order, kills ex-girlfriend” True Crime Daily
“Jury Begins Deliberations In Carter Murder Trial” by Hilda Muñoz, Hartford Courant
“Carter Found Guilty Of Murder” by Christine Dempsey, Hartford Courant
“Carter Refuses To Be In Court As He Is Sentenced To 60 Years For Killing Tiana Notice” by Christine Dempsey, Hartford Courant
“STATE of Connecticut v. James P. CARTER, Jr.” findlaw.com

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 30+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  

Feb 23, 2022
202: Death Penalty Cases
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Wanda Lopez was a little freaked out. She was working the evening shift, alone, at a gas station in a rough part of town, and a sketchy dude was outside the store with a knife. She called the police, but they brushed off her concerns. The guy hadn’t done anything! He wasn’t even inside the store! But the man’s presence set off Wanda’s alarm bells. So she called 911 again. The dispatcher didn’t like Wanda’s tone (!!) but sent officers to the scene when he overheard the man attack her. It was too late. Wanda didn’t make it, but at least there were eyewitnesses who could tell the police who’d done it. The murderer was a thin, 5’9” Hispanic man with curly, ear-length hair. He was wearing a flannel jacket. Or was it a white button up? Tomayto, tomahto! 

After a 45-minute manhunt, they arrested Carlos DeLuna. Carlos claimed he was innocent. He’d seen another man commit the crime – a man who was also named Carlos. Carlos Hernandez. But Carlos DeLuna was full of shit. Right?

Then Brandi keeps the bummers coming with another family annihilator. On a weekend in July of 2003, Joanie Harper, her children Marques, Lyndsey, baby Marshall and mother Earnestine Harper were all murdered in their home. The killer made a lame attempt at staging a break-in, but because they’d seen Dateline, investigators immediately turned their suspicion on Joanie’s husband, Vincent Brothers. But Vincent had been out of town during the murders, and he had the receipts to prove it. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“The Phantom” documentary
“The Wrong Carlos: Anatomy of a Wrongful Execution,” by James S. LIebman  and the Columbia DeLuna Project 
“The wrong Carlos: How Texas sent an innocent man to his death,” by Ed Pilkington for The Guardian
“Carlos DeLuna” entry on Wikipedia
“Yes, America, we have executed an innocent man,” by Andrew Cohen for The Atlantic

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Harper Family” episode Family Massacre
“The Mystery of the Lost Weekend” episode Dateline
“'That’s A Lot Of Hate’: Dead Insects Lead Detectives To Man Who Killed 5 Family Members” by Joe Dziemianowicz, oxygen.com
“DEFINING CASES: Bugs and sex: Vincent Brothers’ 2007 multiple-murder conviction came down to insect parts and his smugness on the stand” by Jessica Logan, The Bakersfield Californian
“Brothers attorneys blame woman for murders” by Jessica Logan, The Bakersfield Californian
“Vincent E. Brothers” murderpedia.org
“Vincent Brothers” wikipedia.org

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 30+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  
Feb 16, 2022
201: Jodi Arias (Pt. 2) & Clarence Elkins
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If you haven’t listened to last week’s episode, then sashay away. If you have listened to part one of Brandi’s Jodi Arias coverage, then Shante, you stay. 

This week, Brandi tells us about the epic trial of Jodi Arias. Brace yourself for a dramatic make-under, a homemade t-shirt, and several plot twists. Our advice? BUCKLE UP.

Then Kristin covers the legal battles of Clarence Elkins. Stay buckled, because this one includes an appearance on the Maury Povich show, drunken chore completion, and a prosecutor who can’t keep his grubby mitts off the evidence.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Melissa Elkins” episode of I Solved A Murder
“The Murder of Judith Johnson” episode of American Justice
“Killer Instinct” by Sara James
“Shadow of a Doubt: The Clarence Elkins Story” by Katherine Ramsland for Crime Library
“Clarence Elkins” entry on Wikipedia

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Jodi Arias Revised Timeline (UPDATED)” by David Lohr, huffpost.com
“How an Inside Edition Interview Became a Key to Prosecuting Jodi Arias” Inside Edition
“The Case Continues: Jodi Arias Pt. 1” episode Snapped
“The Case Continues: Jodi Arias Pt. 2” episode Snapped
“Arias Trial Timeline of events in Mesa murder case” The Associated Press, East Valley Tribune
“Timeline: A look back at the Jodi Arias murder case” azcentral.com
“In Saving Jodi Arias' Life, Kirk Nurmi Became the Most Hated Lawyer in Arizona” by Shanna Hogan, Phoenix New Times
“Jodi Ann Arias” murderpedia.org
“Murder of Travis Alexander” wikipedia.org


YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 30+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  
Feb 09, 2022
200: Jodi Arias & the Duke Lacrosse Scandal
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We missed you all! We are back from break, refreshed and rejuvenated and ready to bring you a VERY meaty boi!

Kristin starts us off with a sports story. (Yes, you read that correctly.) Over spring break of 2006, the Duke University men’s lacrosse team was bored. So they threw a party. As the night wore on, they hired two exotic dancers to come perform at their house party. The night was a shitshow. The two women performed for the crowd of men, but stopped when one of the players made a threatening comment about a broomstick. Later that night, hours after the party dispersed, one of the women reported that she’d been gang raped.

Then Brandi shows off her giant balls by giving us part one of her Jodi Arias coverage! When Travis Alexander met Jodi Arias, he was awestruck. She was beautiful. They talked all evening, and Travis fell head over heels. Jodi was everything he wanted in a woman. She seemed equally smitten with him. Even though they lived in different states, they tried to make their long-distance relationship work. Jodi even converted to Travis’ religion. But Travis’ friends weren’t quite so taken by Jodi. Over time, he came to question whether Jodi was really the one after all.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
The book, “The Price of Silence” by William D. Cohan
“Fantastic Lies” episode of 30 for 30
“Duke lacrosse case,” entry on Wikipedia

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Case Continues: Jodi Arias Pt. 1” episode Snapped
“The Case Continues: Jodi Arias Pt. 2” episode Snapped
“Friends say they warned Travis Alexander that Jodi Arias was dangerous for months before she killed him” by Gail Deutsch, Denise Martinez-Ramundo, Jonathan Balthaser, and Enjoli Francis, ABC News
“Jodi Ann Arias” murderpedia.org
“Murder of Travis Alexander” wikipedia.org
“Jodi Arias Timeline: Key Dates In Case Of California Woman Accused Of Stabbing Ex-Boyfriend 27 Times” by David Lohr, huffpost.com
“Timeline: A look back at the Jodi Arias murder case” azcentral.com


YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 30+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  

Feb 02, 2022
199: Shawn Bentler & War Machine
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Shawn Bentler had money trouble. He wanted money desperately, but didn’t want to work for it. In fact, Shawn was so bad at showing up for work that he got fired from the family business. He later got fired from another job when he told his boss that he was overwhelmed by the sudden passing of his father. (His dad was very much alive.) But at some point, Shawn came up with an idea. If his family was dead, he’d inherit a lot of money. 

When Christy Mack and Jon Koppenhaver, a.k.a. “War Machine” met on a photo shoot for Hustler Magazine, Christy was indifferent. She wasn’t looking for a boyfriend. She valued her independence. But she and Jon got to talking, and she was charmed. She’d never had someone shower her with so much love and attention before. Within a few weeks, they began dating. A few months later, the violence began.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“The Case of Jon Koppenhaver,” JCS - Criminal Psychology
“The tragic love story of Christy Mack and MMA fighter War Machine,” by Jane McManus for espn.com
Christy Mack’s twitter account
“Cage-fighter War Machine blames anti-male society for his domestic violence in suicide note,” by Scott Kauffman for rawstory.com
“Ex-fighter War Machine gets judge to postpone trial,” by Ken Ritter for the Associated Press
“War Machine sentenced to life for brutal assault of ex: Inside the MMA star’s fall,” by Mike Bohn for Rolling Stone
“Christy Mack vs. War Machine: The whole ugly case, explained,” by Meera Jagannathan for the Daily News
“Porn star Christy Mack’s alleged ‘rape fantasy’ new focal point of War Machine abuse trial,” by Jessa Schroeder for the Daily News
“War Machine blows ‘offensive’ kiss after arguing that porn star ex cant’ claim rape because of her job as sex worker,” the Daily News
“MMA Fighter ‘War Machine’ arrested in Simi Valley, was sought in Las Vegas beating of ex-girlfriend,” by Melissa Palmer and Mary Beth McDade for KTLA

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Shawn Bentler” podcast episode, This Is Monsters
“Shawn Michael Bentler” murderpedia.org
“Man charged in killing described as unreliable” Associated Press
“Trial Opens for Man accused of Killing his 3 Sister, Parents in Iowa” Associated Press
“Judge to visit home where man is accused of killing his family” by Amy Lorentzen, Associated Press
“Emotional day for Bentler family” Associated Press
“Remembering the Bentlers” by Melissa Shriver, KHQA News
“Killer’s Children Get Millions” KTVO News
“State v. Bentler” Findlaw.com

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 28+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  

Dec 15, 2021
198: The Murder of Ahmaud Arbery & a Mysterious Pool Death
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Nearly every day, Ahmaud Arbery went out for a jog. February 23, 2020 was no exception. His route included a loop through Satilla Shores – a neighborhood just a couple miles from his own, but not nearly as racially diverse. After a while, a truck with a Confederate flag vanity plate began following Ahmaud. Inside the truck were Gregory and Travis McMichael. Both men had guns. They yelled at Ahmaud to stop. They wanted to “talk to him.” Ahmaud wasn’t interested. He tried to get away from the men, but soon, a man named William Roddie Bryan joined in. He used his truck to trap Ahmaud. Ahmaud had nowhere to run. 

Then, Brandi tells us about a mysterious pool death. As handyman Gerald Gardener walked toward the back of Samira and Adam Frasch’s home, he spotted the couple’s dog running loose by the pool. Then he saw a pair of sandals. One was caught under a hose on the first step of the pool. The other floated nearby. Gerald moved in closer. That’s when he spotted Samira, dead at the bottom of the pool.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
Episode of 20/20, “Nowhere to Run”
Episode of 48 hours, “A Promise to Ahmaud”
“Ex-Brunswick DA indicted for misconduct in Ahmaud Arbery case surrenders,” by Brittany Muller for News4Jax
“In Ahmaud Arbery’s name, Georgia repeals citizen’s arrest law,” by Emma Hurt for NPR
“Factbox: Who was Ahmaud Arbery?” by Rich McKay for Reuters
“The citizen’s arrest law cited in Arbery’s killing dates back to the Civil War,” by Frances Robles for the New York Times
“Ahmaud Arbery: Waycross district attorney explains in letter why no one was arrested in 25-year-old’s shooting death,” by Amber Krycka for Action News Jax
“Race not a factor jurors will consider in the case of three men accused of murdering Ahmaud Arbery,” by Anne Schindler for First Coast News

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Illicit Affairs” episode In Ice Cold Blood
“At The Bottom Of The Pool” episode Dateline
“Frasch murder investigation reveals couple’s torrid existence” by Jennifer Portman, Pensacola News Journal
“Samira Frasch” chillingcrimes.com

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 29+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  


Dec 08, 2021
197: Childhood Friends & the Kidnapping of Frank Sinatra Jr
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Initially, Sarah Stern’s disappearance looked like a suicide. Her car had been found abandoned on a bridge. On the day she went missing, she gave a box of keepsakes to a neighbor. Her best friend, Liam McAtasney, confirmed to police that Sarah had been depressed. She’d told him she wanted to “get away.” But Sarah’s family and other friends told a different story. For one, she would never have left her beloved dog unattended. Secondly, she wasn’t depressed at all.

Then Kristin tells us about the kidnapping of Frank Sinatra Junior. Barry Keenan was down on his luck. He was addicted to drugs and alcohol, and for the first time in his life, he was broke. He needed money, fast. So he hatched a plan to kidnap Bob Hope’s son. But Bob Hope seemed so nice. He was always entertaining the troops! Kidnapping Bob Hope’s son would be positively un-American. So Barry decided to kidnap Frank Sinatra’s son, instead. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Snatching Sinatra” by Peter Gilstrap for The New Times Los Angeles Magazine 1998
“‘Son of Sam’ law upheld in Sinatra kidnapper’s movie deal,” Reporters Committee For Freedom of the Press
“Frank Sinatra, Jr., kidnapping,” FBI.gov
“Kidnapping ordeal tested family ties,” by J. Randy Taraborrelli for Arizona Republic, Nov 26, 1997
“Court asked to overturn ban on felons selling stories,” by Robert Jabion for the Associated Press, December 7, 2001
“Both Sinatras due to testify soon,” by Ridgely Cummings for Civic Center News Agency, Feb 27 1964
“Perjury enters Sinatra case as witness changes his story,” UPI, Feb 25, 1964
“Frank Sinatra, Jr., denies kidnapping publicity stunt,” Associated Press, Feb 29, 1964
“Sinatra could go, defendant claims,” Associated Press, March 3, 1964
“Sinatra-abduction case goes to jury,” Associated Press, March 7, 1964
“Jury gets Sinatra kidnap case,” Associated Press, March 7, 1964

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Sarah Stern” chillingcrimes.com
“With Friends Like These” episode 20/20
“Sarah Stern murder: Suspect said she wanted to run away, had suicidal past” by Kathleen Hopkins, Asbury Park Press
“Sarah Stern murder: No new trial for Liam McAtasney” by Kathleen Hopkins, Asbury Park Press
“Friend Who Killed 19-Year-Old New Jersey Student Sarah Stern Gets Life Without Parole- Plus 10 Years” by Brian Thompson, NBC New York News

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 28+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  

Dec 01, 2021
196: Internment Camps & a Bathtub Mystery
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Before the attack on Pearl Harbor, Fred Korematsu led a fairly typical American life. His family went to church every Sunday. They owned a small business. The Korematsu family had always faced some level of racism, but nothing compared to the aftermath of the attack on Pearl Harbor. President Franklin Roosevelt ordered the relocation and incarceration of more than 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry into concentration camps. None of the people who were put in the camps had done anything wrong. There wasn’t even evidence that they’d *maybe* done anything wrong. In the face of this racist hysteria, Fred Korematsu stood firm. As a person with Japanese ancestry, he had been ordered to leave his home. But he refused. 

Then Brandi tells us another terrifying story about a bathtub. At around 1 a.m. on April 27, 2012,
Chad Cutler called 911. He told the dispatcher that he’d just discovered his wife, Lisa, blue and unresponsive in their bathtub. He guessed she’d been in there for a few hours. He claimed he’d fallen asleep after she got in the bathtub earlier that evening. But when paramedics arrived on the scene, they noticed that the bed in the master bedroom was still made. Chad was fully dressed, and eerily calm.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“U.S. v Korematsu,” by Douglas O. Linder for FamousTrials.com
“Fred Korematsu Fought Against Japanese Internment in the Supreme Court… and Lost,” by Erick Trickey for Smithsonian Magazine
“Fred Korematsu,” entry on Wikipedia
“Internment of Japanese Americans,” entry on Wikipedia
“Fred’s Story,” from the Fred T. Korematsu Institute
In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Dead In The Water” episode Accident, Suicide, or Murder
“'None Of It Made Any Sense': Illinois Mother's Murder Staged As Bathtub Drowning” by Sharon Lynn Pruitt, Oxygen
“Relationships of Cutlers Focus of Trial” by Huey Freeman, Herald and Review
“Chad Cutler Trial Focuses on Injuries” by Huey Freeman, Herald and Review
“Cutler Jury Begins To Deliberate” by Huey Freeman, Herald and Review
“Illinois Man Who Drowned Wife For Insurance Remains Jailed” Insurance News Net
“People v. Cutler” casetext.com

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Nov 17, 2021
195: Boston Massacre & Alexis Murphy
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Alexis Murphy had a bright future ahead of her. She was the captain of her high school’s volleyball team, a robust social media presence, and plans to go to college. But one day in August of 2013, she left home to buy hair extensions and never came back. Investigators tracked down surveillance footage of Alexis at a gas station in Lovingston, Virginia. The footage didn’t reveal anything explicitly sinister, but it did reveal that a local creep had held the door open for her. 

Then Norm joined the podcast to give us an American history lesson! (Turns out, if they didn’t sing about it in Hamilton, we don’t know anything about it.) Norm gives us the story of the Boston Massacre. It went down on March 5, 1770 amidst growing tensions between colonists and British soldiers. Private Hugh White was the lone soldier guarding the Custom House. When colonists insulted him, Hugh fought back. Hugh wasn’t outarmed, but he was outnumbered.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Norman pulled from: 
“Boston’s Massacre” by Eric Hinderaker https://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674237384

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“What happened to Alexis Murphy” True Crime Daily
“Timeline: The Search for Alexis Murphy” NBC29 News
“Alexis Murphy’s Family Addresses Marijuana Allegations” NBC29 News
“Randy Taylor Trial Day Two: Alexis Murphy’s blood found, defense pushes human trafficking” by Lisa Provence, C-Ville.com
“Day 4: Mystery man testifies in Randy Taylor trial” by Lisa Provence, C-Ville.com
“Randy Allen Taylor trial Day 5: Taylor’s fate in jury’s hands” by Lisa Provence, C-Ville.com
“Alexis Murphy Remains Discovered Seven Years After She Vanished” investigationdiscovery.com
“Murder of Alexis Murphy” wikipedia.org

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Nov 10, 2021
194: Newlyweds & Anthony Gray
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Hold onto your hats, because Kristin starts us off with a doozy. When investigators arrived at the home of James and Vivian Gray, they didn’t do a great job. They invited randos to help clean up the crime scene where the couple had been shot. Then, when they left, they handed the scene off to the crime’s main suspect -- the couple’s adult son, Anthony Gray. 

Then Brandi tells us about Cody Johnson, who at 25, was thrilled to be marrying the love of his life, Jordan Graham. But Jordan wasn’t so happy. In fact, as she walked down the aisle, she cried and shook her head. Attendees might have written Jordan’s behavior off as nerves, but she later confided in a friend that she wasn’t happy. She was especially nervous about Cody’s desire to consummate their marriage. Not long after their wedding, Cody went missing. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
The ID show, “Kentucky Murder Mystery: The Trials of Anthony Gray” 
“Kentucky man found guilty of killing parents in third trial,” by Michael Berk for CourtTV
“Gray found guilty of double murder in third trial,” by Kiva Johns-Adkins for the News Graphic
“Gray murder trial continues,” by Kiva Johns-Adkins for the News Graphic

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“New wife convicted of pushing husband off cliff 8 days after wedding” True Crime Daily
“Newlywed Bride Pushes Husband Off Cliff 8 Days After Their Wedding” by Fatim Hemraj, Medium
“Montana bride Jordan Linn Graham goes on trial in husband’s fatal fall from cliff” by Kyung Lah and David Simpson, CNN
“Jordan Graham Trial: Did Her Wedding Blues Lead to Murder?” by Howard Breuer, people.com
“Montana newlywed Jordan Linn Graham gets 30 years in husband’s murder” by Jack Hannah, CNN
“Jordan Linn Graham” murderpedia.org

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Nov 03, 2021
193: An Anniversary Getaway & the Lynching of Timothy Coggins
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Harold Henthorn loved a good surprise. So when he began planning a surprise anniversary trip for his wife, Toni, he pulled out all the stops. He asked her office staff to clear her schedule. He packed her suitcase. Then, on what was supposed to be a typical workday, Harold gave Toni the good news: They’d be going on a romantic trip to Estes Park, Colorado, to celebrate their 12th anniversary. They’d leave right away. But Harold had more than a surprise trip up his sleeve. 

Then Kristin tells us about the lynching of Timothy Coggins. Timothy’s murder was heartbreaking, but it wasn’t exactly a whodunit. In fact, within a few weeks, two black officers were closing in on Timothy’s murderers. But the higher-ups in the local police force put a stop to the investigation. They’d hit a dead end... supposedly. For 34 years, the case went cold. Then a young agent from the Georgia Bureau of Investigations gave the case a closer look.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“A brutal lynching. An indifferent police force. A 34-year wait for justice.” by Wesley Lowery for GQ
“In the cold dark night” episode of 20/20
“The hate crime solved after 34 years,” by Natasha Frost for History.com
“Two indicted in 1983 Georgia killing,” by Nelson Helm for the Atlanta Journal Constitution
“Five things to know about the Spalding trial in the murder of man dragged behind pick up truck,” by Christian Boone for the Atlanta Journal Constitution

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Over the Edge” episode Dateline 
“Harold Henthorn” chillingcrimes.com
“Black Widower: How One Man Allegedly Murdered Two Wives” by Caleb Hannan, Rolling Stone
“Harold Henthorn’s wife died in a freak accident. When his second wife died police had questions.” by Gemma Bath, MamaMia
“The unusual deaths of the two Mrs. Henthorns” CBS News
“Tip leads reporter to story of mysterious deaths” CBS News
“‘Lethal love’: Harold Henthorn had two wives. Both died in bizarre, brutal ways.” by Michael E. Miller, The Washington Post
“United States of America v. Harold Arthur Henthorn” findlaw.com

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Oct 27, 2021
192: A Wild Robbery and the Honeymoon from Hell
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Marjorie Jackson was a multi-millionaire who didn’t trust banks. So, when she discovered that a high ranking bank employee had stolen from her, she took action. Over the course of four months, she showed up at the bank with a suitcase or a couple of grocery bags and made massive cash withdrawals. She took out millions of dollars and hid the money in her modest Indianapolis home. People worried about Marjorie. It didn’t seem safe for a 66-year-old woman to live alone, surrounded by millions of dollars in cash. It wasn’t.

Then Brandi tells us about a pair of newlyweds whose honeymoon ended in murder. Anni Hindocha and Shrien Dewani were a beautiful couple. They married at Lake Powai near Mumbai, India, and afterward, went on a whirlwind honeymoon to South Africa. They started their trip with a few nights at Kruger National Park, followed by a trip to Cape Town. Once they got there, they met a driver named Zola Tongo. He told the couple he’d be their tour guide. On the ride back from dinner one night, two men hijacked the car.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Notorious 92: Indiana’s Most Heinous Murders in all 92 counties,” by Andrew E Stoner
“Banker testifies in heiress’ murder,” by Kristie Hill for the Associated Press
“Alleged bandit gang activities taken up,” The Indianapolis News, November 30, 1931
“F. Lee Bailey told Willard, to bury cash, witnesses say,” by R. Joseph Gelarden for the Indianapolis Star, December 3, 1977
“Robinson innocent of Jackson slaying; guilty on other counts,” by Carolyn Pickering for the Indianapolis Star, April 25, 1978
“Robinson’s defense brief in murder trial,” The Indianapolis Star, April 23, 1978
“Missing millions and the murder of grocery heiress Marjorie Jackson,” by Dawn Mitchell for the Indianapolis Star
“Murdered heiress, missing millions an enduring Indiana mystery,” by Tim Evans for the Indianapolis Star
“Marjorie Jackson Murder Case,” Encyclopedia of Indianapolis
“Was FBI agent involved in missing fortune of murdered heiress?” by Mia De Graaf for the Daily Mail

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Honeymoon Murder” by Joshua Hammer, The Atavist Magazine
“Anni Dewani” chillingcrimes.com
“Honeymoon Murder: Timeline of events for Shrien Dewani” BBC.com
“Dewani murder case: How grieving husband became suspect” by Steven Morris, David Smith, and Alex Duval Smith, The Guardian
“Dewani trial: what really happened and how did police get it so wrong?” by Dan Newling, The Guardian
“Murder of Anni Dewani” wikipedia.org

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Oct 20, 2021
191: Bresha Meadows & Nailah Franklin
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Bresha Meadows had run out of options. She’d tried talking to the police. She’d tried running away from home. She tried everything she could think of to get away from her abusive father. Nothing seemed to work. So, in July of 2016, when she was 14 years old, Bresha took her father’s gun and killed him in his sleep. 

Then Kristin tells us about Nailah Franklin, a pharmaceutical sales rep who seemed to be living the good life. She had a big, loving family, close friends, and a new relationship with a handsome lawyer. There was just one thing that wasn’t right -- her douchebag ex-boyfriend, Reginald Potts. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Smoke and Mirrors,” episode of Dateline
“Man Convicted in 2007 Killing of Pharmaceutical Sales Rep Nailah Franklin Sentenced to Life in Prison,” by Charlie Wojciechowski for NBC Chicago
“Reginald Potts guilty of murder in 2007 death of Nailah Franklin,” by Michelle Gallardo Rob Elgas for ABC News
“Woman called Reginald Potts 'pathological' in email before killing,” by Steve Schmadeke for the Chicago Tribune
“Remembering Nailah Franklin,” by Dawn Turner for the Chicago Tribune
“Nailah Franklin’s Boyfriend Says He Sent Her An Email Asking: ‘Are You Alive?’” CBS Chicago
“Sentencing begins for man in 2007 murder of Nailah Franklin,” by Steve Schmadeke for the Chicago Tribune
“Reginald Potts found guilty of killing Nailah Franklin,” Fox 32 Chicago
“After wrenching week of hearings, judge to sentence Franklin’s killer,” by Steve Schmadeke for the Chicago Tribune
“Testimony concludes in trial of man charged with killing Nailah Franklin,” CBS Chicago
“Reginald Potts Sentenced To Life In Prison For Murder Of Nailah Franklin,” CBS CHicago

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Bresha Meadows Thought You’d Understand” by Melissa Jeltsen, The Huffington Post
“Bresha Meadows' cousin says he also was abused by Jonathan Meadows” by Andrea Simakis, The Plain Dealer
“Murder or self defense? Bresha Meadows accused of killing father” by John Caniglia, The Plain Dealer
“Bresha Meadows Returns Home After Collective Organizing Efforts” by Mariame Kaba and Colby Lenz, TeenVogue
“Who is Bresha Meadows? 16-year-old, who killed her allegedly abusive father, released from custody” by Najja Parker, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
“Bresha Meadows, Ohio Teenager Who Fatally Shot Her Father, Accepts Plea Deal” by Jonah Engel Bromwich, The New York Times
“Alumni Story: CMLaw HOF Member And Friedman Reflects On The Bresha Meadows Case” Cleveland-Marshall College of Law


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Oct 13, 2021
190: A Mighty Slut Shaming & Brothers
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T’was the fall of 1882, and Nicholas Dukes had a lot going for him. He was a prominent attorney. He’d just been elected to the Pennsylvania House of Representatives. To top it all off, he was engaged to Lizzie Nutt. Lizzie came from a prominent family and was hot as hell. But as Nicholas and Lizzie got to know one another better, Nicholas became concerned. She was flirty. Forward. It was possible she wasn’t a virgin! (Neither was he, but that didn’t matter.) Nicholas was disgusted to find himself engaged to a woman who wanted to have sex with him. So he told her father. 

On the afternoon of October 2, 1998, 15-year-old Zach Witman called the police. He’d just discovered his 13-year-old brother, Greg, dead in their home. Zach told the dispatcher, “I came downstairs, and the door was cracked and he was lying there. Just lying there! Gone! Gone! Gone! Gone! Why? Why? Why?” Greg had been stabbed multiple times -- to the point of near decapitation. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Demon in a bottle: the Dukes/Nutt affair,” by Paul Slade for PlanetSlade 
“An honorable vengeance: the Dukes-Nutt saga,” developed by Rachel Zajac for the Uniontown Public Library 
“A matter of honor,” Murder by Gaslight
“19th century Dukes-Nutt murder scandal subject of new exhibit and book,” by Frances Borsodi for the Herald Standard

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Witmans” documentary
“Commonwealth v. Witman” findlaw.com
“Gregory fought for life” by Rick Lee and Teresa Ann Boeckel, York Daily Record
“In the jurors’ hands” by Rick Lee and Teresa Ann Boeckel, York Daily Record
“I killed my brother: Zachary Witman admits to gruesome 1998 murder; parole now possible” WITF.org
“The Untold Truth Of The Witman Murder Case” by Aimee Lamoureux, grunge.com


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Oct 06, 2021
189: The Secret Serial Killer & a Mother
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It was the summer of 2004, and Charlie and Teri Brandt needed to get someplace safe. With Hurricane Ivan headed for their home in Big Pine Key, the couple went to Orlando to stay with their niece, Michelle Jones. Michelle was thrilled to have them, but toward what should have been the end of their visit, she stopped returning phone calls. So did Teri and Charlie. Finally, one of Michelle’s friends went to the house to check on everyone. She was horrified by what she discovered.

Then Kristin tells us about the evening of February 17, 2007. Melissa Lucio was in a panic. Her two-year-old daughter Mariah had fallen asleep, but wasn’t waking up. Paramedics arrived at Lucio’s apartment, and attempted to revive the little girl. But she remained unresponsive. As moments ticked by, the paramedics grew more and more concerned. The girl’s body was covered in bruises. It looked like she’d been badly beaten. Melissa’s other children told the EMT’s that Mariah had recently fallen down the stairs, but medical personnel feared something much more sinister had occurred. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
The documentary, “State of Texas vs. Melissa”
Wrongful Conviction podcast episode, “Melissa Lucio”
“Divided Federal Appeals Court Reinstates Death Sentence for Texas Mother of Child Who May Have Died in Accidental Fall,” Death Penalty Information Center
“Did Melissa Lucio, the First Hispanic Woman on Death Row in Texas, Kill Her Daughter? An Uneven New Documentary Raises More Questions Than Answers.” by Roxanna Asgarian for Texas Monthly
“Doctor testifies abuse was ‘worst’ he’s seen,” by Allen Essex for the Valley Morning Star
“Mother found guilty of murder,” by Allen Essex for the Valley Morning Star
“Detective testifies in Lucio trial,” by Allen Essex for the Valley Morning Star

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Deadly Obsession” episode 48 Hours
“Charlie Brandt Killed His Mom At 13 — Then Walked Free To Butcher His Wife As An Adult” by William DeLong, allthatsinteresting.com
“Deadly rage brewed in ‘quiet kid’” by Robert Perez and Melissa Harris, The Orlando Sentinel
“Killer tied to ’89 death—wife suspected him all along” by Gary Taylor, The Orlando Sentinel

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 25+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  
Sep 29, 2021
188: The Mysterious Death of Greg Fleniken & a Love Triangle
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When Detective Scott Apple entered room 348 of the MCM Elegante Hotel, he didn’t think he had a mystery on his hands. A man named Greg Fleniken lay dead on the floor. The hotel room showed no signs of a struggle. Greg’s wallet contained more than $1,000. His body showed no obvious signs of trauma. Clearly, he hadn’t been the victim of a robbery or foul play. It seemed a lifetime of smoking had caught up with him. But an autopsy revealed otherwise.

Then Brandi tells us about a love triangle. Rachel Wade and Sarah Ludemann were in love with the same guy -- Josh Camacho. But rather than turn their anger toward the guy who was playing them both, Rachel and Sarah battled one another. Sarah showed up at Rachel’s work to harass her. They left each other nasty voicemails. Then, on the evening of April 14, 2009, Rachel headed over to an ex-boyfriend’s house. But before she left, she tucked a knife into her purse. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“The Body in Room 348” by Mark Bowden for Vanity Fair
“I know what you did,” episode of 20/20
“Trial nixed in civil suit over notorious death at MCM Elegante Hotel,” by David Yates for the Southeast Texas Record
“Wife of man found dead at MCM Elegante proceeds with lawsuit,” by Sarah Moore for the Beaumont Enterprise
“Update: Lance Mueller gets 10 year prison sentence for shooting,” The Chippewa Herald

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“One teen boy, two teen girls and homicide” by Lane DeGregory, Tampa Bay Times
“Rachel Wade Sentenced: Teenage Love Triangle Murderer Gets 27 Years for Death of Sarah Ludemann” by Kevin Hayes, CBS News
“Teen love triangle: Street fight over boyfriend ends in death” True Crime Daily
“Rachel Wade” episode Snapped
“Woman found guilty in death of love rival” by Mark Douglas, The Tampa Tribune
“Rachel Wade” wikipedia.org


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Sep 22, 2021
187: What are the chances??
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Candy Williams couldn’t believe her luck. She’d been out on the beach in late 2005, when a handsome stranger approached her. His name was Jovan Collier. The pair quickly hit it off. Jovan was charming and funny -- and not at all afraid of commitment. Three months later, Candy and Jovan were living together and planning to get married. But as Candy later discovered, there was quite a bit she didn’t know about Jovan. The least of which was his actual name. 

Then Kristin tells us about Sharee and Warren Smith, who were living quiet lives in Birmingham, raising their young son. One day, an older man knocked on their door. He told Sharee that he was considering moving in next door. When Sharee asked him why he was moving, he told her that his neighbors were too loud. He suspected they were drug dealers. Sharee felt sorry for the old man. A few weeks later, the man -- Harry Street -- moved in next door with his wife and their young daughter. Pretty quickly, he proved to be a nightmare neighbor.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
An episode of Nightmare Neighbour Next Door (season four, episode 5)
“The night Barry Williams killed five people after neighbour dispute over noise,” by Nick McCarthy for the Birmingham Mail
“Shooting spree killer Harry Street detained over bomb and weapons,” BBC
“Harry Street: 1978 West Bromwich killings remembered,” BBC
“Mass killer Harry Street detained indefinitely over weapons charges,” The Guardian
“Harry Street: Timeline of a serial killer,” Birmingham Mail

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“A Teen Killer’s Dark Secret” by Bruce Vielmetti, The Journal Sentinel
“Teen’s Dark Secret: He Murdered His Family” by Ashley Bridges and Miguel Sancho
“From Teen Killer to Obsessive Stalker: How a boy who slayed 3 members of his family ended u behind bars 25 years later” The Daily Mail
“Man who slaughtered family 30 years ago arrested in Texas for harassing ex-fiancee who learned of his past” by Sasha Goldstein, New York Daily News
“Convicted killer pleads guilty to harassing 3 McLennan County women” by Tommy Witherspoon, Waco Tribune-Herald

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 25+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  
Sep 15, 2021
186: The Murder of Robert Schwartz & a Mystery in Miami
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When a utility worker came across Inna Budnytska, he initially thought she was dead. She’d been severely beaten and abandoned in a vacant lot in Miami. She was unconscious, and remained in that state until a team at Jackson Memorial Hospital nursed her back to health. The next day, when Inna felt well enough to communicate with police, she told them her name and asked to speak with her attorney. That struck detectives as odd. Suspicious, even. But the truth was that Inna had just survived a terrible crime. She was alone in America, and her attorney was one of the few people she knew.   

Then Brandi tells us about Robert Schwartz, a celebrated scientist and founding member of the Virginia Biotechnology Association. Robert’s colleagues began to worry about him when he didn’t show up for work one Monday morning in December of 2001. A neighbor came to check on Robert in his rural home, and discovered a grizzly scene. Robert had been murdered two days earlier, just as he was preparing to sit down to eat dinner. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“The Case of the Vanishing Blonde,” by Mark Bowden for Vanity Fair
“The Woman in the Suitcase,” episode of 20/20
“Serial rapist was on the loose for years before an abandoned suitcase put a stop to his crimes,” by Chris Kilmer and Allie Yang for ABC News
“‘Suitcase rapist pleads guilty in New Orleans and sentenced to 45 years,” by Jim Mustian for The New Orleans Advocate

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Clara Schwartz” episode Snapped
“Clara Schwartz: A Deadly Game” by Katherine Ramsland, The Crime Library
“Schwartz v. Commonwealth” findlaw.com
“Fantasy, reality collide at murder trial” by Jon Echtenkamp, The Fairfax Times
“Clara Jane Schwartz” murderpedia.org

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Sep 08, 2021
185: The Clinton 12 & the Murder of Adrianne Reynolds
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Adrianne Reynolds had a tumultuous childhood. But when she turned 16, she moved to East Moline, Illinois to live with her adoptive father and stepmother, and it seemed that Adrianne was on steady ground. She began working toward her GED at Black Hawk College Outreach Center, got a job at a fast food chain, and did chores around the house. She even made a few friends. At least, she thought they were her friends.

Then Kristin tells us about the first court-ordered integration of a public school in the South. Black students had limited options in Clifton, Tennessee. The local school for black students lacked the resources of the white students’ public school. Plus, it only taught children through the eighth grade. If a black student in Clifton wanted to attend middle or high school, they had to be bussed to a school in Knoxville. On top of that, their parents had to pay tuition. To add insult to injury, most of the black folks in Clifton lived just a few yards away from Clifton High School. So, in 1950, a brave group of black students and their families fought the local school board for their right to equal education.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
The documentary, “The Clinton 12”
“The Clinton Desegregation Crisis,” Blackpast.org
“Clinton Desegregation Crisis,” by Carroll Van West for Tennessee Encyclopedia
“The Clinton High School Desegregation Case,” by Linda T. Wynn for the Nashville Conference on African American History and Culture
“Forgotten Heroes: Lessons from School Integration in a Small Southern Community,” by Whitney Elizabeth Cate for East Tennessee State University

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Sarah Kolb” episode Snapped
“Circle of Friends” episode Dateline
“Sarah Kolb Part 1” True Crime Family: Killer Profile, podcast episode
“Sarah Kolb Part 2” True Crime Family: Killer Profile, podcast episode
“Sarah Anne Kolb” murderpedia.org

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Sep 01, 2021
184: 2002!
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Lydia Fairchild was in a tight spot, financially. She had two young children, was pregnant with a third, and she was unemployed. So she applied for welfare. As part of Washington state’s application process, she and the children’s father both submitted DNA samples to confirm that they were the children’s biological parents. But the DNA tests revealed shocking news. She was not the children’s mother.

Then Brandi tells us about a murder that hit close to home. It was the spring of 2002, and Amanda Sharp and her friend Kevin Gunby didn’t want to go to school. So the pair skipped class and headed over to Kevin’s house. Hours later, when their friend Brad Jaynes showed up at Kevin’s house, Kevin delivered startling news. He told Brad that he’d killed Amanda. Then he showed him her body. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
The documentary, “The Twin Inside Me” 
“She’s her own twin,” from ABC News
“The You in Me,” by Sam Kean for Psychology Today
“The case of Lydia Fairchild and her chimerism,” by Alexis Darby for The Embryo Project Encyclopedia

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“SM North students trying to cope with classmate’s death” by Kati Jividen, The Kansas City Star
“Slain girl remembered as creative, adventurous” by Richard Espinoza and Kati Jividen, The Kansas City Star
“Trial date set for teen in slaying of girl, 17” by Tony Rizzo, The Kansas City Star
“Teenager is convicted of first degree murder” by Tony Rizzo, The Kansas City Star
“Fairway man gets life sentence for strangling girlfriend” by Tony Rizzo, The Kansas City Star
“State v. Gunby” findlaw.com

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Aug 25, 2021
183: Exonerations!
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Kathy Sigman and Maria Ridulph were best friends. The little girls played together constantly, and the evening of December 3, 1957, was no exception. But that evening, a young man approached them. He seemed friendly. He offered them piggyback rides and asked them about dolls. He told them his name was Johnny, and that he wasn’t married. At one point, Kathy excused herself to get a pair of mittens. But when she came back outside, Maria was missing, and Johnny was nowhere to be found.

Then Kristin tells us about a college student in Oklahoma, who woke up to a loud thump. The woman sat in bed for a while, listening for more strange sounds. When she didn’t hear any, she got up to go to the bathroom. That’s when she saw a man standing at the end of her hallway. She flipped on the lights, but the man vanished behind a corner, only to reemerge seconds later. The man sexually assaulted her, then left out the front door. Later, when the woman called police, they showed her two line-ups. Both line ups included an innocent man named Thomas Webb. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“The Wrong Man” by Jon Schuppe for NBC News
The book “Rectify: A story of healing and redemption after wrongful conviction,” By Laura Bazelon
“Wrongfully convicted man gets $175,000 for 13 years in prison,” by Jon Schuppe for NBC News
“Rape suspect walks free after innocent man spends 14 years in prison,” by Dallas Franklin for kfor.com
“Thomas Webb, III” entry on The National Registry of Exonerations

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
"Taken: The Coldest Case Ever Solved” by Ann O’Neill, CNN
“JUSTICE STORY: The coldest case, ‘The Piggyback Kidnap’” by Mara Bovsun, New York Daily News
“Man cleared in 1957 slaying of Sycamore girl wins $300K settlement from Seattle. Cops there arrested him after DeKalb County reopened case.” Associated Press
“Man wrongly convicted in 1957 Sycamore killing of 7-year-old declared innocent by judge” by Clifford Ward, Chicago Tribune
“Murder of Maria Ridulph” wikipedia.org


YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 25+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  

Aug 18, 2021
182: Kidnappings!
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When he was working as a manager at Imo’s Pizza, Michael Devlin put up a pretty good front. He was personable. Well read. Friendly. But back at his apartment, Michael was a different man. He was rude and quiet. His son, Shawn, appeared to have adopted Michael’s habits. Neighbors said they never saw Shawn smile. But what they didn’t know was that Shawn wasn’t really Michael’s son. His name wasn’t even Shawn Devlin. It was Shawn Hornbeck. But the truth wouldn’t come out until much later, when another boy, Ben Ownby, went missing. 

Then Brandi tells us about a kidnapping that shook Long Island, New York. It was July 4, 1956. Betty Weinberger’s one-month-old infant, Peter, fell asleep in his carriage on the patio. As the little boy slept, Betty went inside the house. When she came back out a few minutes later, her baby boy was gone. Betty’s husband later found a ransom note at the scene. In it, the kidnapper demanded $2,000 in exchange for the baby. The kidnapper warned the Weinbergers not to involve the police, but the couple felt they had no choice. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Monster next door?” by Malcolm Gay for the Riverfront Times
“One search, two boys found: The Missouri miracle 14 years ago,” by Tim O’Neil for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch
“Michael Devlin stabbed in prison with ‘ice pick,’” by Todd Frankel for the St. Louis Post-Dispatch
“I am still too scared to tell my mom and dad, ‘kidnap’ creep admits,” by Susannah Cahalan for the New York Post
“Shawn Hornbeck,” Crime Museum
“MIchael J. Devlin,” entry on Wikipedia

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Held for Ransom” by Michael Dorman
“Mark of a Murderer” by Mike McAlary, Esquire
“JUSTICE STORY: Tragic kidnapping of Long Island infant shattered two young families” by Robert Dominguez, New York Daily News
“Weinberger Kidnapping” FBI.gov
“Vincent LaMarca” wikipedia.org

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 19+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  
Aug 11, 2021
181: Sh*tbags!
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This episode nearly killed us. ….Or was it the Oreos, Pringles and alcohol that nearly killed us? 

When we sat down to record this episode a *second time,* we about lost our minds at the thought of talking about these two shit bags again. But ya girls persevered, technology issues and tummy troubles be damned! 

Brandi started us off with the story of Jacque Waller. Jacque worked her ass off. As a mom of triplets, she also juggled a demanding career. But her husband, Clay Waller, didn’t pull his weight. He couldn’t hold a steady job, and he rarely lifted a finger with the kids. If that imbalance wasn’t bad enough, Clay then became abusive. When Jacque told him she’d had enough, he threatened her life. 

Then Kristin tells us about Donnah Winger, who was coming home from a trip to Florida with her infant daughter, Bailey. Donnah’s parents had arranged for Donnah and Bailey to be picked up from the airport and driven the two hours back to their home. It seemed like a perfect plan, but as soon as the driver started talking, Donnah knew she was in for a rough time. The man said he had a demon in his head. Then he invited Donnah to an orgy. She was deeply disturbed. When she got home, she told her husband Mark Winger about the driver, and he insisted that she file a complaint. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
An episode of 20/20 titled, “The Perfect Lie”
“Jailed killer plotted to kill 5 more,” by Wanda DeMarzo for the Miami Herald
“Man accused of staging 2 killings,” the Associated Press
“Man gets life sentence in slaying of wife, shuttle bus driver,” the Associated Press for the St Louis Post-Dispatch
“Tale of grisly double murder will be retold,” by Wanda DeMarzo for The Miami Herald
“Mark Winger,” entry on Wikipedia

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Devil’s Island: The Missouri Murder of Jacque Waller” episode Crime Watch Daily
“Jacque Waller” chillingcrimes.com
“Jacque’s sister asks Clay Waller: Does she haunt you?” by Heartland News, KFVS12 News
“United States v. Waller” findlaw.com

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 20+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  
Aug 04, 2021
180: Candy Montgomery & Ruth Snyder
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Candy Montgomery was bored. Her life wasn’t half bad. She was living in her dream home in the outskirts of Dallas, she had two kids, and a husband who made bank at Texas Instruments. Plus, she had a church community that she loved. But Candy wanted more. She wanted fireworks. More specifically, she wanted really good sex. Then one day, during a church volleyball game, she collided into her friend’s husband, Allan Gore. In doing so, Candy made a discovery. Allan smelled sexy. 

Then Brandi tells us about an old timey murder. Ruth Brown Snyder’s relationship with Albert Snyder got off to a weird start. Shortly after berating her over the phone, Albert found himself charmed by Ruth’s sweet, sincere apology. He asked if he could meet her so that he could apologize for his temper. Soon, he met Ruth and turned on the charm.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Love and death in silicon prairie,” by Jim Atkinson and John Bloom for Texas Monthly 
“Some in Wylie don’t know of 1980 ax slaying; others can’t forget,” by Jeffrey Weiss for The Dallas Morning News
“Anniversary of an ax murder,” by Sonia Duggan for In and Around magazine
“Wylie ax slaying defendant acquitted,” by Frank Trejo and Michelle Scott for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram
“The loving Christian mom who became an axe murderer,” by Erica Tempesta for The Daily Mail

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Murder of Albert Snyder” by Denise Noe, The Crime Library
“The 1927 Murder That Became a Media Circus—And a Famous Movie” by Becky Little, history.com
“The Shocking Story Behind This Photo Of Ruth Snyder’s Execution” by Katie Serena, allthatsinteresting.com
“Ruth Snyder-Judd Gray Trial: 1927” encyclopedia.com
“Ruth Snyder” wikipedia.org


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Jul 28, 2021
179: A Mother-Daughter Bond & A Speech
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Steven Robards was in rough shape. He’d been perfectly fine just hours earlier, but suddenly, the 38-year-old man’s arms and legs went stiff. He couldn’t swallow. His mouth foamed. By the time paramedics arrived at Steven’s apartment, there was little they could do. Steven died, apparently from a heart attack. For his daughter, Dorothy Marie Robards, his death was yet another tragedy in her already tumultuous life. 

Then Kristin tells us about a high school student named Matthew Fraser, who caused a stir when he gave a hilarious, innuendo-laced speech to his fellow Bethel High School students. During a school assembly with nearly 600 students present, Matthew nominated his friend for student body vice president by telling them that his friend was “rock hard -- he’s firm in his pants, he’s firm in his shirt, his character is firm -- but most of all, his belief in you, the students of Bethel, is firm.” The school administrators were not amused.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Bethel School District v. Fraser,” FamousTrials.org
“FIRE Starters: Bethel School District v. Fraser,” by Foundation for Individual Rights in Education on YouTube
“Bethel School District v. Fraser,” entry on Wikipedia
“Matthew Fraser speaks out on 15-year-old supreme court free speech decision,” by David Hudson for the Freedom Forum Institute

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Poisoning Daddy” by Skip Hollandsworth, Texas Monthly
“Marie Robards: Deadly Daughter” by DeLani R. Bartlette, Medium
“Death Play” episode Forensic Files

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 19+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  
Jul 21, 2021
178: An Old Timey Meghan Markle & A Possession
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Ready for some old timey Meghan Markle vibes? Unfortunately, America has its own homegrown case. Back in the day, the Rhinelander name was synonymous with success. The Rhinelanders were as wealthy as they were well connected. They were American royalty. But the Rhinelander family was rocked by scandal when Leonard “Kip” Rhinelander had the audacity to fall in love with a working class woman of color named Alice Jones. 

Then Brandi tells us a story that, on the surface, seems pretty straightforward. On February 16, 1981, Arne Cheyenne Johnson killed Alan Bono. That can’t be debated. But what can be debated is why Arne killed Alan. According to Arne’s defense attorney, the murder wasn’t Arne’s fault. The devil made him do it.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Rhinelander v Rhinelander: The 1920s Race & Sex Scandal You’ve Never Heard Of,” by Melina Pendulum on YouTube
The Ted Talk, “Challenge your biases, America. Make fairer laws: Angela Onwuachi-Willig at TedxDesMoines”
“When one of New York’s glitterati married a ‘quadroon,’” by Theodore R. Johnson III for NPR
“Love and race caught in the public eye,” by Heidi Ardizzone and Earl Lewis for Notre Dame News
“The Rhinelander Affair,” by Carlyn Beccia for HistoryofYesterday.com
“Leonard “Kip” Rhinelander Trial,” by Barbara Behan for BlackPast.org
“What interracial and gay couples know about passing,” by Angela Onwuachi-Willig for The Atlantic
“Rhinelander v. Rhinelander,” entry on Wikipedia

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“By Demons Possessed” by Lynn Darling, Washington Post
“The Twisted Murder Trial Of Arne Cheyenne Johnson, The Man Who Claimed To Be Possessed By Demons” by Marco Margaritoff, allthatsinteresting.com
“'The Conjuring 3': The True Story Behind 'The Devil Made Me Do It’” by Samuel Spencer, Newsweek
“What Really Happened With Arne Cheyenne Johnson's 1981 'The Devil Made Me Do It' Trial?” by Kevin Dolak, oxygen.com
“Brookfield man sues over 'demon' book” The News-Times
“Trial of Arne Cheyenne Johnson” wikipedia.org

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Jul 14, 2021
177: A Cold Case & A Lover
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Corey Wieneke was popular. He’d been a high school football star, and soon after graduation, he began working in his family’s bar -- Wink’s Bar & Grill. His good looks and gregarious personality made him a well-liked bartender in West Liberty, Iowa. That’s why it was such a shock when, in 1992, Corey was discovered beaten to death in his home. 

Then Kristin tells us about Gerald Gilbert, who was beaten to death with a fire extinguisher in his workplace. Gerald’s murder was so brutal that a doctor later testified that his head nearly exploded. The crime wasn’t tough to solve. Soon after Gerald’s body was discovered, his ex-wife Ann Huxley, arrived at the scene. When she heard about the crime, she handed police a list of possible suspects.  

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
An episode of Vengeance: Killer Lovers titled, “Secret Lives and Alibis”
“Salesman clubbed to death,” for the Crewe Chronicle

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Black Candle Confession” episode Dateline
“Annette Cahill” episode Snapped
“Corey Wieneke” chillingcrimes.com
“Corey Lee Wieneke” iowacoldcases.org
“Woman Convicted In Lover’s Baseball Bat Beating 27 Years After His Murder” by Benjamin H. Smith, Oxygen
 
YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 19+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  


Jul 07, 2021
176: Disappearance of Kyron Horman & a Suicide Helper
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Nadia Kajouji was having a rough time. It was her first year of college, and she was suffering from depression. Feeling isolated, Nadia turned to an online forum where she found people struggling with suicidal thoughts. It didn’t take long for Nadia to make a new friend -- someone who understood what she was going through. The woman said her name was Cami. She was 31, a registered nurse, and living in Minneapolis. She claimed that she, too, was having suicidal thoughts. Then she suggested that she and Nadia make a suicide pact. 

Then Brandi tells us about the disappearance of Kyron Horman. To this day, what happened to little Kyron Horman remains unknown. What we do know is that on June 4, 2010, his stepmom Terri dropped him off at Skyline Elementary School, just in time for the science fair. She took a photo of Kyron in front of his poster, and then she says she watched him walk down the hall to class. But no one ever saw him in class. And despite the photo, no one remembered seeing him at the science fair, either. It was as if he’d vanished into thin air.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
The “Killer Chatroom” episode of Web of Lies
“Unmasking the Faribault, Minn., suicide nurse” Grand Forks Herald
“Inside the tragic death of Nadia Kajouji: A teen pushed to suicide by an online predator,” by Patrick Gomez for People.com
“Man who aided Ont. teen’s suicide gets year in jail,” CBC
“Former nurse helped instruct man on how to commit suicide, court rules,” Associated Press
“William Francis Melchert-Dinkel,” entry on Wikipedia

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“A Betrayal of Trust: Where is Kyron Horman?” by Jenn Baxter, Medium
“Kyron Horman, missing 10 years: A timeline” by Lizzy Acker, The Oregonian
“Kryron Richard Horman” The Charley Project
“Landscaper wore wire, asked Terri Horman for $10,000 in murder-for-hire plot, sources say” by Maxine Bernstein, The Oregonian
“10 Years Later: Case of Missing Boy Kyron Horman Featured in TV Special on Investigation Discovery” by People Staff, People
“Disappearance of Kyron Horman: wikipedia.org
 
 
 YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 19+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  

Jun 02, 2021
175: A Cult & the Murder of Doris Angleton
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Sherry Shriner had a wacky belief: That alien lizards had come to Earth, shape shifted into human form, and were conspiring to put the antichrist in power. Sherry shared this belief online, and incredibly, her views gained traction. Soon, thousands of people came to believe the “prophet” Sherry Shriner’s teachings. Steven Mineo and his girlfriend Barbara Rogers were two of Sherry’s loyal followers. But when Barbara made a Facebook post about steak tartare, their online community turned on them.

Then Kristin tells us about the Angleton family. The Angletons had it all. They lived in an affluent area of Houston, Texas. They belonged to the best country club. They hobnobbed with all the right people. Bob Angleton worked long hours as a bookie. His hard work meant big money. But the money couldn’t make up for the problems in Bob and Doris’ marriage. So in February of 1997, Doris asked Bob for a divorce. Two months later, police discovered Doris Angleton dead in her home.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
An episode of The Dead Wives Club titled, “The Bookie’s Wife”
“The Bookmaker’s Wife,” by Skip Hollandsworth for Texas Monthly 
An episode of Power Privilege and Justice titled, “The Murder of Doris Angleton” 
“Doris Angleton” entry on Wikipedia

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Online Alien Reptiles” episode Deadly Cults
“Man's Online Feud With Reptile-Fearing Cult Ends In Bizarre Murder” by Erik Hawkins, Oxygen
“Reptile Cult Feud Ends in Death” by Kelly Weill, The Daily Beast
“It looked like a simple domestic murder. Then police learned about the alien reptile cult.” by Kyle Swenson, The Washington Post
“Homicide Trial: Woman Claims Online Alien Cult Led to Deadly Shooting” by Carmella Mataloni, WNEP16 News
“Tobyhanna woman convicted in cult-related slaying” The Pocono Record
“She killed her boyfriend because of an alien cult – and was sentenced to up to 40 years” by Ryan W. Miller, USA Today
“Barbara Rogers Loses Murder Appeal” by Alberto Luperon, LawandCrime.com
 
 
YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 19+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  
May 26, 2021
174: A Determined Mother
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Patrick Smith called 911, distraught. He told the dispatcher that his wife, Amanda, had just shot herself in the head. When police arrived on the scene, they found gun cleaning equipment near the bed. The room was bloody, but Patrick wasn’t. He told the police what happened that night, but hours later, his story changed. With each iteration, the story got more strange. And Amanda’s mom, Judith Binnie, grew suspicious.

Kristin felt like poo poo butter this week, so she didn’t do a case! By the way, you’ve heard the term poo poo butter before, right?

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Killer Fetish” episode Accident, Suicide, or Murder
“'I Would Go After Him With My Dying Breath': Mom Gets Justice For Daughter In Suicide-Turned-Murder Case” by Erik Hawkins, Oxygen
“Patrick Smith v The State of Texas” justia.com
“Jury learns more of sex than killing” by Dave Harmon, Austin American-Statesman
“A daughter’s death, a family’s quest” by Dave Harmon, Austin American-Statesman
“Patrick Smith’s murder trial goes to jury” by Dave Harmon, Austin American-Statesman
 
 YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 19+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  

May 19, 2021
173: The Kidnapping of Zephany Nurse & the Dionne Quintuplets
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Celeste lay in her hospital bed, drifting in and out of sleep. Her newborn baby, Zephany, lay sleeping in a cot next to her. At some point, Celeste remembers a woman in a nurse’s uniform coming in to comfort her baby. Celeste didn’t think much of it. She fell back asleep. But when she woke up, the hospital staff was alarmed. Baby Zephany was missing. 

Then Kristin tells us about five little girls who became a tourist attraction. In 1934, news of the Dionne Quintuplets spread worldwide. People couldn’t believe it. Five beautiful, identical little girls had been born to surprised parents in Ontario. Thousands of people showed up outside the Dionne’s farmhouse to get a look at the girls. But the girls’ parents, Elzire and Oliva, were torn. They weren’t sure how they could afford to care for their premature newborns, but they didn’t want to exploit them, either.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“The Dionne quintuplets: The exploitation of five girls raised in a baby zoo,” by Gillian Brockwell for the Washington Post 
“BBC1 Miracle Babies - The Story of the Dionne Quintuplets” on YouTube
“The story of the Dionne Quintuplets is a cautionary tale for the age of ‘kidfluencers,’” by Shelley Wood for Time Magazine
“The dark side of the famous five,” by Ian Parker for the Independent
“The babies of Quintland now: Broke, and bitter,” by Anthony Depalma for the New York Times
“Dionne Quintuplets” entry on Wikipedia 

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“'The selfie that revealed I was a stolen baby’” by Sarah Mcdermott, BBC News
“Search for daughter never-ending” by Bianca Capazorio and Leila Samodien, IOL
“How a Teen Girl Learned She Was Abducted As a Baby” by Catie L’Heureux, The Cut
“I’m broken, says man who raised Zephany Nurse” by Catherine Rice, IOL
“In 2015, Miché met a girl who looked just like her. She had been abducted 17 years earlier.” by Billi Fitzsimmons, MamaMia
“Celeste and Morné Nurse back together five years after finding long-lost daughter” by Daily Voice, IOL
“My biological dad is a 'lost cause', Zephany Nurse reveals in new book” by Dave Chambers, Times Live
“Zephany Nurse kidnapper jailed for 10 years in South Africa” by Jason Burke, The Guardian
 
 YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 19+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  

May 12, 2021
172: The Murder Of Botham Jean & A Fire
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Botham Jean had been looking forward to a quiet night at home. The 26-year-old accountant made himself a bowl of ice cream and settled into his comfy leather couch, ready to watch some football. But Botham didn’t get a quiet night at home. Instead, an off duty police officer named Amber Guyger entered his apartment. She shot twice. Judging by the trajectory of the bullet that killed Botham, he was either in the process of getting up or cowering when Amber shot him. When Amber called 911, she was frantic. “I thought it was my apartment. I thought it was my apartment,” she said.  

Then Brandi tells us about a woman everyone pitied. Luz Cuevas couldn’t seem to accept that her infant daughter, Delimar Vera, had died in a house fire. She told anyone who would listen that her daughter was still alive. But that was nuts. Everyone knew that the ten-day-old little girl was dead. Years passed, but Luz didn’t waver. She was certain that her daughter was alive. She just had to find her. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“The Ballad of Botham Jean” episode of Impact of Murder 
“Amber Guyger is sentenced to 10 years for the murder of Botham Jean,” by Marina Trahan Martinez, Sarah Mervosh and John Eligon for the New York Times
“Amber Guyger trial: ‘I shot an innocent man,’ ex-officer says,” by Marina Trahan Martinez and Sarah Mervosh for the New York Times
“Trial opens for former officer who killed unarmed black man in his apartment,” by Marina Trahan Martinez and Manny Fernandez for the New York Times
“Ex-Dallas officer who killed man in his own apartment is found guilty of murder,” by Bobby Allyn for NPR
“Brandt Jean’s act of grace toward his brother’s killer sparks a debate over forgiving,” by Bill Chappell and Richard Gonzaels for NPR
“Murder of Botham Jean,” entry on wikipedia

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Delimar Vera” episode Crimelines Podcast
“I believe in my heart she’ll accept me” by Audrey Gillan, The Guardian
“Mom Surrenders” by Jim Walsh and Jason Nark, The Courier-Post
“Girl Found and Woman Held After a Ruse Lasting Years” by Jason George, The New York Times
“No Contest Plea To Kidnapping Newborn In 1997” by Natalie Pompilio
“Her Side of the Story” by Nicole Weisensee Egan, Philadelphia Daily News
 
 YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 19+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  
May 05, 2021
171: An Intruder & A Real Estate Agent
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Julene Simko called 911 in a panic. She’d just discovered her husband dead in their bed. He’d been shot in the back of the head by an intruder. She’d already grabbed a gun and fired two shots to scare off the attacker, but she feared the person was still in the house. But who could the intruder be? Julene and Jeremy’s home in rural Vermilion, Ohio, was remarkably secure. They had multiple guard dogs, a security system, and plenty of guns. Who could have gotten past all those safeguards and murdered Jeremy Simko?

Then Kristin tells us about real estate agent Beverly Carter. In 2014, Beverly was the top selling and listing agent for Crye Leike Realtors. The previous year, she’d sold $12 million in real estate -- no small feat in central Arkansas. So when a man calling himself Steven Adams reached out to her about buying a new house, Beverly was all ears. Steven said that he and his wife, Crystal, were relocating to the area. They were cash buyers. That meant a quick sale for Beverly. But Beverly was cautious. She corresponded with Steven by phone and email for a few weeks. When he asked to meet her out at a rural property, she insisted that his wife Crystal meet them there, too. Crystal got on the phone and assured Beverly she’d be there. But when Beverly arrived at the home, Crystal was nowhere to be found.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
A Dateline episode, titled, “The Client”
A Web of Lies episode, titled, “Final Sale”
“Realtor Murder,” by Arkansas Online, compiled from Arkansas Democrat-Gazette Archives
“The Beverly Carter Story,” by Stewart Title on YouTube

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Julene Simko” episode, Snapped
“Vemilion woman goes on trial in 2009 murder” by Keith Reynolds, The Morning Journal
“Julene Simko won’t look at photos of husband’s body during murder trial” by Keith Reynolds, The Morning Journal
“No physical evidence Vermilion woman performed CPR on dying husband, ex-Lorain County Coroner says” by Keith Reynolds, The Morning Journal
“Defense rests without calling witnesses in Vermilion woman’s murder trial” by Keith Reynolds, The Morning Journal
“Vermilion woman’s murder trial now awaits verdict” by Keith Reynolds, The Morning Journal
“Julene Simko guilty of murdering her husband in 2009 in Vermilion” by Keith Reynolds, The Morning Journal
“Vermilion woman gets 28 years to life for 2009 murder of husband” by Keith Reynolds, The Morning Journal
“Vermilion woman was slave before killing husband” by Katie Nix, Sandusky Register
 
 YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 19+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  






Apr 28, 2021
170: A Catfish & A Brutal Murder
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Brian Hile was smitten. He’d never had much luck with the ladies, but at 28, his dream had come true. He’d found a smokin’ hot girlfriend. She had long blond hair, piercing eyes, and she loved to send him sexy pictures. But after two years of dating, Brian discovered that he’d been catfished. He’d never been talking to a woman. He’d been talking and sending pictures to a man in South Africa. Brian wanted revenge, but South Africa was too far away. So he went after Tiffany Watkins, the completely innocent woman from the photos.

Then Brandi tells us about Kristine Young, who became deeply concerned when she couldn’t get ahold of her adult daughter, Ashley Young. That concern grew when she realized that her daughter had recently visited an old friend, Jared Chance. Kristine had always had a bad feeling about Jared. She’d been right to feel that way. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Catfished” episode of Web of Lies
United States of America v. Brian Curtis Hile on docketbird.com
“Michigan stalker of Santee woman fit to stand trial,” by Dave Rice for The San Diego Reader
“Online hoax prompted man’s revenge plot,” the Smoking Gun.com 
“Crime of passion: How web hoax triggered revenge plot,” The Sydney Morning Herald

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
 “Foul smell and trail of blood led to discovery woman's friend was really monster” by Gail Shortland, The Mirror
“‘Optics not good,’ defense attorney admits, in woman’s killing, dismemberment” by John Agar, Michigan Live
“Jury finds Jared Chance guilty of murder, mutilation” Fox17 News
“Parents of convicted killer Jared Chance get jail for their roles after the crime” by John Hogan, WZZM13
“Father of man who killed, mutilated woman avoids retrial on perjury charge” by John Agar, Michigan Live
“Appeals court upholds Jared Chance murder conviction” by Sentinel Staff, Ionia Sentinel-Standard
“People of MI v Jared Chance” justia.com
 
 
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Apr 21, 2021
169: Cold French Fries & a Texas A&M Professor
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Cindy Reese had a bad feeling. The second she opened her front door, she saw that her house had been ransacked. She called for her husband, Michael, but he didn’t answer. Clearly, something was wrong. So Cindy called the police. When they arrived, police discovered Michael Reese dead on the kitchen floor. He’d been shot execution style. Cindy was stunned. As she told it, she’d narrowly missed encountering the murderer herself. She and Michael had been to church that evening, and afterward they got some fast food. When they arrived home, Cindy remembered she needed some orange juice and ham from the grocery store. She told Michael to take their dinner inside. She’d eat with him after she got back from the Piggly Wiggly. But investigators didn’t buy Cindy’s story.

Then Kristin tells us about the suicide of a Texas A&M professor. James Aune was a pretty big deal. He was a tenured professor who’d authored two books on rhetoric. He had the respect of his peers and his students. But James had a dark side. He spent a lot of time online, mostly in chat rooms. One day, he met an 18-year-old woman named Karen. James was smitten. He opened up to the teenager, and she did the same. Eventually, Karen confessed that she wasn’t 18. She was 16. James didn’t have a problem with that. In fact, he exchanged nude pictures with her. Then it backfired.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Web of Lies” ID show, titled, “Online Education”
“The strange and sordid end of an A&M professor,” by Ross Dubois for Texas Monthly
“Man accused of blackmailing Texas A&M professor pleads not guilty,” by Maggie Kiely for The Eagle
“FBI says man was blackmailing Texas A&M professor before suicide,” by Maggie Kiely for The Eagle
“Man gets year in prison for extorting Texas A&M professor,” Associated Press

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Even The Devil Went To Church” episode Dateline
“Cindy Reese” episode Snapped
“Michael Reese’s Wife Shot & Killed Him to Be With Her Pastor” by Caroline Warnock, heavy.com
“Church-goer and her pastor lover killed her husband so they could be together” by Gail Shortland, The Mirror
“Cindy Reese sentenced to prison for 2015 murder of her Morris husband” by Ivana Hrynkiw, AL.com
 
 YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 19+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  




Apr 14, 2021
168: A Man Who Hated Domino's & a Family Annihilator
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Mitchell Carlton Sims was pretty proud of himself. He’d landed a job as the manager of a Domino’s Pizza in West Columbia, South Carolina. But the good times didn’t last long. He got into a disagreement with his boss over a bonus and flipped out. Mitch tried to stage a coup. It didn’t work. He tried to get his boss fired. That didn’t work either. Finally, Mitch quit. But he held onto an out-of-control rage toward his former employer. 

Then Brandi tells us about a family annihilator. (Does that surprise you? If so, welcome to the podcast.) James Kraig Kahler was a bad husband. He controlled and manipulated his wife, Karen. He controlled Karen’s social circle, as well as her finances. But James lost a little control when Karen sold enough cakes to buy herself a gym membership. She became a regular at the gym, and eventually found work as a trainer. It was there that she met Sunny Reece. Karen and Sunny’s friendship soon blossomed into something more. Initially, James was okay with that.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
An episode of Vengeance: Killer Coworkers, titled, “Killing Spree”
“Defendant’s voice: Tape describes killing of pizza deliveryman,” by Patricia Klein for the Los Angeles Times
People v. Sims, on courtlistener.com
“Mitchell Carlton Sims,” entry on Murderpedia
“Motel visit key to ‘pizza murder’ verdict,” by Stephanie O’Neill for the Los Angeles Times
“Restaurant robbery described,” Associated Press
“Death penalty urged in slaying of pizza deliveryman,” Associated Press
“Witness says murder defendant hated pizza chain,” by Stephanie O’Neill for the Los Angeles Times

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Death in the Family” episode Fatal Vows
“Fatal Vows: Lesbian affair leads jilted husband to murder his ex-wife and their daughters - The Kahler Case” The Mirror
“James Kraig Kahler” murderpedia.org
“Testimony begins in Kahler murder trial” by Brennan David, Columbia Daily Tribune
“State of Kansas v. James Kahler” findlaw.com
“Kahler v. Kansas” wikipedia.org

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 19+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  

Apr 07, 2021
167: A Supposedly Sketchy Medical Examiner & the Murder of Mandy Stavik
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Kay Sybers hated going to the doctor. According to her husband, Bill Sybers, Kay hated going to the doctor so much that she refused to get medical treatment for her ongoing chest pain. The morning of May 30,1991, Kay woke up in pain. Bill, who was a pathologist and medical examiner, attempted to draw blood from Kay’s arm so that he might figure out what was wrong. But he couldn’t get any blood. He then left for work, and Kay died later that morning. But how did she die, exactly? Had Bill really been trying to draw blood? Or had he injected her with a deadly poison? 

Then Kristin tells us about a murder that haunted a small Washington town for nearly 30 years. Mandy Stavik was home from her freshman year of college for Thanksgiving break of 1989. She went for a five-mile jog with her dog, Kyra, as she often did, but she never came back. Mandy’s mom immediately panicked. She called everyone she knew. People searched and searched for Mandy. Three days later, a detective found Mandy’s body in the Nooksack River. It took decades to solve the crime.  

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
An episode of 48 Hours, titled, “Mandy Stavik: The Case No One Could Forget”
An episode of 20/20, titled, “30 years searching” 
“Here’s what we learned from the defense attorney on day one of the Bass Trial,” by the Bellingham Herald on YouTube
“Here’s what we learned from the prosecuting attorney on day one of the Bass Trial,” by the Bellingham Herald on YouTube

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Dr. Bill Sybers, Florida doctor accused of murdering his wife” by Seamus McGraw, The Crime Library
“Evidence Embalmed” by Jonathon King, The Sun Sentinel
“Medical examiner: He didn’t kill wife, did botch autopsy” Associated Press, Ocala Star Banner
“Facing retrial, state drops murder case” Associated Press, The Herald “TribuneFormer Bay medical examiner Dr. Sybers dies of lung cancer” by News Herald Staff, The Panama City News Herald

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 19+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  

Mar 31, 2021
166: An Office Romance & a Terrible Fall
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As far as 911 calls went, this one was strange. An anonymous woman claimed that her neighbor, whose name she didn’t know, had been attacked by a man. Then she hung up. When the dispatcher called back, she realized that the “neighbor” had called from a pay phone outside a fast food restaurant. But when police arrived on the scene, they quickly realized that the caller had been onto something. Anna Lisa Raymundo, an ivy-league educated research scientist, lay dead in her entryway. She’d been stabbed multiple times and beaten over the head. Her condo showed signs of a violent struggle with her attacker.

Then Brandi tells us about a woman who died tragically while taking down party lights from a tree. When investigators arrived at the home of Louis Mahony and Lainie Coldwell, it seemed clear that Lainie had fallen off a ladder, to her death. But she was only injured on the back of her head. The rest of her body was unharmed. As time passed, it seemed less and less likely that Lainie’s death was an accident. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
Vengeance: Killer Coworkers episode, “Obsession at the office” 
“Sheila Davalloo,” entry on Murderpedia.com
“Big pharma researcher stabs romantic rival to death, then tries to kill husband,” by Benjamin H. Smith on oxygen.com
An episode of Killer Women with Piers Morgan
“Wife guilty of trying to kill husband,” by Jonathan Bandler for The Journal News

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Ex-cop staged freak accident to cover up brutal murder” by Gail Shortland, The Mirror
“R v Mahony” Queensland Judgements
“'I could put my fist into back of her head': Attending nurse” by Peter Hardwick, Sunshine Coast Daily
“Murder trial: Clothes iron 'very good fit' with head wound” by Peter Hardwick, Sunshine Coast Daily
“Partner discovered murder accused having affair after STD” by Peter Hardwick, Sunshine Coast Daily
“Lainie Coldwell was leaving her husband, murder trial hears” by Peter Hardwick, Sunshine Coast Daily
“Murder accused was 'ranting and raving': Court hears” by Peter Hardwick, Sunshine Coast Daily
“Murder accused changed story at de facto wife's wake” by Peter Hardwick, Sunshine Coast Daily
“Accused killer had colleagues lie to claim wife's $2m” by Peter Hardwick, Sunshine Coast Daily
“Accused wife killer had secret sex tryst in Sydney” by Peter Hardwick, Sunshine Coast Daily
“Accused killer's laptop had 'accidental deaths' search” by Peter Hardwick, Sunshine Coast Daily
“Murder trial: Human movement expert doubts tree fall death” by Peter Hardwick, Sunshine Coast Daily
“Why would Louis kill Lainie at home? Barrister asks” by Peter Hardwick, Sunshine Coast Daily
“Accused wife killer manipulated investigators, Crown claims” by Peter Hardwick, Sunshine Coast Daily
“Ex-policeman sentenced to life for murdering de-facto wife” by Peter Hardwick, Sunshine Coast Daily
 
 
YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 19+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  

Mar 24, 2021
165: A Missing Bullet & the Black Widow of Las Vegas
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Tim Noble called 911, desperate for help. He’d just walked into the home he shared with his fiance, Debra Holden, and found her dead on the couch. A gun lay next to her. It appeared she’d died by suicide, and that’s exactly what the medical examiner ruled. Investigators couldn’t find the bullet, though. That seemed a little odd. The blood trail also seemed odd. It was as if she’d been moved after she died. Then Tim showed up at the hospital with a bullet in his leg and an incredibly strange story as to how it got there.

Then Kristin tells us about Margaret Rudin, the so-called black widow of Las Vegas. When Margaret and Ron Rudin got married, it was the fifth marriage for both of them. What had been a whirlwind courtship got rocky as soon as they moved in together. Margaret discovered that Ron was having an affair. She also discovered that he’d never renovated the home after his ex-wife died by suicide. Over the years, Margaret says their marriage improved. But when Ron was brutally murdered, Margaret was the prime suspect. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Five Weddings and a Murder,” episode of 20/20
“Rudin’s Revenge,” episode of Mugshots
“Last Vegas attorney Amador arrested on felony assault charges,” by Mike Blasylas for the Vegas Review-Journal
“Socialite seeks a mistrial,” by Ken Ritter for the Associated Press

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Missing Bullet” episode Accident Murder or Suicide
“Man Passes Out, Urinates Himself After Being Questioned About Fiancée's Murder” by Aly Vader Hayden, oxygen.com
“Murder trial: Opening statements paint two pictures of a woman’s death” by Amanda Thames, Jacksonville Daily News
“Defendant takes stand in murder trial” by Mike McHugh, Jacksonville Daily News
“Onslow Co. man sentenced to life in prison for killing fiancee” by Elizabeth New, WNCT9 News

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 19+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  
Mar 17, 2021
164: The Tesco Bomber & a Sinister Minister
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John Purnell was having a pretty normal day at his job as head of security for Great Britain’s biggest supermarket chain. Then he got a bizarre phone call from a local newscaster. The newscaster said they’d found a troubling document in their photocopier. The document was an extortion letter, aimed at Tesco. In it, a person calling themselves “SALLY,” threatened to send bombs to Tesco customers. The bombs would get bigger, and deadlier, unless Tesco paid up.

Then Brandi tells us about Joe Musante, who was discovered dead in his pastor’s office. Investigators determined Joe’s death to be a suicide, but his sister, Rose, had questions. Hadn’t her brother and his wife recently been seeing their minister, AB Schirmer for marital counseling? When investigators looked into AB’s history, they discovered his wife had died tragically. And so had the one before her.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
The documentary “Real Crime: Supermarket Heist”
“Forgive me, says baby food poisoner as he goes free,” The Free Library.com
“Tesco blackmail ‘bomber’ jailed,” BBC News
“Inside the capture of Robert Dyer the supermarket blackmailer who threatened to bomb Tesco customers,” by Jennifer Newton for The Sun

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Sinister Minister” episode Accident Murder or Suicide
“Death At The Parsonage” episode 48 Hours
“DA Describes Prosecuting The ‘Sinister Minister,’ Who Had 2 Wives Die Under Mysterious Circumstances” by Benjamin H. Smith, oxygen.com
“Former Lebanon pastor A.B. Schirmer sentenced in first wife's death” by Barbara Miller, Penn Live
“Porn-addict pastor killed two wives and managed to make them look like accidents for years” by Akshay Pai, meaww.com
 
YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 19+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  
Mar 10, 2021
163: Ewell Family Murders & April Kauffman
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Brandi starts us off with a very Brandi case. It was Easter weekend, 1992, and Dana Ewell was concerned. He was spending time with his girlfriend’s family and couldn’t get a hold of his parents. When investigators arrived at the Ewell home, they discovered a chilling scene. Dana’s sister Tiffany had been shot. So had his father, Dale. His mother, Glee, had been shot four times. The killer had taken their time with the murders. They left no DNA. No prints. No shell casings. The home appeared to have been ransacked, but little -- if anything -- was taken. 

Then Kristin tells us about the murder of talk radio show host April Kauffman. In what would later turn out to be April’s last day on the air at WIBG, The Talk of South Jersey, she told her listeners that she “felt like she was on borrowed time.” She said that if she were to be “taken out” and sent to “see our creator,” she could take comfort knowing that she’d raised her daughter, Kimberly with the right values. April’s co-host didn’t look too deeply into what April said. But April seemed to know she was in danger. The next day, she was dead.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Family Secrets” Episode of 2020
“Freddy Augello, ‘hands dripping red with the blood of April Kauffman,’ convicted of her murder,” by Amy Rosenberg for The Philadelphia Inquirer
“EHT man to be sentenced for witness tampering in April Kauffman murder trial,” by Molly Bilinksi for the Press of Atlantic City
“Husband of slain radio host paid man to kill his wife 5 years ago, authorities say,” by Chris Franklin for New Jersey.com
“‘I can breathe,’ says daughter of slain radio host after murder charges filed,” by Chris Franklin for New Jersey.com
“‘I feel like I’m on borrowed time,’ April Kauffman said on radio before her killing,” by Claire Lowe for The Press of Atlantic City
“Pagans guitar maker Freddy Augello sentenced to life plus 30 years in April Kauffman murder at Shore,” by Amy Rosenberg for The Philadelphia Inquirer
“Ferdinand Augello sentenced to life in prison, +30 years for murder of April Kauffman,” Office of the Atlantic County Prosecutor
“Atlantic County Prosecutor accused of mortgage, criminal investigation corruption,” by Dan Alexander WPG Talk Radio

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Two in a Million” episode Forensic Files
“The Ewell Family Murders” by Lori Johnston, medium.com
“Pure Greed” by Mark Gribben. The Malefactor’s Register
“'Odd Couple' College Students Murder One's California Family For Inheritance” by Ethan Harfenist, oxygen.com
“Dana Ewell” wikipedia.org
“Dana Ewell” murderpedia.org

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 19+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  



Mar 03, 2021
162: Undercover Mother & Another Bathtub Murder?
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Mark Fisher just wanted to have a little fun. That’s why the 19-year-old college sophomore headed into New York City with his friends. While they were out drinking, Mark ran into another friend, and by the end of the night, he found himself at a house party in Brooklyn, surrounded by mostly strangers. The next morning, Mark’s body was discovered just two blocks from the house party. He’d been beaten and shot. When investigators tried to speak with the people Mark had partied with that night, they clammed up. But over time, police came to suspect John Giuca, who’d thrown the party, and his friend, 17-year-old Antonio Russo.

Then Brandi tells us about yet another questionable bathtub murder. When Michele Somers’ family first met Martin MacNeil, they knew something was up. They couldn’t quite put their finger on it, but something about Martin seemed sketchy. But Michele was under Martin’s spell. They eloped in 1978, and aside from Martin’s six month jail stint for forgery, the couple had what appeared to be a healthy marriage. They raised four children, then adopted more. Martin got a medical degree and a law degree. They prospered. But after several decades of marriage, Michele became suspicious of Martin and unhappy with her appearance. Martin suggested she get a facelift.  

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Undercover Mother” episode of 20/20
“Mother Justice” by Christopher Ketcham for Vanity Fair
“A murder, a conviction, and a never-ending case,” by Alan Feuer for The New York Times
“Second suspect is charged in 2003 murder of student,” by Michael Wilson for The New York Times
“Citing misconduct, lawyer seeks review of conviction in ‘03 Brooklyn killing,” by Vivian Yee for The New York Times

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Martin MacNeill: Was his wife Michele's death accidental or was it murder?” by Sara Lenz and Brian West, Desert News
“Martin MacNeill timeline” by Brian West, Desert News
“Secrets in Pleasant Grove” episode Dateline
“Utah doctor's life of lies unravels after some of his children are convinced he murdered their mother” by Allie Yang, ABC News
“Murder of Michele MacNeill” wikipedia.org
 
 YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 19+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  

Feb 24, 2021
161: The Murder of Randy Sheridan
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It was just before Christmas 1992. Randy Sheridan was out jogging near his house in Junction City, Kansas, when he was ambushed and killed. An investigation revealed that he’d been shot five times -- three times at a distance, and twice at point blank range. When investigators spoke to Randy’s girlfriend, Judy Junghans, she gave them some helpful information. Randy had a daughter with a woman named Dana Flynn, and Dana was convinced that Randy was a bad man.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Dana Flynn” episode Snapped
“‘God Wants Him Dead’: Evangelical Siblings Gun Down Woman’s Ex-Boyfriend Amid Custody Battle” by Benjamin H. Smith, Oxygen
“Brother Convicted In Religion-Fueled Shotgun Murder Speaks Out In Exclusive ‘Snapped’ Interview” by Benjamin H. Smith, Oxygen
“Court upholds Salina siblings’ convictions” Associated Press, Lawrence Journal-World
“Closing arguments paint different picture of death” by David Clouston, The Salina Journal
“Jury begins foray into ’92 murder” by David Clouston, The Salina Journal
“Circumstantial evidence was enough against flimsy alibis” by David Clouston, The Salina Journal

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 19+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  

Feb 17, 2021
160: The Mysterious Death of Sarah Widmer
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It was nearly 11 p.m. when Ryan Widmer called 911. He told the dispatcher, “My wife. She fell asleep in the bathtub, I think. I was downstairs. I just came up here and she was laying face down in the bathtub.” He said that his wife, Sarah, fell asleep in the bathtub “all the time.” Ryan drained the bathtub and removed Sarah from it, then began performing CPR. Paramedics showed up a short while later, but were unable to revive Sarah. Later, questions emerged about how exactly Sarah Widmer died.

Brandi presented the only case because Kristin and Norm said goodbye to their sweet pup of 13 years this week. Peanut lived a long, happy life and left her mark on this podcast. She never shared a case, but she did make her presence known with an occasional bark. She’ll be missed.  

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Mystery in the Master Bedroom” episode Dateline
“Sarah Widmer” chillingcrimes.com
“Widmer admitted to punching, killing wife, witness testifies” by Denise G Callahan, Springfield News-Sun
“Newly uncovered Ryan Widmer documents: My wife walked on tippy toes the night she drowned” by Keith BieryGolick, cincinatti.com
“A decade after Sarah Widmer drowned in tub, husband is still trying to overturn murder conviction” by Paula Christian, WCPO Cincinnati
“‘Reasonable Doubt’ explores Ryan Widmer case, concludes he lied to police” by Jay Warren, WCPO Cincinnati 

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 19+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  



Feb 10, 2021
159: The Worst Woman on Earth & a Cruise Ship
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Brandi starts us off with a story about a serial killer who the New York Times dubbed, “the worst woman on Earth.” In 1889, Lizzie Brown took a job working as a housekeeper for a 70-year-old farmer named Paul Halliday. Paul quickly proposed to Lizzie, but he’d come to regret that decision. As it turned out, Lizzie Brown wasn’t her real name. Soon, the Halliday’s barn burned down. So did the family home. Paul’s adult son, John, died in the blaze. Neighbors suspected Lizzie had something to do with the fires.  

Then Kristin tells us about the cruise from hell. “The Island Escape” is a no-frills cruise ship that sails the Mediterranean. It’s a converted ferryboat that caters to budget travelers and offers balconies that -- unlike most other cruise ships -- hang over the water. Nonetheless, this was the cruise that attorney Lonnie Kocontes selected when he wanted to woo his ex-wife, Micki Kanesaki. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
The “Open Water” episode of Dateline
“Irvine attorney convicted in ex-wife’s cruise ship murder,” NBC Los Angeles
‘Almost Got Away With the Perfect Crime': Attorney Gets Life in Prison for Ex-Wife's Cruise Ship Murder,” NBC Los Angeles
“Former lawyer convicted of murdering ex-wife on cruise, tossing her overboard,” by Amanda Woods for the New York Post

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Worst Woman on Earth” Murder by Gaslight
“True Crime: The Worst Woman on Earth” by Kieran W, Medium
“She Was Crazy About Killing by Mara Bovsun, New York Daily News
“Lizzie Brown Halliday: The Worst Woman on Earth” by David Levine, Hudson Valley Magazine
“Lizzie Halliday’s Trial” Buffalo Weekly Express, newspapers.com
“Mrs. Halliday Convicted” Lancaster Intelligencer, newspapers.com
“Lizzie Halliday” wikipedia.org

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 19+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  


Feb 03, 2021
158: Rosa Parks & a Serial Killer
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We all think we know the story of Rosa Parks. She was an old, tired woman who got on a bus in segregated Montgomery, Alabama. When the white bus driver asked her to give up her seat to a white passenger, Rosa refused. She was tired! Her feet hurt! For refusing to move, Rosa Parks was arrested. Then, oopsies, she became a civil rights icon! … well, that’s not quite how it went down. Rosa Parks wasn’t that old. Her feet didn’t hurt. When she refused to give up her seat, she knew exactly what she was doing. She’d been a take-no-shit activist her entire life. 

Then Brandi tells us about a serial killer. When Alice Williams showed up at 86-year-old Norma Davis’ house and shouted her name, Norma didn’t respond. Alice became concerned. So she cautiously made her way through Norma’s home. That’s how Alice discovered that Norma had been brutally murdered. A knife stuck out of Norma’s neck. Another stuck out of her chest. About a week later, another woman in Norma’s gated community was murdered. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
An episode of the show “The Origin of Everything,” titled “Is the Rosa Parks Story True?”
A Ted Talk titled “The real story of Rosa Parks -- and why we need to confront myths about black history” by professor  David Ikard
“Rosa Parks,” entry on Wikipedia
“Edgar Nixon,” entry on Wikipedia
“Recy Taylor,” entry on Wikipedia
“Browder v. Gayle,” entry on Wikipedia

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Dana Sue Gray” episode Diabolical Women 
“Addicted to Luxury: The Pampered Killer” by Katherine Ramsland, The Crime Library
“Justice Story: Serial killer Dana Sue Gray offed elderly women so she could shop with their credit cards” by Mara Bovsun, New York Daily News
“Dana Sue Gray” wikipedia.org

YOU’RE STILL READING? My, my, my, you skeezy scunch! You must be hungry for more! We’d offer you some sausage brunch, but that gets messy. So how about you head over to our Patreon instead? (patreon.com/lgtcpodcast). At the $5 level, you’ll get 19+ full length bonus episodes, plus access to our 90’s style chat room!  
Jan 27, 2021
157: Amber Alerts!
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Stephenie Woods was beyond exhausted. She’d just had a c-section a week earlier, when she gave birth to her daughter, Abby. So Stephanie laid down on her couch for a nap. Abby was asleep in her crib, and Stephanie’s one-year-old son, Conner, was in his playpen. Stephenie woke to a stranger at her door. The woman was Shannon Torrez. She told Stephenie that her car had broken down. Could she use her phone? Could she use her bathroom? Stephenie was groggy and taken off guard. Bewildered, she agreed to help the woman. But Shannon wasn’t there for Stephenie’s phone. She was there for her baby.

Then Kristin tells us about Elizabeth Thomas. In the fall of 2016, 15-year-old Elizabeth was at a particularly vulnerable time in her life. She and her siblings had been homeschooled their whole lives by an abusive mother. The kids eventually made the brave decision to call Child Protective Services on their mother, and she was removed from the home. This meant that at 15, Elizabeth would enter public school for the first time. It was a rocky transition, but her health teacher, Tad Cummins made it better. He took a special interest in her. He cared for her. At least, it seemed that way at first.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
The 20/20 episode, “From Classroom to Captive”
“‘The devil won, my dad freaked out,’ daughter of Tad Cummins pens letter before sentencing,” by Caitlyn Shelton for News Channel 9
“Teen kidnapped by former Maury County teacher Tad Cummins settles suit for $650,000,” by James Bennett for the Columbia Daily Herald
“Tad Cummins sentenced to 20 years in prison for taking a teenage student from home for sex,” by Adam Tamburin for The Tennesseean
“Tad Cummins’ wife files for divorce amidst Elizabeth Thomas Amber Alert,” by Natalie Neysa Alund for USA Today Network
“Tad Cummins sentencing: Read the teen victim’s statement to teacher who took her for sex,” on The Tennessean

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Shannon Torrez” episode Snapped
“MO Newborn Abducted Day of Stillbirth” NBC14 News
“Kidnapped Baby Found” ABC News
“Judge Gives Torrez Maximum Sentence” by Maggie Rotermund, emissourian.com
“Franklin County woman sentenced in throat slashing and kidnapping” by Betsy Taylor/The Associated Press, The Columbia Missourian
“Woman Gets 30 Years For Newborn Abduction” by The Associated Press, CBS News
Jan 20, 2021
156: The Mysterious Lloyd Gaines & a Creepy Church Lady
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When Lloyd Gaines requested a course catalog from the University of Missouri’s School of Law, the registrar sent one right away. Later, when Lloyd applied to the school, university officials thought nothing of it. He was a qualified applicant. Then the university’s registrar received his undergraduate transcripts, and shit hit the fan. The transcripts came from historically black Lincoln University. But the University of Missouri School of Law refused to accept black students. They asked Lloyd to go to law school in a neighboring state, but Lloyd refused.

Then Brandi tells us about a creepy church lady. Mary Jane Fonder had been attending Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church for years. Despite her long tenure at the church, she didn’t have many friends there. People generally thought she was pretty weird. But her weirdness kicked into overdrive when she convinced herself that she and the church pastor had feelings for one another. She left him long, incoherent messages. She snuck food into his house. Later, when he began helping a new church member named Rhonda Smith, Mary Jane lost her shit.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Before Brown: Charles H Houston and the Gaines Case,” by Douglas O. Linder for Famous-Trials.com
“Lloyd Gaines,” entry on Wikipedia
“Charles Hamilton Houston,” entry on Wikipedia
“Little known Supreme Court case from Missouri was early stepping-stone to school desegregation,” by Ryan Delaney for St. Louis Public Radio

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Mary Jane Fonder” episode Snapped
“Test of Faith: Killing shocks congregation” by Keith Morrison, Dateline
“Bucks County killer Mary Jane Fonder dies just weeks after search for missing father reopened” by Manuel Gamiz Jr., The Morning Call
“Police hope remnants of Bucks County home, once owned by a murderer, holds clues about long-missing man” by Vinny Vella, The Philadelphia Inquirer
“Mary Jane Fonder” wikipedia.org
“Mary Jane Fonder” murderpedia.org
Jan 13, 2021
155: A Killer Son-in-Law & An Innocent Joke!
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Kenneth Parks showed up at his local police station in a haze. He was covered in blood. His hands were horribly injured. He was confused, but horrified. He told police, “I think I have just killed two people.” In fact, he’d just murdered his mother-in-law, Barbara Ann Woods. He’d attempted to murder his father-in-law, Dennis Woods as well, but Dennis survived the attack. But why did Kenneth attack his in-laws? Prosecutors said he did it because he didn’t want to tell them about his gambling addiction. But Kenneth’s defense argued he hadn’t intended to attack his in-laws at all. He’d committed the crime while sleepwalking.

Then Kristin tells us about a former army ranger who was down on his luck. Pat Sabo was back in his hometown of Eastlake, Ohio. Money was tight. He’d had a few run-ins with the law. That’s when an old high school friend named Christine Metter connected with him on Facebook. The pair hadn’t talked in nearly 20 years, but they quickly bonded over stories about their ex’s. Christine, in particular, wouldn’t shut up about her ex, David. She and David were recently divorced, and he was seeking primary custody of their daughters. Christine was pissed. So, Pat made an innocent joke. He said, “save your money and hire a hitman! LMAO.” Pat was kidding. But Christine took him seriously.   

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Eastlake Conspiracy” episode of Dateline
“‘Have Fun,’ Says Dad Trying To Hire A Hitman To Off His Daughter’s Ex,” by Daniel Egitto for Oxygen.com
“Ex-husband Statement At Wife’s Murder-For-Hire Sentencing,” News 5 Cleveland on YouTube
“Facebook Murder-for-Hire Conviction Gets Woman 10 Years,” by Nikki Ferrell for Patch.com
“Christine Metter Gets Maximum 10-Year Setnence For Trying to Hire Hit Man To Kill Ex-Husband,” by Tracey Read for The News-Herald
Clips from Oxygen’s “Murder For Hire” episode, “Daddy’s Girl”

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“A Bump in the Night: When Sleepwalkers Turn Violent” by Matt Soniak, Mental Floss
“Sleepwalking man’s excuse in death of mother-in-law” The Ottawa Citizen
“Innocent By Reason Of…” by Ken MacQueen, The Ottawa Citizen
“Jury acquits sleepwalker in attempted murder case” The Windsor Star
“Sleepwalking Canadian Walks On Murder Charge” by Toronto Globe and Mail, The Chicago Tribune
“Man Acquitted Of Sleepwalking Murder Running For School Trustee In Durham” by News Staff, City News Toronto

Jan 06, 2021
154: PATREON EXCLUSIVE: Typhoid Mary & Scrunchies
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Hello you skeezy scunches! We’re off this week for New Year’s, but we’ll be back next week with a brand spankin’ new episode. We hope you’re having a safe and happy holiday season!

And if you enjoy this episode and feel so inclined, please join our Patreon! You’ll automatically get 17 bonus episodes to binge!
 
In this episode, Brandi starts us off with an old timey story that may have you screaming “TOO SOON!” 

In the early 1900s, germs were a novel concept. Washing your hands was an optional activity. The idea of being an asymptomatic carrier was nearly unheard of. So when a sanitation engineer named George Soper approached a woman and demanded samples of her blood, urine and feces, she scared him away at forkpoint. She scared the next doctor away, too. But the public health community would not be deterred. They were convinced that Mary Mallon was an asymptomatic spreader of Typhoid. And they had to stop her.

Then Kristin tells us about a nightclub singer named Rommy Revson. Rommy had gorgeous, long hair. She even used it as part of her act. For her first couple of songs, she’d have her hair clipped up with a clampy ring-shaped thingy. Then she’d take it down. But then she had to do the rest of her songs holding that damn hair clip! Rommy knew there had to be a better way. She wanted something that could hold her hair up, without damaging it, and that she could slip on her wrist when she wasn’t wearing it. But that thing didn’t exist. She had to invent it. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.
 
For this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Typhoid Mary's tragic tale exposed the health impacts of ‘super-spreaders’" by Nina Strochlic, National Geographic
“Was The Real Typhoid Mary A Reckless Superspreader Or The Victim Of An Unjust System?” All That’s Interesting
“The Frightening Legacy of Typhoid Mary” by Veronique Greenwood, Smithsonian Magazine
“The Most Dangerous Woman in America: In Her Own Words” pbs.org
“Mary Mallon” wikipedia.org
 
For this episode, Kristin pulled from: 
“The Queen of the Scrunchie” episode of the podcast “Every Little Thing”
“Night club singer, Scrunchie inventor Rommy Revson relocates to Rogers” by Kim Souza for Talk Business
Dec 30, 2020
153: REBROADCAST: EHR MAH GERD! A CERH BERM!
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Hi everyone! We are taking the week off to celebrate the holidays, but we're rereleasing one of our all-time favorite episodes. We hope you enjoy! Happy Holidays from the LGTC crew!

Amy Anderton was concerned. Her boyfriend, Logan Storm, *seemed* like a good guy. He was a middle school math teacher. He talked a lot about trust and positivity. But something seemed off. So one day, when Logan left for work, Amy snooped through Logan’s stuff. That’s when she came across a thumbdrive. She plugged it into her computer, opened it, and was horrified by what she saw -- hundreds of images of child pornography.

Then, Brandi tells us about high school student Tyler Hadley’s massive party. When Tyler first told his friends about his plan to throw a party, they were a little skeptical.Tyler wasn’t the party-throwing type. His parents were super strict. But Tyler was determined to throw a party, and that’s exactly what he did. Tons of kids showed up from all over the sleepy town of Port St. Lucie, Florida. They had so much fun that they didn’t notice that Tyler’s house was a crime scene.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Still claiming innocence, Logan Storm sentenced to eight years in prison on child porn, failure-to-appear convictions,” by Helen Jung for The Oregonian
“Logan Storm slips ankle bracelet, flees hours after verdict on child porn charge,” by Helen Jung for The Oregonian
“Child porn convict dumps monitor,” Statesman Journal
“Former teacher, Logan Storm, sentenced to prison for possessing child pornography and failing to appear in court,” press release for the United States Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon
“Jury finds former teacher Logan Storm not guilty of groping girls in public pool,” by Aimee Green for The Oregonian
“Why did seven years pass before former teacher Logan Storm was tried for child molestation,” by Aimee Green for The Oregonian
The “Weathering the Storm” episode of “Who The Bleep Did I Marry?”

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Tyler Hadley’s Killer Party” by Nathaniel Rich, Rolling Stone
“Best Friend ‘Ruined My Life’ When He Killed His Own Parents” by Sean Dooley, Jenner Smith, and Alexa Valiente, ABC News
“Murder of Blake and Mary Jo Hadley” wikipedia.org

Dec 23, 2020
152: Embezzlement and Sisters
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Rita Crundwell had just about everything. She owned multiple properties. A kick ass RV. 400 horses. A freezer full of horse semen. How did she support herself? Well, that depended on who you asked. Some people thought her parents had been early investors in Campbell’s Soup. Other people thought her side hustle brought in good money. One thing was certain -- Rita’s salary as the treasurer of Dixon, Illinois, wasn’t enough to cover her lavish lifestyle.

Then Brandi tells us a terrible story that begins in a doublewide trailer in Florida. The bank had recently foreclosed on the trailer. Neighbors said that the two sisters who occupied it hadn’t been there in months. But when a father and son crew arrived to clean it out, they discovered a horrible stench. The body of Debbie Burns had been wrapped in several blankets and a shower curtain. Her sister/caretaker, Barbara, was nowhere to be found.  

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
The documentary “All the Queen’s Horses” 
“Rita Crundwell” entry on Wikipedia

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Saint: Barbara Burns was devoted to her disabled sister” by Lane DeGregory, Tampa Bay Times
“The Sacrifice: Barbara Burns wanted her life back, so she took another” by Lane DeGregory, Tampa Bay Times
“She cared for her sister her whole life. Then she killed her.” by Lane DeGregory, Tampa Bay Times
Dec 16, 2020
151: A "Massive" Defense Strategy & Ed Johnson
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Richard Henry Patterson was mortified. His girlfriend, Francisca Marquinez, was dead in his bed, and he knew exactly what was to blame. His sizable penis. He was certain she’d choked and died while performing oral sex. Richard was so embarrassed that he took a few days to call the police. At least… that’s the story he told them when they showed up.

Then Kristin tells us about the first and only criminal trial in the history of the United States Supreme Court. It all started in 1906 in Chattanooga, Tennessee. A pretty white woman named Nevada Taylor was on her way home from work when a man attacked and raped her. She didn’t get a good look at her attacker. She knew he had a soft, gentle voice, strong arms, and… was maybe black? That was all Sheriff Joseph Shipp needed to hear. In fact, it was all that most white folks needed to hear. Soon after the reward money piled up, a sketchy man came forward with an incredible story. He was pretty sure he’d seen a black man who matched the attacker’s description near the scene of the crime, around the time of the crime, twirling the leather strap that the attacker had wrapped around Nevada’s neck. That man, apparently, was Ed Johnson.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Sheriff Shipp Trial,” by Douglas O. Linder for famous-trials.com
“Mrs. Daisy Hixon Divorced,” Chattanooga Daily Times, Sept. 28, 1907
“Miss Nevada Taylor Dies,” Chattanooga Daily Times, May 13, 1907
“Styles Linton Hutchins,” Tennessee State Government website
“Lynching of Ed Johnson,” entry on Wikipedia
“Lynching of Alfred Blount,” entry on Wikipedia
“Ed Johnson Gravesite; Pleasant Garden Cemetery,” by Rob’s Randomness on YouTube

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Man accused of murder asks to show penis to jury in oral-sex choking defense” by Rafael Olmeda, Sun Sentinel
“Florida man who claimed girlfriend choked during oral sex because of his over-sized manhood, is found NOT guilty of her murder” by Abigail Miller and Snejana Farberov, The Daily Mail
“"It needs to be erect": Accused murderer's bizarre defense” by Jackie Salo, New York Post
“Defense rests in man’s oral sex choking trial” by Rafael Olmeda, Sun Sentinel
“Man who claimed girlfriend choked during oral sex acquitted in murder case” by Rafael Olmeda, Sun Sentinel
“Margate man acquitted in murder case after oral-sex defense”by Rafael Olmeda, Sun Sentinel
"Lawyer admits size never mattered in big-penis murder trial” by Jackie Salo, New York Post
“Man who murdered high-flying solicitor and claimed she choked to death while performing a sex act on him is jailed for life” The Daily Mail
Dec 09, 2020
150: Consensual Murder & Horror at Dollar General
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It was the mid-90’s and Sharon Lopatka was super into the brand spankin’ new world wide web. She launched a handful of online businesses. She chatted with newfound friends. She also explored her sexuality. The anonymity of the internet allowed Sharon to discuss some pretty kinky stuff. She went into chat rooms, looking for men to torture her to death. Some said yes, but backed away when the conversation shifted from fantasy to logistics. Then, Sharon found a guy who wasn’t scared. His name was Robert “Bobby” Glass. 

Then Brandi tells us a horrifying tale that took place right across from her salon. Robin Bell was the manager of a Dollar General in Bonner Springs, Kansas. One night in November of 2005, she planned to work late. The district manager was coming the next day, and she wanted the store to look perfect. But when her husband, Don, woke up in the middle of the night and found that Robin wasn’t in bed with him, he knew something had to be wrong. He drove straight to the Dollar General, using the exact route Robin should have taken back home. But he didn’t find her car along the side of the road. He found it in the store’s parking lot.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“A date with death,” by Rachael Bell for the Crime Library
“Killer of Carroll woman dies in N.C. prison,” by Sheridan Lyons for the Baltimore Sun
“Take my life -- please,” Raleigh News and Observer, November 3, 1996

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“A year later, family still wondering who killed Tonganoxie woman” by Jesse Truesdale, The Tonganoxie Mirror
“Bonner murder leaves lasting impression” by Nicole Kelley, The Basehor Sentinel
“Family attends hearing in murder case” by Bobbi Mlynar, The Emporia Gazette
“Jurors view grisly video of Dollar General crime scene” by Jesse Truesdale, The Basehor Sentinel
“Dollar General killers receive life in prison” by Nicole Kelley, The Chieftain
“Third defendant in 2005 Dollar General murder gets maximum juvenile sentence” by Nicole Kelley, The Lawrence Journal-World
“State v. Haberlein” caselaw.findlaw.com
“State v. Backus” caselaw.findlaw.com
Dec 02, 2020
149: Wrongful Convictions
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When Kathleen Schroll called her mom late one night in the spring of 2008, her voice shook with fear. She said that a man named Ollin “Pete” Coones was in her house. He’d stolen her lawn mower, and now he planned to kill Kathleen and her husband, Carl. Kathleen told her mom that Pete said “he has his tracks covered where no one will know who did it.” When police arrived at the Schroll home, it was too late. Carl and Kathleen were dead. So… Pete did it. Right?

In that same vein, Kristin tells a story that starts bad and gets so much worse. In 1913, Atlanta was rocked by the murder of 13-year-old Mary Phagan. Mary was killed at the National Pencil Company, where she worked long hours for little pay. The crime scene was littered with evidence, including bloody fingerprints, footprints, human feces, and two notes -- presumably written by Mary as she lay dying. Atlanta police rushed to solve the case, but didn’t go where the evidence led them. They went to Leo Frank, the factory’s superintendent.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Leo Frank,” famous-trials.com
“Leo Frank case,” New Georgia Encyclopedia
“Star witness in Frank case arrested here,” The Atlanta Constitution, October 21, 1941
“Frank case witness to be freed Nov. 15,” The Atlanta Constitution, November 5, 1941
“Jim Conley admits attempted at burglary,” The Atlanta Constitution, January 17, 1919
“Leo Frank,” entry on Wikipedia

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Did His Dad’s Caretaker Frame Him for Her Own Murder-Suicide?” By Rachel Olding, The Daily Beast
“Kansas man was framed in ‘Machiavellian’ murder-suicide scheme, lawyers argue” by Luke Nozicka, The Kansas City Star
“Olin “Pete” Coones v. State of Kansas, Motion To Vacate” Midwest Innocence Project
“KCK man goes free after 12 years in prison” by Luke Nozicka, The Kansas City Star
“Olin ‘Pete’ Coones Exonerated” Midwest Innocence Project
Nov 18, 2020
148: A Dwelling Defender & a Normal Middle Class Family
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Byron David Smith was in his basement on Thanksgiving Day, minding his own business when he heard a window break upstairs. Then he heard someone enter his home. Byron grabbed his gun and waited quietly as the intruder roamed the house. When the intruder came down the stairs, Byron fired his gun three times. The intruder, 17-year-old Nicholas Brady, died. Ten minutes later, another intruder entered Byron’s home. It was 18-year-old Haile Kifer. Byron killed her, too -- shooting her six times. On the surface, it seemed that Byron had acted within his legal rights. In Minnesota, a person may use deadly force to prevent a felony from taking place in their home or dwelling. But as investigators soon discovered, this case wasn’t clear cut, and Byron wasn’t as innocent as he seemed.  

Then Brandi tells us about a “normal, middle class family,” but we all know where this story is headed. Chris and Tina Lunney were living what appeared to be a pretty comfortable life in New Jersey. They had two children, and had asked Tina’s mother to come live with them. From the outside looking in, it seemed that everything was going well. But then one day, Tina called Chris in a panic. Her mother, Marie Zoppi, had died by suicide. She hadn’t seemed unhappy, but she’d taken her life. Or had she?

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“12 minutes on Elm street” episode of Dateline
“Court to announce jury’s verdict in Byron Smith murder trial,” by Ashli Overlund for WJON News
“MN Supreme Court upholds Byron Smith conviction,” by Allen Costantini for KARE 11
“Graphic audio released by courts of Byron Smith as he guns down two teens in his Minnesota basement,” Associated Press
“Little Falls man found guilty on all four counts of murder,” Associated Press 
“Castle Doctrine,” entry on Wikipedia
“Byron David Smith killings,” entry on Wikipedia 
“Byron David Smith,” entry on Murderpedia

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Tina Lunney” episode Snapped
“State of New Jersey v. Tina Lunney” law.justia.com
“Prosecutor: Fairfield woman killed mother, 81, staged it to look like a suicide” by Julia Terruso, The Star-Ledger
“Husband reads letter to jurors where wife confesses to murdering her mother” by Julia Terruso, The Star-Ledger
“Fairfield woman told police she strangled mother with necktie” by Julia Terruso, The Star-Ledger
“Jury convicts Fairfield woman of strangling her mother” by Julia Terruso, The Star-Ledger
Nov 11, 2020
147: MURDER!
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When Bruce Rouse didn’t show up for work one summer morning in 1980, his employees immediately knew something was up. So they called his house and Bruce’s teenage children went to their parents’ master bedroom to check on them. But the scene in their parents’ bedroom was shocking. Their mom, Darlene, had been shot in the face. Their dad, Bruce, had been shot in the face, too. He’d also been beaten and stabbed. A sheet covered their bodies. Who could have done such a thing? (This is a total Brandi case, so we’ll give you one guess.)

Then Kristin tells us about Julia Phillips -- a Southern lady who was pumped to celebrate her birthday. She got a bunch of Mike’s Hard Lemonade, bought some sexy new lingerie from Victoria’s Secret and headed to her boyfriend, Melvin Roberts’ house. But as she was getting out of her car, a man came up from behind her. He was black. Or was he hispanic. He had an accent. Maybe Indian? It was all a blur as the mystery man wrapped duct tape around her wrists, legs, eyes and mouth.  

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Death in the Driveway” episode of Dateline
“Julia Phillips, convicted killer of former York Mayor Melvin Roberts, dies at age 72,” by Andrew Dys for the Herald 
“Prosecution Rests its Case,” by Jonathan McFadden for the Herald 
“Phillips found guilty; sentenced to life,” by Jonathan McFadden for the Herald 

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Family Secrets” by Mark Gribben, The Malefactor’s Register
“Murder Mansion: The Shotgun Slaying of Bruce and Darlene Rouse” by Tori Richards, The Crime Library
“Murder Thy Father and Thy Mother” by Marie Kusters-McCarthy, Crime Magazine
“Man Confesses To Brutally Murdering Parents 15 Years After Squandering His Inheritance” by Benjamin H. Smith, Oxygen
“Rouse’s Defense Tries To Implicate His Brother” by Shirley Salemy, Chicago Tribune
“Judge Gives Rouse 80 Years, Wishes It Were More” by Gary Mays, Chicago Tribune
Nov 04, 2020
146: Dane Cook & Ryan Ferguson
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For a few years in the mid-2000’s, Dane Cook was on top of the world. He performed high-energy stand up routines to countless adoring fans. He sold out Madison Square Garden. One of his stand up comedy albums went platinum. The next one went double platinum. He got movie deals. He created his own production company. At the risk of stating the obvious, Dane got rich. Super rich. Luckily, his half-brother Darryl McCauley was by his side the whole time, acting as Dane’s business manager.

Then Brandi tells us a story that’ll make your blood boil. In November of 2001, Kent Heitholt, a sports editor for the Columbia Daily Tribune, was discovered dead in the newspaper’s parking lot. Kent had been brutally beaten and strangled. His murder went unsolved for two years. But a young man named Charles Erickson, who’d been 17 at the time of Kent’s murder, read about the crime and got a bad feeling. He and his friend Ryan Ferguson had been partying at a nearby bar on the night of Kent’s murder. Charles had done cocaine, taken adderall, and been drinking that night. He couldn’t remember the night in question, but he began having troubling dreams. Those dreams made him wonder whether he and Ryan had been involved in Kent’s death. Charles eventually confessed to the crime. Police accepted the story, despite the fact that Charles’ dreams didn’t match the evidence.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
Dane Cook’s appearance on the podcast, “Your Mom’s House”
Dane Cook’s appearance on the podcast, “Inside of You”
Dane cook’s appearance on the podcast, “Bertcast”
“Dane Cook’s half-brother, sister-in-law must repay $12 million,” by Alan Duke for CNN
“Dane Cook’s manager-brother ordered to pay him $12 million,” by Lindsay Powers for The Hollywood Reporter
“Wife of Dane Cook’s brother sentenced in embezzlement scheme,” by Lisa Redmond for the Lowell Sun

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Dream/Killer” Documentary
“Ryan Ferguson’s Habeus Corpus Petition” courts.mo.gov
“Saving Ryan Ferguson: One Lawyer’s Story” episode 48 Hours 
“The Ryan Ferguson Case: An examination of a strange murder and conviction” by Chris Hamby
“Ryan Ferguson Freed After Spending Almost a Decade in Prison for Murder” by Lauren Effron and Victoria Thompson, ABC News
“Ryan W. Ferguson” wikipedia.org
Oct 28, 2020
145: The Kidnapping of Shannon Matthews & Eliza Jumel's Divorce
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It was a cold February day, and mother of the year Karen Matthews was in a panic. Her nine-year-old daughter, Shannon Matthews, hadn’t come home from school that day. Immediately, the tightknit community of Dewsbury, England, came together to find the missing child. Investigators searched 3,000 homes. They stopped 1,500 drivers. But the days crept on. Shannon was nowhere to be found. Meanwhile, Karen acted like a big weirdo.

Then Brandi returns from her battle with COVID to tell us about an old timey divorce. 

Eliza Jumel was, too put it mildly, rich. When her husband died, Eliza became the richest woman in New York. By that point, Eliza had discovered that money could buy her a lot of things -- the former home of the American Revolution, for example -- but it couldn’t buy her acceptance from the upper crust of New York City society. For that, she needed to marry the right dude. So she set her sights on Aaron Burr. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
An episode of Casefile titled, “Shannon Matthews” 
The documentary tv series, “Tears Lies and Videotape”
“The Kidnapping of Shannon Matthews,” wikipedia

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Invention” podcast episode, Lore by Aaron Mehnke
“Long After Alexander Hamilton's Death, His Son and Rival Aaron Burr Dueled in Divorce Court” by Kirstin Fawcett, Mental Floss
“The Life of Eliza Jumel” newyorkcityhistory.org
“Burr’s Role In Adultery: Is It Opera?” by Dena Kleiman, The New York Times
“Eliza Jumel” wikipedia.org


Oct 21, 2020
144: The Queen of Mean & Sunny von Bulow
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 Leona Helmsley referred to herself as the queen of the palace, but her terrible personality earned her a more apt nickname -- the queen of mean. She and her husband were rich beyond most peoples’ imaginations. They stayed that way in part thanks to savvy real estate investing, and to tactics that were illegal at worst and immoral at best. But when Leona finally stiffed the wrong contractor, her luck began to crumble.

Then Kristin tells us about heiress Sunny von Bulow, who had the bad fortune of marrying the wrong man. When she married Claus von Bulow, Sunny was smitten. But the pair were a bad match. Sunny came to their marriage with a tremendous fortune. Sunny’s money was a sore spot for Claus, and Claus’s infidelity was a sore spot for Sunny. By the late 70s, the pair seemed headed for divorce. Then Sunny slipped into a sudden coma. She recovered, only to slip into another one for good.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“The Claus Von Bulow Case” by Mark Gribben for the Crime Library
“Sunny von Bulow” entry on Wikipedia

In this episode, DP pulled from:
NY Times article by Edin Nemi “Leona Helmsley, Hotel Queen, Dies at 87”
Time Magazine “Top 10 Tax Dodgers”
The New Yorker article by Michael Schulman “Her Majesty”
The Leona Helmsley Movie “The Queen of Mean”
“Leona Helmsley” on Wikipedia
Oct 14, 2020
143: Ruth Bader Ginsburg & Identity Theft
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Ruth Bader Ginsburg was a trailblazer. When she entered Harvard Law School, she was one of just 9 women in a class of nearly 500 men. Later, in her legal career, she faced incredible discrimination. But Ruth didn’t let the douchebags get her down. She was whip smart, and a tireless worker. Her children remember her staying up until the wee hours in the morning, poring over law books, with a stale cup of coffee on one side of her desk and a box of prunes on the other. She kept working, and working, and working. She argued before the Supreme Court multiple times -- and won. She became a judge. And then, in 1993, she became the second woman appointed to the Supreme Court.

Then, with Brandi recovering from COVID-19, Kristin’s sister Kyla fills in with all the energy of an eager understudy! Kyla tells us about a family in Portland, Indiana, who had a hell of a time in the 90s. It all started with their mail being stolen. They got a PO box, but their mail kept going missing. Their credit scores plummeted. Someone was after them. Someone was stealing from them. This went on for years. When Axton Betz-Hamilton went off to college, she thought she’d get a break from the paranoia that had taken over her family. She was wrong.   

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
The Documentary, “RBG”
“Ruth Bader Ginsburg,” entry on oyez.org
“Ruth Bader Ginsburg,” entry on Wikipedia
“At Harvard Business School, Ruth Bader Ginsburg displayed the steel she’d be famous for,” by Asher Klein for nbcboston.com
“Ruth Bader Ginsburg,” entry on History.com
“A conversation with Ruth Bader Ginsburg at HLS,” video by Harvard Law School on YouTube

In this episode, Kyla pulled from:
Eh… she’ll fill this in soon! 

Oct 07, 2020
142: REBROADCAST: Too Much Betrayal & the Reluctant Lottery Winner
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Steven Beard woke up on October 2, 1999, in horrible pain. His stomach was split open. His intestines were exposed. When he called 911, he couldn’t tell the dispatcher what had happened — he could only say that he desperately needed help. It didn’t take investigators long to discover that Steven had been shot in his sleep. But who would want him dead?

Then Kristin tells us a story that, at first glance, makes no sense. A man walked into a QuikTrip, bought a couple of lottery tickets, and despite the overwhelming odds against him, won $16.5 million. Great, right? Not so much. He refused to claim the prize money. Iowa lottery officials were stunned. Who wouldn’t want $16.5 million? Months passed. The man still refused to come forward. Lottery officials smelled something fishy.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Court says Iowa lottery rigging investigation took too long,” Associated Press
“Just a dollar and a scheme,” episode of American Greed
“The man who cracked the lottery” by Reid Forgave for the New York Times

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Marriage, Money and Murder: Steven and Celeste Beard” by David Krajicek, crimelibrary.com
“Celeste Beard Johnson” episode Snapped
“Marriage, Money, and Murder” by Bill Hewitt, People Magazine
Sep 30, 2020
141: The Pitfalls of Being a Child Star & a Troubled Marriage
7407
Jackie Coogan landed his first movie role when he was just an infant. A few years later, when he was performing the shimmy on stage, Charlie Chaplin was taken by his performance. He cast little Jackie in a couple of his films, and with that, Jackie’s career took off. Jackie became one of the industry’s biggest stars. By the time he was 12, he’d earned a million dollars. By the time he was 21, he’d earned four million. He was set for life. The money had all been set aside -- just waiting for him to hit adulthood. At least, that’s what he’d been told.

Then Brandi tells us about a troubled marriage. Jennifer and Frederick Trayers had been married for nearly two decades. They’d been through ups and downs together. Frederick’s career in the navy took them all over the place, but they always had each other. But in 2002, Frederick began an affair. Suspicious, Jennifer installed spyware on Frederick’s computer. She began reading every emotionally-charged email between the two. She read and read and read, and eventually, she took action.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Coogan Case Spurs Move to Safeguard Wealth of Minors” by Martha Martin, The Daily News, 1938
“California Child Actors Bill,” entry on Wikipedia
“Jackie Coogan,” entry on Wikipedia
“Jackie Coogan wins fortune fight decision,” Los Angeles Times, 1938
“Mother of Jackie Coogan reweds,” The Pomona Progress Bulletin, 1936
“In life, as on screen, pathos marks career of the kid,” Frederick Othman, The Oklahoman, 1938

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Love Triangle Murder of Lt. Commander Fred Trayers” by Bryan Lavietes, The Crime Library
“Jennifer Trayers” murderpedia.org
“Trayers v. Johnson” casetext.com
Sep 23, 2020
140: High Schoolers
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As the Civil War came to an end, Alexander Clark saw possibilities. He’d helped dismantle slavery, and now he wanted a piece of the next big fight -- the fight for equality. So he and other black men lobbied Iowa for voting rights. When they won that fight, Clark turned his attention to education. His home sat next door to Grammar School No. 2. It was a good public school. But his children couldn’t attend it. Instead, they had to go to a poorly funded school about a mile away. So when his daughter Susan was 12 years old, Alexander and his wife Catherine sent her to Grammar School No. 2. When she was turned away, they sued.

Then Brandi tells us about 17-year-old Ashley Reeves. Ashley had always been a dependable kid, so when she broke curfew one April night in 2006, her mom immediately knew that something was wrong. Initially, police suspected Ashley’s boyfriend. But when that lead didn’t go anywhere, they turned their focus on a 27-year-old physical education teacher named Samson Shelton.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
The documentary “Lost in History: Alexander Clark” by Iowa PBS
“Clark v. Board of School Directors: Reflections After 150 Years,” by Drake School of Law
“Alexander Clark,” entry on Wikipedia
“Muscatine, Iowa,” entry on Wikipedia
“Clark v. Board of School Directors,” entry on Wikipedia

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Deadly Lessons” episode On the Case with Paula Zahn
“Midwestern Teen Left For Dead In Woods” episode Crime Watch Daily
“Did Teacher Strangle Teen, Go Dancing?” by Christine Lagorio, CBS News
“Mother: Ashley Reeves Neck Not Broken” by Beth Hundsdorfer, The Belleville News-Democrat
“‘Miracle’ Girls Sees Attacker Sentenced” Associated Press, The Oklahoman
Sep 16, 2020
139: A Facebook Stalker & a Foreclosure
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It all started with a friend request. Amanda Playle was flattered to see the Facebook request come in from her old high school boyfriend, Anthony Reynolds. The two hadn’t spoken for a while, but they quickly reconnected. They talked about their lives. So much had changed since their high school days. Amanda was married to her husband Paul. She’d become a mother. Over time, she admitted to Anthony that her marriage wasn’t perfect. But when Anthony pressed her to meet up, she declined. She didn’t want to cross a line. But Anthony refused to take no for an answer. Soon, he began stalking and harassing her.

Then Kristin tells us about a man who fell behind on his mortgage payments. Tony Kiritsis planned to turn his real estate into a shopping center, but after falling behind on his payments a few too many times, he found himself under the threat of foreclosure. He was livid, but didn’t blame himself. He blamed Meridian Mortgage. So he showed up at their offices one winter morning with a sawed off shotgun and took mortgage broker Dick Hall hostage.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
The documentary “Dead Man’s Line”
“Tony Kiritsis” entry on Wikipedia
“Kin testify Kiritsis held sister hostage in 1969,” by Carolyun Colwell for The Courier-Journal
“Kiritsis jury ‘far from a decision,’” by Kristie Hill for the Associated Press

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Stalker Inside My House” episode BBC Outlook
“Amanda was terrorised by a stalker for two years. Then she learned her husband was to blame.” by Jessica Clark, mamamia.com
“Man jailed for stalking wife by impersonating ex-boyfriend” by Damien Gayle, The Guardian
“Bexhill stalking victim speaks out and urges others to seek help” by Isabelle Cipirska, The Bexhill-On-Sea Observer
“SLEEPING WITH THE ENEMY Mum-of-three terrorised by stalker for two years horrified to discover it was her own HUSBAND” by Carl Stroud, The Sun
“'Calculating and cruel' husband, 43, set up fake Facebook accounts to pose as his wife's EX-boyfriend to threaten her and quiz her over past sex life is jailed for more than three years” by Thomas Burrows, The Daily Mail
Sep 09, 2020
138: The Ken and Barbie Killers & the Cocoanut Grove Fire
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In the early 1940s, Boston’s Cocoanut Grove nightclub was *the* place to see and be seen. The club owner, Barnet “Barney” Welansky, was a sharp businessman. He ensured that the club was beautifully decorated with blue satin hanging from the ceilings, heavy drapes, and support columns that were made to look like palm trees. He also kept a watchful eye on the finances by ensuring that no one left without paying. He locked almost every exit and covered windows with draperies. On November 28, 1942, the Cocoanut Grove gained the horrific distinction of becoming the deadliest nightclub fire in American history.

Then Brandi brings in her sister, Kaci, to tell us about Paul Bernardo and Karla Homolka, aka, the Ken and Barbie Killers. In the late 80s, the people of Scarborough, Ontario, were on edge. There’d been a string of rapes in their community, and all anyone seemed to know about the rapist was that he was blonde and in his twenties. On little more than hunches, two women called the police to report that they suspected Paul Bernardo as the perpetrator. The women were right, but it’d be years before Paul faced justice. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
The documentary “Six locked doors: the legacy of Cocoanut grove” 
 “The Cocoanut Grove Inferno” by Jack Thomas for the Boston Globe
“Grove Owner Starts 12-15 Year Sentence,” The Boston Globe
“Court Upholds Prison Term in Night Club Fire,” Universal Press
“Night Club Owner Guilty In Boston,” The New York Times
“The Cocoanut Grove Fire,” BostonFireHistory.org

In this episode, Kaci pulled from:
An episode of Autopsy from HBO “Autopsy 8: Dead Giveaway”
“Paul Bernardo & Karla Homolka” by Marilyn Bardsley, The Crime Library
“Karla Leanne Homolka,” Murderpedia.org
“Paul Kenneth Bernardo,” Murderpedia.org
“Karla Homolka,” Wikipedia.org
“Paul Bernardo,” Wikipedia.org
Sep 02, 2020
137: A Poisoner & A True Douche Canoe
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Audrey Marie Frazier defies true crime labels. Was she a black widow? Was she a master of disguise? An escape artist? We like to think she was all three! See, ladies? We really can have it all. Audrey was a chronic spender. She never had enough money to support her expensive tastes. So she got creative. She bought life insurance policies, and umm…. All of a sudden, the people around her got sick. Super sick.

Then Kristin tells us about John Darwin. This man is a douche canoe if we’ve ever heard of one. On March 21, 2002, John hopped in his handmade canoe and set out into the North Sea. The waters were calm and he was an experienced canoeist, but John didn’t show up for work that evening. His wife, Anne, panicked. She called the authorities. Rescue crews worked tirelessly to find John, but all they found was his paddle and the wreckage of his canoe. Don’t worry about John, though. He was just fine.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

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In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
An episode of the podcast Redhanded, “How Not To Fake Your Death: John Darwin - Canoe Man”
“‘Canoe man’ John Darwin who faked his own death has extraordinary new life,” by Emily Retter for The Mirror
“Canoe pair lose jail term appeals,” BBC News
“Canoe man’s ‘lover’: Darwin the Druid is psychotic - and I was terrified of him,” the London Evening Standard
“Canoeist sons ‘put through hell,” BBC News
“Sea search for missing canoeist,” BBC News
“Missing canoeist admits deception,” BBC News
“Anne Darwin’s week in court: ‘A woman able to lie and deceive at length,” by David Randall for the Independent
“John Darwin disappearance case” entry on Wikipedia
“Canoe man and wife jailed for six years,” by Tom Wilkinson for The Independent

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Marie Hilley: Inscrutable Black Widow” by Marlee MacLeod, The Crime Library
“The Great Escape Artist” by Mark Gribben, The Malefactors Register
“Alabama Woman Who Poisoned Her Husband And Daughter Dies After Escaping Prison” by Benjamin H. Smith, oxygen.com
Aug 26, 2020
136: The Great Molasses Flood & a Father's Love
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It was the winter of 1919, and the folks at the Purity Distilling Company were working their asses off. Prohibition was right around the corner, and they wanted to make as much rum as they could -- while it was still legal. They received shipment after shipment of a key ingredient: Molasses. All of it went in a tank in Boston’s North End. The tank was 50 feet tall and 90 feet in diameter. It held up to 2.3 million gallons of molasses. But the tank had problems. It leaked constantly, and it made strange groaning sounds. It had been poorly constructed. On January 15, 1919, the tank collapsed.

Then Brandi tells us about pedofile Jeff Doucet. Jeff ran a karate studio in the 80s, and that’s how he gained the trust of 11 year old Jody Plauche. Over time, Jeff groomed Jody. For a year, he sexually abused the boy. Then, in February of 1984, he kidnapped Jody. Investigators tracked Jeff down to a motel in California, and returned Jody to his parents. Jody’s parents were devastated to hear what had happened to their son. And Jody’s father Gary decided to get revenge.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
The book, “Dark Tide: The Great Boston Molasses Flood of 1919” by Stephen Puleo
“The Great Molasses Flood,” by Robert Stanly for New England Today
“Why the Great Molasses Flood Was So Deadly” by Emily Sohn for history.com
“Great Molasses Flood” entry on Britannica
“Great Molasses Flood” entry on Wikipedia

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Survivors Perspective with Jody Plauché” episode, Criminal Perspective podcast
“Molested, abducted as a child in infamous Baton Rouge case, Jody Plauché wants his story to help others” by George Morris, The Advocate
“A Father’s Justice” by Rick Reilly, ESPN
“Man Who Shot Son’s Alleged Kidnapper Pleads Innocent” by Guy Coates, AP
“Plauche Pleads No Contest To Manslaughter Charges” by Ray Formaker Jr., AP
“Father Who Killed Alleged Abuser on TV Avoids Jail” Los Angeles Times
“Gary Plauché” wikipedia.org
Aug 19, 2020
135: Love Stories
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This week, we covered two romantic entanglements that’ll have you reaching for the puke bucket.

Burt Pugach was a wealthy, married lawyer when he met 21-year-old Linda Riss on a park bench in New York City. Linda wasn’t particularly attracted to Burt, but he was pushy. They’d been dating a while when Linda discovered that Burt was married. Burt had a million excuses, but Linda didn’t buy any of them. She decided to move on with her life. But Burt made that impossible.

Then Kristin tells us a truly revolting catfishing tale. In 2005, Thomas Montgomery was living the life of a married suburban dad. But Tom was unfulfilled. So he got online. He quickly fell into conversation with an 18-year-old high school student who went by the screenname Talhotblond. She sent him pictures of herself. She was gorgeous, and she wanted to see pictures of him. What was a balding, 40-something man to do? Lie his ass off. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
The documentary “Talhotblond”
And several unsuccessful google searches

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Crazy Love” Documentary
“It’s Me and Burt Against The World” by Paul Schwartzman, The Washington Post
“Meet the Pugachs” by Marianne Macdonald, The Guardian
“Linda Riss Pugach, Whose Life Was Ripped From Headlines, Dies at 75” by Margalit Fox, The New York Times
Aug 12, 2020
134: The Kidnapping of Jeremy London & a House Fire
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Cameron Todd Willingham woke up to his two-year-old daughter screaming “Daddy, Daddy!” He sat up in bed, but was surrounded by smoke so thick he could barely see. He made his way out of the burning house and yelled for his neighbors to call the fire department. His two-year-old daughter and one-year-old twins were  trapped inside the home. Cameron dropped to his knees and cried. Firefighters arrived on the scene, but they couldn’t save the children. All three of the Willingham children died in the fire. It was a tragedy, plain and simple. But a few days later, when arson investigators reviewed the scene, they were certain that the fire was set intentionally. Cameron had set the fire. But years later, certainty waned. Were those arson experts really experts, after all?  

Then Brandi tells us a bizarre story about Seventh Heaven star Jeremy London. In 2010, Jeremy claimed that a group of men abducted him after they helped him change his flat tire. They forced him to do drugs and drink alcohol at gunpoint. He told them he was in recovery, but they didn’t care. For twelve hours, they forced him to take drugs. He finally got free when one of the kidnappers took pity on him. Jeremy reported his story to the police, but he faced skepticism -- namely from his mom and twin brother. They thought his story sounded fishy. Perhaps Jeremy made the story up in order to cover up a relapse? 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
The article “Trial by Fire” by David Grann in The New Yorker
The Frontline episode, “Death by Fire” 
“Cameron Todd Willingham,” entry on Wikipedia

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Jeremy London: ‘I Was So Scared’” by Michelle Tauber, People
“Jeremy London Survives Bizarre Kidnapping Incident” by Ken Lee, People
“Jeremy London kidnapped, forced to do drugs, buy booze at gunpoint: report” by Michael Sheridan, New York Daily News
“EXCLUSIVE: Hollywood Actor Jeremy London Kidnapped; Held At Gun Point, Robbed & Forced To Smoke Drugs” Radar Online
“Is Jeremy London’s Kidnapping Story Falling Apart?” by Josh Grossberg, E! Online
“Jeremy London’s Mom: I Don’t Want to Bury Another Child” by Natalie Finn and Ken Baker, E! Online
“EXCLUSIVE JAILHOUSE INTERVIEW: Man Accused Of 'Kidnapping' Jeremy London Says 'We Partied All Night' -- He Took Ecstasy and Xanax” Radar Online
“Jeremy London: I’m Vindicated in Kidnapping Case” by Johnny Dodd, People
Aug 05, 2020
133: The Watcher & Laura Ingalls Wilder
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Derek and Maria Broaddus couldn’t have been more thrilled. In the summer of 2014, they bought their dream home in Westfield, New Jersey. But their dream home quickly turned into a nightmare when the couple received a series of unsettling anonymous letters. The letter writer knew their names. The writer knew the nicknames they gave their children. The writer alluded to secrets within the walls of the home, and referred to the Broaddus children as “young blood.” Each creepy letter was signed, “the watcher.” 

Then, Kristin tells us about the controversy surrounding the literary estate of Laura Ingalls Wilder. Laura Ingalls Wilder authored the Little House on the Prairie series of children’s books. She began writing them when she was in her sixties. The books brought her tremendous financial stability. When she died, her will was crystal clear. Her literary estate would go to her daughter, Rose Wilder Lane. Upon Rose’s death, the literary estate would go to the Laura Ingalls Library of Mansfield, Missouri. But that’s not what happened. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Lawsuit on the prairie: Battle pits small library against huge estate,” by Hallie Levine for the New York Post
“Little library on the offensive,” by Lynda Richardson for The New York Times
“Little library on the prairie  in a legal tangle,” by Stephanie Simon for the Los Angeles Times
“Little house on the controversy: Laura Ingalls Wilder’s name removed from book award,” by Kat Chow for NPR
“Rose Wilder Lane” entry on Wikipedia
“Laura Ingalls Wilder” entry on Wikipedia

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Haunting of a Dream House” by Reeves Wiedeman, The Cut
“The Real Life Story Of The Watcher Feels Like A Stephen King Novel” by Alana Robson, TheThings.com
“'The Watcher' house is sold years after a family was terrorized with creepy letters” by Allen Kim, CNN
Jul 29, 2020
132: Brandi's Back & the Black Widow of Keller, Texas
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Michelle Williams called 911 in a panic. She’d woken up from on her living room couch to a loud bang. She groggily made her way to the master bedroom, only to be struck in the face by a man dressed in black. When she came to, she made her way to the bed. Her beloved husband Gregory Williams lay dead from a gunshot wound. The intruder had shot Gregory with his own gun. At least, that’s what Michelle initially told police. 

Then Brandi comes back from maternity leave to tell us a truly horrifying tale about being in labor for 50+ hours. Brandi battled pain, hunger, and a very pushy lactation specialist, but in the end, it was all worth it. London Lyric Pond was born in the wee hours of June 19, 2020. She is absolutely perfect. And here’s a fun fact for your Tim Pounds journal -- she looks EXACTLY like Tim Pounds!

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Temptation in Texas” episode of 48 hours 
“‘Black widow’ breaks down in tears while looking at photos of husband’s body at her murder trial as prosecutors claim she was driven by greed when she shot him,” by Snejana Farberov for the Daily Mail
“Closing arguments in Keller murder trial set for Monday,” by Chris Van Horne for NBCDFW

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
Her life!






Jul 22, 2020
131: Conrad Hilton III & a Bad Pot of Coffee
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Daryl Pitts, aka DP, is back for his third illustrious guest appearance on the podcast, and he has one hell of a story to tell. 

Conrad Hilton III is young, rich, and accustomed to getting what he wants. So when he boarded a commercial flight (the horror!) from London to Los Angeles and was asked to turn off his cell phone, he immediately lost his cool. He screamed obscenities at the flight attendants. He punched the bulkhead. He smoked weed in the airplane bathroom. Later, he threatened to kill the flight attendants. When they handcuffed him, he complained that they would ruin his modeling career. When they finally landed and lil Conrad was made to face some consequences, his family hired famed O.J. Simpson attorney Robert Shapiro.

Then Kristin tells a truly disgusting story about a horrific pot of coffee. On a Monday morning in the spring of 2009, Michael Utz was at work for the city of Culpeper, Virginia. He walked over to his personal coffee pot, but when he opened it up, he noticed that it was already filled with water. But… the water didn’t smell like water. It smelled like urine. He immediately went to his boss, who made it his mission to find the culprit. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Peeved ex-employee relieves himself of $5,001,” by Rhonda Simmons for the Star Exponent

In this episode, DP pulled from:
“Conrad Hilton and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good Flight” by Amy Wallace for GQ.com
“Hilton Family Struggles to Keep Their Latest Drama Under Wraps” by Erica Harwood for Vanity Fair
“Conrad Hilton Violates Restraining Order, Seen in Bizarre Video with Stuffed Bear Outside of Ex-GF’s House” by the Blast Staff for TheBlast.com
“Conrad Hilton, Brother of Paris, Gets Probation for Taking Ex-girlfriend’s Father’s Bentley” by City News Services for the LA Daily News
 “Socialite Conrad Hilton’s Journey to the Dark Side” by Amy Zimmerman for the Daily Beast
“Paris is Bad? Meet Her Little Brother Conrad Hilton” by Nick Clark for the NZHerald.com
Jul 15, 2020
130: Rebroadcast: Bad Dads! (Featuring DP)
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Hey everybody! With Brandi out on maternity leave, we decided to rebroadcast one of our favorite episodes -- the Bad Dads episode, featuring Kristin's Dad, Daryl Pitts. But why this episode? Well, hold onto your hat. We chose this episode to prepare you for NEXT week, when DP will guest star in a brand new episode. That's right. Two weeks of DP. Can you handle it??

Guess who’s baaaack? It’s none other than Daryl Pitts, a.k.a. DP. For some reason, you people just can’t get enough DP. We don’t judge. We just indulge your every whim.  
 
For this episode, we let the judges on Patreon pick our theme. We asked them to choose between spoiled kids and bad dads, and bad dads won by a mile. 
 
Brandi starts us off with a predictably dark case. When Christian Longo met Mary Jane Baker, the two hit it off almost immediately. They were both Jehovah’s Witnesses, and both eager to start a family. But Christian didn’t pay much attention to the commandments. He stole regularly. He committed adultery. Eventually, he committed murder. 
 
Then Kristin tells us about a sketchy family business. Scott Catt loved robbing banks. It was easy. The tellers never put up a fight. There was a downside, though. The payoffs were never very big. So one day, Scott got to thinking. If he recruited some more robbers, he could get into the vault. His haul would be so much bigger. So he asked his son, Hayden, and daughter, Abby, to join him.  
 
And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.
 
In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
Episode of 20/20 “A Family Affair”
“I would only rob banks for my family,” by Skip Hollandsworth for Texas Monthly 
Catt Family wikipedia page 
 
In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Trials of Christian Longo” by Elizabeth Engstrom, The Crime Library
“Christian Longo” entry, crime museum.org
“Oregon v. Longo: A family’s murder” murderpedia.org
 
Jul 08, 2020
128: A Museum Heist & Dalia Dippolito
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Dalia Dippolito was mid-workout when she got a terrible phone call. A police officer informed her that she needed to come home immediately. He wouldn’t say why. Dalia rushed back to the townhome she shared with her husband Mike, only to find their neighborhood swarming with police officers. Caution tape surrounded her home. Fingerprint dust covered her front door. She rushed up to a police officer, who confirmed that Mike was her husband, and delivered the awful news, “I’m sorry to tell you ma’am, he’s been killed.” Curiously, Dalia began wailing before he finished the sentence.

With Brandi out on maternity leave, Kristin’s sister Kyla Pitts-Zevin filled in with a story that was totally NOT Brandi approved. That’s right. Kyla came on the podcast to talk about a museum heist. In November of 2009, a talented young flutist named Edwin Rist broke into the British Natural History Museum at Tring. His mission? To stuff a shitton of rare birds into his suitcase. He left the museum, undetected, with more than a million dollars worth of feathers. Edwin wasn’t a criminal mastermind, but it took awhile for him to get caught.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
20/20 episode, ““Down Payment on Death”
The Court Junkie episode, “Dalia Dippolito and the Attempted Murder of Her Husband”
“Dippolito mistrial: State vows to try case again,” by Daphne Duret for the Palm Beach Post
“Defense attorneys point to growing mistrust of police for jury deadlock,” by Jane Musgrave for the Palm Beach Post

In this episode, Kyla pulled from:
This American Life episode 654: “The Feather Heist”
Kirk Johnson’s book: “The Feather thief: Beauty, Obsession, and the Natural History Heist of the Century”
BBC article: “Natural History Museum thief ordered to pay thousands”

Jul 01, 2020
127: PATREON BONUS EPISODE: The Candyman & Buried Alive
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Barbara Mackle had just been kidnapped. An armed man and woman had stormed into her hotel room, bound and chloroformed her mother, and taken her at gunpoint to their car. They drove for roughly 20 miles, then stopped in a remote, wooded area outside of Atlanta. They injected her with tranquilizers, then brought her to a grave. At the bottom of the grave lay a fiberglass box. It contained a lamp, food and water, and ventilation tubes. The kidnappers ordered her to get inside. Then they buried her alive. 

Then Brandi tells us a story that nearly ruined Halloween. It was Halloween of 1974 when Ronald O’Bryan and a friend took their children trick-or-treating in a Pasadena, Texas neighborhood. The children ran excitedly from house to house, getting candy along the way. But at one house, no one answered. The kids ran impatiently to the next house, but Ronald stayed behind. When he caught up with the rest of the group, he held five 21-inch Pixy Stix. The kids couldn’t resist.

If you enjoyed this episode and want to hear more bonus episodes, sign up for our Patreon.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.
 
For this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Man Who Killed Halloween” by Lisa Marie Fuqua, medium.com
“The True Story of the Notorious Trick-or-Treat Murderer” by Michael Segalov, Vice
“'Man Who Ruined Halloween': Recounting the horror story of Houston's notorious ‘Candyman’" by Alison Medley, The Houston Chronicle
“Candy Man's legacy still haunting today” The Houston Chronicle
“Ronald Clark O’Bryan” wikipedia.org
 
For this episode, Kristin pulled from: 
“A terrified Barbara read her instructions,” by Gene Miller for the Miami Herald
“Kidnap case goes to jury; Krist silent,” by Gene Miller for the Miami Herald
“Witnesses pin Mackle kidnap on man with ‘heavy beard,’” Fort Myers News-Press
“‘Bury me in a box,” Krist says,” by Gene Miller for the Miami Herald
“Gary Stephen Krist,” wikipedia
“Gary Stephen Krist,” murderpedia
“He buried Barbara Mackle alive -- then became a doctor and a drug trafficker,” by Kara Goldfarb for allthatsinteresting.com
“Krist v. State”
“Barbara Mackle, the heiress who was kidnapped and buried alive for three days,” by Mike McPadden for investigationdiscovery.com
“Barbara Mackle’s 83 hours in a tomb,” by Gene Miller for the Miami Herald
 
 






Jun 24, 2020
126: Police Officer Daniel Holtzclaw & a Shocking Medical Diagnosis
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Buckle up. This first story is awful. 

Daniel Holtzclaw had been an officer with the Oklahoma City Police Department for a few years when a woman came forward with an accusation. Her name was Jannie Ligons. She told officers that she’d been stopped by a police officer late at night, as she was coming home from bingo. He’d sexually assaulted her. Jannie was traumatized, but she remembered enough details to give detectives key information. They zeroed in on Daniel Holtzclaw. But as they dug into his past, they grew increasingly disturbed. It appeared Daniel had a pattern of targeting vulnerable black women, and in at least one case, a vulnerable black girl. Jannie Ligons’ bravery got this investigation moving forward, but she wasn’t the first woman to alert police to Daniel’s modus operandi. She was just the first to be taken seriously.

Then Brandi tells us the story of Richard Mason, a multi-millionaire who appeared to have it all. He had three children. He’d co-founded a successful business. But his health was failing him. Finally, when he was in his mid-50s, doctors gave him upsetting news. He had cystic fibrosis. That part wasn’t a complete surprise. Cystic fibrosis ran in his family. But what did surprise him was the revelation that he was most likely infertile, and always had been. Richard was stunned. If he was infertile, how had he fathered three children? 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“A guilty verdict for Daniel Holtzclaw,” by Matt Ford for The Atlantic
“The 13 women who accused a cop of sexual assault, in their own words,” by Jessica Testa for Buzzfeed
The episode of 20/20 “What the Dash Cam Never Saw”
The interrogation video, on YouTube
“Former OKC police officer’s attorney offers explanation for evidence in rape trial,” by Kyle Schwab for the Oklahoman
“Closing arguments to begin for former Oklahoma City police officer accused of rape, sexual assault,” by Kyle Schwab for the Oklahoman
“Jury deliberating in trial of former Oklahoma City police officer,” for kfor.com
“Former Oklahoma City cop Daniel Holtzclaw sentenced to 263 years on rape charges,” by Andrea Cavallier, for the Associated Press
“Oklahoma court denies appeal of ex-police officer,” by Tim Willert for The Oklahoman
“Daniel Holtzclaw” entry on wikipedia

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Millionaire Reveals Moment a Doctor Told Him He Couldn’t Be the Father of Three Adored Boys” by Nick Craven, The Daily Mail
“Father learnt that three sons from 20-year-marriage were not his after doctor told him he was infertile” by Jack Hardy, The Telegraph
“Multi-millionaire who found out sons weren't his reveals why he went public” by Amber Hicks, The Mirror
“Richard Mason paternity row: Son breaks silence to claim millionaire father was 'very manipulative’” by Phoebe Southworth, The Telegraph
Jun 17, 2020
125: Larry Flynt vs. Jerry Falwell & the Murder of Becki Dillard
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Moody, Missouri, isn’t known for its crime rate. So when a passerby discovered a dead body on the side of the highway, they called 911 and reported a fatal car crash. But when police arrived on the scene, they discovered something much more unusual. The body belonged to 24-year-old Becki Dillard. She had been shot twice. When investigators went to notify the family, they were immediately suspicious of Becki’s husband, Justin. His reactions were strange. But over time, they began to focus on Justin’s mom, Debra Dillard and her boyfriend, Billy Joe Eastep.

Then Kristin tells us about Hustler Magazine publisher Larry Flynt. When Hustler hit its peak in the early 80s, it became known and loved for being a smuttier version of Playboy. Hustler’s contents made Larry a lot of enemies, but perhaps none were more passionate than televangelist Jerry Falwell. One day, Larry decided to poke the bear by creating an ad that parodied a popular Campari ad. It was rough. The ad featured an “interview” with Jerry Falwell, in which he confessed that his first sexual experience had been with his mother, in an outhouse. When the reverend saw the ad parody, he was incensed. So he sued.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“The Jerry Falwell v Larry Flynt Trial,” famous-trials.com, by Douglas O. Linder
“Hustler Magazine v. Falwell” entry on Wikipedia
“Hustler Magazine v. Falwell” by James C. Foster for mtsu.edu

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Debra Dillard” episode Snapped
“Howell County Sheriff Says Woman’s Death Was No Accident” by Kathee Baird, The Crime Scene
“Mother-In-Law Charged in Howell County Murder” by Kathee Baird, The Crime Scene
“Jury Convicts Debra Dillard of Murdering Daughter-In-Law” by Kathee Baird, The Crime Scene
Jun 10, 2020
124: The Chicago Tylenol Murders and Corruption in Kansas City
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TW: Police Brutality

We don’t normally do trigger warnings, but we’re making an exception this week. In this episode, Brandi’s case very briefly mentions police brutality. The case is old timey and the alleged brutality wasn’t racially motivated, but in light of police officer Derek Chauvin’s recent murder of George Floyd and the protests that have followed, we figured some folks might like a heads up. Note: If it seems weird that we discuss police brutality without mentioning the current climate, that’s because we recorded this episode before the protests.

It was happening all around Chicago. People felt a little ill. So they took a Tylenol. A short time later, they dropped dead. Doctors were initially puzzled. Why were young, seemingly healthy people dying so suddenly? They soon found the unsettling answer. Someone -- or maybe multiple someones -- had gone to multiple Chicago-area grocery stores and drugstores, took the Tylenol off the shelves, and filled the capsules with poison. They then returned the poisoned Tylenol to the store shelves, where unsuspecting buyers picked it up. 

Then Brandi tells us about Kansas City socialite Florence Barton. On an October night in 1920, Florence and her fiance Howard Winter went for a drive. They drove Howard’s Dodge Coupe through Swope Park, and eventually headed down a country road. When they stopped for Howard to smoke his cigar, a car pulled up alongside them. A man jumped out. He asked Howard for directions. As Howard answered, he realized that the man had a gun, and it was aimed right at him.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“The Tylenol Terrorist,” by Rachael Bell on Crime Library
“Murder by Tylenol,” by Brian Anderson for Vice
“Home of man linked to Tylenol deaths searched,” the Associated Press
“James Lewis rape case reveals horrifying allegations,” by Laurel J. Sweet for the Boston Herald 

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The 1920 murder of a socialite exposes a corrupt Kansas City” by Diane Euston, Martin City Telegraph
“Roberts Aids Defense Pleas of an Alibi” The Kansas City Kansan, newspapers.com
“Denzel Chester Freed of Murder” Sacramento Union, California Digital Newspaper Collection
Jun 03, 2020
123: A World Health Organization Researcher & a Fallopian Tube
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Jean-Claude Romand was a pretty big deal. He was a medical doctor. He was a researcher for the World Health Organization. He had an eye for good investments. To the outside world, Jean-Claude Romand looked like he was living the good life. His work was intellectually stimulating, and his schedule was flexible. But in January of 1993, Jean-Claude Romand’s perfect life came crashing down. 

Then Kristin tells us… absolutely nothing! This week, Kristin had some medical issues (not COVID-19), so she didn’t have time to prepare a case. Instead, she shares PSA’s from her personal experience: 1. Listen to your body; 2. Get good health insurance.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
Her own shitty experience!

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“France:The Phantom WHO Doctor” episode The Evidence Locker Podcast
“Jean-Claude Romand: Fake French doctor who killed family is free” BBC News
“Notorious French fake doctor and killer freed – lawyer” by Agence France-Presse, rappler.com
“The Jean-Claude Romand case: fifteen years of lies, five murders” tellerreport.com
“Fake French doctor who killed his family after they discovered his double life to be released” by Agence France-Presse, TheLocal.fr
“Jean-Claude Romand” wikipedia.org
May 27, 2020
122: Episode 122: Fruitcakes & an Obsessed Girlfriend
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The Collin Street Bakery makes one hell of a fruitcake. For more than 100 years, the bakery has shipped their fruitcakes to everyone from Grace Kelly to Vanna White. In fact, the small-town bakery is such a big deal that Corsicana, Texas, is known as the fruitcake capital of the world. So when Sandy Jenkins landed a job as a payroll supervisor at the bakery, he and his wife Kay were ecstatic. But the glow wore off pretty quickly. He worked hard. He thought his pay rate was low. Too low. But as his role with the bakery grew, so did his access to the bakery’s money. So in December of 2004, he decided to help himself to some cash.

Then Brandi tells us about a strange 911 call. It was October 12, 2012, when Shayna Hubers called 911. She’d just shot her boyfriend, attorney Ryan Poston. She told the dispatcher that she’d done so in self defense. Ryan had been violent with her, she said. He’d knocked her around and pushed her into a bookcase. The evidence told a different story.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Just Desserts” by Katy Vine for Texas Monthly
“Former Collin Street Bakery Executive and Wife Sentenced,” FBI.gov
“Sandy Jenkins gets 10 years prison; probation for wife Kay,” Corsicana Daily Sun
“A tale of trust betrayed at landmark Corsicana bakery,” by Barry Shlachter for the Fort Worth Star-Telegram

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Obsessed” episode 48 Hours
“Shayna Hubers” episode Snapped
“Murder of Ryan Poston” wikipedia.org


May 20, 2020
121: Family Annihilator Neil Entwistle & a Tumor
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Rachel Entwistle’s friends knew something was up. They’d had plans to get together, but Rachel wasn’t answering the door. She wasn’t answering her phone, either. Plus, earlier that day, she’d blown off lunch plans with her mom. That didn’t seem like Rachel. Her friends convinced police to enter the Entwistle’s new home, but they didn’t find anything suspicious. It was a little weird that there was food on the table and the bathtub was full, but there were no signs of foul play. Surely Rachel, her husband Neil and their infant daughter Lillian would show up any minute. 

Then Kristin tells us… absolutely nothing! This week, Kristin had some medical issues (not COVID-19), so she didn’t have time to prepare a case. Instead, she shares PSA’s from her personal experience: 1. Listen to your body; 2. Get good health insurance.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
Her own shitty experience!

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Neil Entwistle: Sex, lies, and how a family man from Worksop murdered his wife and baby” by David Whitfield, The Nottingham Post
“CRIME FILES: Former York student Neil Entwistle murdered wife and baby daughter” by Mike Pryce, York Press
“Neil Entwistle” murderpedia.org
“Murders of Rachel and Lillian Entwistle” wikipedia.org
May 13, 2020
120: Pizzagate & the Seton Hall Dorm Fire
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Pizzagate is a wildly stupid, debunked consipracy theory. It goes a little something like this: There’s a pizza place in Washington DC! They have a child sex ring in the basement!! Hilary Clinton and a bunch of other politicians go there to abuse kids!!!! 

There’s not an ounce of truth to this story, but that didn’t stop a bunch of right wing fringe “news” outlets from running it. As a result, people believed it. And one man decided to take action.

Then Brandi tells us an infuriating story about a dorm fire at Seton Hall. It was the wee hours of the morning in January of 2000, when the fire alarm went off in Boland Hall. Smoke filled the dormitory. Students tried to get to safety, but they’d never had a fire drill. The dorm wasn’t equipped with sprinklers. The smoke was so thick that it blinded them. The fire was traumatizing. Three students died. Fifty-eight were injured. And it all started thanks to a prank. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“How the bizarre conspiracy theory behind pizzagate was spread,” by Craig Silverman for Buzzfeed
“Pizzagate Gunman Sentenced to Four Years in Prison,” by Merrit Kennedy for NPR
“The Comet Ping Pong Gunman Answers Our Reporter’s Questions,” by Adam Goldman for the New York Times
“Comet Pizza Gunman Pleads Guilty to Local and Federal Charges” Washington Post
“Is Comet Ping Pong Pizzeria Home to a Child Abuse Ring Led by Hillary Clinton?” by Kim Lacapria for Snopes.com
“Anatomy of a Fake News Scandal,” by Amanda Robb for Rolling Stone

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Seton Hall: The Worst Dormitory Fire In The US” by Seamus McGraw, The Crime Library
“Seton Hall dorm fire: A look at where some of the key people are today” by Alex Napoliello, NJ.com
“3 Killed in Fire at Seton Hall; Dozens of Students Are Hurt” by Dan Barry, The New York Times
“Sean M. Ryan v. New Jersey State Parole Board” justia.com
“Boland Hall Fire” wikipedia.org
May 06, 2020
119: Kate Middleton's Topless Photos & William Wallace
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William Wallace was on a wild goose chase. He’d been told to go to 25 Menlove Gardens East, in Liverpool, for a business meeting. But no matter how hard he tried, or how many people he asked for directions, he couldn’t find the address. Dejected, he headed back home. But when he got home, he couldn’t get in. He complained to his neighbors, then went to the back of his house to try his key again. This time, the door opened. He went inside to discover his wife, Julia had been beaten to death. Suspicions quickly turned to William. He seemed to be the only person with a motive, but he also had a strong alibi.

Then Kristin tells us about the summer of 2012, when the Duchess of Cambridge Kate Middleton and her husband Prince William went on vacation to Provence, France. They stayed at a friend’s house on a 640-acre estate. At one point, the couple went out on their balcony in their swimsuits. Kate took off her top, to get a little sun. The couple had every reason to think they were alone. Little did they know that half a mile away, members of the paparazzi were hiding out, snapping pictures of the couple via long range lenses.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“The Watershed Significance of Kate Middleton’s Topless Photo Lawsuit,” by Elise Taylor for Vogue.com
“Duchess of Cambridge topless photo case: Closer ordered by French court to pay 91,700 in damages,” by Maya Oppenheim for The Independent
“Kate Middleton Topless Photos: Duke and Duchess Reveal Anger at ‘Grotesque’ Invasion,” Huffington Post UK
“Kate Middleton Topless Photos Lawsuit Against French Magazine Ends in Payout For Royal Couple,” by Julia Glum for Newsweek
“Death of Diana, Princess of Wales,” Wikipedia
“The Princess and the Paparazzi: How Diana’s Death Changed the British Media,” by Kate Samuelson for Time Magazine
“Diana Sues Over Gym Photos,” BBC
“Court awards Duchess of Cambridge Damages Over Topless Photos,” by Kim Willsher for The Guardian

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Killing of Julia Wallace: An Impossible Murder” TheUnredacted.com
“The "Impossible" 1930s Murder That Still Fascinates Crime Writers” by Deanna Cioppa, Mental Floss
“The 'impossible' murder that rocked Liverpool and remains unsolved 80 years on” by Emilia Bona, The Liverpool Echo
“William Herbert Wallace” wikipedia.org
Apr 29, 2020
118: The Lululemon Murder & A Woman in a Trunk
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Mary Scott Castle was hot, rich, and well connected. But when she met a 21-year-old Porter Charlton, she was down on her luck. She’d just gotten divorced, and she’d blown her reputation to bits by shooting a man in the lobby of the Waldorf Astoria. But when Mary and Porter locked eyes, it was love at first sight. They got married a month later, and took off for a romantic European honeymoon. There was just one problem. Porter wasn’t so stable himself.

Then Brandi tells us about a horrific attack in a Lululemon store. It was March of 2011. Coworkers Brittany Norwood and Jayna Murray had just left the Lululemon Athletica store in Bethesda, Maryland, when Brittany realized that she’d left her wallet in the store. When she called Jayna to tell her what she’d done, Jayna was accommodating. She told Brittany she’d meet her back at the store. The pain re-entered the store, leaving the door unlocked behind them. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Lady in the lake” by Mara Bovsun The Daily News.
“The Murder of the Beautiful and Accomplished Mrs. Edith Woodhill, 1909,” written by Thomas Duke in 1910, posted to historicalcrimedetective.com
“Charlton Must go to Italy for Trial,” The Evening Times-Republican, June 10, 1913
“May Ask Wilson to Save Slayer,” The Washington Herald , June 11, 1913
“True Detective Tales: What is Justice? Murder at Romantic Como,” by Peter Levins for the Pittsburg Sun-Telegraph, April 24, 1940
“‘On Trial’ -- Omaha Boy in Spotlight,” The Omaha Sunday Bee, October 17, 1915

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Brittany Norwood” episode Snapped
“‘The Yoga Store Murder: The Shocking True Account of the Lululemon Athletica Killing’ by Dan Morse” by Daniel Stashower, The Washington Post
“Lululemon victim was alive through most of beating” by Andrea Noble, The Washington Times
“Brittany Norwood sentenced to life without parole” by Richard Reeve, WLJA 7 News
“Maryland Lululemon Store Gives ‘Love’ Memorial to Family of Woman Killed There” NBC4 Washington
“Lululemon Murder” wikipedia.org

Apr 22, 2020
117: The Murder of Skylar Neese & Dr. Ossian Sweet
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This week, Brandi makes up for Kristin’s April Fool’s Day prank by *actually* covering the murder of Skylar Neese. 

It was the summer of 2012, and Dave Neese was supposed to have lunch with his 16-year-old daughter, Skylar. But Skylar wasn’t anywhere to be found. Dave was annoyed. It wasn’t like Skylar to be so irresponsible. He called her, but got no answer. Hours passed. Skylar missed her shift at Wendy’s. Her co-workers were concerned. Skylar always showed up for work. At that point, Dave and Mary Neese called the police.

Then Kristin tells the story of Dr. Ossian Sweet. Brandi tried to tell this story for our Black History Month episode, but threw in the towel. (In case you couldn’t tell, this episode is a rough one!) In 1925, Dr. Ossian Sweet and his wife Gladys Sweet were ready to buy their first home. As a black couple, they faced incredible obstacles. Restrictive covenants barred people of color from buying houses in white neighborhoods. That spring and summer, mobs of white people harassed black families who moved into white neighborhoods. Despite their fears, the Sweets bought a house at 2905 Garland St, Detroit, Michigan, and prepared to defend their property.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“The Sweet Trials” famous-trials.com
“Ossian Sweet” wikipedia
“Sweet Trials: 1925-26” encyclopedia.com
The book, “We Return Fighting: The Civil Rights Movement in the Jazz Age” by Mark Robert Schneider
“Dr. Alexander Turner” by Mariel Watkins for the Black Bottom Archives

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Something Wicked” episode Dateline
“16-Year-Old Skylar Neese Was Stabbed To Death By Her Two Best Friends Because They Didn’t Like Her Anymore” by William DeLong, AllThatsInteresting.com
“From Best Friends to Killers: Teens Murder Friend Because They 'Didn't Like Her’” by Gail Deutsch and Alexa Valiente, ABC News
“Murder of Skylar Neese” wikipedia.org
Apr 15, 2020
116: The Springfield Mall Shooting & Mrs. Sherlock Holmes
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It was February of 1917, and 18-year-old Ruth Cruger was missing. Her family panicked. They called the police. But detectives didn’t seem too concerned. They assured the family that Ruth would come back. And if she didn’t? Well, Ruth was probably… on the prowl. The Crugers were offended by the implication, and incensed that the police weren’t taking them seriously. Months went by. Despite a credible suspect, the case went cold. So the Crugers did the only thing they could think to do. They hired a courageous, tenacious attorney named Grace Humiston. By the end of the saga, Grace would be dubbed, ‘Mrs. Sherlock Holmes.’ 

Then Brandi tells us about a shocking event that bystanders initially wrote off as a joke. It was the day before Halloween, in 1985, at the Springfield Mall in Springfield, Pennsylvania. A woman approached the mall wearing fatigues. She carried a gun. Most people thought she was in costume. Then she fired her very real weapon.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Mrs. Sherlock Holmes Takes on the NYPD” by Karen Abbott for Smithsonian Mag
“Missing in Action” By David Krajicek for the New York Daily News 
The “Mrs. Sherlock Homes” episode of Criminal, where Brad Ricca is interviewed for his book, “Mrs. Sherlock Holmes: The true story of New York city’s greatest female detective and the 1917 missing girl case that captivated a nation”
“Cocchi implicated in police grafting,” New York Herald June 23, 1917
“Buried Truth,” by Joseph McNamara for The Daily News
“Cocchi says his wife killed girl,” Daily News June 26, 1919

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Sylvia Seegrist: Guilty But Insane” by Katherine Ramsland, The Crime Library
“Sylvia Seegrist went psycho and killed three innocent people at the Springfield, Pa., mall” by Mara Bovsun, New York Daily News
“Decades After Sylvia Seegrist, Mentally Ill People Are Still Murdering Innocents” by Victor Fiorillo, Philadelphia Magazine
“Sylvia Seegrist” wikipedia.org
 
Apr 08, 2020
115: Pepsi's Big Mistake & the Murder of Skylar Neese
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It was the early 90s, and Pepsi needed to make a name for itself in the Philippines. So they came up with a brilliant idea. They dubbed it Number Fever. Under the bottle cap of each Pepsi product, consumers would find a number. If they were lucky, that number would earn them extra cash. The typical reward was roughly 100 pesos. But if a Pepsi drinker was especially lucky, they could win one million pesos. People all over the country played the game. They were eager for a shot at the life changing money. Then, Pepsi announced that night’s winning number 349. There was just one problem. For some strange reason, a lot of people had that number. 

Then Kristin tells us about the murder of Skylar Neese. In the summer of 2012, Skylar was sixteen years old. She’d just gotten home from a shift at Wendy’s when her friends Rachel Shoaf and Sheila Eddy asked her to come hang out. Skylar wasn’t so sure. It was late. She’d have to sneak out of her family’s apartment. Plus, she and Rachel and Sheila had been on the outs lately. She wasn’t eager to hang out with them. But they kept pressing her. Eventually, Skylar gave in. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Trial by Twitter” by Holly Millea for Elle magazine
“Unfriended” episode of 20/20

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Pepsi’s “Number Fever” in the Philippines caused street riots, deaths, and 14 years of lawsuit” by Tijana Radeska, The Vintage News
“The Computer Error That Led to a Country Declaring War on Pepsi” by Jake Rossen, Mental Floss
“That Time Pepsi Accidentally Promised Hundreds of Thousands of People $40,000 Each” by Karl Smallwood, TodayIFoundOut.com
“Philippines: Court clears Pepsi on promo fiasco” just-drinks.com
“SC decides in finality on 'Pepsi 349' case” by Rene U. Borromeo, The Philippine Star
Apr 01, 2020
114: The Biggest Idiot Ever & a Woman Who Refused to Marry a Rapist
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Picture it. Sicily. 1963. 

Franca Viola was 15 years old, and engaged to a mafia member named Filippo Melodia. When Filippo went to jail for theft, Franca broke off the engagement. She moved on with her life. She became engaged to a childhood friend. Life seemed pretty good, until Filippo came back into the picture. He stalked her. He threatened her. Then, he and a band of douchebags stormed her family’s home. They beat up her mother. They kidnapped Franca, and her little brother, too. Filippo held Franca captive for eight days. He sexually assaulted her many times. He was pretty pleased with himself. After all, in those days, that meant he’d found a bride.

Then Brandi tells us a story about Paul Warner Powell, the biggest idiot to walk the planet. In January of 1999, Paul was a 20-year-old self described neo nazi who had a crush on his 16-year-old neighbor, Stacie Reed. One day when Paul was over at Stacie’s house, he became incensed to find out that her boyfriend was black. He attempted to rape Stacie, then murdered her as she fought back. Paul went on to commit more crimes against Stacie’s family that day. At one point, he thought he’d gotten away with everything. So he began bragging.  

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“A brave young woman fought a centuries-old cruel Sicilian tradition and won,” by E. L. Hamilton for The Vintage News
The book, “Italian Sketches: The Faces of Modern Italy,” by Deirdre Pirro
“Franca Viola says ‘No’” by Daisy Alioto for Mashable
“Franca Viola” entry on Wikipedia

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Paul Warner Powell” imsurroundedbyidiots.com
“Paul Warner Powell” clarkprosecutor.org
“Inmate Lands Back on Death Row for Taunting Letter He Sent to Prosecutors” lifedaily.com
“Death-row defense argues double jeopardy” The Washington Times
“Powell v. Kelly” findlaw.com

Mar 25, 2020
113: Episode 113: The Murder of Peter Porco & the Boorn Brothers
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Kristin starts us off with our most old timey story ever. It was May of 1812 in Manchester, Vermont, and something was up. Russell Colvin was missing. People were pretty sure he’d come back. He had a wife. He had a child. He had obligations. Plus, he was known to wander off from time to time. But then months passed. Then years. People in town became suspicious. What if Russell hadn’t wandered off? What if he’d been murdered?

Then Brandi tells us about a November morning in 2004. Peter Porco, an Appellate Division court clerk, had always been reliable. So when he didn’t show up for work one day, a coworker went to Peter’s house to check on him. The coworker peered through the windows to discover a grizzly scene. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Then Again: A case of who done… what?” by Mark Bushnell for the Vermont Digger
“The Boorn Affair,” Cincinnati Daily Star, May 24, 1875
“First wrongful conviction: Jesse Boorn and Stephen Boorn” Bluhm Legal Clinic Center on Wrongful Convictions 

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Christopher Porco” by Rachael Bell, The Crime Library
“Memory of Murder” episode 48 Hours
“Christopher Porco 15 Years Later” by Diego Cagara, Spotlight News
“Christopher Porco: The Unthinkable” ForensicFilesNow.com
“Christopher Porco 2: The Explainable” ForensicFilesNow.com
“Murder of Peter Porco” wikipedia.org

Mar 18, 2020
112: The Sinking of the USS Indianapolis & the Caffey Family Murders
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In the summer of 1945, the USS Indianapolis was tasked with a top secret mission. The ship was to transport materials for the atomic bomb that the United States would later drop on Hiroshima, Japan. Under the leadership of Captain Charles B. McVay III, the ship accomplished its mission. From there, the ship headed off to Guam, and then to the Philippines. But before they left for the Philippines, Captain McVay requested a destroyer escort. The USS Indianapolis didn’t have submarine detection equipment, but destroyer escorts did. His request was denied. So, off he sailed into submarine infested waters.

Then Brandi tells us the story of the Caffey family murders. Terry Caffey woke up to a blast, riddled with bullets. Two men were in his bedroom. They had guns. One had a samurai sword. The men murdered his wife, Penny, and left Terry for dead. Soon, Terry smelled smoke. The men had set his house on fire. Nearly dead but desperate to get help, Terry found the strength to get himself to a neighbor’s house. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Captain, once a scapegoat, is absolved,” by David Stout for the New York Times
“USS Indianapolis sinking: ‘You could see sharks circling’” by Alex Last for the BBC
“USS Indianapolis,” entry on Wikipedia
“Charles B. McVay III,” entry on Wikipedia

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Flesh and Blood” by Pamela Colloff, Texas Monthly
“Father Uses Family Massacre to Help Others” by David Lohr, AOLNews
“Girl, 17, Gets 2 Life Terms In Family Slay” Associated Press, CBSNews
“Family Slaughtered for Teen Love” episode Dr. Phil
“Erin Caffey” episode Killer Women with Piers Morgan
 
Mar 11, 2020
111: Chocolate Candy Murders & the Wrongful Conviction of Scott Hornoff
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Brandi starts us off with a wrongful conviction story unlike any we’ve ever covered. When Scott Hornoff was put on trial for the murder of Victoria Cushman, he had every conceivable advantage. The prosecution didn’t rely on junk science. There were no faulty eye witnesses. He had good legal representation. He was a police officer. He is white. But that didn’t stop the jury from finding against him. 

Then Kristin tells us about the infamous chocolate candy murders. Back in the late 1800’s, a married woman named Cordelia Botkin met a married man named John Preston Dunning. Cordelia was immediately smitten. John was hot, smart, a great writer, and an all-around good time. The two immediately struck up an affair. After a few years, John broke the news that he was leaving Cordelia. He wanted to go back to his candy-loving wife. Cordelia decided to stop him.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“The heinous crimes of Cordelia Botkin,” by Heather Monroe on medium.com
“Murder by mail: The story of San Francisco’s most infamous female prisoner,” by Katie Dowd for the San Francisco Chronicle
“Candy from a stranger: The Cordelia Botkin Case of 1898,” by Thomas Duke in 1910, posted on historicalcrimedetective.com
“Cordelia Botkin” entry on Wikipedia
“Mrs. Cordelia Botkin pleads with her judges for her life,” Dec. 23, 1898, The San Francisco Call

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Tangled Up in Blue: The Scott Hornoff Story” by Seamus McGraw, The Crime Library
“Jeffrey Scott Hornoff’s Murder Conviction Is Exposed As A Sham When The Real Killer Confesses” by Hans Sherrer, Justice Denied
“Killer's confession frees convicted man” by The Associated Press
“State v. Hornoff” casetext.com
 


Mar 04, 2020
110: The Murder of Emmett Till & Justice for Cyntoia Brown
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This week, Kristin starts us off with a case that’s as awful as it is important. Emmett Till was just fourteen years old in 1955, when he traveled from his home in Chicago to visit relatives in rural Mississippi. Before he left, his mother warned Emmett that Chicago and Mississippi were two different worlds. The culture was different -- the racism more intense. He’d have to be careful. But no warning could prepare Emmett for what lay ahead of him in Mississippi.  

Then Brandi tells us the infuriating, but ultimately positive story of Cyntoia Brown. From the moment she was born, Cyntoia faced incredible obstacles. By the time she was a teenager, Cyntoia had been sex trafficked by an older man. When she was 16, a 43-year-old real estate broker named Johnny Michael Allen approached her in a Sonic, looking for sex. The two went back to his house, where Cyntoia felt increasingly afraid. 
 
And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Emmett Till Murder Trial” by Douglas O. Linder for famous-trials.com
“Emmett Till” entry on wikipedia
“What happened to the key figures in the Emmett Till case?” by Devery S. Anderson for the Mississippi Clarion Ledger

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“A timeline of the Cyntoia Brown case, conviction and successful bid for clemency” by Jon Garcia, The Tennessean
“Who was Cyntoia Brown convicted of killing? A look at Johnny Allen.” by Jon Garcia, The Tennessean
“Read Cyntoia Brown-Long's note to her 16-year-old self facing life in prison” by Juan Buitrago, The Tennessean
“Cyntoia Brown wasn’t a victim, stole money after killing Johnny Allen: Prosecutors” by Christal Hayes, Newsweek
“Cyntoia Brown, a trafficking victim jailed for killing a man using her for sex, was granted clemency following a social-media campaign. Here's everything you need to know.” by Benjamin Goggin, Insider
“How The Justice System Failed Cyntoia Brown” by Leah Carroll, Refinery29
“Attorneys seek new trial for teenage killer” Associated Press, The Oklahoman
“Cyntoia Denise Brown v.  State of Tennessee” tncourts.gov
“Cyntoia Brown Is Getting Back The Childhood She & So Many Young Black Girls Never Had” by Clarissa Brooks, Bustle
“Cyntoia Brown” wikipedia.org
“Cyntoia Brown” episode ExpediTIously Podcast
Feb 26, 2020
109: An Interview With The Dog Lady of Lansing Prison
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Get ready for a wild ride. This week, we sat down with Toby Dorr, who made international headlines in 2006 when she helped an inmate escape from Lansing Federal Prison. 

Back then, her name was Toby Young, and she had what seemed like a normal life. She was married. She had two kids. She had a demanding corporate job. But the truth was that Toby felt isolated and unhappy. Following a layoff and a battle with cancer, Toby wanted to live a more meaningful life. So she created the Safe Harbor Prison Dog program, where she brought dogs in to be trained by inmates at the Lansing Correctional Facility. 

But while she was there, she fell in love with an inmate named John Manard. John was serving a life sentence for felony murder, due to his role in a fatal carjacking. Despite their differences, Toby felt a bond with John that she didn’t feel in her marriage. So on February 12, 2006, she helped John escape prison in a dog crate. Toby and John were on the run for 12 days before they were caught, thanks to a high speed chase. 

Toby was sentenced to 27 months in prison for her role in the escape. In the years since then, Toby has worked on herself. She doesn’t let the escape define her. She doesn’t downplay what she did, or shift the blame toward John. Instead, she tells her story in the hope that it will help other women. 

Let us be the first to tell you… if you’ve read a few headlines and thought, “how the hell could anyone do that?!?” Give this episode a listen. Toby’s story is worth hearing. 

If you’d like to learn more about Toby Dorr, check out her website at tobydorr.com. Be on the lookout for her forthcoming memoir, Unleashed



Feb 19, 2020
108: A YouTube Lawsuit & the Disappearance of Lizabeth Wilson
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In 2013, Matt Hoss created an exceptionally cringey YouTube video. He cast himself as the cool guy. He cast a hot young woman to act alongside him. He wrote a script where he gave himself all the good comebacks, and made the woman swoon for him. His video got millions of views. Then one day, YouTubers Ethan and Hila Klein of H3H3 productions created their own video reacting to Matt’s video. They gave him a bit of a roast, but ended on a respectful note. There was just one problem. Matt didn’t think their video was very funny.

Then Brandi tells us about a case that took place in the summer of 1974. On her way home from the pool, thirteen-year-old Lizabeth Wilson cut through the parking lot of Shawnee Mission East High School. She was never seen again. Suspicion circled around the school’s janitor, John Henry Horton, but without concrete evidence, the case grew cold.   

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Bold Guy vs Parkour Girl,” Matt Hoss Zone on Youtube 
“WE WON THE LAWSUIT!” h3h3Productions on Youtube
“The Big, the BOLD, the Beautiful (Re-Upload)” h3h3 Productions on Youtube
Matt Hosseinzadeh v Ethan Klein and Hila Klein court docouments
“Judge sides with YouTubers Ethan and Hila Klein in copyright lawsuit,” by Anthony Ha for techcrunch.com

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“State v. Horton” findlaw.com
“Conviction is upheld in 1974 murder of Prairie Village girl” by Tony Rizzo, The Kansas City Star
“40 years later, conviction upheld on teen’s killer” by Rick Dean, The Topeka Capital-Journal
“Judge Denies New Trial In Killing Of Kansas Girl” by Kelley Hoskins, Fox2Now St. Louis
“Chloroform killer of Prairie Village girl gets chance at release from prison” by Tony Rizzo, The Kansas City Star
“Parole denied for Shawnee Mission school janitor who killed Prairie Village girl” by Tony Rizzo, The Kansas City Star

Feb 12, 2020
107: Fatal Attraction & the Kidnapping of Brooke Hart
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Dave Kroupa thought he’d hit the jackpot. He’d just met Cari Farver, a beautiful, intelligent woman who wasn’t looking for a long-term commitment. The two dated casually for a little while, but all of a sudden, Cari became much less easy going. She dumped him, via text and abruptly left town, leaving her son to fend for himself. For years afterward, she sent Dave countless verbally abusive texts. But over time, Cari’s family became suspicious. Had she really up and left? 

Then Kristin tells us about an old timey kidnapping that took the state of California by storm. Brooke Hart had it all. At 22 years old, he was good looking, athletic, and wealthy. Really wealthy. His family owned the beloved Hart’s Department store. He was next in line to run the family business, but that all changed on November 9, 1933. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
The book “Swift Justice” by Harry Farrell
“Bay Area mob lynched kidnappers 75 years ago,” by Carl Nolte for the San Francisco Chronicle
“Brooke Hart” entry on wikipedia.com

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Scorned” episode Dateline
“How investigators used technology to solve the mysterious disappearance, murder of a Macedonia woman” by Brian McCormack, Daily Nonpareil
“Cari Lea Farver” iowacoldcases.org
“Cari Lea Farver” charleyproject.org

Feb 05, 2020
106: Cases Covered by America's Most Wanted
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This week, we’re talking about cases profiled by America’s Most Wanted.

Kristin starts us off with the story of David James Roberts -- the first fugitive featured in the pilot episode of America’s Most Wanted. Coincidentally, he was also the first fugitive ever captured thanks to America’s Most Wanted. 

David James Roberts was a terrible dude. He murdered a husband and wife, set their house on fire, and left their infant to die in the home. When he was out on bond, he raped a woman twice, locked her in the trunk of her car, then set her infant son out to die in an Indiana winter. Juries were horrified by what they heard. He was ordered to spend the rest of his life in prison. But a few years later, he escaped.

Then Brandi tells us about the murder of Ashley Peoples. Ashley was just 22. She was hard working and responsible. So when she suddenly stopped returning her mother’s phone calls and didn’t show up for work, her friends and family knew something was up. Suspicion quickly turned to a man named Darryl Crenshaw. News outlets refer to him as Ashley’s boyfriend or ex-boyfriend, but her family says either term is too strong. He was just a guy she’d seen a few times, and didn’t want to see again.  

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Top 10 America’s Most Wanted Captures,” by Claire Suddath for Time Magazine
“Episode 1: Show About Fugitives Leads to Arrest,” by Christopher Drew, Chicago Tribune
“David James Roberts,” Murderpedia
“Gasoline can presented as murder link,” The Daily Journal
“Formidable armchair posse ropes in ‘America’s Most Wanted,” by Peter Genovese for The Central New Jersey Home News
“Angola jury convicts Roberts of murder,” The Daily Journal
“Testifies in murder-rape case: Woman identifies suspect,” The Daily Journal
“Jury finds Roberts guilty,” The Daily Journal

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“'He didn't have to kill her' Parents of Ashley Peoples talk about their ordeal and justice in the aftermath of her murder” by Laura F. Alix, Journal Inquirer
“America's Most Wanted Leads To Fugitive's Capture In Mexico” by David Owens, Hartford Courant
“Trial Underway In 2008 Slaying Of Ashley Peoples” by Christine Dempsey, Hartford Courant
“MURDER, NOT MANSLAUGHTER: Jury convicts Crenshaw of more serious charge based on evidence of intent in killing of Ashley Peoples” by Alex Wood, Journal Inquirer
“78 Years for Convicted Murderer” by Bob Connors, NBC Connecticut
“Man Resentenced In Kidnapping, Murder Of Girlfriend” by Kelly Glista, Hartford Courant
“Prisoner Doing 78 Years For Murder Charged With Having Child Porn In Prison” by David Owens, Hartford Courant 
“State v. Crenshaw” casetext.com
 
 
 
 
 
 





Jan 29, 2020
105: The Mother from Hell & the Kidnapping of Yingying Zhang
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In the summer of 1984, a small fire broke out along a California highway. A driver pulled off the road to get a closer look at the blaze, but that closer look brought more questions than answers. What the hell was that awful smell? Soon, another driver arrived on the scene. He used a fire extinguisher to put out the flames. Once the smoke cleared, the two drivers made a disturbing discovery -- a burnt human body. Investigators learned that the body belonged to a woman -- and that she’d sustained multiple injuries over her lifetime. But it would take them years to discover who that woman was, and who had tortured her.

Then Kristin tells us about a bright, talented young woman whose life was cut short by a total dirtbag. Yingying Zhang was beyond smart. Originally from Nanping, China, she attended one of the nation’s top universities. When it came time to earn her doctorate, she headed off to the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign. She had only been in the United States for a few weeks when she suddenly went missing. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Undercover girlfriend” episode of 20/20
“The Kidnapping and murder of YingyingZhang” entry on wikipedia
“Prosecutor: Suspect in Chinese student’s kidnapping discussed ‘ideal victim’” by Kaylee Hartung, Janet DiGiacomo and Darran Simon for CNN.com
“In opening statement, attorney admits Brendt Christensen abducted, killed Chinese scholar at University of Illinois,” by Jamie Munks for the Chicago Tribune
“Guilty: Brendt Christensen found guilty in Yingying Zhang’s kidnapping, killing,” wandtv.com 

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Mother Knows Best: The Story of Theresa Jimmie Cross” by David Lohr, Crime Library
“‘Unbelievable’ Tale Reveals Grisly Crimes” by Richard C. Paddock, Los Angeles Times
“Theresa Jimmie Knorr” murderpedia.org
“Theresa Knorr” wikipedia.org
 
 
 
 
 




Jan 22, 2020
104: The Hazing Death of Matt Carrington & a Murderer Turned Professor
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Matt Carrington wasn’t your typical frat boy. He was reserved. He didn’t drink much. But when a friend asked him to rush the Chi Tau fraternity at Chico State University, Matt said sure. He couldn’t have guessed what he was in for. Over the course of what is commonly referred to as “hell week,” Matt endured relentless hazing. The hazing ramped up as the week progressed. On the final night of hazing, Matt died.

Then Brandi tells us about a brilliant, troubled young man named James Gordon Wolcott. James grew up in a small town in Texas. He excelled academically, but he struggled to fit in at home. His sister, Elizabeth had a Southern accent that grated on him. His father, a conservative professor at Southwestern University, disapproved of James’ more liberal politics. One day, in the summer of 1967, James had enough. He murdered his entire family.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Matt’s Law” entry on wikipedia
“The Pledge” episode of The Shadows of Death
“New ‘Matt’s Law’ toughens penalties for college hazing,” by Matt Krupnick for Contra Costa Times
“Horrifying details in hazing death,” by Cecilia Vega for the San Francisco Chronicle
“7 face trial in hazing death,” Associated Press
“4 fraternity members plead guilty in student’s death,” Associated Press
“Student dies during fraternity hazing,” Santa Maria Times
“A fraternity hazing gone wrong,” by Elaine Korry for NPR
“Hazing death at Chico State” episode of Dateline

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Innocence Lost” by Kim Janssen, Chicago Sun Times
“Esteemed Illinois professor revealed as teen killer who murdered his family — and served just six years after insanity bid” by Joe Kemp, New York Daily News
“The Family Annihilator Turned University Professor – James Gordon Wolcott” by Emily Thompson, Morbidology
“Boy who killed family turns up 46 years later as college professor” by Mike Robinson, NBC News
 
 
 
 



Jan 15, 2020
103: Carol Burnett v. The National Enquirer & the Seemingly Perfect Couple
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Brandi starts us off with a story from her Johnson County, Kansas, bubble. Ed and Tyler Patton seemed like the perfect couple. In many ways, they were opposites. He was a partier, while she was more straightlaced. Their friends figured that Ed and Tyler’s differences were what made them a good match. But less than a year after they got married, Ed was murdered. Despite her many protests, Tyler seemed like the obvious culprit.

Then Kristin tells us about legendary comedian and actress Carol Burnett. Carol is well known for being a hollywood trailblazer, but she’s also a trailblazer when it comes to fighting back against tabloids. It all started with a fun night out in January of 1976. Carol was out with some colleagues. She shared her dessert with a few nearby tables. On her way out, she said hello to Henry Kissinger. A few months later, when the National Enquirer wrote about Carol’s night out, they told an entirely different tale. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Burnett v. National Enquirer, Inc.” wikipedia
“Carol Burnett sued The National Enquirer and won!” clip from John Fugelsang’s ‘Tell Me Everything’ show on SiriusXM
“Burnett Wins Enquirer Suit,” by Jay Mathews for The Washington Post
“Tabloid Law,” by Alex Beam for The Atlantic
“Carol Burnett given $1.6 million in suit against National Enquirer,” by Robert Lindsey for The New York Times
“Carol Burnett launches trial balloon,” by Vernon Scott for UPI

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Kansas Woman Brutally Beats Husband To Death With Wooden Plank” by Benjamin H. Smith, oxygen.com
“Greed led wife to kill husband, jurors told” by The Associated Press, Lawrence Journal-World
“State v. Patton” findlaw.com
“Widow found guilty of murdering husband” The Associated Press, Lawrence Journal-World
 
 


Jan 08, 2020
102: The Origin of Miranda Rights & an "Ugly" Anchorwoman
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We all know that Miranda rights are important. They’re a staple in every episode of Law & Order. They’re a quick and concise way of making a person aware of their rights. But how did we get Miranda rights? Well, it’s complicated. And it all started with a world-class douchebag named Ernesto Miranda. 

Then, Kristin tells us about anchorwoman Christine Craft. Christine was good at her job. By the time she was hired to co-anchor the evening news in Kansas City, she’d proven herself as a talented reporter and a hard worker. But Christine was no dummy. She knew that women news anchors get unfairly judged for their looks. So before she took the job in Kansas City, she told the station management that she wasn’t looking for a makeover. They assured her they were hiring her for her journalistic talent. They were full of shit.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“The surfing and survival of Christine Craft,” by Elisabeth Bumiller for the Washington Post
“Judging the news by appearance,” The Age
“Jury awards Christine Craft $325,000,” by Peter Kerr for The New York Times
“Once fired for appearance: Christine Craft to be anchor in Sacramento,” by Jay Sharbutt for The Los Angeles Times
The appellate court opinion on Justia.com
The book, “Waiting for Prime Time: The Women of Television News” by Marlene Sanders and Marcia Rock
“Manager: Appearance key for the TV news anchor,” United Press International
“Christine Craft” wikipedia

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Miranda v. Arizona: The Crime That Changed American Justice” by Mark Gribben, The Crime Library
“Miranda v. Arizona” wikipedia.org
“Facts and Case Summary - Miranda v. Arizona” USCourts.gov
“Miranda v. Arizona” Encyclopedia Britannica


Jan 01, 2020
101: Holiday REMIX
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It’s time for a remix! In honor of the holiday season, we are re-releasing last year’s ridiculously fun holiday episode. But we’ve added some new stuff, too! There’s a new set of holiday-themed questions at the end, plus SUPREME COURT inductions. Plus: Someone’s mom bought them a SUPREME COURT induction for Christmas. Was it your mom? Listen to find out!

Around the holidays, a lot of people bake cookies for their neighbors. It’s supposed to be a nice, friendly gesture. But boy, can it backfire! Teenagers Taylor Ostergaard and Lindsey Zellitti learned that lesson the hard way when they anonymously left a plate of cookies at Wanita Young’s house. Their late night cookie drop scared the crap out of Wanita. She was so shaken that she went to the hospital the next day, suffering from what appeared to be a heart attack.

Then Brandi tells us about the time Santa robbed a bank. The robbery took place on December 23, 1927, in Cisco, Texas. A man dressed as Santa Claus entered First National Bank. His armed accomplices followed. Together, the men terrorized the customers and emptied the bank’s safe. Afterward, Santa and his gang took off. What followed was the largest manhunt Texas has ever seen.  

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
The book, “The Party of the First Part: The Curious World of Legalese,” by Adam Freedman
“Family says they are under attack in cookie caper,” Associated Press
“Nation rallies around girls sued by neighbor over late-night cookies,” East Bay Times
“Teens sued for cookie delivery to neighbor,” ABC News

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Santa Claus Bank Robbery” by Boyce House, Startling Detective Adventures
“The Night the Posse Chased Santa Claus” by Maggie Van Ostrand, TexasEscapes.com
“Santa Claus Bank Robbery” by Walter F. Pilcher, Texas State Historical Association
“Santa Claus Bank Robbery” wikipedia.org


Dec 25, 2019
100: Can we get a re-do??
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Can you believe it? It’s our 100th episode! Holy sexy times! Thank you to everyone who joined us on this perilous journey. We hope you’ll stay with us for many episodes to come. If you don’t, we’ll send a Bob Moss after you. Or maybe a juvenile bigfoot. 

In honor of our 100th episode, we are re-doing our very cringe-y first episode! Note: We’re not re-releasing the first episode. We’re completely redoing it. So sit back, relax, and let us tell you for a second time about the crimes that got us interested in lawsuits. 

Kristin starts us off with the story of Robert Courtney, a Kansas City pharmacist who was caught diluting cancer drugs. Over the course of several years, Robert diluted everything from chemotherapy drugs to fertility treatments. His horrific crimes affected an estimated 4,200 patients. 

Then Brandi tells us about the Tate-LaBianca murders, also known as the Manson Family murders. In the summer of 1969, members of Charles Manson’s cult brutally murdered seven people. They killed five people one night, and two more the next. The crimes were as senseless as they were shocking.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“The Toxic Pharmacist,” New York Times Magazine
“Jury Awards 2.2B in Courtney Case,” Kansas City Business Journal
“Deadly Rx for Greed,” American Greed 
“Pharmacist Robert Courtney Admits He Diluted Drugs,” Kansas City Star
“Prosecutors Say Greed Drove Pharmacist to Dilute Drugs,” The New York Times
“Courtney’s Wife Pleads Guilty to Making False Statement,” Kansas City Business Journal
“Pharmacist’s Wife to Give Money to Victim Fund,” Southeast Missourian

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Charles Manson and the Manson Family” by Marilyn Bardsley, The Crime Library
“Charles Manson Trial” Famous-Trials.com
“Helter Skelter” by Vincent Bugliosi
“Tate-LaBianca Murders” wikipedia.org


Dec 18, 2019
Episode 99: Another Family Annihilator & the Smiling Widow
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Lowell Lee Andrews seemed like a brainy, well-behaved teenager. In fact, the local newspaper called him, “the nicest boy in Wolcott.” After he graduated from high school, he took off for the University of Kansas, where he majored in zoology. Lowell’s life seemed unremarkable in its normalcy. But then, during his Thanksgiving break in 1958, Lowell went home and murdered his entire family.

Then Kristin tells us about Jessie Costello, a.k.a., the smiling widow. In the 1930s, Jessie Costello was really something. She was a flapper. She was a snappy dresser. But her life was a little dull. She was married to a stern firefighter named Bill Costello. She was the mother of four children. She didn’t work outside the home. But her life got a whole lot more interesting when she met a married policeman named Edward McMahon. The two started up an affair, and they weren’t exactly discreet about it. So, a few months later, when Bill Costello died of an apparent heart attack, the people of Peabody, Massacusetts were skeptical.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Costello slain, doctor says at widow’s trial,” by Grace Robinson the Daily News
“Jessie on trial during 23 days,” by Joseph F. Dinneen for The Boston Globe
“McMahon near break under cross-examination on story,” by Melville E. Webb Jr for The Boston Globe
“Dr. Rooney says cyanide caused Costello’s death,” by Alfred J. Monahan for The Boston Globe
“Brands poison widow as sorceress-killer,” for the Daily News
“‘I’m vindicated, M’Mahon isn’t,’ Jessie declares,” for the Daily News
“Drop Dead Gorgeous: The Scandalous Trial of Jessie Costello” by Stephanie Almazan for The Lineup
“The Festive Murder Trial of Jessie Costello” New England Historical Society 
“Justice and Jessie Costello” Strange Company Blog

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The nicest boy in Wolcott: ‘Polite’ Lowell Lee Andrews proved to be another ‘cold’ Kansas killer” by David Krajicek, The New York Daily News
“A Crime For All Time” by Mike Belt, Lawrence Journal World
“State v. Andrews” law.justia.com
“Lowell Lee Andrew” wikipedia.org

Dec 11, 2019
Episode 98: Celia Fought Back & the Disappearance of Kelsey Berreth
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Celia was sick and tired. She was an enslaved woman, living in Missouri. It seemed the man who purchased her had done so for the sole purpose of raping her. For years, Robert Newsom raped Celia. She did everything she could to stop him. Then, after roughly five years of abuse, Celia reached her breaking point. Robert said he would come to her cabin that night. She warned him not to. She said she’d hurt him. She wasn’t kidding.

Then Brandi tells us about the disappearance of Kelsey Berreth. Kelsey went missing on Thanksgiving Day, 2018. That weekend, she texted her boss at Doss Aviation to say she wouldn’t be in the next week. But that wasn’t like Kelsey. Her mom, Cheryl-Lee sensed that something was wrong. Kelsey had an infant daughter and an important career as a pilot. She wouldn’t have just taken off. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
The book, “Celia, A Slave,” by Melton A. McLaurin
“Missouri v. Celia, a Slave: She killed the white master raping her, then claimed self-defense,” by DeNeed L. Brown for the Washington Post
“Celia, A Slave Trial,” by Douglas O. Linder for famous-trials.com
“State of Missouri v. Celia, a Slave” wikipedia.com

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Kelsey Berreth Case: What to Know About the Missing Colorado Mom Last Seen on Thanksgiving Day” by Caitlin Nolan, Inside Edition“Fiancé of missing Colorado mother Kelsey Berreth arrested, charged with murder” Associated Press, CBS News
“Kelsey Berreth case: Timeline of investigation and Patrick Frazee’s murder trial” by The Denver 7 Team, The Denver Channel
“Kelsey Berreth murder trial: Patrick Frazee had hit list of witnesses to kill, inmate says in testimony” by Carol McKinley, Clayton Sandell, and Emily Shapiro, ABC News
“Patrick Frazee found guilty of killing missing fiancee Kelsey Berreth; sentenced to life without parole” by Clayton Sandell, Carol McKinley, and Emily Shapiro, ABC News
“Patrick Frazee convicted of killing his fiancée, sentenced to life without the possibility of parole” by Jack Hannah and Darran Simon, CNN

Dec 04, 2019
Episode 97: A Biology Professor & Winona Ryder’s Shoplifting Trial
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It was a seemingly normal day at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. The biology department was holding their weekly meeting. Biology professor Amy Bishop was unusually quiet that day, but her coworkers didn’t seem to mind. She tended to dominate their meetings. Perhaps being denied tenure had made her less enthusiastic? Roughly 50 minutes into the meeting, Amy suddenly stood. She pulled out a gun and began firing. 

Then, Kristin tells us about Winona Ryder’s shoplifting trial. In 2001, Winona Ryder was on top of the world. She’d been nominated for two Oscars. She’d guest starred in an episode of Friends. She was famous and wealthy. But in December of that year, she was caught shoplifting at Saks Fifth Avenue. People were stunned… but come on. A famous actress would surely get a plea deal, right? Not this time.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Show Trial” by Duncan Campbell for the Guardian
“Winona Ryder Shoplifting Trial” archive on CourtTV.com
“Lawyer: Ryder’s arrest a ‘misunderstanding,” CNN.com
“Actress Winona Ryder arrested,” BBC News
“Winona Ryder convicted of theft, likely to get probation” by Matt Bean, Court TV
“Winona Ryder Goes on Trial,” Associated Press

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“A Loaded Gun” by Patrick Radden Keefe, The New Yorker
“Amy Bishop” murderpedia.org
‘Lawsuits against Amy Bishop over 2010 UAH shooting rampage have been settled” by Brian Lawson, AL.com

Nov 27, 2019
Episode 96: Taylor Swift’s Assault Trial & Ali Kemp
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Taylor Swift was doing her thing. Before her concert started, she stood backstage, greeting fans and posing for photos. It all seemed pretty normal. Then, a Denver morning radio DJ named David Mueller approached her with his then-girlfriend, Shannon Melcher. Taylor chatted with Shannon. But when it was time to take the photo, Taylor says that something shocking happened. David reached up the back of her dress and grabbed her bare ass.

Then Brandi tells us about the senseless, horrifying murder of Ali Kemp. Ali was a 19-year-old college student working at an upscale neighborhood pool one summer when she was brutally murdered. Her body was discovered in the pool house, hours after she’d been attacked. But who could have done such a thing? Ali didn’t have any known enemies. For a while, it seemed like the case might go cold. But Ali’s dad, Roger Kemp, fought tirelessly to bring his daughter’s killer to justice.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Ex-DJ says $1 payment to Taylor Swift sent by mail last week,” Associated Press
“DJ who lost Taylor Swift groping case has a new job,” by Lisa Respers France, CNN
“Taylor Swift was groped by radio host, jury finds,” by Donna Bryson, New York Times
“Judge drops complaint aimed at Taylor Swift in groping case brought by DJ,”  by Donna Bryson, New York Times
“Taylor Swift won her day in court. Here’s what you need to know,” by Constance Grady, Vox
“A timeline of events leading up to Taylor Swift groping trial,” by Sabrina Finkelstein, Billboard
“Taylor Swift Testifies: ‘He grabbed my ass underneath my skirt,’” by Joyce Chen, Rolling Stone
“Taylor Swift take the stand in former radio DJ groping trial,” ABC News on YouTube
“The Silence Breakers,” by Stephanie Zacharek, Eliana Dockterman and Haley Sweetland Edwards, Time Magazine
“Taylor Swift assault trial kicks off with changing stories and hurt feelings,” by Hilary Weaver, Vanity Fair

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Ali Kemp” episode Stolen Voices, Buried Secrets
“State v. Appleby” courtlistener.com
“Ali Kemp – 249” episode Generation Why podcast
“Suspect charged in 2002 slaying of K-State student” by Matt Sedensky, Lawrence Journal World
“Murderer gets life sentence for killing at pool” by The Associated Press, Lawrence Journal World
“JoCo judge will decide if man convicted in brutal 2002 murder gets new sentence” by Katie Bernard, The Kansas City Star
“Judge denies request by Ali Kemp’s killer to have his Hard 50 sentence thrown out” by Karra Small, Fox4KC

Nov 20, 2019
Episode 95: Mob Bosses! (a.k.a. Bob Mosses)
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Brandi starts us off with the ultimate mob boss, Al Capone. For years, Al Capone ran Chicago. He was the co-founder and boss of the Chicago Mafia, commonly known as the Chicago Outfit. During the Prohibition era, Capone made big money by operating illegal establishments. Anyone who threatened his businesses was promptly killed. Al did too many illegal things to list, but the most boring one is what took him down. He didn’t pay his taxes.

Then Kristin tells us about Dutch Schultz. He may not be a household name today, but in his day, Dutch Schultz was very well known. He was violent, ruthless, and rich. He ran illegal lotteries, operated speakeasies and extorted restaurateurs. Oh yeah. And he didn’t pay taxes. Are we sensing a pattern? 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
The book, “The Last Testament of Lucky Luciano: The Mafia Story in His own words” by Martin Gosch and Richard Hammer
“Thomas E. Dewey Defeats Dutch Schultz,” historynet.com
“Gangster Dutch Schultz died a millionaire, but where did all his money go?” by William DeLong for allthatsinteresting.com
“Dutch Schultz,” wikipedia

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Al Capone Trial (1931)” Famous-Trials.com
“Al Capone” by Marilyn Bardsley, Crime Library
“Al Capone” FBI.gov
“Al Capone” wikipedia.org

Nov 13, 2019
Episode 94: Skechers Shape-Ups & a Ton of Leaves
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Ten years ago, Skechers Shape-Ups took the world by storm. The shoes were a miracle. They melted our fat, sculpted our hips buns and thighs. And the best part? We didn’t have to do any extra work. All we had to do was put on a pair of Skechers Shape-Ups, and BOOM! Instant workout! Except… well, the shoes didn’t quite live up to the hype.

Then Brandi tells us an alarming tale (doesn’t she always?). When Tina Herrmann didn’t show up for work one day, her boss immediately sensed that something was up. She went to Herrmann’s home, broke in, and discovered a grisly scene. There was blood everywhere. Tina, her two children, and her friend Stephanie Sprang were missing. Investigators rushed to the scene. The clues led back to a man named Matthew Hoffman, whose home was filled with leaves.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Skechers will pay $40 million over claims that its sneakers toned muscles,” by Ashley Lutz for Business Insider
“Skechers Shape-Ups lawsuit: Woman sues saying ‘toning shoes’ caused hip fractures” by Elisabeth Leamy for ABC News
“Skechers to pay $40 million for exaggerated shoe claims,” by Brett Barrouquere for the Christian Science Monitor

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Killer Stuffed His House With Leaves, Kept Kidnapped Girl on Bed of Leaves” by Jessica Hopper, ABC News
“What was in the home (and mind) of Matthew Hoffman?” by Allison Manning and Holly Zachariah, The Columbus Dispatch
“Excerpts from Matthew Hoffman’s confession” The Columbus Dispatch
“Missing Ohio Trio Were Stabbed to Death; Bodies Found Stuffed in Hollowed Out Tree” by Dean Schabner, ABC News
“Ohio town grieves; hollow tree that held 3 bodies removed” Associated Press
“Matthew Hoffman, Ohio Killer Who Hid Bodies in Tree, Pleads Guilty” by Edecio Martinez, CBS News

Nov 06, 2019
Episode 93: A Psychic & Nightmares in a Mansion
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Jude Deveraux is a prolific romance writer. She’s a New York Times Bestseller and the author of more than 40 novels. One day, the celebrated novelist sought out the services of a psychic named Rose Marks. The two bonded immediately, and pretty soon, Jude found herself forking over millions upon millions of dollars. But was Rose really a psychic? Or was she a con artist?

Then Kristin tells us about a horrific quadruple murder in a high-end Washington, D.C. neighborhood. When firefighters arrived at the Savopoulos family home, they though they were dealing with a house fire. When they got inside, they realized that the home was a crime scene. Savvas and Amy Savopoulos, their 10-year-old son Philip, and the family’s housekeeper, Veralicia Figueroa had all been retrained, beaten, and murdered. But who could have done such a thing? Investigators hit a breakthrough when they discovered leftover Domino’s pizza.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Murder in the Mansion” episode of 20/20
“DNA, Facebook usage and a sword among the evidence as D.C. quadruple murder trial continues,” by Keith L. Alexander for The Washington Post
“Suspect in Savopoulos family killings takes the witness stand,” The Washington Post
“Suspect in D.C. quadruple killing testifies he was lured to the scene, never saw victims,” The Washington Post
“Prosecutor tells jurors Daron Wint is guilty in D.C. quadruple killing, even if someone else was involved,” by Keith L. Alexander for The Washington Post

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Psychic, The Novelist and the $17 Million Scam” by Robert Andrew Powell, Reader’s Digest
“Florida Psychic and Her Family Cheated Clients of $40 Million, Prosecutors Say” by Lizette Alvarez, The New York Times
“Author Jude Deveraux Was Suicidal After Losing $20 Million to Fortune Telling Con” by Christina NG, ABC News
“Judge scolds feds over alleged misconduct in $25 million ‘psychic fraud’ case” by Paula McMahon, The Sun Sentinel
“Psychic accused in $25 million fraud says she is portrayed ‘as some kind of monster’” by Paula McMahon, The Sun Sentinel
“Imprisoned ‘psychic’ testifies she regrets going to trial in $17M fortunetelling fraud” by Paula McMahon, The Sun Sentinel
“Rose Marks” wikipedia.org

Oct 30, 2019
Episode 92: A Man Who Sued His Wife’s Lover & a Robbery at a Video Game Store
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When Kevin Howard’s wife, Julie, announced that she wanted to separate, Kevin was stunned. They’d been married for twelve years. They had two children. He thought they were happy. Julie claimed she didn’t like how much time Kevin spent at work, but Kevin suspected he wasn’t getting the full story. So he hired a private investigator, who quickly discovered that Julie was having an affair with a coworker named Greg Jernigan. Kevin wanted revenge, and he got it thanks to an obscure, old timey law.

Then Brandi tells us about a tragedy at an EB Games store in San Antonio, Texas. Amber Belken was the store’s manager. Amber had a reputation for being dependable, so when she didn’t answer her phone on January 29, 2007, other EB Games managers began to worry. When they arrived at the store, they encountered a grizzly scene.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“A North Carolina man just won a $750,000 lawsuit after suiting his wife’s lover,” by Christina Maxouris and Leah Asmelash for CNN
“His wife cheated on him. So he sued the other man for $750,000 and won,” by Lateshia Beachum for The Washington Post
“Pitt County man wins $750,000 judgment against man for stealing his wife,” WITN.com

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Everything She Knew” episode Dateline
“Man to plead guilty in suffocation death during 2007 Game Stop robbery” by KENS Staff, KENS 5 News
“Ex-fugitive gets life in prison for video game store slaying” by Craig Kapitan, MySanAntonio

Oct 23, 2019
Episode 91: Fatty Arbuckle & Strangers with Candy
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Fatty Arbuckle was a star. He could act. He could sing. He could make an audience roar with laughter. By the 1910s, he was one of the highest paid actors, and among the most popular stars of silent films. It seemed like nothing could stop his shine. But then, following a weekend of partying at the St. Francis Hotel in San Francisco, his friend Virginia Rappe died. It wasn’t immediately clear why Virginia died, but her friend supplied the answer: Virginia had been raped and killed by one of America’s most beloved stars.

Then Kristin tells us about the ultimate old-timey kidnapping. If your parents ever warned you about taking candy from strangers, this is why. On July 1, 1874, four-year-old Charley Ross and his six-year-old brother Walter were playing in their front yard when two men pulled up in a horse-drawn carriage. The men offered to buy the boys candy and fireworks. Naturally, the boys jumped at the chance. The men took the boys on a long, winding ride. They stopped at a store, and gave Walter 25 cents to buy fireworks. But after Walter made his purchase, he came back outside to find that the men were gone. They’d taken Charley with them.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Charley Ross: Efforts to induce Westervelt to confess — he says, ‘search the Catholic Institutions,’” The Tennessean
“Among the missing: Charley Ross,” by Jay Robert Nash for The Tampa Tribune
“A notorious 19th century kidnapping in Brooklyn,” by Michael Pollak for The New York Times
“‘JonBenet’ case of its time — 1874,” by Jeff Gammage for The Philadelphia Inquirer
“Little Charley Ross,” The St. Albans Advertiser
“The story of Charley Ross,” ushistory.org
“The disappearance of Charley Ross,” by Steven Casale for The Lineup 

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Fatty Arbuckle and the Death of Virginia Rappe” by Denise Noe, The Crime Library
“The Skinny on the Fatty Arbuckle Trial” by Gilbert King, Smithsonian
“Roscoe Arbuckle” wikipedia.org

Oct 16, 2019
Episode 90: The Assassination of William McKinley & a Disturbed Young Gamer
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United States President William McKinley was on top of the world. For the most part, the American people loved him — and he loved them. In fact, shaking hands and meeting new people was one of his favorite parts of the job. But it was also one of the most dangerous. 

Despite the fact that two previous U.S. Presidents had been assassinated, presidential security was still grossly insufficient. It was the ideal environment for anarchist Leon Czolgosz to enact his revenge. 

Then, Brandi tells us an unsettling story about a deeply disturbed teenage boy. When Zachary Davis was just nine years old, his father died from ALS. His father’s death was understandably difficult on the young boy. He withdrew. He became quieter than ever before. Eventually, he was diagnosed with schizophrenia and depressive disorder. Years later, as a teenager, Zachary brutally murdered his mother, Melanie Davis, then attempted to light the house of fire. The prosecution would argue that Zachary was cold-blooded. But the defense made a case for leniency. They said he was a disturbed young man who desperately needed mental health treatment.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Czolgosz is to die,” The Fairmont News
“Leon Czolgosz” entry for Wikipedia
“James Benjamin Parker” entry for Wikipedia
“Assassination of William McKinley” entry for Wikipedia

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Sledgehammer Killer -Zachary Davis” by Emily Thompson, morbidology.com
“Zachary Davis: The Disturbing Story Of The 15-Year-Old Who Bludgeoned His Mother And Tried To Burn His Brother Alive” by William DeLong, All Things Interesting
“Davis trial Day 3: Zachary Davis tells jurors ‘I didn’t do it’” by Tena Lee, Tennessean
“Zachary Davis gets 20 more years in bludgeoning death of mother” by Tena Lee, Tennessean
“Mentally Ill or Monster?” episode Dr. Phil

Oct 09, 2019
Episode 89: The Divorces of Kim Kardashian & Susan Kuhnhausen
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It’s divorce week! In this episode, we’ll talk about Kim Kardashian’s two divorces and we’ll hear about a guy who *really* didn’t want a divorce.

It was 1988 and Susan Walters was ready for love. So she placed a personal ad in the Willamette Week. Her ad read, in part, “SWF, 33, overweight but not over life, seeks SM who wants more out of a relationship than just “slender.” Her ad went on to describe herself as an adventurous, active health care professional. That caught the attention of Mike Kuhnhausen. The pair hit it off immediately, and were married a short time later. But over the course of many years, the couple grew apart. Mike’s negative outlook on life didn’t mesh well with Susan’s sunny personality. After 17 years of marriage, Susan asked for a divorce. But Mike didn’t like that idea. 

Then Kristin wraps things up with the stories of Kim Kardashian’s two divorces. When she was just 19 years old and high on ecstasy, Kim and 29-year-old music producer Damon Thomas eloped in Las Vegas. Their marriage lasted just a few years. In documents that have since been made public, Kim alleged that Damon was physically and emotionally abusive. Damon denied physically abusing Kim. A few years later, Kim met NBA player Kris Humphries. The pair’s highly publicized, star-studded wedding drew international attention. But the wedding lasted just 72 days. The divorce, however, lasted almost two years. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Exclusive: Kim Kardashian’s divorce scenes on ‘KUWTK’ were reshot and scripted” by Chantal Waldholz for Life and Style Magazine
“Kim K/Kris H officially divorced,” TMZ
“Kim Kardashian and Kris Humphries divorce timeline,” US Magazine
“Kanye bought his first phone because of Kris Humphries,” Kocktails with Khloe clip on YouTube
“I never wanted to be that guy,” by Kris Humphries for the Players Tribune
“In Touch Exclusive Interview: Kim Kardashian ex-husband tells all,” In Touch Weekly
“Kim Kardashian and Kris Humphries Wedding was 7 Years Ago: Remembering Their 72-Day Marriage,” by Natalie Stone for People Magazine
“He punched me in the face and told me I needed liposuction: Kim Kardashian’s marriage hell revealed for first time,” Daily Mail
“Kris Humphries talks marriage to Kim Kardashian, ‘brutal’ divorce: ‘I was in a dark place’” by Sara Moniuszko for USA Today
“The Dark Secrets Behidn Kim Kardashian’s First Marriage that Everyone Forgot About,” by
Chelsea Leary for Showbiz CheatSheet

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“A Hit Man Came to Kill Susan Kuhnhausen. She Survived. He Didn’t.” by Beth Slovic, Willamette Week
“Intended Murder Victim Has Her Day In Court” The Oregonian
“Woman Who Strangles Attacker Wins $1 Million From Estranged Husband” by Kathleen Glanville, The Oregonian
“Portlander Michael Kuhnhausen, who hired hitman to kill wife (she strangled him), dies in prison” by Bryan Denson, The Oregonian
“No Bigger Gamble” episode Who the (Bleep) Did I Marry
“Susan/John and Jean/Penny” episode I Survived

Oct 02, 2019
Episode 88: The Durable Michael Malloy & A Mother Who Took Justice Into Her Own Hands
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Michael Malloy was one tough dude. He was also an out-of-work alcoholic who didn’t have many friends or family. But his apparent poor health and social isolation made him the ideal target for a murderous scheme. A group of sketchy men, later dubbed the “Murder Trust,” took out life insurance policies on Michael. They figured he’d die from alcoholism and they’d cash in. And if they sped up the dying process … who would be the wiser? They tried, and tried, and tried to kill Michael Malloy. Each time, Michael survived, and their attempts got more brazen. 

Then Brandi tells us about Ellie Nesler. In the summer of 1988, Ellie’s 7-year-old son, Willie Nesler, begged her to send him to summer camp. Ellie was hesitant, but she took comfort knowing that her friend, Daniel Mark Driver, would be working at the camp that summer. But when Willie returned from camp, something was off. He was withdrawn. He eventually told his aunt that he’d been molested by Daniel. Ellie was determined to make things right. But when the justice system revealed its flaws, Ellie took justice into her own hands.  

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“The Man Who Wouldn’t Die” by Karen Abbott for Smithsonian Magazine
“The Durable Mike Malloy” New York Daily News
“Doctor on stand denies covering insurance death,” The Daily News
“Death certificate of durable Mike convicts doctor,” The Daily News
“Four hear doom; ‘Nice day — for some,’ says one,” The Daily News
“Officers of murder trust are executed,” by James Cannon for I. N. Service
“Four convicted of hard-to-kill Malloy murder,” the Times Union
“Four go to chair after five attempts at murder,” by Max Haines for The Ottawa Citizen
“Try four as deliberate murderers to get victim’s insurance,” Chicago Tribune
“Death demanded for four in $1,800 risk plot murder,” The Daily News

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“William Nesler Still a Fugitive” The Associated Press, CBSNews
“Accused Molester is Killed in Court” The Associated Press, The New York Times
“Ellie Nesler killed son’s accused molester in courtroom shooting” The Associated Press, The Denver Post
“Ellie Nesler: Woman and Myth” by Charles Schwab, SFGate
“Woman Gets 10 Years For Killing Son’s Alleged Molester” by Nancy Mayer, The Associate Press
“Lasting Effects of Child Molestation” Oprah.com

 

 

 

 

Sep 25, 2019
Episode 87: A Brutal Attack on a Lawyer & Olestra
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Jennifer Morey Caldwell was a cautious person. So when she picked out her apartment complex, she chose the Bayou Park Apartments. She was a young lawyer living alone in Houston, Texas, so she was drawn to the complex’s 24-hour security. The apartment complex was protected by Pinkerton Security. She’d heard of them. Surely they’d keep her safe. 

Then, Kristin wraps things up with the explosive story of Olestra. Those of us who lived through the 90’s remember Frito-Lay’s Wow brand of chips. They were made using the chemical Olestra, which worked as a fat substitute. It was amazing! The chips tasted great! They had hardly any fat! There was just one tiny problem. They caused anal leakage.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Nutrition group seeks warning labels for olestra,” by Bruce Mohl for The Boston Globe
“Frito-Lay agrees to label fake fat Olestra more clearly on its “Light” chips,” article by the Center for Science in the Public Interest
Notice of intent to sue from the Center for Science in the Public Interest to Frito-Lay
“Frito-Lay target of Olestra lawsuit,” article by the Center for Science in the Public Interest
“Olestra: A Leaky History,” portablepress.com
“FDA says Proctor & Gamble free to use fake fat,” medicinenet.com
“Frito-Lay’s Wow chips hit Hoosiers hard,” press release by the Center for Science in the Public Interest

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“False Sense of Security” by Steve McVicker, Houston Press
“Jennifer/Sampson/Norina” episode I Survived

 

Sep 18, 2019
Episode 86: The Suicide of Tyler Clementi & a Discovery in a Cooler
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Tyler Clementi was a smart, talented young man with a promising future. But shortly before his freshman year at Rutgers University, Tyler’s randomly assigned roommate, Dharun Ravi, discovered that Tyler was gay. Dharun he tweeted about it. He IM’ed his friends about it. He seemed obsessed. When the semester began and Tyler invited a date back to the dorm, Dharun and his friend Molly Wei spied on Tyler and his date via a webcam. Once again, Dharun tweeted. He encouraged others to tune in. What Dharun did was unspeakably cruel. It didn’t take Tyler long to find out.  

When Justin Rey showed up at his storage unit in Lenexa, Kansas, with his young daughters, it didn’t take long for police to show up, too. Police worried about the girls. They were dirty. They didn’t appear healthy. When police asked about the girls’ mother, their concerns grew to full-on alarm. Justin pointed to a cooler. Inside was the dismembered body of his wife, Jessica Montiero. Justin had a hell of an explanation. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“The story of a suicide,” by Ian Parker for The New Yorker
“Witness: Viewing Party Planned,” by Gene Racz for The Courier-News
“Ex-classmates testify in trial,” by Gene Racz for The Central New Jersey Home News
“Webcam witness: First, pair tried to contain it,” by Geoff Mulvihill for the Associated Press
“Student says he helped set up webcam,” by Geoff Mulvihill for the Associated Press
“Man testifies about his relationship with the late Rutgers student,” by Jonathan Allen for Reuters

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Dad charged after police say investigation revealed more than human remains at Lenexa storage unit” by Megan Dillard, Fox4KC
““You don’t forget things like that:” Witness describes bringing suspect and two young girls to Lenexa storage unit” by Megan Dillard, Fox4KC
“Outburst in court-Man whose wife’s body was found in cooler yells about Johnson County injustice” by John Pepitone, Fox4KC
“Court documents offer graphic details of inside of Lenexa U-haul where police found man, two children and wife’s remains” by Makenzie Koch, Fox4KC
“Man charged in Lenexa storage unit case named a suspect in California murder” by Makenzie Koch, Fox4KC
“Attorney for man charged with dismembering wife files motion saying Justin Rey is unfit to withstand trial” by Fox 4 Newsroom, Fox4KC
“In unusual fashion, man accused of dismembering wife’s body in KC files handwritten motions to dismiss charges” by Fox 4 Newsroom, Fox4KC
“Man found in Lenexa with wife’s dismembered body is competent for trial” by Tony Rizzo, Kansas City Star
“Prosecutors allege child porn found on phone of man who once said he cut up wife’s body” by Associated Press, Fox4KC
“Trial begins for man found in Lenexa storage unit with kids, wife’s dismembered body” by Shannon O’Brien, Fox4KC
“Man found in Lenexa U-Haul with kids, wife’s dismembered body takes stand in trial” by Alana Laflore, Fox4KC
“Man discovered in Lenexa U-Haul with kids, wife’s body found guilty of child endangerment” by Makenzie Koch and Zac Summers, Fox4KC
“Justin Rey sentenced to nearly 9 years in prison for child porn possession, child endangerment” by Andrew Lynch, Fox4KC
“Man skinned and dismembered wife so badly cops couldn’t tell if she was male or female” by Jimmy McCloskey, Metro

 

 

 

 

Sep 11, 2019
Episode 85: The Dartmouth Murders and an Evil Phlebotomist
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Dartmouth College professors Half Zantop and Susanne Zantop were hanging out at home, waiting for their friend to arrive for dinner, when two boys showed up at their door. The boys said they were working on a school project. Could they ask Half a few questions? Half obliged. He’d devoted his life to academics. Of course he would help 16 year old James Parker and 17 year old Robert Tulloch. But James and Rob weren’t there for a school project. In fact, there was no school project.

Then, Kristin talks about a phlebotomist named Bryan Stewart. When Bryan and Jennifer Jackson first got together, things were great. But Bryan quickly became abusive. When Jennifer left Bryan, his threats escalated. The thought of paying child support for their infant son enraged him. He promised Jennifer that their son, Brryan Jackson, wouldn’t live to the age of five. Around that same time, Bryan “joked” with coworkers that as a phlebotomist, he could inject his enemies with disease-tainted blood, and they’d never know what hit them. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Brryan Jackson: My father injected me with HIV” by Lucy Hancock, for BBC News
“A positive life: How a son survived being injected with HIV by his father,” by Justin Heckert for GQ Magazine
“Man accused of injecting H.I.V. in son,” by Jo Thomas for the New York Times
“Mother testifies that defendant hinted at son’s death,” CNN
“Brian Stewart (phlebotomist)” Wikipedia entry

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Dartmouth Murders” by Denise Noe, The Crime Library
“Hearts of Darkness” by Alex Tresniowski, People Magazine
“Dartmouth professors’ murderer to get new sentence” by Peter Schworm and John R. Ellement, The Boston Globe
“Man convicted in 2001 murders of professors asks for early release” by Elliot Zornitsky, The Dartmouth
“2001 Dartmouth College murders” wikipedia.org

 

 

 

 

 

Sep 04, 2019
Episode 84: A Big Hug & An Incredible Story of Survival
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It was Sean Tarala’s eighth birthday party, and man was he excited. He’d just gotten a new red bike! He was gonna eat cake! And then, just when life couldn’t get any better, his aunt, Jennifer Connell, showed up. “Auntie Jen! Auntie Jen!” he shouted. He ran to her. He lept into her arms. But Jennifer wasn’t prepared for such an exuberant hug. The pair tumbled to the ground. Jennifer experienced immediate pain in her wrist. So what did she do? She sued her nephew for $127k. You’ll want to hear the whole story. This one has a twist ending. 

Then Brandi tells us an incredible story of survival. Robert Lee Burton was a controlling, abusive boyfriend. Following a violent attack, Melissa Dohme got a restraining order against Robert. That restraining order effectively ended their relationship. Melissa felt like a new woman. She felt free. But Robert didn’t want to let her go. He called her and called her. He begged her for closure. He said he wanted one last hug. Melissa said okay.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Aunt who sued nephew for $127k says she’s not after money,” by Chris Perez for the New York Post
“‘She loves us’: Nephew speaks out on aunt’s hug injury lawsuit,” Tribune Media Wire
“8-year-old Westport boy on trial for exuberance,” by Daniel Tepfer for the Connecticut Post
“Woman loses lawsuit against nephew over ‘exuberant hug,’” by Kim Lacapria for Snopes

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Live to Tell: One Last Hug” 48 Hours episode
“48 Hours: Dating violence survivor tells story” by Melissa Dohme, CBS News
“Marrying the man who saved my life” BBC News Magazine
“Domestic Abuse Survivor Finds Happily Ever After with First Responder Who Saved Her Life: ‘He Loved Me Through It All’” by Rose Minutaglio, People Magazine

 

Aug 28, 2019
Episode 83: Bad Dads! (Featuring DP)
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Guess who’s baaaack? It’s none other than Daryl Pitts, a.k.a. DP. For some reason, you people just can’t get enough DP. We don’t judge. We just indulge your every whim.  

For this episode, we let the judges on Patreon pick our theme. We asked them to choose between spoiled kids and bad dads, and bad dads won by a mile

Brandi starts us off with a predictably dark case. When Christian Longo met Mary Jane Baker, the two hit it off almost immediately. They were both Jehovah’s Witnesses, and both eager to start a family. But Christian didn’t pay much attention to the commandments. He stole regularly. He committed adultery. Eventually, he committed murder. 

Then Kristin tells us about a sketchy family business. Scott Catt loved robbing banks. It was easy. The tellers never put up a fight. There was a downside, though. The payoffs were never very big. So one day, Scott got to thinking. If he recruited some more robbers, he could get into the vault. His haul would be so much bigger. So he asked his son, Hayden, and daughter, Abby, to join him.  

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
Episode of 20/20 “A Family Affair”
“I would only rob banks for my family,” by Skip Hollandsworth for Texas Monthly
Catt Family wikipedia page 

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Trials of Christian Longo” by Elizabeth Engstrom, The Crime Library
“Christian Longo” entry, crime museum.org
“Oregon v. Longo: A family’s murder” murderpedia.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aug 21, 2019
Episode 82: Holding your wee for a Wii & the Disappearance of a Troubled Teen
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In the winter of 2007, the Nintendo Wii reigned supreme. It was cool, new, and impossible to get ahold of. So when the California radio station KDND-FM 107.9 The End announced their “hold your wee for a Wii” contest, 28-year-old mother of three Jennifer Strange signed up. She and 17 other participants went to the radio station, where they were given water every ten minutes for nearly three hours. As the contest went on, the participants ached with discomfort. It was entertaining radio. But concerned listeners called the station. They warned the DJs that the contest was dangerous. Hadn’t they heard of water intoxication? One DJ said that he had, but he wasn’t worried. The participants had all signed releases. No matter what happened, the station couldn’t be held liable. 

Then Brandi tells us one of her strangest stories yet. It’s hard to know what’s true about Treva Throneberry’s complicated life, but one thing is for certain — she was a very troubled girl. When she was in high school, Treva sought the help of police. She told them that her father had raped her at gunpoint, and that when she’d tried to tell her mom, she’d just laughed. Treva’s three sisters doubted her story, but they didn’t doubt that she’d been raped. They’d all been sexually abused by an uncle. Surely the predatory uncle had gone after Treva, too. But before anyone could get to the truth, Treva vanished. 

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Woman dies after being in water-drinking contest,” Associated Press
“Jury rules against radio station after water-drinking contest kills California mom,” by Suzan Clarke and Rich McHugh for Good Morning America
“Radio station behind ‘hold your wee for a Wii’ promotion shuts down,” by Joon Chun for Chief Marketer.com
“Wii death case resolved,” by Patrick Kolan for IGN
“Trial over woman’s death in radio station contest to begin today,” by Andy Furillo for McClatchy-Tribune
“Jennifer Strange case finds end, Entercom forfeits license,” by Dan Morain for the Sacramento Bee
“No charges in radio contest death,” by Henry Lee for the San Francisco Chronicle
“Sue from Fiddletown took a stand in the public interest,” by Dan Morain for the Sacramento Bee

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Day Treva Throneberry Disappeared” by Skip Hollandsworth, Texas Monthly
“Treva Throneberry” by Rachael Bell, The Crime Library
“Forever Young” by Emily White, The New York Times
“Treva or Brianna” by Katia Dunn, Portland Mercury
“Treva Throneberry” wikipedia.org

 

 

 

 

Aug 14, 2019
Episode 81: The Kidnapping Of Edward Cudahy & A Baker Who Refused To Make A Cake
7733

Brandi starts us off with the old timey-est kidnapping of them all! It was the winter of 1900 in Omaha, Nebraska, and 16-year-old Edward Cudahy was walking home from a neighbor’s house. Two men pulled up beside him and lured him into their carriage. They’d chosen their target wisely. Edward’s father owned Cudahy Packing Company. He was a millionaire. He had more than enough money to pay their ransom. But would he?

Then Kristin tells us about a cake maker who didn’t want to make a cake. It was 2012, and Charlie Craig and David Mullins were in love. In fact, they were so in love that they decided to get married. That was a little tricky, though. At the time, Colorado prohibited same-sex marriage. But Charlie and David weren’t going to let legalized homophobia stop them. They planned to get married in Massachusetts and have a reception back in their home state. So they went to Masterpiece Cakeshop to order a wedding cake. There was just one problem. The owner of the bakery, Jack Phillips, refused to make cakes for same-sex couples.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“In baker’s case, neither side has much reason to rejoice,” by Jennifer Rubin for the Washington Post
“Colorado judge orders Christian baker to bake gay wedding cake. Will he say no?” by Patrik Jonsson for the Christian Science Monitor
“Colorado cake maker asks Supreme Court to provide a religious liberty right to refuse gay couple,” by David Savage for the Los Angeles Times
“Supreme Court to take case on baker who refused to sell wedding cake to gay couple,” by Robert Barnes for the Washington Post
“Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission,” Wikipedia

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Bold Cudahy Kidnapping” by David Krajicek, Crime Library
“Kidnapping Edward Cudahy Jr.” NorthOmahaHistory.com
“New Life For The Strangest Of Legends” by Micah Mertes, Omaha World-Herald 

 

 

Aug 07, 2019
Episode 80: A Swig of Mountain Dew & the Phony Pony Bandit
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Ronald Ball was thirsty. So he walked over to the vending machine, got himself a Mountain Dew and cracked it open. He took a swig. Right away, he became violently ill. As soon as he recovered, he turned his attention to the Mountain Dew. What the hell was wrong with it? As he poured the rest of the soda into a cup, a dead mouse plopped out. When Ronald Ball threatened Pepsico with a lawsuit, the company relied on a defense that shocked the world… and probably had their PR team looking for new jobs. 

Then, Brandi tells us about a string of bank robberies that occurred in the summer of 2012. Over time, law enforcement came to refer to the mysterious bank robber as the “Phony Pony Bandit,” because the robber wore a cheap wig, pulled back in a ponytail. The Phony Pony Bandit went on quite a spree, but it came to an end on September 25, when a sheriff’s deputy caught him in the act.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Swig of Mountain Dew included dead mouse, suit claims,” by Kelly Holleran for the Madison-St. Clair Record
“A brief history of rodents in soda containers,” by Arielle Duhaime-Ross for The Verge
“Pepsi says Mountain Dew can dissolve mouse carcasses,” by Eric Randall for The Wire.
“Mouse and Mountain Dew Experiment” on YouTube 

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Bank robbery suspect shot in Stanwood” by Diana Hefley and Rikki King, The Everett Herald
“‘Phony Pony Bandit’ admits to armed robberies” by Diana Hefley, The Everett Herald
“‘Phony Pony Bandit’ gets 17-year sentence for robberies” by Diana Hefley, The Everett Herald
“Bank robber shot in Stanwood drops lawsuit against SnoCo” by Jeremiah O’Hagan, Skagit Valley Herald

 

 

 

 

Jul 31, 2019
Episode 79: Cruel Teenage Girls & the Snake House
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Brandi starts us off with a story so upsetting that she’s put off telling it for weeks. In the winter of 1992, two hunters discovered a body that was so badly abused it initially didn’t look real. The body was charred. It had been beaten and stabbed. Law enforcement officers were stunned. Murders weren’t common in Madison, Indiana, but this one was unspeakably gruesome. Despite the state of the body, it didn’t take long to determine that it belonged to 12-year-old Shanda Sharer. A little while later, investigators rounded up their prime suspects: teenagers Melinda Loveless, Laurie Tackett, Hope Rippey, and Toni Lawrence. 

Then Kristin tells us about Jeff and Jody Brooks. In 2014, the couple found a house they thought they’d live in for the next twenty years. The modest ranch in Annapolis, Maryland, had a main floor office for Jody and plenty of room for their children. But the home also had a strange scent. As winter turned to spring, the family discovered snakeskins on the floor. Then, they heard movement coming from inside their walls. What they discovered will give you the heebie jeebies.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Welcome to ‘The Snake House’: Lawsuit claims home infested with snakes,” by Tim Prudente for the Capital Gazette
“Settlement reached in Annapolis ‘snake house’ case,” by Ben Weathers for the Captial Gazette
“Capital follow-up: Famed Annapolis ‘snake house’ close to sale,” by Rachael Pacella for the Capital Gazette 

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Death of Innocence – The Murder of Young Shanda Sharer” by David Lohr, Crime Library
“Why 12-Year-Old Shanda Sharer Was Tortured And Killed By Four Teenage Girls” by William DeLong
“Woman convicted in 1992 slaying of 12-year-old Shanda Renee Sharer is released from prison” by Justin L. Mack, The Indy Star

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jul 24, 2019
Episode 78: Dating Naked & the Abduction of Amber Hagerman
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When Jessie Nizewitz agreed to be on VH1’s reality dating show “Dating Naked,” she knew one thing for certain — she’d be filmed naked. When Jessie arrived on set, she says producers encouraged her to wrestle naked with her date. They urged her to playfully slam him into the sand. Jessie was hesitant, until they reassured her that all of her private parts would be blurred when the episode aired. A few weeks later, Jessie was back at home, watching her episode. Just as promised, her naked body was blurred. But then, for a split second, it wasn’t. That image was captured and spread all over the internet. Jessie was humiliated. She felt lied to. So she decided to sue. 

Then Brandi tells us about the abduction of Amber Hagerman. Her name might not initially sound familiar, but you probably know her legacy. Amber was just nine years old, riding her bike a few blocks from her grandparents’ home when a man abducted her. A neighbor witnessed the abduction. He called police to report what he’d seen. Soon, the FBI stepped in. But did they have enough information to find Amber?

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“This is why Dating Naked was Canceled,” by Nicki Swift for YouTube
“‘Dating Naked’ cast member sues after crotch-blur fail,” by Jamie Schram and Amber Sutherland for the New York Post
“‘Dating Naked’ cast member sues after VH1 showed her naked,” James Hibberd for Entertainment Weekly
Court documents
“‘Dating Naked’ lawsuit seeks to strip Viacom of $10M for showing too much,” by Dominic Patten for Deadline
“‘Dating Naked’ $10M lawsuit stripped by judge,” by Dominic Patten for Deadline
“‘Dating Naked” $10M “inadvertent” nudity suit should be tossed, says Viacom,” by Dominic Patten for Deadline
“$10M ‘Dating Naked’ lawsuit dismissed,” HNGN.com

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Amber Hagerman” by David Krajicek, The Crime Library
“Amber Hagerman: 20 Years Later” CBS DFW
“Amber Alert” wikipedia.org.
“Ariel Castro Kidnappings” wikipedia.org

 

 

 

 

Jul 17, 2019
Episode 77: A Home Invasion & Pepsi Points
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It was the winter of 2014, and Sue Duncan and her husband Leo Fisher were settling in for a quiet night at home. Sue had a chicken roasting in the oven, and Leo was reading on his recliner. Then, the doorbell rang. Leo opened the door to find a man in a long black jacket at his doorstep. The man fired a Taser at Leo’s chest and barged into the couple’s home. The man said he was with the “Virginia SEC,” and that he was there to arrest Leo. Right away, Sue sensed she didn’t have the full story.

Then, in the mid-90’s, Pepsi launched a new ad campaign. It was pretty simple. Every time you bought a Pepsi, you earned points. With those points, you could buy items from the Pepsi catalogue. To advertise Pepsi Points, Pepsi aired a commercial aimed at showing off all of their sweet swag. You could buy a t-shirt. A leather jacket. And, as a funny little twist, they ended the commercial by saying that Pepsi drinkers could buy a Harrier jet for 7,000,000 points. It was clearly a joke. At the time, Harrier jets were worth $33.8 million. Plus, they were only available for military use. But you know who didn’t think they were joking? A 21-year-old business student named John Leonard.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
The commercial itself, which is available on YouTube
Leonard v. Pepsico, Inc., 88 F. Supp. 2d 116 (S.D.N.Y. 1999)
“Pepsi Harrier Giveaway,” Snopes.com
John Leonard, Plaintiff-appellant, v. Pepsico, Inc., Defendant-appellee, 210 F.3d 88 (2d Cir. 2000)
“Pentagon: ‘Pepsi ad not the real thing.’” CNN.com

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“A Home Invasion, A Torture Session, One Lawyer Nearly Killing Another—The Gruesome November Night in One of Washington’s Wealthiest Suburbs.” by Jason Fagone, The Washingtonian
“Ex-Lawyer Sentenced to 45 Years in Home Invasion, Torture Attack of Former Boss, His Wife” by David Culver, NBC Washington

 

 

Jul 10, 2019
Episode 76: A Shopaholic & the Glensheen Mansion Murder Mystery
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It’s October of 2014, and the people of Duncan, Oklahoma, are concerned. They haven’t seen the Hruby family all weekend. The Hruby’s are usually everywhere. They own the local newspaper. They’re actively involved in the community. But on Monday morning, their longtime housekeeper made a gruesome discovery. John, Tinker, and 17-year-old Katherine Hruby were dead. Everyone in the Hruby family was dead. Everyone but Alan.

Then, Brandi tells us about a murder mystery at the Glensheen Historic Estate. The 20,000 square foot mansion is something to behold. It’s now a museum, operated by the University of Minnesota Duluth. But for a long time, the mansion was home to the Congdon family. In the late 60’s, the original owner’s youngest daughter Elisabeth promised the home to the university upon her death. But her death came sooner than anticipated. Late at night on June 27, 1977, Elizabeth Congdon and her nurse Velma Pietila were murdered. Who could have carried out such a senseless crime?  

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
American Greed episode “Blood Relatives”
“Man to spend life in prison for killing parents, sister,” by Nolan Clay for The Oklahoman

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Trail of clues, legal twists kept Glensheen murder case going for years” by Candace Renalls, Duluth News Tribune
“Blood money: The grisly murders at Duluth’s Glensheen mansion” by Hannah Jones, City Pages
“Man’s Suicide Note: ‘I Didn’t Kill Those ’Girls’” Associate Press
“40 years later, Glensheen murders still grip Duluth” by Dan Kraker, MPR News

 

Jul 03, 2019
Episode 75: The Jenny Jones Show & Brandi’s Most Horrifying Case
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Brandi starts us off with a story that makes her skin crawl. Seriously. She dry heaved like five times telling this story. It starts innocently enough. In late 2007, Brian and Susan Trost bought their dream home. Their 2,400-square-foot house had gorgeous views of the Whitmoor Country Club’s lush golf course. Soon after they moved in, the Trosts gave their new home a deep clean. But not long after they’d cleaned the house, Susan noticed a spider web. She figured it was no big deal — she’d just missed it. But she figured wrong.

Then Kristin tells us about what is arguably the most controversial episode of any daytime talk show, ever. On March 6, 1995, the Jenny Jones Show taped an episode on same sex secret crushes. Scott Amedure was on the show to discuss his secret crush on an acquaintance named Jonathan Schmitz. Before Jonathan came on stage, Jenny asked Scott to describe the fantasies he’d had about Jonathan. Scott laughingly obliged. When Jonathan finally came on stage and learned that Scott was the one who’d brought him on the show, Jonathan seemed surprised. He told the Jenny Jones show that he was a heterosexual. All in all, the segment didn’t seem like much. Scott had a crush; Jonathan didn’t feel the same way. But then, three days after the taping, Jonathan bought a shotgun, drove to Scott’s home, and shot him twice in the chest.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
Gay and Trans Panic Defense, LGBT Bar
“Jury: Jones’ show liable; awards $25 million,” by Justin Hyde for the Associated Press
“Dad of accused gay-killer rips TV host, victim,” by Todd Nissen for Reuters
“Murder trial under way in talk show slaying,” Associated Press
“Jurors watch ‘Gay Crush’ episode,” Associated Press
“Woman describes Schmitz’s manner before fatal shooting,” Associated Press
“Lawyer: Make Jones testify,” by Greta Guest for the Associated Press
“Defense lawyer angles for manslaughter verdict,” by L.L. Brasier, Detroit Free Press
“Witness: Two at bar together,” by Justin Hyde for the Associated Press
“Same Sex Secret Crushes” episode of the Jenny Jones Show on YouTube

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Extreme case of brown recluse spiders drives owners from Weldon Spring home” by Susan Weich, St. Louis Post-Dispatch
“State Farm Was NOT There When This Family’s House Was INFESTED With Thousands Of DEADLY SPIDERS” by Eric Owens, Daily Caller
“Spider Man” by John Amick, The Pitch

 

 

 

Jun 26, 2019
Episode 74: A Killer Party & An Upsetting Discovery
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Amy Anderton was concerned. Her boyfriend, Logan Storm, *seemed* like a good guy. He was a middle school math teacher. He talked a lot about trust and positivity. But something seemed off. So one day, when Logan left for work, Amy snooped through Logan’s stuff. That’s when she came across a thumbdrive. She plugged it into her computer, opened it, and was horrified by what she saw — hundreds of images of child pornography.

Then, Brandi tells us about high school student Tyler Hadley’s massive party. When Tyler first told his friends about his plan to throw a party, they were a little skeptical.Tyler wasn’t the party-throwing type. His parents were super strict. But Tyler was determined to throw a party, and that’s exactly what he did. Tons of kids showed up from all over the sleepy town of Port St. Lucie, Florida. They had so much fun that they didn’t notice that Tyler’s house was a crime scene.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Still claiming innocence, Logan Storm sentenced to eight years in prison on child porn, failure-to-appear convictions,” by Helen Jung for The Oregonian
“Logan Storm slips ankle bracelet, flees hours after verdict on child porn charge,” by Helen Jung for The Oregonian
“Child porn convict dumps monitor,” Statesman Journal
“Former teacher, Logan Storm, sentenced to prison for possessing child pornography and failing to appear in court,” press release for the United States Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon
“Jury finds former teacher Logan Storm not guilty of groping girls in public pool,” by Aimee Green for The Oregonian
“Why did seven years pass before former teacher Logan Storm was tried for child molestation,” by Aimee Green for The Oregonian
The “Weathering the Storm” episode of “Who The Bleep Did I Marry?”

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Tyler Hadley’s Killer Party” by Nathaniel Rich, Rolling Stone
“Best Friend ‘Ruined My Life’ When He Killed His Own Parents” by Sean Dooley, Jenner Smith, and Alexa Valiente, ABC News
“Murder of Blake and Mary Jo Hadley” wikipedia.org

 

 

 

 

Jun 19, 2019
Episode 73: Brock Turner & The Boy Who Thought He Pulled Off the Perfect Murder
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We’re launching a Patreon! You can support the show by joining the district, appellate, or the SUPREME COURT! Either, way, we guarantee you’ll be as happy as a juvenile bigfoot prancing through the woods.

Now back to our regularly scheduled programming: Shirley Kopitske was concerned. It had been days since she’d heard from her adult son, Glenn. When she drove to his house to check on him, she discovered a horrifying scene. Glenn was dead, and had been for some time. An investigation would reveal that he’d been shot and stabbed. Initially, investigators weren’t sure who would commit such a heinous crime. But months went by, and a bold, unashamed suspect emerged. He blabbed his motive all over town. But when his trial rolled around, he changed his tune.

Then, Emily Doe woke up in a hospital room with pine needles in her hair and blood on her hands and elbows. She had bruises on her body. Her underwear was missing. She remembered going to a party at Stanford University with her sister the night before, but after that, her memory went blank. Weeks later, she was at work when she came across an article about her attack. She learned that two Swedish exchange students were biking through campus when they spotted a man and woman behind a dumpster. It didn’t take them long to realize that the man was thrusting on top of an unconscious woman. They yelled at him. He ran, but they caught him and pinned him to the ground. Emily’s attacker was 19-year-old Brock Turner.

And since this is apparently sooo important, you should probably know that he was a great swimmer.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

 

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“People v. Turner,” wikipedia
“Brock Turner Wanted Only Outercourse, Lawyer Argues in Appeal,” by Daniel Victor for The New York Times
Victim impact statement

“Father of student convicted of rape: Steep price for ‘20 minutes of action,” by Alexandra Samuels for USA Today
“Brock Turner’s mommy calls cops as protesters swarm house,” by Lindsay Putnam for the New York Post
“Brock Turner case goes to jury,” by Sue Dremann for the Palo Alto Weekly
“Stanford swimmer denies alleged rape in police report,” by Elena Kadvany for the Palo Alto Weekly

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Gary Hirte and the Perfect Murder” by Seamus McGraw, The Crime Library
“All-American Thrill Killer” by Seamus McGraw, Stuff Magazine
“Murder of Glenn Kopitske” wikipedia.org

 

 

 

Jun 12, 2019
Episode 72: The Assassination Attempt on Ronald Reagan & Bite Mark Analysis
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Ione Cychosz’s life ended in the worst possible way. Her body was discovered in a vacant lot. She’d been beaten, stabbed, and bitten. There were no witnesses. And since it was the 80’s, investigators didn’t test for DNA. So they turned to a relatively new form of science — bite mark analysis. A forensic dentist examined the bite marks and told detectives that the killer was missing an upper front tooth. It didn’t take long for investigators to find 20-year-old Robert Lee Stinson. Robert lived near the crime scene and was missing a right front tooth. The detectives knew they had the right guy. There was just one problem: They didn’t.

Then, Brandi tells us about the assassination attempt on President Ronald Reagan. Interestingly, when John Hinckley Jr. set out to murder Ronald Reagan, he didn’t have a political agenda. In fact, John later admitted that he opened fire on the president in an attempt to impress actress Jodie Foster. He’d become obsessed with Jodie ever since he saw her in the movie Taxi Driver. His trial drew worldwide attention and forever changed the way we look at insanity pleas.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“False Positive: When Forensic Science Fails,” Vox video
“Robert Lee Stinson,” National Registry of Exonerations
“Robert Lee Stinson case,” Wikipedia
“Robert Lee Stinson,” Innocence Project
“Innocent man piecing life together after conviction,” by Dinesh Ramde for the Associated Press
“A long ride for me,” by Dinesh Ramde and Todd Richmond for the Associated Press
“Man sentenced to life for murder,” Associated Press

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The John Hinckley Case” by Denise Noe, Crime Library
“The Trial of John W. Hinckley Jr.” Famous-Trials.com
“John Hinckley Jr.” wikipedia.org

 

 

 

 

Jun 05, 2019
Episode 71: A Murder Mystery & Nazi Saboteurs
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It was early in the morning on March 7, 1986. Joyce Cohen called 911 in a panic. Her husband, Stan, had just been shot. Police rushed to the couple’s lavish mansion in Miami’s exclusive Coconut Grove neighborhood. Joyce told police that she hadn’t witnessed her husband’s murder. She’d been up all night in another room, sorting through clothing for an upcoming charity event. But she had managed to spot a few shadowy figures fleeing her home. Police weren’t sure what to believe, but they had a feeling they weren’t getting the full story.   

Then, Kristin tells us about a WWII plot that could have devastated America. In 1941, Adolf Hitler was beyond pissed off. Germany had a bunch of spies working in the United States — but one of them had just revealed themselves as a double agent. As a result, 33 German spies were captured and convicted. Hitler vowed revenge. He started up a new spy ring, dubbed Operation Pastorius. The Nazi government quickly found eight men who’d all spent significant time in America. They trained the men for three weeks, then sent them off in submarines for America. The men were ordered to blow up factories, destroy canal locks, detonate railroad tracks, and ruin New York’s water supply. But someone took the plan off track.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“The Inside Story of How a Nazi Plot to Sabotage the U.S. War Effort Was Foiled,” by David A. Taylor for Smithsonian.com.
“The Nazi Saboteurs Trial,” by Douglas O. Linder for famous-trials.com
“Six Nazi spies were executed in D.C. White supremacists gave them a memorial — on federal land,” by John Woodrow Cox for the Washington Post

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Murder in Miami: Stan and Joyce Cohen” by David Krajicek, The Crime Library
“Revisiting a Case of Murder” by Mike Clary, The Los Angeles Times
“Jail Informant’s Credibility on Trial” by Daniel de Vise, The Miami Herald

 

 

 

 

May 29, 2019
Episode 70: Dr. Kevorkian & IHOP
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Dr. Jack Kevorkian is a polarizing figure. Some call him a murderer. They think he earned the nickname “Dr. Death.” But to others, Dr. Kevorkian was a compassionate man who performed a necessary service. Over his lifetime, Kevorkian assisted in the suicides of more than 100 terminally ill patients. He was a champion of the right to die movement. But Kevorkian’s detractors were loud and powerful, and took him to court several times.

Next, put that syrup away. Brandi’s talking about the other IHOP — the International House of Prayer. In the winter of 2012, a young nurse named Bethany Deaton was discovered dead in her car. Police discovered a suicide note, along with a few bottles of pills. But did Bethany really take her own life? She had so much to live for. She’d just gotten married, she was at the start of a promising career, and she was part of IHOP’s tight-knit church. In fact, she and her charismatic husband, Tyler, were part of an even more tight-knit religious group, known as “the community.” Days after Bethany’s body was discovered, Micah Moore came forward. He said that he’d killed Bethany — under the instruction of her husband, Tyler. But as Micah’s trial grew closer, he recounted those statements.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“The Trials of Dr. Jack Kevorkian,” famous-trials.com
“Jack Kevorkian,” wikipedia
“He breaks his own rules,” by Kirk Cheyfitz for the Detroit Free Press
“An end to pain,” by Julia Prodis for the Associated Press
“Kevorkian proves a lively witness,” by David Zeman and Janet Wilson for the Detroit Free Press
“Two faces of Kevorkian painted,” by David Zeman and Janet Wilson for the Detroit Free Press
“‘There is no law’, Kevorkian shouts,” by Jeff Martin for the Detroit Free Press|
“Kevorkian: Intent was not to murder,” by Justin Hyde for the Associated Press

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Love and Death in the House of Prayer” by Jeff Tietz, Rolling Stone
“Fall From Grace” episode 48 Hours
“The Bizarre Christian Sex Cult Death of Bethany Leidlein Deaton” by John Nova Lomax, The Houston Press
“Bethany Deaton Suicide Now Considered A Murder; Police Arrest Micah Moore” by David Lohr, The Huffington Post
“Prosecutor drops murder charge against Micah Moore in the death of Bethany Deaton”by Donald Bradley, The Kansas City Star

 

 

May 22, 2019
Episode 69: A Terrible Commute & The Dark Web
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It was a hot day in the summer of 2014. Justin Ross Harris was driving down the road with his toddler, Cooper, when the pair stopped at Chick-fil-A for breakfast. Justin was supposed to drop Cooper off at daycare afterward, but instead, he drove straight to his office. Justin got out of his vehicle and walked into work, leaving his little boy in the SUV. Cooper died that day. But did Justin leave Cooper there on purpose? Or was it a terrible accident?

Then Kristin tells us about Stephen Allwine. Stephen presented himself as a deeply religious man who loved his wife, Amy. But on his 43rd birthday, Stephen traded $6,000 cash for some bitcoin, ate a late lunch with his mistress, and then got on the dark web. He reached out to a freelance hitman. He wanted his wife dead.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“If you want to kill someone, we are the right guys,” by Mara Hvistendahl for Wired.com
“Stephen Allwine sentenced to life in prison for wife’s murder,” by Tom Lyden for Fox9
The Stephen and Amy Allwine episode of Crime Watch Daily with Chris Hansen

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Leanna Taylor Speaks Out” episode 20/20
“Ross Harris trial: More sexting part of 3 key things to know” by Christian Boone and Bill Rankin, The Atlanta Journal Constitution
“Why did the jury convict Justin Ross Harris on all counts?” by Christian Boone and Bill Rankin, The Atlanta Journal Constitution
“A timeline of the Justin Ross Harris case” by Christian Boone, The Atlanta Journal Constitution
“Day by day: Key moments from the Justin Ross Harris trial” by Mayra Cuevas and Natisha Lance, CNN

 

May 15, 2019
Episode 68: The Day Care Shooter & Misery at Taco Bell
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It was a typical Thursday morning for Rusty Sneiderman. He woke up, had breakfast with his son Ian, and then dropped his son off at Dunwoody Day Care. But as Rusty left the day care, a man approached him. With chilling resolve, the man shot Rusty four times. Witnesses couldn’t believe what they’d just seen. By the time police arrived on the scene, the killer was long gone. But it didn’t take too long to determine that the killer was a man named Hemy Neuman. Hemy, it turns out, was Rusty’s wife’s boss at General Electric. Hemy was in love with Andrea. That much was certain. But did she love him back? And what role — if any — did she play in her husband’s murder?

Then Brandi gets revenge on Kristin. Last week, Kristin told a horrifying tale about a dog being murdered. So this week, Brandi attacks the one thing Kristin holds dear — her beloved Taco Bell. It was the summer of 2006 in Provo, Utah, when Ryan Klinkenbeard stopped for lunch at Taco Bell. He ordered a cheesy gordita crunch, a bean burrito, a taco supreme, and a Diet Pepsi. He noticed the bean burrito tasted a little funky, but didn’t think much of it. But hours later, when the rumble in Ryan’s stomach grew to a roar, he knew something was terribly wrong.

Stay tuned till the end, folks. You won’t want to miss it.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
The 20/20 episode, “Angels and Demons”
“Retrial of day care shooter may lack drama,” by Christian Boone for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
“Sneiderman lawyer: New trial is needed,” by Christian Boone for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
“Convicts attorneys encouraged,” by Christian Boone for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution
“Sides settle in death lawsuit,” by Christian Boone for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

 

May 08, 2019
Episode 67: Fraud, Embezzlement, and the Vatican & Road Rage
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If Martin Frankel had one thing, it was confidence. Confidence in his own intelligence. As a young adult, Martin wanted to get ahead in life. He figured the easiest way to do that was to get involved in a brokerage business. He studied as hard as he could. He amassed an impressive amount of book smarts. But there was one thing he didn’t have: Ethics.

Then Kristin scars Brandi for life with the story of Sara McBurnett. Sara was driving toward San Jose International Airport with her little dog Leo in the passenger’s seat when an SUV cut them off. Sara accidentally hit the SUV’s bumper. The driver of the SUV jumped out of his car and ran over to Sara. She tried to apologize, but it was no use. The man was livid. Then, he reached into her car, grabbed Leo, and flung him into oncoming traffic.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Can a little dog’s death end the road rage plague?” by Jeffrey Page, The Record
“Jailed killer of dog sues dog’s owner,” Associated Press
“Dog’s killer gets 3-year sentence,” by Ron Harris, Associated Press
“Dog’s death leads to howls of anger,” by Ray Delgado and Annie Nakao, San Francisco Examiner
“Nothing new yet in dog traffic killing,” San Jose Mercury News
“California road rage trial begins,” by Ron Harris, Associated Press
“New evidence permitted in dog’s traffic death,” Associated Press
“New evidence in animal cruelty case,” Associated Press
“Judge hands maximum sentence to dog killer,” Washington Post
“California court rejects appeal by dog killer,” CNN.com
“Dog-killing case gets stranger as trial halts,” Los Angeles Times

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Martin Frankel: Sex, Greed and $200 Million Fraud” by Rachael Bell, Crime Library
“Billion-Dollar Vanishing Act?” by CBS News Staff, CBS News
“The Martin Frankel Case” episode American Greed
“17-Year Sentence Affirmed for Investor Who Looted Insurers” by The Associated Press, The New York Times

 

May 01, 2019
Episode 66: The Man in the Attic & an Unsolved Mystery
6583

Walburga “Dolly” Oesterreich was unhappy in her marriage. She and her husband, Fred, were financially successful, but Dolly was bored. One day, Dolly told Fred that her sewing machine was broken. She asked him to send one of his repairmen to fix it. Fred sent 17-year-old

Otto Sanhuber. When Dolly answered the door, she was wearing stockings, a silk robe, and not much else. It was the start of a lengthy affair. But when her neighbors asked questions, Dolly was in a pickle. How could she keep cheating on her husband without anyone finding out?

Then Brandi tells us about Sharon Kinne, whose life is shrouded in suspicion and mystery. Sharon was just 16 when she met 22-year-old James Kinne. The couple got married quickly, but their happiness didn’t last. On March 19, 1960, James was shot dead in their Independence, Missouri, home. Who could have done it? Sharon had the answer. It was the couple’s toddler.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Sanhuber says he confessed to save widow,” Associated Press
“Attic batman and jury visit murder scene,” Universal Services
“Mystery of the man in the closet,” by Ruth Reynolds, the Honolulu Advertiser
“Lived like a bat in an attic,” by A.L. Wooldridge, the Post-Dispatch Sunday Magazine
“Bedroom in the attic,” by Spencer Hardy, King Features Syndicate
“‘Bat Man’ case: a lurid tale of love and death,” by Cecilia Rasmussen, Los Angeles Times
“The married woman who kept her lover in the attic,” By Addison Nugent, Atlas Obscura
“Lover in  the attic,” by Joseph McNamara, Daily News

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Maybe I’ll Meet You on The Run” by Mark Gribben, The Malefactor’s Register
“Sharon Kinne” by J.J. Maloney, crimemagazine.com
“Sharon Kinne” wikipedia.org

 

Apr 24, 2019
Episode 65: Cyberbullying & the Hot Cup of Coffee
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Thirteen-year-old Megan Meier was thrilled. She’d just logged onto MySpace, and found a message from a hot 16-year-old boy named Josh. Megan wasn’t allowed to spend much time online, but she and Josh quickly became friends. The pair bonded, but one day, Josh’s messages went from sweet to sour.

Then, Kristin tells us a story that everyone has heard before. Back in the early 90’s, a woman went through the drive thru at McDonald’s. She ordered a coffee. She put the coffee between her legs and drove off down the road. As she sped off, the coffee spilled. It hurt. So what did she do? She sued McDonald’s for millions of dollars. This story has been hailed as an example of America’s many frivolous lawsuits. But reality isn’t quite so outrageous.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Scalded by coffee, then news media,” New York Times Retro Report
“A matter of degree: How a jury decided that a coffee spill is worth $2.9 million,” Wall Street Journal by Andrea Gerlin
“Hot Coffee” documentary
“Liebeck v. McDonald’s Restaurants” Wikipedia entry

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
‘”My Space’ hoax ends with suicide of Dardenne Prairie teen” by Steve Pokin, St. Louis Post-Dispatch
“Pokin Around: The story of Megan Meier’s suicide” by Steve Pokin, Springfield News-Leader
Judge Acquits Lori Drew in Cyberbullying Case, Overrules Jury” by Kim Zetter, wired.com
“United States v. Drew” wikipedia.org

 

 

Apr 17, 2019
Episode 64: Trapped in a Burger King & Eccentric Millionaire John du Pont
4718

Curtis Brooner loved Burger King. In fact, he ate there almost every day. So it’s no surprise that on December 15, 2018, Curtis popped into Burger King for a quick bite. But before he left the restaurant, he went to the bathroom. Big mistake.

Then Brandi tells us about John du Pont. John was an heir to the du Pont family fortune. He had plenty of money, but hardly any friends. Over time, he developed a passion for wrestling. He created a wrestling facility at his home, and became a sponsor for USA Wrestling. John had always been eccentric, but as years passed, his behavior became more and more concerning.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Man sues for free Burger King for life after saying he got trapped in the bathroom,” Time Magazine
Curtis Brooner vs Burger King Corporation
“Burger King broke its promise of free-meals-for-life to Portland area customer, lawsuit claims,” By Aimee Green for The Oregonian
“Oregon man gets $9,000 settlement after suing Burger King to regain promise of free meals for life,” By Everton Bailey for The Oregonian

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“A LIFE IN PIECES; For du Pont Heir, Question Was Control” by Jere Longman. Pam Belluck, and Jon Nordheimer, The New York Times
“Blood on the Mat” by John Greenwald, Time Magazine
“John E. DuPont Trial:1997” encyclopedia.com
“John Du Pont And The Murder Of Dave Schultz: The True Story Behind ‘Foxcatcher’” by Mark Oliver
“John du Pont” wikipedia.org

 

 

 

Apr 10, 2019
Episode 63: Too Much Betrayal & the Reluctant Lottery Winner
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Steven Beard woke up on October 2, 1999, in horrible pain. His stomach was split open. His intestines were exposed. When he called 911, he couldn’t tell the dispatcher what had happened — he could only say that he desperately needed help. It didn’t take investigators long to discover that Steven had been shot in his sleep. But who would want him dead?

Then Kristin tells us a story that, at first glance, makes no sense. A man walked into a QuikTrip, bought a couple of lottery tickets, and despite the overwhelming odds against him, won $16.5 million. Great, right? Not so much. He refused to claim the prize money. Iowa lottery officials were stunned. Who wouldn’t want $16.5 million? Months passed. The man still refused to come forward. Lottery officials smelled something fishy.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Court says Iowa lottery rigging investigation took too long,” Associated Press
“Just a dollar and a scheme,” episode of American Greed
“The man who cracked the lottery” by Reid Forgave for the New York Times

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Marriage, Money and Murder: Steven and Celeste Beard” by David Krajicek, crimelibrary.com
“Celeste Beard Johnson” episode Snapped
“Marriage, Money, and Murder” by Bill Hewitt, People Magazine

 

Apr 03, 2019
Episode 62: April Fools: The Exercise Guru & the Innocent New Yorkers
4465

Brooke Taylor was the head of a fitness empire. She was completely gifted. She could make you lose three pounds in one class. But her perfect world shattered when she found her beloved husband Hayworth Windham shot dead. Everyone thought Brooke was guilty — everyone except a bright eyed first-year law student named Elle Woods.

When two young New Yorkers stopped at the Sac-o-Suds convenience store in rural Alabama, the last thing they wanted was trouble. But when the store clerk was shot dead, the pair became suspects. Thanks to a gigantic misunderstanding, Bill Gambini and Stan Rothenstein found themselves arrested for murder. They turned to Bill’s cousin Vinny for legal counsel.

And now for a note about our process. For this special April Fools day episode, we chose fake court cases from our favorite movies. We hope you enjoyed it!

In this episode, Kristin told the plot of the movie, “Legally Blonde.”
In this episode, Brandi told the plot of the movie, “My Cousin Vinny.”

Apr 01, 2019
Episode 61: The Ha Ha Tonka Castle and the Acid Doctor
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When Kansas City businessman Robert McClure Snyder ordered the construction of Ha Ha Tonka Castle, he thought he was building the ultimate vacation home. In a way, he was. Robert spared no expense for his massive home. Construction began in the early 1900s, and at one time, boasted a construction crew of 200 people. But the Ha Ha Tonka dream home ultimately became a nightmare for the Snyder family.

Then, Kristin horrifies us with the story of Dr. Geza de Kaplany. Geza felt certain that his wife, Hajna Piller, was cheating on him. He didn’t have any evidence, but that didn’t shake his certainty. So what did Geza do? He loaded up a suitcase with a butcher knife, three bottles of acid, and restraints, and waited for his wife to come home.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“The Acid Doctor,” by David Krajicek The Daily News
“Geza gets life, wants to atone,” The Oakland Tribune
The book, “Doctors Who Kill: Profiles of Lethal Medics,” by Carol Anne Davis
“Mother of DeKaplany’s son called,” Oakland Tribune
“State rebuttal — De Kaplany sane,” Oakland Tribune
“Dramatic ‘pretty girl’ De Kaplany photo,” Oakland Tribune
“De Kaplany shifts to guilty plea,” Oakland Tribune
“De Kaplany yells at psychiatrist,” Oakland Tribune
“Doctor held after acid scars,” Milwaukee Sentinel
“Geza de Kaplany,” wikipedia entry
“Slashed bride better,” Associated Press

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“James A. Reed: Legendary Lawyer; Marplot in the United States Senate” by J. Michael Cronan
“The tragic story of the mansion and the Snyder family” by Paul Johns, The Christian County Headliner
“MOzarks Moments: The senator, the seamstress, the gangster and Ha Ha Tonka” by Paul Johns, Bolivar Herald-Free Press
“The Lake on Trial” by Michael Gillespie, lakehistory.info

Mar 27, 2019
Episode 60: The Chipotle Lawsuit & Infidelity
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Jeanette Ortiz was a model Chipotle employee. She’d worked there for 14 years. She had excellent performance reviews. But in early 2015, things got weird. Hundreds of dollars went missing from the restaurant’s safe. A manager came in to review the restaurant’s surveillance footage and claimed the camera had captured Jeanette stealing the money. But had she?

Then Brandi tells us about Clara Harris, a woman who thought she had the perfect marriage. Little did Clara know, her husband David Harris was having an affair with a co-worker named Gail Bridges. When the affair finally came out into the open, David told Clara he wanted to work on their marriage. He just needed one last meeting with Gail to end things for good. Clara let him go, but she wasn’t far behind.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Chipotle cuts losses, settles case with ex-worker rather than face big dollar damages,” by Pablo Lopez for the Fresno Bee
“Fresno jury says Chipotle owes former manager $7.97 million for wrongful termination,” by Pablo Lopez for the Fresno Bee
“Chipotle wrongfully accused a manager of stealing $636. She just won millions in court,” by Rachel Siegel for the Washington Post

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Suburban Madness” by Skip Hollandsworth, Texas Monthly
“Clara Harris, Who Killed Cheating Husband With Her Mercedes, Released From Prison” by Skip Hollandsworth, Texas Monthly
“Clara Harris” episode Snapped
“Murder of David Lynn Harris” wikipedia.org

Mar 20, 2019
Episode 59: The Milkshake Murder & Blood Spatter Analysis
5953

Robert Kissel appeared to have it all. He was a high-powered investment banker living in Hong Kong with his wife and children, making millions of dollars a year. Then, in late 2003, he did something out of character. The reliable workaholic missed an important conference call. His coworkers were immediately suspicious. What could have happened to Robert?

Then, Warren Horinek was drunk. Super drunk. He and his wife Bonnie had just spent the evening drinking at TGIFriday’s. They’d hadn’t been home long when Warren called 911. Through slurs, he told the dispatcher that his wife had been shot. But had she? Police, the medical examiner and the district attorney all agreed that the scene looked like a suicide. But Bonnie’s friends and family thought differently.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“A bloody injustice,” by Dave Mann, Texas Observer
“The defense calls Terry Laber,” Texas Center for Community Journalism
“CNN explores Warren Horinek Case,” Texas Observer
“The Warren Horinek Case,” waco-criminal-attorney.com

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Born to Win” episode Behind Mansion Walls
“Nancy Kissel: The Hong Kong Milkshake Murder” by Anthony Bruno, TruTV.com
“Kissels Of Death” by Steve Fishman, New York Magazine
“Murder of Robert Kissel” wikipedia.org

 

Mar 13, 2019
Episode 58: The Sleepwalker & the McDonald’s Strip Search
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Scott Falater killed his wife — that much we know is true. He stabbed Yarmila dozens of times, then held her underwater. Afterward, he hid the murder weapon and his bloody clothes. When police arrived on the scene, Scott was dazed. He said he wasn’t sure what had happened. He didn’t remember a thing. He would never have chosen to kill his wife. So he must have committed the murder while he was sleepwalking. Right?

Then Kristin tells us about a phone call that a self-proclaimed police officer made to a McDonalds in Mount Washington, Kentucky. A man who called himself “Officer Scott” told assistant manager Donna Summers that he was investigating a theft. A McDonald’s employee had stolen a customer’s purse. He described the suspect, and Donna offered a name. It had to be Louise Ogborn, the 18-year-old high school senior. Donna brought Louise into the office and followed Officer Scott’s increasingly odd instructions.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“A hoax most cruel,” The Courier-Journal by Andrew Wolfson
“Appeals court upholds $6.1 million strip-search verdict against McDonald’s,” The Courier-Journal
“Ogborn awarded $6.1 million in suit against McDonald’s,” The Courier-Journal
“Ogborn, first set of lawyers involved in fee dispute,” The Courier-Journal
“Acquittal in hoax call that led to sex assault,” MSNBC
“Strip-search case closed?” ABC News
“Judge: Company must pay legal fees,” The Courier-Journal
“McDonald’s didn’t warn workers, suit says,” The Courier-Journal
“Ex-McDonald’s worker wins lawsuit over strip search,” Associated Press
“McDonald’s Corporation v Ogborn,” findlaw.com
“Strip search phone call scam,” Wikipedia
Clip of 20/20 episode on YouTube

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Walking Terror” episode Forensic Files
“The Big Sleep” by Paul Rubin, Phoenix New Times
“A Killer Sleep Disorder” by Paul Rubin, Phoenix New Times
“Husband Admits He Killed His Wife —In His Sleep” Desert News
“Sleepwalking Given As Defense by Man In Killing of Wife” Associated Press, The New York Times
“Woman Stabbed, Drowned by ‘Sleepwalking’ Husband” by Joe Enea, ABC 15 News
“‘Sleepwalker’ Guilty of Murder” by CBSNews.com Staff, CBS News

 

Mar 06, 2019
Episode 57: The Seaman Family & Elizabeth Freeman’s Quest for Freedom
5297

Nancy and Bob Seaman had a long and unhappy marriage. They got married in 1973, and by 2004, they were sleeping in different areas of the house and communicating exclusively through angry post-it notes. It looked like they were heading for divorce. But then Bob went missing. It didn’t take long for police to discover his body in the back of Nancy’s Ford Explorer. There’s no question that Nancy murdered Bob, but that’s where the certainty ends. Nancy claimed he’d been abusive for the entirety of their marriage. The couple’s youngest son, Greg, backed her up. But their oldest son, Jeff didn’t. Who was the jury to believe? Was Nancy a cold-blooded killer? Or was she an abused spouse who lashed out in self defense?

Elizabeth Freeman was one hell of a woman. She was born into slavery in the mid-1700s. But thanks to a lot of gumption, the newly created Massachusetts Constitution, and a kick ass legal team, Elizabeth became the first enslaved woman to successfully sue for her freedom. Her lawyers argued that Massachusetts’ new constitution, which championed freedom and equality, effectively abolished slavery. Just nine years after her lawsuit, the federal census recorded no slaves living in Massachusetts.  

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Freedom Suits of the Pre-Constitutional Era,” www.mass.gov
“Elizabeth Freeman,” PBS
“Jury Decides in Favor of Elizabeth “Mum Bett” Freeman,” www.massmoments.org
“Elizabeth Freeman,” www.womenhistoryblog.com
“Slavery in New England,” section of the book Bentley’s MIscellany, Volume 34
An episode of “Finding Your Roots”
Wikipedia entries for Elizabeth Freeman, Quock Walker, Theodore Sedgwick, the Sheffield Declaration, and the Colonel John Ashley House

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Nancy Seaman” episode Snapped
“The judge who sentenced Nancy Seaman for murder now wants to set her free” by Hanna Rappleye, NBC News
“Nancy Seaman” wikipedia.org

 

Feb 27, 2019
Episode 56: Fugitive Slave Anthony Burns & the Power of Suggestion (Part 2)
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Anthony Burns was born into slavery in Stafford County, Virginia. Despite laws that forbade him to do so, he learned to write and read. He became a preacher. As he got older, there was one thing he wanted more than anything: Freedom. So he boarded a ship to Boston and escaped. For a while, Anthony lived as a free man. But his former “owner,” Colonel Charles F. Suttle Douchelord the Third, wanted Anthony back. Unfortunately, Charles had the law on his side.

Then Brandi finally ends the suspense by wrapping up her two-part series on the Beatrice Six. In last week’s episode, she told us about 68-year-old widow Helen Wilson, who was discovered raped and murdered in her apartment in Beatrice, Nebraska. Police initially suspected Bruce Allen Smith, but a blood test ruled him out. The case grew cold. But then, a hog farmer and former police officer named Burdette Searcey stepped in. He was determined to solve the crime — by any means necessary.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Anthony Burns Trial of 1854,” www.famous-trials.com
“Anthony Burns and the Fugitive Slave Act,” www.longroadtojustice.org
“Anthony Burns,” PBS
The book, “Boston slave riot, and trial of Anthony Burns”
Wikipedia entries for Anthony Burns, Twelfth Baptist Church, Boston Vigilance Committee, Fugitive Slave Act of 185, and Franklin Pierce

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Presumed Guilty Part Four: Pointing Fingers” by Catharine Huddle, Lincoln Journal Star
“Presumed Guilty Part Five: Threat of Death” by Joe Duggan, Lincoln Journal Star
“Presumed Guilty Part Six: The Trial” by Catharine Huddle, Lincoln Journal Star
“Presumed Guilty Part Seven: DNA Changes Everything” by Joe Duggan, Lincoln Journal Star
“Presumed Guilty Part Eight: A New Investigation” by Joe Duggan, Lincoln Journal Star “Memories of a Murder” by Rachel Aviv, The New Yorker
“Even in 1989, forensics didn’t point to men and women who went to prison for crime” by Joe Duggan, Omaha World-Herald
InnocenceProject.org

 

Feb 20, 2019
Episode 55: The Power of Suggestion & Con Man Clark Rockefeller
8761

In this episode, Brandi gives us part one of a two-part series that begins with the rape and murder of 68-year-old widow Helen Wilson. When investigators discovered Helen’s body, they were baffled. She had no enemies. Who in the tight-knit city of Beatrice, Nebraska, could have killed her? Investigators had a pretty solid lead, but blood analysis ruled out their top suspect. After that, the case went cold… that is, until a retired police officer and full-time hog farmer picked up the case.

Then Kristin tells us about con man Clark Rockefeller. Things seemed relatively normal in July of 2008, when Clark, his daughter, and a social worker walked through a posh area of Boston. But when a black SUV limo pulled up beside them, Clark shoved the social worker out of the way and pulled his daughter into the vehicle. The limo sped off, leaving the social worker behind. Boston police rushed to Clark’s ex-wife, Sandra Boss. If they were going to catch him, they needed all the information they could get. Therein lay the problem. Clark Rockefeller didn’t have an ID. He didn’t have a social security number. In fact, Clark Rockefeller wasn’t Clark Rockefeller at all.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“The Man in the Rockefeller Suit,” by Mark Seal for Vanity Fair
“Lawyer says ‘Rockefeller’ won’t get fair trial,” The Boston Globe.
“‘Rockefeller’ wins false name battle,” Associated Press
“11 jurors chosen in kidnap trial,” Boston Globe
“Rich deception,” Associated Press
“‘Rockefeller’ defense claims delusions,” Associated Press
“Ready-Made Rockefeller,” New York Times
Newspapers.com
|Wikipedia.com

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Presumed Guilty Part one: Murder in Apartment 4” by Joe Duggan, Lincoln Journal Star
“Presumed Guilty Part two: The Search For a Killer” by Catharine Huddle, Lincoln Journal Star
“Presumed Guilty Part three: The Break” by Joe Duggan, Lincoln Journal Star
“Presumed Guilty Part four: Pointing Fingers” by Catharine Huddle, Lincoln Journal Star
“Memories of a Murder” by Rachel Aviv, The New Yorker
“Even in 1989, forensics didn’t point to men and women who went to prison for crime” by Joe Duggan, Omaha World-Herald

 

Feb 13, 2019
Episode 54: The So-Called Kayak Killer & the Girl Scout Camp Murders
6528

Angelika Graswald and her fiance, Vincent Viafore, loved going on adventures. On a Sunday in April of 2015, they strapped two kayaks to the top of Vincent’s Jeep and headed for the Hudson River. They planned to kayak over to Pollepel Island, where they’d see the Bannerman Castle ruins. But there were a few big obstacles in their way. The water was cold. Their kayaks weren’t suited for the river. Vincent didn’t wear a life vest. On top of all that, the weather that evening was predicted to take a turn for the worst. On their way back across the river, Vincent’s kayak capsized. Later, Angelika’s statements to detectives had people asking whether this was a tragic accident or a calculated murder.

Then Brandi tells us the heartbreaking story of three violent murders at an Oklahoma girl scout camp. In the summer of 1977, Doris Milner, 10, Lori Farmer, 8, and Michelle Guse, 9, shared a tent. Everything seemed normal on the night of June 12, but early the next morning, a camp counselor discovered a grizzly scene. The girls’ dead bodies had been piled together on a trail. The crime stunned and terrified the nation. Police soon captured a man named Gene Leroy Hart. But did they have the right guy?

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.


In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Murder by kayak?” episode of 20/20
“Woman pleads guilty in fiance’s kayak death on Hudson River,” New York Times
“‘Who’s Miranda?’ Suspect in kayak killing didn’t understand her rights, lawyer says,” New York Times
“A kayak trip on the Hudson, ending in death and an arrest,” New York Times
“Murder charge for woman who said fiance’s kayak capsized in Hudson River,” New York Times
“Woman convicted in fiance’s death entitled to portion of his life insurance,” CBS News

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Girl Scout Murders | June 13, 1977” by Tim Stanley, Tulsa World
“Girl Scout murders in Oklahoma remain unsolved 40 years after tragedy” by Juliana Keeping and Brianna Bailey, The Oklahoman
“Gene Leroy Hart Is Found Innocent In Sex Slayings of Three Girl Scouts” by Jim Bradshaw, The Washington Post
“40 Years After 3 Girl Scouts Were Killed at Camp, Police Hope DNA Will Reveal Their Killer” by Jeff Truesdell and Christine Pelisek, People Magazine
“The Troubling, Still-Unsolved Case of the 1977 Oklahoma Girl Scout Murders” by Cheryl Eddy, Gizmodo

 

Feb 06, 2019
Episode 53: Drug Dealer Jesse James Hollywood & Andrea Yates
8069

Jesse James Hollywood was a suburban Los Angeles pot dealer. At just 20 years old, he owned his own home, pulled in a grand a week, and had a couple of his old little league friends to sell his drugs and do his bidding. Jesse thought he was hot shit. So when one of his henchmen refused to fall in line, Jesse decided to send him a message. He kidnapped the man’s 15-year-old brother, Nicholas Markowitz, and later learned from a family lawyer that the justice system doesn’t go easy on kidnappers. What Jesse did next landed him on the FBI’s Most Wanted List.

Then Kristin really bums us out with the story of Andrea Yates, a deeply troubled Texas mother who drowned her five children in her bathtub. Andrea’s story shocked and disturbed the nation, but it also raised important questions about Andrea’s mental state. By the time she murdered her children, she’d been hospitalized, she’d attempted suicide, she’d withheld food from her children, and she’d been prescribed antipsychotic drugs. Both the prosecution and the defense agreed that Andrea was mentally ill, but would the jury find her not guilty by reason of insanity?

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Profile of Andrea Yates,” Thoughtco.com
“Andrea Yates,” episode of Mugshots
“Where is Andrea Yates’ Husband Now?” People.com
“Andrea Yates,” Wikipedia
Newspapers.com
“Defense derides psychiatrist as a witness for hire,” Los Angeles Times
“Andrea Yates case turns on trail error,” Los Angeles Times

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Last Ride of Jesse James Hollywood” by Jesse Katz, Los Angeles Magazine
“The Real Story Behind Alpha Dog” episode Dateline
“Defendant Denies Killing Teen” by Sue Fox, Los Angeles Times
“Prosecutor Okayed for Jesse James Hollywood Trial” by Chris Meagher, Santa Barbara Independent
“Witness Rundown in Hollywood Trial” by Amy Silverstein and Chris Meagher, Santa Barbara Independent
“Jesse James Hollywood Tells His Story” by Chris Meagher, Santa Barbara Independent
“Hollywood Jury Deliberating” by Chris Meagher, Santa Barbara Independent
“Verdict In: Hollywood Guilty of Murder and Kidnapping” by Chris Meagher, Santa Barbara Independent
“The Murder of Nicholas Markowitz” wikipedia.org
“Jesse James Hollywood” wikipedia.org
“Joshua Lynn” wikipedia.org

 

Jan 30, 2019
Episode 52: A Celebrity Stalker & the Blended Family
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Rebecca Schaeffer was at the beginning of a promising acting career. She was gorgeous, talented, and dedicated. She landed the cover of Seventeen magazine, nabbed several movie roles, a recurring role on a soap opera, and most notably, a role on the CBS sitcom, “My Sister Sam.” But as Rebecca’s fame grew, an unstable 19-year-old named Robert John Bardo became obsessed with her. What transpired would help criminalize stalking in the United States.

Then Brandi wraps up her horrifying series on Johnson County crimes with a story she first read when she was 10 years old. Seriously. Ten. This is why we’re weird.

It starts innocently enough. When Ed Hobson met Sueanne at a local skating rink, he was smitten. He asked her out. She turned him down. He asked her out again. She turned him down again. Then Sueanne spotted Ed’s high-end car and decided she’d give him a chance. Eventually, the two married. The pair had children from previous marriages, so Ed brought his 13-year-old son Chris and Sueanne brought her 13-year-old daughter Suzanne into the home. Everything went great. Until it didn’t.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Suspect in actress’ murder spirited to LA,” Associated Press
“Sanity issue raised by Bardo Lawyer,” Los Angeles Times
“Police directed to evidence in actress’ death,” Los angeles Times
“Robert John Bardo,” Wikipedia.com
“Rebecca Schaeffer,” Wikipedia.com
“The shocking 1983 crime that raised awareness about stalking,” Gizmodo
“A rising star lives to shine again after a near fatal knifing,” People magazine
“Six years ago, Rebecca Schaeffer was fatally shot,” Entertainment Weekly
“It took this up-and-coming actress’s tragic death to change anti-stalking laws,” Ranker
… and several other articles from newspapers.com

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Family Affairs” by Andy Hoffman
“Hit Mom” episode Evil Stepmothers
“Stepmother of 13 year old boy forced to dig his own grave charged with murder” UPI
“Sueanne Hobson wanted her 13-year-old stepson killed by Christmas” by Toni Cardarella, UPI
“A jury Friday convicted Sueanne Hobson of first degree murder” by Michele DiGirolamo, UPI
“Love Never Dies” by Ben Paynter, The Pitch

 

Jan 23, 2019
Episode 51: Johnson County’s Other Serial Killer & the Graduate
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Brandi starts us off with the story of Johnson County’s other serial killer. That’s right, folks. There’s more than one.

In the late 80’s, young women in Johnson County apartment complexes had a good reason to be afraid. Three twenty-something’s vanished without a trace. Their apartments showed no signs of a break in. But there weren’t signs of murder, either. For a while, all anyone could go on was a sinking suspicion that something was terribly wrong.

Then, to everyone else in Sugar Land, Texas, the Whitaker family seemed to have it all. But that all changed one winter night in 2003. The family went out to celebrate Bart Whitaker’s graduation from Sam Houston State University, and when they arrived back home, a masked gunman shot all four of the family members. Kevin died almost immediately. Trisha died in the hospital. Bart and his father Kent survived. They begged police to find the people responsible for the crime. But police didn’t have to look too far…

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
The 48 hours episode, “Sugar Land: Life or Death”
And a tad from “Thomas Bartlett Whitaker,” Wikipedia.com

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Gone in an Instant” episode, On The Case With Paula Zahn
“CRIME HISTORY: Serial Killer Richard Grissom — A Conviction Without Any Corpses” by Terri Osborne, crimefeed.com
“Jurors Convict Grissom in Triple Murder, Eight Other Counts” by Richard D. Lipsey, Associated Press
“20 Years Later, Killer Refuses to Reveal Bodies’ Location” Associated Press

 

Jan 16, 2019
Episode 50: The Wood Chipper Murder & a Robbery Gone Wrong
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If there was one thing Helle Crafts’ friends knew for certain, it was that Helle’s husband Richard was a violent sketch ball. So when she didn’t show up for work one day, they got suspicious. Richard’s explanations were less than reassuring. Was she visiting her mother in Denmark? Or was she with a friend on vacation? The story kept changing, but one thing remained the same — Helle was nowhere to be found.

Then Brandi continues her Johnson County, Kansas, series with a robbery gone terribly wrong. It all started at the She’s a Pistol gun store in Shawnee, Kansas. Becky Bieker owned the store with her husband Jon. She was behind the counter on January 9, 2015 when four teenagers entered the store. Two of them were armed. One of the teens punched Becky, knocking her unconscious. Shortly afterward, Jon came out of a back room, gun drawn. A gun battle ensued. Later, one of the teens’ lawyers mounted an… interesting legal defense.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“50-year sentence imposed in wood chipper murder,” New York Times
“Wood Chipper Murder” Crime Library
“The Disappearance of Helle Crafts” episode of Forensic Files
“23 years ago Richard Crafts was more willing to part with his wife than his money,” NewsTimes.com
“Crafts unconcerned at wife’s disappearance, her friends say,” Hartford Courant
“Chopped to bits,” Daily News
“Richard Crafts denies killing his wife, says he believes she is alive,” Hartford Courant

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Owner Killed, Three Shot in Attempted Robbery at Gun Shop” Associated Press, NBC News
“Co-owner of Shawnee gun shop dies; three suspects shot during attempted robbery” by Michelle Pekarsky and Megan Brilley, Fox 4 “Suspect in ‘She’s A Pistol’ murder to plead guilty, while 3 alleged accomplices prepare for murder trial” by Michelle Pekarsky, For 4 KC
“Four Charged With Murder In Gardner Man’s Death” Danedri Thompson, The Gardner News
She’s a Pistol gun store in Shawnee is closing” by Tony Rizzo, The Kansas City Star
Judge denies defendant’s self-defense claim in She’s a Pistol killing” by Tony Rizzo, The Kansas City Star
“Owner of She’s A Pistol tearfully announces store’s closure amid mounting expenses” by Shannon O’Brien, Fox 4 KC
“Trial begins for ‘She’s A Pistol’ gunman who claimed he shot store owner in self-defense” by Kerri Stowell, FOX 4 KC
“On day three of his trial, She’s A Pistol suspect pleads guilty as charged” by Nick Sloan and Natalie Davis, KCTV5
“One man convicted for role in deadly shooting at ‘She’s A Pistol’ sentenced to ‘Hard 25’ for murder” by Andrew Lynch, FOX 4 Kc

Jan 09, 2019
Episode 49: Cheaters… with Daryl Pitts!
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The day has arrived. Kristin’s dad Daryl Pitts, a.k.a. DP, *cringe* is on the podcast! Our theme this week is cheaters, because what could be more fun to discuss with your father?

Brandi starts us off with yet another brutal attack in Olathe, Kansas. Late at night on February 28, 1982, Melinda Harmon ran to her neighbors for help. She told them that two masked men had just broken into her home. They’d killed her husband David right in front of her. Police rushed to the scene, but the evidence didn’t match Melinda’s story.

Then Daryl tells us about a strange night in March of 2011, when Kandi Hall called police to report that two men were shot in a Walgreens parking lot. One was her husband; the other was her boss and lover. Kandi’s husband Rob survived, but Emmett Corrigan wasn’t so lucky.

Then Kristin tells us about Leon Jacob, a greasy-haired guy who fancied himself a bit of a ladies man. His charm worked on recently divorced veterinarian Valerie McDaniel. The couple quickly moved in together. Together, they plotted to murder their exes.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Toxic Love” episode of 20/20
“What happened in bizarre murder-for-hire plot that led to veterinarian’s suicide, her boyfriend in prison,” ABC News

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“A Knock on the Door” episode 48 Hours
“Conspiracy To Kill” by Richard Jerome, People Magazine
“Police Catch Woman and Her Young Paramour 20 Years After They Beat Husband To Death So They Could Be Together” by Benjamin H. Smith, oxygen.com
“In a Limbo of Another Kind” by Marek Fuchs, The New York Times
“Killer in infamous Olathe love triangle case soon will go free” by Tony Rizzo, The Kansas City Star

In this episode, Daryl pulled from:
“Deadly Desire” episode of Dateline
An episode of Dr Phil
“Dr. Phil Show does not provide healing for Ashlee Birk,” by Maggie O’Mara for USA Today
“Woman’s affair with her boss leads to deadly parking lot confrontation,” by Jason Mattera for True Crime Daily
Articles for Idahonews.com
Articles in the Idaho Statesman by Cynthia Sewell

Jan 02, 2019
Ep. 48: Holiday Crimes!
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Around the holidays, a lot of people bake cookies for their neighbors. It’s supposed to be a nice, friendly gesture. But boy, can it backfire! Teenagers Taylor Ostergaard and Lindsey Zellitti learned that lesson the hard way when they anonymously left a plate of cookies at Wanita Young’s house. Their late night cookie drop scared the crap out of Wanita. She was so shaken that she went to the hospital the next day, suffering from what appeared to be a heart attack.

Then Brandi tells us about the time Santa robbed a bank. The robbery took place on December 23, 1927, in Cisco, Texas. A man dressed as Santa Claus entered First National Bank. His armed accomplices followed. Together, the men terrorized the customers and emptied the bank’s safe. Afterward, Santa and his gang took off. What followed was the largest manhunt Texas has ever seen.  

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
The book, “The Party of the First Part: The Curious World of Legalese,” by Adam Freedman
“Family says they are under attack in cookie caper,” Associated Press
“Nation rallies around girls sued by neighbor over late-night cookies,” East Bay Times
“Teens sued for cookie delivery to neighbor,” ABC News

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Santa Claus Bank Robbery” by Boyce House, Startling Detective Adventures
“The Night the Posse Chased Santa Claus” by Maggie Van Ostrand, TexasEscapes.com
“Santa Claus Bank Robbery” by Walter F. Pilcher, Texas State Historical Association
“Santa Claus Bank Robbery” wikipedia.org

Dec 25, 2018
Episode 47: Subway Spokesman Jared Fogle & a Brutal Attack on a Midwestern Family
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John Duffield woke to a horrifying sound. It was his 15 year old son, Paul, calling out for help. John sprang out of bed to find Paul lying on the couch, bleeding from a massive head wound. But Paul’s injuries were just the start of the horror. John’s 12-year-old daughter Janelle was dead in her room. His 17-year-old daughter Kelly was missing. Investigators were puzzled. Was Kelly taken, or did she leave willingly? Was it really possible that John slept through this bloody attack? And if so, did that mean that this attack was carried out by a cold-blooded stranger?

Then Kristin tells us about the downfall of former Subway spokesman and total creep Jared Fogle. When Jared was in college, he lost an astonishing 245 pounds by eating two Subway sandwiches a day for eleven months. His story made national headlines, and he quickly became the face of Subway. It was a win-win. Subway’s profits soared. Jared became a millionaire many times over. Subway couldn’t have asked for a better spokesman. Jared was just a genuine, boring midwestern guy. At least, that’s what everyone thought.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
An episode of Dr. Phil
“Jared Fogle pens icky, flirty letter to woman from prison,” The Mercury-News
“U.S. Atty: Jared Fogle used “wealth status and secrecy” to exploit kids,” CBS News
“Why Jared Fogle was — and still might be — the perfect Subway spokesman,” The Washington Post
“Subway Guy Visits Somerset,” Commonwealth Journal
“Why did the Jared Fogle investigation take so long?” My Suncoast
“From obesity to duplicity: Jared’s fall to Earth,” USA Today
“Jared Fogle,” wikipedia

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Silent Night” episode Ice Cold Killers
“Man convicted in 35-year-old Olathe murder wants out of prison” by Peggy Breit, KMBC 9 News
“Michael Cade K0044347” jococourts.org

Dec 19, 2018
Episode 46: The Great Brink’s Robbery & the Murder of Kelsey Smith
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It was the late 1940s in Boston, Massachusetts, and a group of career criminals had a crazy idea. They wanted to rob the Brinks’ armored car depot. If they could pull it off, it would be the biggest robbery in United States history. For two years, they planned and plotted. They broke into the building to get a lay of the land. They stole the building’s lock cylinders, brought them to a locksmith, had keys made, and replaced the cylinders — all before the building reopened the next day. By the time they finally committed the robbery, they were like a well oiled machine. They were slick. They were smart. And they almost got away with it.

Then Brandi tells a story that hits close to home. On June 2, 2007, 18-year-old Kelsey Smith went to Target to find an anniversary present for her boyfriend. The trip shouldn’t have taken long. When Kelsey didn’t return home right away, her family started to worry. They searched for her, hoping that maybe she’d had car trouble. But a few hours later, they discovered her car in the parking lot of a nearby mall. Their hearts sank. Her wallet, purse, and Target bags were in the vehicle — but Kelsey was nowhere to be found.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Brink’s Robbery” fbi.gov
“The Great Brink’s Robbery of 1950: Not Quite the Perfect Crime,” New England Historical Society

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Kelsey Smith: Gone in an Instant” episode See No Evil
“Edwin Hall Guilty in Kelsey Smith Killing” by Diane Carroll, Laura Bauer, and Joe Lambe, The Kansas City Star
“Edwin Hall: I’m So, So Sorry” KMBC 9 News
“Murder of Kelsey Smith” wikipedia.org

Dec 12, 2018
Episode 45: The “Other” Craigslist killer & the Watts Family Murders
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When Nicole Atkinson dropped her friend Shanann Watts off at home early one morning, everything seemed fine. But the next day, Shanann didn’t answer any of Nicole’s texts. Then Shanann missed her 10 a.m. doctor’s appointment. Nicole called Shanann’s husband, Chris, but he seemed kind of dismissive. That didn’t set well with Nicole. So she called the police.

Then Kristin wraps things up with a murdering con man. In the post-recession era, Richard Beasley dreamt up a near-perfect con — one that preyed on men who were down on their luck. He posted a job on Craigslist that promised $300 a week and a two-bedroom trailer — all in exchange for watching over a 688-acre ranch. Applications poured in. But there was no job. Richard’s Craigslist ad was his twisted way of luring unsuspecting men to Ohio.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Murder by Craigslist,” by Hanna Rosin for The Atlantic
“’Craigslist’ killer Richard Beasley sentenced to death,” Cleveland.com
“Death sentence for Craigslist killer upheld by Ohio Supreme Court,” Cleveland.com
“The Craigslist Killer: Richard Beasley” episode of Monster in my Family

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“A Secret Mistress Comes Clean & a Suspicious Bed Sheet Spotted from the Sky: How Chris Watts Was Caught” by Adam Carlson, People Magazine
Murder Suspect Husband Gave TV Interviews, Before His Arrest, Outside House Where Wife & Kids Likely Died” by Adam Carlson, People Magazine
“Chris Watts case: What we learned from unsealed affidavit” by Madison Park, CNN
“Timeline: Key dates in investigation of deaths of Shanann Watts, 2 daughters in Colorado” by Sady Swanson, Fort Collins Coloradoan
“Court documents: Watts children found in oil well, may have been strangled” by Coloradoan Staff, Fort Collins Coloradoan
“Chris Watts sentenced to five life terms without parole for killing pregnant wife, two daughters” by Blair Miller, Denver 7 News

 

Dec 05, 2018
Episode 44: That’s My Foot & The Tyneside Strangler
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When Shannon Whisnant bought a storage unit at auction, he got a whole lot more than he bargained for. He discovered a severed human foot tucked inside the unit’s BBQ grill. Turns out, the owner of the foot was alive and well, and he wanted it back. But Shannon wasn’t willing to let it go. He’d bought the foot fair and square. And plus, it might just be his ticket to fame.

Then Brandi tells us a story that’s as creepy as it is disturbing. In the late 60s, four year old Martin Brown died from a terrible accident. Later, in that same neighborhood, three year old Brian Howe went missing. But when police discovered his body, they quickly realized that Brian was the victim of a twisted killer. And in hindsight, perhaps Martin was, too. As police hunted down the responsible parties, evidence pointed them toward a surprising set of suspects — two young girls.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
The documentary, “Finders Keepers”

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Mary Bell” by Shirley Lynn Scott, Crime Library
“Mary Flora Bell” murderpedia.org
“The mob will move on, the pain never can” by Nicci Gerrard, Richard Brooks, Jonathon Calvert, Lucy Johnston and Andy McSmith, The Observer
“Mary Bell” wikipedia.org

 

Nov 28, 2018
Episode 43: Deadly Love & The Unbelievable Kidnapping
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Randy Stone played a big role in his community. He owned an insurance business, was a former marine, and was an active member of New Hope Baptist church. But seemingly out of nowhere, after years of loyal church attendance, Randy cut ties with the church. A short time later, he was murdered. But who would want Randy dead, and why?

Then Kristin tells us about a kidnapping that sounds fishy as hell. A man dressed in a wetsuit woke Denise Huskins and Aaron Quinn. He blindfolded them with blacked out swim goggles, forced them to drink sedatives, put headphones on them, and eventually left with Denise. When Aaron came to, there were motion detecting cameras everywhere. There was red tape on the first floor of the home. The rules were clear: if he stepped outside the lines, Dense would be hurt. When Aaron called police to report the horrific crime, they didn’t believe him.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
20/20 episode, “Stranger than fiction”
“‘I’m not guilty’: Matthew Muller gives jailhouse interview about bizarre kidnapping, assault on Vallejo couple,” NBC Los Angeles
“Primary suspect in Gone Girl kidnapping: ‘We fancied ourselves a sort of Ocean’s Eleven,’” People.com
“Harvard-educated lawyer charged in Gone Girl kidnapping that cops initially called a hoax,” People.com
“Vallejo kidnapping suspect Matthew Muller faces more criminal charges,” KRON4.com
“Man convicted in 2015 Vallejo kidnapping case returning to court, representing himself,” Fox40.com

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Killer Love” by Mark Morris and Brian Burnes, The Kansas City Star
“Former Marine’s Murder Exposes Wife’s Affair with Pastor” by Brooke Stangeland and Alexa Valiente

 

Nov 21, 2018
Episode 42: Spree Killer Charles Starkweather & the Pricey Murder for Hire Plot
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Nancy Howard just wanted a quiet night at home. She pulled into the garage of her upscale home, got out of her car, and was about to head inside for dinner when an armed gunman grabbed her by the neck. The pair struggled. He shot her and left her for dead. But Nancy survived. Investigators were perplexed by the crime, but soon, the pieces came together. It was even stranger than they’d initially suspected.

Then Brandi tells us about infamous teenaged spree killer Charles Starkweather. In just two months, Charles killed eleven people. His underaged girlfriend was with him the entire time. Starkweather’s horrific crimes won a place in pop culture. The crimes inspired the film Natural Born Killers, a truly terrible Bruce Springsteen song, and were mentioned in Billy Joel’s, “We didn’t start the fire.”

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“How to not get away with murder” by Michael J Mooney for D Magazine
An episode of the podcast Swindled
“‘They got you, didn’t they?’ Denton County woman tells prison-bound ex who tried to have her killed,” The Dallas Morning News
“Love affair takes center stage in Carrollton murder-for-hire trial,” NBCDFW.com
“Appeal denied in John Howard case,” Carrollton Leader
“Trial begins for alleged hit man hired by North Texas man convicted of plotting to kill wife,” MySanAntonio.com

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Charles Starkweather and Caril Fugate” by Marilyn Bardsley, Crime Library
“Charles Raymond Starkweather” murderpedia.org
“The Killing Spree that Transfixed a Nation: Charles Starkweather and Caril Fugate, 1958” by Lesley Wischmann, WyoHistory.org
“Charles Starkweather And Caril Fugate Trials: 1958” encyclopedia.com

 

Nov 14, 2018
Episode 41: The Dangers of Winning the Lottery & the Unhappy Father
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When Abraham Shakespeare won a $30 million lottery, he was ecstatic. He bought himself a beautiful home and a new car. He was generous with nearly everyone he encountered. When friends needed a loan, he gave it to them. When they fell behind on their mortgages, he stepped in. But Abraham was quickly overwhelmed. He worried that people were taking advantage of him. Then he met Dee Dee Moore. She was a savvy businesswoman who wanted to help him with his money. Or so she said. Later, when Abraham went missing, his friends and family had a hunch who was to blame.

Then Kristin tells us about one of the dumbest lawsuits of all time. Peter Wallis and Kellie Smith were in love, but that all changed when Kellie got pregnant. Peter proposed. She said no. Peter encouraged her to get an abortion. She said no to that too. Then like a real winner, he kicked her out of their apartment. Kellie moved in with her parents and eventually gave birth to a baby girl. A year after their daughter was born, Peter sued Kellie, claiming she lied about being on the pill. Kellie said she had been on the pill, and that the pregnancy was as surprising to her as it was to him. Peter told the world he was a victim of “contraceptive fraud.”

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Judge tosses man’s suit over ex-lover’s pregnancy,” Albuquerque Journal
“Dismissal of Lawsuit over pregnancy upheld,” Albuquerque Journal
“Man sues his ex-girlfriend for becoming pregnant,” Washington Post

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Lady Killer” episode American Greed
“Dee Dee Moore” episode Snapped
“Dorice ‘Dee Dee’ Moore” murderpedia.org

 

Nov 07, 2018
Episode 40: Crimes That Inspired Horror Movies
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Happy Halloween, and welcome to a very spooky episode of Let’s Go To Court! This week, we discuss crimes so terrifying that they inspired horror films.

Kristin starts us off with the most disgusting story of all time. Ed Gein was just a quiet bachelor who lived alone on his isolated Wisconsin farm. But there was more to Ed than met the eye. When police went to question him about a murder, they were horrified by what they discovered. Body parts littered his filthy home. There were lamp shades and chairs made of human skin. There was a collection of noses, and face masks on the walls. Ed’s story is so sickening that it inspired the movies Psycho, Texas Chainsaw Massacre, and The Silence of the Lambs.

Then Brandi tells us about an entire family who was killed in their sleep. Well… not an entire family. One family member, Ronald DeFeo, lived to tell the tale. A year later, a new family moved into the home. The disturbing story was the basis for the Amityville Horror movies. Brandi recommends the 2005 Amityville Horror remake, starring Ryan Reynolds. She’s a fan of his muscle definition. And his acting.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Ed Gein,” episode of A&E’s biography
“Ed Gein Biography,” Wisconsinsickness.com
“The Ultimate Ghoul,” Crime Library
“10 skulls found in house of horror,” Oshkosh Daily Northwestern
“Judge orders Ed Gein back to mental hospital,” The La Crosse Tribune
“Order Ed Gein tried on murder, robbery,” The Oshkosh Northwestern
“Ed Gein found guilty of murder,” Ironwood Daily Globe
“Ed Gein,” Wikipedia

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Real Life Amityville Horror” by Douglas B Lynott, Cirme Library
“Couple and 4 children killed in ‘Amityville Horror’ murders” by Jerry Schmetterer and Daniel Driscoll Ronald Defeo Jr.
“The Amityville Horror” wikipedia.org
AmityvilleFiles.com

Oct 31, 2018
Episode 39: Intern Chandra Levy & the Wichita Horror
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Chandra Levy had her life together. She was an intern at the Federal Bureau of Prisons and was just a few days shy of graduating with a master’s degree in public administration. She had dreams of working for the FBI. Maybe the CIA. So when she suddenly went missing in early May of 2001, her parents were alarmed. Their alarm swelled when they learned that Chandra’d been having an affair with Congressman Gary Condit. Was Condit to blame for Chandra’s disappearance? Had he done something to her? Despite a damn good alibi, suspicion enveloped Condit.

In the winter of 2000, two men terrorized Wichita, Kansas. Over a short period, their random crimes escalated. First they robbed a man. Then they shot a woman. Then, they raped and terrorized a group of five, twenty-something friends. The men murdered four of the five friends. The lone survivor lived through the ordeal when the killers’ bullet deflected off her barrette. She played dead, then sought help. Ultimately, her testimony helped put the men behind bars.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Who Killed Chandra Levy?” Washington Post investigative series by Sari Horwitz, Scott Higham, Sylvia Moreno
Season 38, Episode 48 of 20/20
“Chandra Levy,” Wikipedia
“Gary Condit,” Wikipedia

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Wichita Horror” by Denise Noe, Crime Library
“True Crime: The Wichita Massacre” by Kara Kovalchik, MentalFloss.com
“High court overturns death penalty sentences for Carr brothers, upholds conviction” by Sherman Smith, The Topeka Capital-Journal
Supreme Court restores death sentences in heinous Kansas murder spree” by Richard Wolf, USA Today

 

Oct 24, 2018
Episode 38: The Affluenza Teen & the “CIA” Con Artist
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Ethan Couch did a horrible thing. When he was 16 years old, he got drunk, loaded his friends in his truck, and drove recklessly down a dark, two-lane road. Not far from his house, Ethan lost control of his truck. He hit one vehicle, and then another, which hit another. Four people died. When police arrived, one deputy remarked that the stretch of road looked, “more like a plane crash than a car wreck.”

The story made national headlines — for an unexpected reason. During Ethan’s sentencing, psychologist Dick Miller contended that Ethan grew up in an environment with no consequences. His family had money, and money meant that you made your own rules. In other words, Ethan was a victim of his own privilege. It was the affluenza defense, and it infuriated the nation.

Then Brandi tells us about the con to beat all cons. In the post-9/11 world, the United States Navy Veterans Association prospered. They brought in millions upon millions of dollars in donations. The money couldn’t have gone to a better cause. People jumped at the chance to help the nation’s veterans. But in 2010, a reporter from the St. Petersburg Times looked into the organization. He was shocked by what he discovered.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“The worst parents ever,” by Michael J. Mooney, D Magazine
“Ethan Couch, affluenza sufferer, has been sentenced to two years in jail,” Texas Monthly
“Teen sentenced to 10 years probation, rehab in 4 deaths,” Star-Telegram
“Ethan Couch, the affluenza teen, has disappeared with his mother and has possibly fled the country,” Texas Monthly
“Teenager’s sentence in fatal drunken-driving case stirs affluenza debate,” New York Times
“Ethan Couch,” Wikipedia
“Affluenza mom Tonya Couch back in jail after authorities say she used meth,” Dallas News
“Fred Couch, father of ‘affluenza teen,’ goes to trial,” Star-Telegram

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Strange, Spectacular Con of Bobby Charles Thompson” by Daniel Fromson, The Washingtonian
“Mystery Man Bobby Thompson blames CIA for bogus charity” by John Martin, Tampa Bay Times
“Money Stolen by Infamous Con Man ‘Bobby Thompson’ Finally Goes to Vets” by Matthew Mosk, ABC News
“United States Navy Veterans Association” wikipedia.org

Oct 17, 2018
Episode 37: The Dangers of Letting Extended Family Live With You & the Kidnapping of Quinn Gray
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Here’s a tip: When a member of your spouse’s family asks to stay with you, just say no. That’s the lesson Brandi took from the murder of millionaire Jacques Mossler. When his younger, “toothpaste model” wife, Candy, suggested they let her nephew Melvin move into their sprawling Houston home, Jacques said sure. But over time, Candy and her nephew got close. Too close.

Then Kristin tells us about the bizarre kidnapping of stay-at-home-mom Quinn Gray. Her kidnapping panicked and perplexed her husband, Reid Gray. Reid was wealthy. Super wealthy. But the ransom note indicated that the kidnappers only wanted $50,000. Why so little? And why did the kidnappers let Quinn make so many phone calls? As Quinn’s kidnapping dragged on, the case got more and more strange.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Ransom” episode of Dateline
“Withhold of adjudication: What everyone needs to know,” Florida Bar Association
“Bizarre saga of fake kidnapping of Quinn Hanna Gray reaches quiet end in court,” Jacksonville.com
“Ponte Vedra woman who faked kidnapping accused of violating probation,” Jacksonville.com
“Nancy Grace Investigates: The Quinn Gray Tapes Part 2,” CNN.com

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“A Million Dollar Murder” by David Krajicek, Crime Library
“Lust and Death on Key Biscayne” by Matt Schudel, Sun Sentinel
“Melvin Powers is Dead at 68” by Douglas Martin, The New York Times

Oct 10, 2018
Episode 36: The Scottsboro Boys & the Dangers of Cheerleading in Texas
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Kristin starts us off with one of the trials of the Scottsboro Boys, a group of nine African American boys and young men who were accused of gang raping two white women in 1931. Their cases are infuriating and upsetting. The Scottsboro Boys were nearly lynched before their trials. At every turn, the justice system was unjust — so unjust that outside groups stepped in to help the young men.

Then Brandi lightens things up with a story about the dangers of high school cheerleading. Wanda Holloway always wanted to be a cheerleader, but her dad wouldn’t let her. So when Wanda gave birth to her daughter Shanna, she knew exactly what Shanna would grow up to be — a cheerleader! But when it looked like another girl might take Shanna’s spot on the squad, Wanda did what any concerned parent would do. She hired a hitman.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Scottsboro Boys,” Famous-trials.com
“Who were the Scottsboro Boys?”, PBS.org
Scottsboro Boys, wikipedia

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Cheerleader Murder Plot” by Mimi Swartz, Texas Monthly
“Cheerleader Plot Tape: Go For It” by Janet Cawley, Chicago Tribune
“The Texas Cheerleader Case: A Daughter’s Painful Memory” by Anne Land and Kristen Mascia, People Magazine
“Wanda Holloway Trial: 1991” encyclopedia.com
“The Pom-Pom Hit: When Texas Was Struck By a Cheerleader Mom’s Murder Plot” by Jake Rossen, Mental Floss

Oct 03, 2018
Episode 35: White Collar Crime
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Kelli Peters was the heart of Plaza Vista School in Irvine, California. She was the PTA president and the volunteer director of the after school program. But then, one day, as she was filling in for a teacher, a police officer said he needed to speak with her. He took her out to the parking lot and asked for her car keys. Kelli was puzzled, but she handed them over. The officer dug through her car, and eventually pulled out a bag of pot, a pipe, some Percocet and some Vicodin. Kelli dropped to her knees. She sobbed. She pleaded with the officer. The drugs weren’t hers, she said. But if they weren’t hers, then why the hell were they in Kelli’s car?  

Then Kristin talks about two things she knows inside and out: fine wine, and the perils of having millions of dollars in spending money. In the early 2000’s, Rudy Kurniawan was just a young, geeky-looking guy bidding on California wines at high-end wine auctions. Hardly anyone paid attention to him. But then his bids got bigger. And bigger. He spent millions on wine, and then began selling it. But over time, the people who bought his wines got suspicious. The wines didn’t taste quite right. And some of the labels looked a little funny. Had they been duped?

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Chateau Sucker,” by Benjamin Wallace for New York Magazine
The documentary “Sour Grapes”
“Prosecutors reveal evidence against accused wine counterfeiter,” Wine Spectator
“Counterfeit fine-wine dealer sentenced to 10 years,” Wall Street Journal
“Kurniawan to tell all in $3M settlement with billionaire Koch, as sentencing is delayed,” Decanter
“Rudy Kurniawan’s court date is set,” Wine Spectator
“Alleged counterfeit wines go on trial,” Wine Spectator

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Framed: A Mystery in Six Parts” by Christopher Goffard, Los Angeles Times
“Former Irvine attorney convicted of planting drugs in the car of PTA volunteer disbarred” by Sean Emery, The Orange County Register
“Jury awards $5.7 million to Irvine PTA mom in drug-planting case” by Kelly Puente and Sean Emery, The Orange County Register
“Irvine mom Kelli Peters writes book about drugs being planted in her car” by Kelly Puente, The Orange County Register

 

Sep 26, 2018
Episode 34: The Brink’s Car Robbery & the Assistant Who Ended Her Boss’s Ponzi Scheme
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Paul Kruse had an irresistible sales pitch. He told his investment clients that their principal investment would be totally safe. They could expect annual returns between 10 and 15 percent. In other words, watch your money grow, risk free. Sounds great, right? If only it’d been true. Paul’s scheme robbed people of their life’s savings, but his plan ground to a halt when his assistant, Amy Weatherford, got suspicious. The feds had plenty on Paul, but he didn’t go down easy. From the comfort of his prison cell, he hatched a violent plan that would make him a free man.

Then Brandi tells us the story of Anthony Curcio. Anthony has always been smart. He’s always been a planner. But he hasn’t always used those skills for good. In 2008, Anthony had an expensive drug habit and a busted real estate business. He needed a lot of money, and he knew just where to get it. Over the course of several months, Anthony made a meticulously detailed plan to rob a Brink’s armored car. His plan was so thought-through, it’s hard to believe he got caught.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
American Greed, “A Mother’s Costly Revenge”
“Greed Report: How to blow the whistle on your boss– and live to tell about it,” CNBC.com
“Jacksonville con man who tried to hire hitman sentenced to 30 years in prison,” The Florida Times-Union

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Out of Prison, Real-Life Thomas Crown Looks Back on Almost-Perfect Heist” by Brooke Stangeland, ABC News
“How an Idaho football player became a bank robber” by Martin Rogers, USA Today
6-year sentence in robbery with getaway inner tube” by Ian Ith, The Seattle Times
“Anthony Curcio” wikipedia.org

Sep 19, 2018
Episode 33: The Casey Anthony Trial & the Starvation Doctor
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Cindy Anthony’s 911 call in the summer of 2008 was as upsetting as it was chilling. She said her granddaughter, three-year-old Caylee Anthony had been missing for 31 days. Her daughter Casey Anthony had also been missing, but now she was back — and her car smelled like it’d held a dead body. Police rushed to the scene to interview 22-year-old Casey. But Casey’s story was odd. She claimed her daughter had been kidnapped, and that she’d been trying to find Caylee on her own. Police quickly caught Casey in a string of lies. She was eventually charged in her daughter’s death.

Then Kristin tells us about Dr. Linda Hazzard. Well, Dr. Hazzard wasn’t really a doctor, but thanks to a handy loophole, Linda was able to call herself one. In the early 1900’s she made a name for herself by championing the benefits of fasting. She even created a sanitarium called Wilderness Heights, where her wealthy patients endured lengthy fasts, enemas, and violent massages. But locals soon dubbed the sanitarium “Starvation Heights.” Linda’s methods killed several patients, but not before they signed over their valuables.  

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Olalla’s Starvation Heights still causes chills after a century,” Kitsap Sun
The book, “Starvation Heights,” by Gregg Olsen
Linda Hazzard, Fasting Proponent and Killer, HistoryLink.org
Linda Burfield Hazzard, Murderpedia

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Caylee Anthony” by Chuck Hustmyre, Crime Library
“Casey Anthony” crimemuseum.com
“Casey Anthony” biography.com
“Death of Caylee Anthony” wikipedia.org

Sep 12, 2018
Episode 32: The Trials of Lizzie Borden & Alice Crimmins
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When Lizzie Borden’s dad and stepmom were brutally murdered in their Massachusetts home, people were stunned. The wealthy couple had been mercilessly hacked to death. But who could have done it? Police had their immediate suspicions — surely this heinous crime was carried out by a male intruder. But in the aftermath of the crime, people weren’t so sure. The slain couple’s 33-year-old daughter was acting weird. Could she have been the violent perpetrator? Police thought so, and so did the district attorney. Lizzie Borden’s eventual trial captivated the nation.

Then Brandi tells us the infuriating story of Alice Crimmins, a woman whose young children went missing one night in 1965. Police suspected the beautiful, perfectly coiffed mother immediately. She didn’t fit their grieving mother narrative. She was well dressed. Her hair was expertly teased and sprayed. Her makeup? Impeccable. Oh, and another thing — she liked to have sex. Police hounded her for years, and despite little to no evidence pointing her way, Alice was brought to trial.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Lizzie Borden,” FamousTrials.com
Thelizziebordencollection.com
“Lizzie Borden,” biography.com
Good ole’ Wikipedia

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Alice Crimmins Case” by Denise Noe, crimelibrary.com
“Alice Crimmins” murderpedia.org
“‘Why Can’t You Behave?’: Revisiting the Case of Alice Crimmins” by Sarah Weinman, Hazlitt Magazine

Sep 05, 2018
Episode 31: The Many Losses of Marybeth Tinning & the Cannibal Cop
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When Marybeth Tinning’s infant daughter Jennifer died, friends, neighbors and medical personnel felt sorry for the grieving mother. A few weeks later, Marybeth’s young son died, too. People couldn’t believe it. How many losses could one person withstand? Then another child died. And another. And another. In total, nine of Marybeth’s children died over the course of 14 years. In that time, people’s reactions evolved from sympathetic to suspicious.

Then Kristin tells us the story of Gilberto Valle, a.k.a., the cannibal cop. Kathleen Valle knew her marriage wasn’t going great. But when Kathleen figured out exactly what her husband Gilberto was doing online, her blood ran cold. Her NYPD policeman husband had been chatting online about torturing, raping, killing and eating her. But the horror didn’t end there. He talked about carrying out these plans on many women. Authorities took action, but Gilberto’s defense was strong. He hadn’t actually carried out any of these plans. He claimed he was just fantasizing — with no intention of ever harming anyone. This case had people everywhere trying to draw the line between fantasies and criminal intent.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“A Dangerous Mind” by: Robert Kolker for New York Magazine
“Gilberto Valle, ex-New York police officer, talks about his cannibalism fantasies in film,” New York Times
HBO Documentary, “Thought Crimes: The case of the cannibal cop”
“Ex-officer’s conviction in cannibal case shouldn’t be reinstated, appeals court rules,” New York Times
“Cannibal Cop’s wife takes the stand as horrific details of former NYPD officer’s twisted bondage fetish emerge in first day of trial,” New York Daily News

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“14 years and nine tiny corpses later, authorities finally took action on murderous mother” by Mara Bovsun, New York Daily News
“Baby Killer” by Mark Gado, crimelibrary.com
“Baby killer Marybeth Tinning leaves prison” Albany Times Union

Aug 29, 2018
Episode 30: Murders at a Chinese Hostel & Gypsy Blanchard’s Quest for Freedom
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In Gypsy Blanchard’s world, nothing is as it seems. For years, people saw her as a sickly girl plagued by medical issues. She was wheelchair bound. She suffered from mental delays. She had trouble breathing. Her life was marked by constant doctor visits and too-frequent surgeries. All the while, her doting mother Dee Dee was by her side. Then one day, someone updated the status on Dee Dee and Gypsy’s shared Facebook account. They wrote, “that bitch is dead.” Friends and neighbors were in for the surprise of their lives.

Then Brandi tells us about four murders at a Chinese hostel. When police arrived at the crime scene in 1995, they had little to go on. The murders were as random as they were brutal. The few leads police developed were vague at best. The case went cold for nearly 20 years. Years later, with the help of DNA testing, investigators took another look at the crime scene. Their discovery led them to a surprising suspect.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
The HBO documentary, “Mommy Dead and Dearest”
“Gypsy Blanchard’s ex-boyfriend upset with his attorney as murder trial approaches,” Springfield News-Leader
“Judge sets trial date for next year in Nicholas Godejohn case,” Springfield News-Leader
“Charged with murder, Godejohn give his side of the story,” Ozarks First

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Anhui Author Detained for 1995 Quadruple Murder” by Fan Yiying, sixthtone.com
“Farmer-writer-killer sentenced to death” by Ma Zhenhuan, China Daily
“Killer author who murdered four people 23 years ago then wrote acclaimed novels ‘inspired by the case’ is sentenced to death in China” by Tracy You, Daily Mail
“Crime writer arrested for four murders committed 22 years ago” The Punch
“Chinese author of unsolved-murder novel arrested over unsolved murders” by Sarah Zheng, South China Morning Post

 

Aug 22, 2018
Episode 29: The Internet’s First Serial Killer & the Disappearance of Cora Okonski
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For years, it looked like investigators would never figure out why 23-year-old Cora Okonski disappeared. One spring day, she left home to buy cigarettes from a local convenience store. She was never seen again. Family, friends and police searched for her, but years passed by without a trace of the young mother. In fact, so much time passed that it looked like they’d never figure out what happened to her. Then, 16 years after Cora went missing, police made an arrest.

Then Kristin gives us the heebie jeebies with the tale of John Edward Robinson, often dubbed the internet’s first serial killer. John didn’t start off as a killer. For years, he was just a thieving con man. He was so conniving that at one point, thanks to an enormous ego and a lot of forged letters, he convinced the mayor of Kansas City to give him the “Man of the Year” award. Over time, John evolved from serial fraudster to serial murderer. His killing spree ended when police discovered barrels containing women’s bodies on his property. Warning: This story is as disgusting as it is disturbing.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Serial Killer JR Robinson’s Sinister Alter Ego,” by David McClintock for Vanity Fair
“Tearful wife of accused serial killer offers an alibi,” CNN.com
“Death sentence is upheld for serial killer John E. Robinson Sr.,” Kansas City Star
…and good ol’ Wikipedia  

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Cora Ann Okonski” IowaColdCases.org
“Where Is Cora Ann” by John Speer, The Tama News-Herald
Murder trial for Iowa woman whose body was never found begins Monday” by Grant Rodgers, Des Moines Register
Cara Okonski feared for her life, friend testifies in murder trial” by Trish Mehaffey, The Courier
“Tait Purk guilty of 1st degree murder” by John Speer, The Toledo Chronicle
“Judge overturns murder conviction of Tama County man in fiancee’s death” by Trish Mahaffey, The Gazette
“Judge recuses self in Tait Purk murder trial” by John Speer, The Toledo Chronicle
“UPDATE: Tait Purk found guilty in disappearance of Cora Okonski” by Trish Mehaffey, The Gazette
“Tait Purk sentenced to 50 years in prison for killing fiancee in 2000” by Trish Mahaffey, The Gazette

Aug 15, 2018
Episode 28: The Kidnapping of America’s Best Businesswoman & the Murder of Lisa Techel
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By the early 1930’s, Nell Donnelly had it all. Women everywhere loved Nell Donnelly’s stylish, well-made, and inexpensive dresses. But she didn’t just make great dresses. She made a great work environment, too. Unlike a lot of factory owners at the time, Nell paid well. She offered her employees medical care and a pension plan. She even paid for them to go to school. Nell’s hard work paid off. Fortune Magazine called her possibly the most successful businesswoman in America. She was rich, stylish and classy. But she was also a target.

On December 16, 1931, Nell and her chauffeur, George, were kidnapped and driven to a nasty old cabin. The eventual trials of Nell’s kidnappers captured the nation’s attention and involved some of Kansas City’s most prominent citizens.

Then Brandi frustrates the hell out of us with the story of Lisa Techel’s murder. When Lisa was discovered shot to death in her Iowa home, everyone knew exactly who’d done it — her neighbor. The man had a bad history with Lisa and her husband Seth. Police were sure they had their guy. But when they went to question him, he wasn’t quite the cold-blooded murderer they expected him to be. Hold on tight, folks. This one has so many twists and turns that it could be a two-hour episode of Dateline. Oh, wait. It is.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
The book, “James A. Reed: Legendary Lawyer; Marplot in the United States Senate,” by Michael Cronan
The book, “Called to Courage: Four Women in Missouri History,” by Heather Roberson and Margot McMillen
The book, “The Devil’s Tickets: A Vengeful Wife, a Fatal Hand, and a New American Age,” by Gary M. Pomerantz
“Strange bedfellows,” KChistory.org
“Nell Donnelly Reed, 102, Pioneer In Manufacture of Women’s Attire,” New York Times

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
Before Dawn” Dateline ep.
“Techel Trial: Opening Arguments Heard” by Stephanie Moore, whotv.com
“Court upholds man’s conviction in slaying of pregnant wife” by Ryan J. Foley, Associated Press

Aug 08, 2018
Episode 27: The Strange Life of Michael Marin and Game Night Gone Wrong
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Brandi starts us off with the strange story of millionaire adventurer Michael Marin. Marin likened himself to the dapper man in the Dos Equis commercials — the Most Interesting Man in the World. As obnoxious as that sounds, he wasn’t wrong. Marin lived most of his life on top of the world, which made it all the more shocking when he fell.

Then Kristin treats us to another old timey Kansas City case. This story starts innocently enough. John and Myrtle Bennett invited their friends Charles and Myrna Hofman over to play bridge. Everyone was having a great time… until they weren’t. John played a bad hand, Myrtle insulted him, and John slapped her several times. But Myrtle didn’t take it sitting down. She ran to her mother’s room and came out with a loaded gun. As crazy as that night was, Myrtle’s trial was even crazier.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Bridge Slaying Story Related,” The Morning Chronicle
“Last Hand at Park Manor: The Trial of Myrtle Bennett,” The Jackson County Historical Society Journal
“The Bridge Murder Case,” Wikipedia
The book, “The Devil’s Tickets: A Vengeful Wife, a Fatal Hand, and a New American Age,” by Gary Pomerantz

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The Extreme Life and Dramatic Death of Michael Marin” by Michale Kiefer, The Arizona Republic
“Arson in America: The Odd Tale of Michael Marin” independentmail.com
“The Millionaire Arsonist” by Heather Sutfin, swordandscale.com

 

Aug 01, 2018
Episode 26: The Big Break & the Kidnapping of Bobby Greenlease
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Eric Abramovitz plays the shit out of the clarinet. He’s amazing. But you know what’s cool about him? He wants to get better. So a few years ago, he applied to the Colburn Conservatory of Music. He set his sights on a huge scholarship and the life-changing chance to study under one of the best clarinet instructors in the world. A few months later, he was rejected. Or was he?

Then Brandi wraps up her kidnapping spree… (hmm. Poor choice of words?) with the kidnapping of Bobby Greenlease. This one started in 1953, when a panicked woman ran into a prestigious Kansas City private school and told one of the nuns that her sister’d had a heart attack. She needed to take her nephew out of school. The nun obliged, but there was just one problem. The whole story was bullshit.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“She faked a rejection from her ex-boyfriend’s dream school,” CNN
“A clarinetist’s girlfriend didn’t want him to leave. So she crushed his dreams,” NY Times
“Abramovitz v. Lee,” CanLII.org

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Greenlease Kidnapping” FBI.gov
“The Kidnapping of Bobby Greenlease” The Kansas City Star
“Bonnie Emily Heady” murderpedia.org
Greenleasefamily.com

Jul 25, 2018
Episode 25: The Lindbergh Baby Kidnapping and the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire
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When the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory caught fire in 1911, it was the worst workplace fire in New York City’s history. In fact, if it weren’t for September 11th, it would still hold that horrible record. In just 18 minutes, the fire took 146 lives. It was devastating, but it was also preventable. The incident inspired activists and politicians. It also encouraged workers to join unions and fight for their right to a safe work environment.

Then we discuss the most famous kidnapping in American history — that of baby Charles Lindbergh. Baby Lindbergh was taken from the second story of his family home. The kidnapper left behind a broken ladder and a poorly written ransom note.

The nearly two year old boy was the son of aviation star Charles Lindbergh and his wife Anne Morrow Lindbergh. The distraught parents did everything they could to get their baby back. They paid the ransom and searched high and low for their child. But it was too late…

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Rose Freedman, Last Survivor of Triangle Fire, Dies at 107,” New York Times
Triangle: Remembering The Fire, HBO documentary
“The Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire,” History.com
“The Triangle Fire of 1911,” by John M Hoenig
“The 1911 Triangle Factory Fire,” Cornell University

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“Hauptmann Trial (1935)” Famous-Trials.com
“Lindbergh Kidnapping” FBI.gov

Jul 18, 2018
Episode 24: The Charming Kidnappers & the Swope Family Murders (?)
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This week, we’re covering old timey Kansas City cases.

Two brothers entered Henry McElroy’s home in the spring of 1933 with a sinister scheme. They wanted to kidnap Henry’s daughter and hold her for ransom. But they were surprised by what they discovered. Henry’s daughter, Mary, wasn’t a child. She was a full grown woman. And she was pretty darn charming, to boot. Weirdly, she found her captors pretty charming, too. This story is as unpredictable as it is intriguing.

Then Kristin tells us about Thomas Swope, who made his fortune buying cheap land in the mid 1800’s, and selling it for a profit as the city grew. In 1896, he donated more than 1,300 acres to be used as Kansas City’s largest park. Toward the end of his life, Thomas toyed with the idea of rewriting his will so that more of his vast fortune would go to charity. But before he could do that, he died. So did his cousin. And later, so did his nephew. In fact, almost everyone in the Swope family became mysteriously ill soon after Thomas’s death. Was someone out to get them? Or did the Swope family just have bad luck?

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (No shade, Wikipedia. We love you.) We owe a huge debt of gratitude to the real experts who covered these cases.

In this episode, Kristin pulled from:
“Dr. Hyde and Mr. Swope,” kchistory.org
“The Mysterious Death of Kansas City’s Thomas Swope,” KCUR.org
“Thomas Swope: KC True Crime,” Kansas City Star
“The Evil Dr. Hyde of Kansas City,” historicalcrimedetective.com

In this episode, Brandi pulled from:
“The lady and her kidnappers” by Mara Bovsun, New York Daily News
“RANSOM MARY McELROY” by Stephen C. Haynes and Richard D. Ralls, Kansas City Star
“Mary McElroy, the City Manager’s daughter” by David Arthur Walters
“Kidnapped!” KCHistory.org
“The abduction of Mary McElroy” by Ted Stillwell, The Examiner

 

Jul 11, 2018
Episode 23: Rolling Stone’s Most Outrageous Article & the Bever Family Murders
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When Rolling Stone published an article about a gang rape at the University of Virginia, people were outraged. Not only had a young woman been assaulted — but her attempts to get meaningful help from university administrators went nowhere. The piece was as beautifully written as it was horrific. But was it accurate?

Then Brandi bums us out with a story that starts with a 12-year-old boy’s call to 911. He told the dispatcher that his brother was attacking the family. Before he could provide more information, the line went dead. Police traced the call, but it was too late to save the family. By the time police arrived, five members of the Bever family were dead and the killers had fled the scene.

And now for a note about our process. For each episode, Kristin reads a bunch of articles, then spits them back out in her very limited vocabulary. Brandi copies and pastes from the best sources on the web. And sometimes Wikipedia. (