The Journal.

By The Wall Street Journal & Gimlet

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Subscribers: 3359
Reviews: 5


 Apr 4, 2022
One of the best. Highly recommended


 Feb 19, 2022


 May 7, 2020


 May 1, 2020

Adi
 Apr 8, 2020
Great collection of news, aptly put together.

Description

The most important stories, explained through the lens of business. A podcast about money, business and power. Hosted by Kate Linebaugh and Ryan Knutson. The Journal is a co-production from Gimlet Media and The Wall Street Journal.

Episode Date
Two Friends Pulled Apart by a Changing Hong Kong
1502
25 years ago, Britain handed Hong Kong back to China. We meet two Hong Kong artists whose friendship has survived personal, political and creative differences in a shared art studio for 13 years. Now, with China exerting more power, one of them is choosing to leave the city for good. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 01, 2022
One Town's Fight Against 'Forever' Chemicals
1272
Peshtigo, Wisconsin, is grappling with a crisis: Chemicals known as PFAS have leached from a nearby industrial site into the town's groundwater. WSJ's Kris Maher traveled to the town to report on what the community is doing and how the contamination has affected people's health and lives.Further reading: -A Wisconsin Town With Contaminated Drinking Water Must Decide Its Future Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 30, 2022
Is Nuclear Power Poised for a Comeback?
1208
As concerns grow over climate change and high oil prices, the U.S. and Europe are starting to build new nuclear power plants, after decades of favoring other energy sources. WSJ's Matthew Dalton explains why those nations have lost some of their expertise in building nuclear plants, causing significant delays.Further reading -Nuclear Power Is Poised for a Comeback. The Problem Is Building the Reactors  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 29, 2022
The ‘Existential Threat’ Facing Big Tobacco
1145
Recent moves by the Biden Administration to rein in the vaping market and nicotine levels in cigarettes could hit the tobacco company Altria Group hard, as it has major investments in both markets. WSJ’s Jennifer Maloney unpacks how the latest moves fit within decades of public health efforts. Further Reading: - Biden Administration to Pursue Rule Requiring Lower Nicotine Levels in US Cigarettes  - FDA to Order JUUL Cigarettes off US Market  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 28, 2022
Murder in the Amazon
1121
Earlier this month, an indigenous expert and a British journalist went missing in an area of dense Amazon rainforest. The disappearance of Bruno Pereira and Dom Phillips sparked an international outcry. WSJ’s Luciana Magalhaes and Samantha Pearson explain what the two men’s disappearance and eventual fate reveal about the state of the Amazon. Further Reading: - Brazilian Police Probe Illegal Fishermen Over Amazon Double Homicide  - Fisherman Confessed to Killing Dom Phillips, Brazilian Police Say  - Brazilian Military Scours Amazon for Missing Journalist  - Brazilian Navy Searches for Missing British Journalist in Amazon  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 27, 2022
The Supreme Court Overturns Roe v. Wade
1155
Today, the Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade, ending the federal right to an abortion. WSJ’s Laura Kusisto breaks down the decision and explains how state governments are responding. Plus, a woman who runs clinics that provided abortions in Oklahoma and Texas shares how restrictions have affected her patients. Further Reading: -Supreme Court’s Abortion Decision Sparks Immediate Action From States  -Fall of Roe v. Wade Upends Abortion Landscape for American Women  Further Listening: - The Potential End of Roe v. Wade   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 24, 2022
Are Rotisserie Chickens ‘Inflation-Proof’?
1071
Inflation is the worst it’s been in more than 40 years. But one bright spot for consumers might be found at the grocery store: rotisserie chickens. WSJ’s Annie Gasparro chronicles the history of America’s love for the quick and versatile meal, and what a "rotisserie chicken economic index" might say about this inflationary moment.Further Listening:-Inflation Is Happening. Should You Be Worried?  Further Reading:-Rotisserie Chickens: The ’90s Gift to Supermarkets That Keeps on Giving  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 23, 2022
The CEO Scandal at WWE
1116
Vince McMahon, the CEO of World Wrestling Entertainment, or WWE, stepped aside as CEO and chairman of the company last week after allegations surfaced that he had an affair with a former employee and agreed to pay $3 million to keep it secret. WSJ’s Ted Mann explains what’s at stake for the company. Further Reading: -WWE Board Probes Secret $3 Million Hush Pact by CEO Vince McMahon, Sources Say  -WWE’s Vince McMahon Steps Back From CEO Role Amid Misconduct Probe  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 22, 2022
'We Are Helpless': Indian Heat Wave Hurts Mango Farmers
967
Record-breaking high temperatures in India have wreaked havoc on crops like mangoes, which are known there as the "king of fruits." As WSJ's Shan Li explains, the devastation is threatening the livelihoods of farmers and raising food prices for the country’s nearly 1.4 billion people.Further reading: -Heat Wave Devastates India’s Mango Harvest   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 21, 2022
Is BTS Breaking Up?
1209
The biggest pop band in the world right now is the seven member K-Pop sensation, BTS. This week, the band released a video signaling that they’re tired and want a break. WSJ’s Neil Shah explains why the group has had breakout success and may need to take a hiatus. Further Reading: - K-Pop Band BTS to Focus on Solo Projects  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 17, 2022
Amazon Went Big During the Pandemic. Now It’s Feeling the Hangover.
1108
To keep up with increased demand during the pandemic, Amazon hired hundreds of thousands of people and massively expanded its logistics network. Now, demand is falling, creating a problem for the company’s new CEO, Andy Jassy. WSJ’s Dana Mattioli explains how Jassy is trying to scale back. Further Reading: - Andy Jassy’s First Year at Amazon: Undoing Bezos-Led Overexpansion  Further Listening: - Amazon After Bezos  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 16, 2022
Celebrities Loved Crypto and NFTs. Then the Markets Crashed.
1378
Earlier this year, it seemed like celebrities everywhere were promoting cryptocurrency and NFTs. But then, in early May, the markets crashed. WSJ’s Ellen Gamerman explains how celebrities got hooked on crypto in the first place, and how they’re responding now that the value of these assets is plummeting.Further Reading: -Reese Witherspoon and Gwyneth Paltrow Push for Crypto Sisterhood  -NFT Sales Are Flatlining  Further Listening: -How An Art World Outsider Landed a $69 Million Sale  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 15, 2022
The Teen Jobs Boom
1053
It’s a teenage dream. Unemployment among teens is near its lowest level in decades as business owners look to solve a hiring crunch. We talk to WSJ’s Kathryn Dill about the bargaining power teens have in today’s job market. Further Reading: - Teens Take Up More Jobs, and More Pay, in Tight Labor Market  - Teen Babysitters Are Charging $30 an Hour Now, Because They Can   Further Listening: - Why Workers Can’t Get Enough Hours, Even in a Jobs Boom  - Why Is Everyone Quitting?  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 14, 2022
The Saudi Money Splitting Golf
1188
Last week, the first LIV Golf event, a Saudi Arabian-funded golf tournament, officially launched. The new tour is offering professional golfers a lot of money to participate. WSJ’s Andrew Beaton explains why the rival PGA Tour is punishing players who try to participate in both. Further Reading: -​​ The Good. The Bad, The Weird At The First Saudi-Funded Liv Golf Event.   Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 13, 2022
Hack Me If You Can, Part 1: The Making of a Russian Hacker
2513
In more than 20 years of reporting on cybercrime, Wall Street Journal reporter Robert McMillan has never come face-to-face with a criminal hacker. Until he met Dmitry Smilyanets.  Dmitry grew up during the fall of the Soviet Union, a computer-loving kid with big dreams. He became part of a generation of Russian hackers who cut their teeth in the early days of the internet and went from stealing passwords to hacking some of America’s biggest companies. This is the story of how Dmitry became one of the best. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 10, 2022
Hack Me If You Can, Part 2: Counterstrike
2521
In 2008, Dmitry Smilyanets and his crew of hackers pulled off one of the biggest hacks in history. It made Dmitry millions of dollars, some of which he used to build an esports empire. But the hack put a target on Dmitry’s back. A U.S. prosecutor, Erez Liebermann, was tasked with bringing Dmitry to justice. In this episode, Erez follows Dmitry’s every move — chasing him around the world. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 10, 2022
Hack Me If You Can, Part 3: The Infiltrator
2488
After his arrest in Amsterdam, the threat of a decades-long prison sentence loomed over Dmitry. If he cooperated with American prosecutors, he could lower his sentence. But he’d have to betray his hacking collaborator and best friend, Vladimir Drinkman. Dmitry takes the deal and starts working with the U.S. government while he serves his time. And in the years since, Dmitry has had a new vantage point to watch the evolving threat hackers pose. Increasingly, hackers are targeting public institutions and infrastructure, putting many Americans at risk. It’s now Dmitry’s job to help stop them. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 10, 2022
The Love Triangle Over Spirit Airlines
985
In February, Frontier Airlines announced its plan to purchase fellow budget airliner, Spirit. But JetBlue’s surprise competing bid for Spirit sent the three airlines into a messy, public love triangle. WSJ’s Alison Sider reports on how the possible mergers will shake up flying in the U.S. Further Reading: - JetBlue Boosts Breakup Fee, Pledges Dividend in Bid to Woo Spirit Holders   - Spirit Airlines Delays Shareholder Vote as It Considers Frontier, JetBlue Offers  Further Listening: - Frontier, Spirit and the Future of Low-Cost Airlines  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 09, 2022
The Most Hated Solar Company in America
1140
Earlier this week, President Biden announced emergency measures to get the solar power industry moving again after a major standstill that had pitted domestic manufacturers against solar panel installers. WSJ’s Phred Dvorak explains how tiny Auxin Solar became the most-hated solar company in America. Further Reading: - The Most-Hated Solar Company in America  - Biden Invokes Emergency Power in Bid to Resolve Solar Import Dispute  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 08, 2022
FanDuel CEO on Sports Gambling's Big Boom
1070
More than a dozen states have legalized online sports gambling since the Supreme Court repealed a federal ban in 2018. That's opened doors for a burgeoning new industry, and companies like FanDuel are trying to capitalize. CEO Amy Howe shares her views on the industry, and she makes her case for legal sports betting. Further Reading: - FanDuel CEO Amy Howe Says Black Market Gambling Poses Threat to Online Sports Betting  - DraftKings, FanDuel Battle Tribes for Control of California Sports Betting  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 07, 2022
Introducing: Hack Me If You Can
113
Wall Street Journal reporter Robert McMillan has spent years trying to find a Russian hacker who would tell him their story. And then, he met Dmitry Smilyanets, the man who managed one of the most notorious hacking teams to come out of Russia.  Dmitry’s story is the story of how a generation of hackers grew up in Russia. It follows the dramatic game of cat and mouse that America plays trying to catch cyber criminals like Dmitry. And in Dmitry’s case, it ends with him facing a choice: go to prison for decades, or help the U.S. government stop hackers like himself.  This is a new series from the Journal - Hack Me If You Can – the story of a Russian cyber criminal who went to the other side. All episodes out June 10th.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 07, 2022
Biden’s Plan to Bring Down Inflation
1037
Inflation is the worst it’s been in 40 years. President Joe Biden says he has a plan to bring it down. WSJ’s Amara Omeokwe talks about whether it will work.  Further Reading: - Joe Biden: My Plan for Fighting Inflation  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 06, 2022
Sheryl Sandberg's Complicated Career at Facebook
1300
After 14 years at Facebook, COO Sheryl Sandberg announced this week that she's leaving the company. WSJ's Deepa Seetharaman describes how Sandberg helped build Facebook's business and faced the fallout of recent scandals. Further Reading: - Why Sheryl Sandberg Quit Facebook’s Meta  Further Listening: - 'The Facebook Files' from The Journal.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 03, 2022
Why Snap's Stock Fell 43% in a Day
945
Things were already tough for Snap, Snapchat's parent company, thanks to big changes in the ad market. Then last week the company made a surprise announcement: It's worse than we thought. WSJ’s Meghan Bobrowsky explains the reasons behind Snap’s stock tumble, and why it’s raising concerns about other tech companies too. Further Reading: - Tech Stocks Continue to Fall After Snap’s Profit Warning  - Snap Plunges, And There Goes Social Media’s Online Ad Biz  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 02, 2022
A Tale of Two Top Guns
1206
This past weekend's release of Top Gun: Maverick -- the sequel to Tom Cruise’s 1986 movie -- was record-breaking at the box office. But it also exposed the increasing power that China and its vast market has in Hollywood. WSJ's Erich Schwartzel explains how Top Gun: Maverick attracted Chinese financing -- and then lost it. Further Reading: - ‘Top Gun: Maverick’ Loses Chinese Investor Due to Pro-U.S. Messaging  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 01, 2022
Can My Stock Portfolio Save the Planet?
1030
What is ESG? Some proponents see it as a way for investors to grow their wealth while fighting climate change and racism. But critics, like Elon Musk, call it an “outrageous scam.” WSJ’s Amrith Ramkumar explains how “environmental, social and governance” became three of the hottest words on Wall Street. Further Reading: - Elon Musk Calls ESG ‘An Outrageous Scam’ After Tesla Was Removed From Index  - SEC Fines BNY Mellon Over ESG Claims  - SEC Proposes More Disclosure Requirements for ESG Funds  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 31, 2022
The Quest to Find a Lost Purple Heart
1412
A Marine died in Fallujah at the height of the Iraq War. Years later, his family found out his Purple Heart was listed on an auction site. WSJ's Ben Kesling, who once served in the same company as the Marine, tells the story of how he helped track it down. This episode was originally published in July 2021. Further Reading: - I Thought I Was Done With Iraq. Then a Fellow Marine’s Purple Heart Turned Up at Auction.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 30, 2022
Old Navy Tried to Make Sizes for All. It Backfired.
988
Last year, Old Navy overhauled its women’s clothes to make sizing more inclusive. But then its sales started falling. WSJ’s Suzanne Kapner unpacks why the company’s plan to reach more customers didn’t work. Further Reading: - Old Navy Made Clothing Sizes for Everyone. It Backfired.  - Old Navy to Scale Back Its Inclusive Sizing Strategy  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 27, 2022
The Fight Over Banning the AR-15
1216
Many of the deadliest mass shootings in the U.S. have involved an assault-style rifle like the AR-15. WSJ’s Zusha Elinson reports on how Washington regulations have failed to stop the gun's rise to prominence. Further Reading: America’s Failed Attempt to Ban Assault Weapons  Further Listening: Red-Flag Laws, Their Application and One Mother’s Experience  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 26, 2022
As the Stock Market Tumbles, so Does a YouTuber's Influence
1081
Kevin Paffrath is a social media influencer who dishes out financial advice on multiple platforms. He cashed in on young people’s hunger for investment tips from non-traditional sources. But as WSJ’s Robbie Whelan explains, Paffrath's followers became fickle when his advice turned cautious.Further Reading: -The Social-Media Stars Who Move Markets Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 25, 2022
Beware the Big Bad Bear Market
902
Recent stock slides are approaching dangerous territory: a bear market. WSJ’s James Mackintosh explains why a recent dramatic plunge in stock indexes is spooking investors, what it could mean for the wider economy, and the likelihood of the markets dipping into a bear market in the coming days. Further Reading: -Conditions Are Ripe for a Deep Bear Market  Further Listening: -Can the Fed Lower Inflation Without Causing a Recession?  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 24, 2022
Can a Hedge Fund Win the World Series?
1007
Billionaire hedge-fund manager Steve Cohen is trying to duplicate his financial success in his other major venture as owner of the New York Mets baseball team. And to do so, he’s calling on some of the same people. WSJ’s Juliet Chung and Jared Diamond explain why some of Cohen’s hedge-fund employees are moonlighting for his team. Further Reading:  - Steve Cohen’s Secret Weapon for the Mets: His Hedge Fund Further Listening:  - The Labor Dispute That Has Baseball on Hold Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 23, 2022
How the Baby Formula Industry Broke
1001
The U.S. is facing a massive shortage of baby formula. WSJ’s Jesse Newman explains how the roots of the crisis lie in the industry’s structure. And a mother in Kentucky describes her desperate search for formula for her son. Further Reading: - Why the Baby-Formula Market Is a Mess: Low Competition, High Regulation  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 20, 2022
U.S. Soccer’s Equal Pay Deal and One Player Who Helped Negotiate It
1075
The four-time World Cup-champion U.S. Women's National Soccer team has scored a new win: equal pay with the men's team. Collective-bargaining agreements between the women's and men's national teams and the United States Soccer Federation align the teams’ pay and create a unique mechanism to share prize money from their respective World Cup competitions. We talk to U.S. Women’s Soccer player Tierna Davidson about the landmark agreement and her role negotiating it. Further Reading:  - U.S. Women’s and Men’s Soccer Teams Will Receive Equal Pay Under New Labor Deals  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 19, 2022
The ‘Death Spiral’ of a Stablecoin
1171
Cryptocurrencies are volatile, but so-called stablecoins were meant to be the exception. But after one major stablecoin, TerraUSD, crashed spectacularly, it caused ripple effects in cryptoland. WSJ’s Caitlin Ostroff explains why regulators are spooked, and what this could mean for the broader economy. Further Reading: Crash of TerraUSD Shakes Crypto. ‘There Was a Run on the Bank.  Cryptocurrency TerraUSD Falls to 11 Cents, Creator Announces Rescue Plan  Further Listening: Bitcoin Comes Untethered  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 18, 2022
How Will We Know When the Pandemic's Over?
985
We speak with Rochelle Walensky, director of the Centers for Disease Control about eroding trust in public health, vaccine approvals for children under 5 and the one million Americans who have now died from COVID-19.Further Listening:The Future of Everything Festival Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 17, 2022
The Political Cost of China's Faltering Economy
1109
China’s sputtering economy is altering the balance of power among its top leaders. For years, President Xi Jinping sidelined his second in command, Premier Li Keqiang, a proponent of economic liberalization. WSJ’s Lingling Wei explains that Li is now gaining clout and pushing back on Xi's socialist policies. Further Reading:  - China’s Economic Distress Deepens as Lockdowns Drag On  - China’s Forgotten Premier Steps Out of Xi’s Shadow as Economic Fixer  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 16, 2022
Why An Online Telehealth Startup Is Limiting Adderall
1138
The digital startup Cerebral began prescribing ADHD drugs like Adderall over the internet, after federal rules loosened. But recently, there have been concerns from inside and outside the company that Cerebral was not careful enough. Now the company has stopped prescribing Adderall to new patients. WSJ's Rolfe Winkler reports. Further Reading: -Startups Make It Easier to Get ADHD Drugs. That Made Some Workers Anxious.  -Cerebral Receives Subpoena From Federal Prosecutors  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 13, 2022
Fidelity’s Controversial Bet on Bitcoin
959
Fidelity Investments will be the first major retirement-plan provider to allow bitcoin in its 401(k) plans. WSJ's Anne Tergesen explains the move and the blowback that followed. Further Reading: -Fidelity to Allow Retirement Savers to Put Bitcoin in 401(k) Accounts  -Labor Department Criticizes Fidelity’s Plan to Put Bitcoin on 401(k) Menu  Further Listening: -How Inflation is Causing Americans to 'Unretire'  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 12, 2022
Can the Fed Lower Inflation Without Causing a Recession?
971
The Federal Reserve has never managed to significantly decrease inflation without causing job losses, but it's trying to now. Central Bank officials hope they can cool down an overheated economy by raising interest rates. But as WSJ’s Jon Hilsenrath explains, the Fed risks triggering a recession. Further Reading: -Hot Economy, Rising Inflation: The Fed Has Never Successfully Fixed a Problem Like This Further Listening: -The Fed’s Shifting Inflation Message Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 11, 2022
Are Stock-Market Games Turning Teens Into Risky Investors?
1249
Every year, more than a million U.S. high-school students learn about investing through stock-picking games. But what do these games really teach? WSJ's Jason Zweig explains the shortfalls of traditional stock-market games, and teacher Mike Scanlan describes the different approach his school is taking. Further Reading:  -What Teenagers Really Learn From Stock-Market Games   -Current Baker Scholar and Alumnus Partner to Improve High School Investors Club  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 10, 2022
Australia Wanted Facebook to Pay for News. Facebook Played Hardball.
1291
Last year, Facebook blocked news pages to pre-empt Australian legislation that would force it to pay publishers for content. But it also took down the Facebook pages of non-news organizations like hospitals, emergency services and charities. Was the move inadvertent or a negotiating tactic? We talk to WSJ's Keach Hagey about what she learned. Further Reading: Facebook Deliberately Caused Havoc in Australia to Influence New Law, Whistleblowers Say Further Listening: The Facebook Files, a Podcast Series  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 09, 2022
The Battle Over Reparations at Georgetown
1293
In 1838, the Jesuits who founded Georgetown University sold 272 enslaved people to pay off the school's debts and keep the college afloat. Nearly 200 years later, the Jesuits want to make amends. But as Lee Hawkins explains, the path to racial healing can be a messy one. Further Reading: - For Georgetown, Jesuits and Slavery Descendants, Bid for Racial Healing Sours Over Reparations  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 06, 2022
The Fight Over a Menthol Cigarette Ban
1229
After decades of debate, the Food and Drug Administration is proposing a ban on menthol cigarettes. A researcher of the tobacco industry explains the benefits of a potential ban, and WSJ’s Jennifer Maloney explains why some want menthols to stay on the market. Further Reading: - FDA Advances Ban on Menthol Cigarettes - Why Does the U.S. Want to Ban Menthol Cigarettes? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 05, 2022
Germany’s Difficult Breakup with Russian Energy
974
The European Union announced a proposal to ban purchases of Russian oil exports, after Germany, Europe’s biggest economy, dropped its opposition. WSJ’s Bojan Pancevski explains why Germany was such a holdout. Further Reading: -EU Proposes Ban on Russian Oil Imports, Sending Prices Higher -Germany Drops Opposition to Embargo on Russian Oil Further Listening:-If Russia Invades Ukraine, Can the U.S. Deliver on Sanctions? Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 04, 2022
The Potential End of Roe v. Wade
1075
A leaked draft opinion from the Supreme Court indicates the court may be preparing to overturn Roe v. Wade, the 1973 precedent that established a constitutional right to an abortion. WSJ’s Brent Kendall explains what this could mean for women in America and why this is a significant moment in the history of the court.  Further Reading: Supreme Court Is Investigating Leak of Draft Opinion Overruling Roe v. Wade  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 03, 2022
How Inflation is Causing Americans to 'Unretire'
1076
Economic data from March revealed a new trend: hundreds of thousands of Americans are "unretiring" and returning to the workforce. WSJ's Harriet Torry reports that rising inflation is making retirement unsustainable for many. We also hear from two retirees who have started looking for work. Further Reading: -Everything Costs More, and That's Disrupting Retirement for Many Further Listening: -Why Older Americans Are Fleeing the Workforce Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 02, 2022
Why Airbnb Is Letting Employees Work Anywhere
1182
As many companies evaluate how to return to the office, Airbnb announced a new ‘work-from-anywhere’ policy that will let its employees work remotely from 170 countries. Airbnb CEO Brian Chesky explains how he arrived at the idea, and how the policy could serve as a blueprint for others companies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 29, 2022
The Rise of the Yimbys
1197
With rising housing prices and concerns about affordability, a new approach to solving the problem has emerged. Its answer is to build more housing of all types. Meet the Yimbys. WSJ’s Christine Mai-Duc explains the origins of the movement and how it's gaining traction around the country. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 28, 2022
Why Florida is Fighting with Walt Disney World
1073
Governor Ron DeSantis revoked the theme park's self-governing privileges after Disney opposed Florida's "Don’t Say Gay" bill. WSJ's Robbie Whelan explains the fight that led to this decision and what it might mean for one of the state’s largest employers. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 27, 2022
Afghanistan’s Desperation Economy
971
Afghanistan is dealing with an unprecedented humanitarian crisis, which has accelerated since the Taliban took power. Jobs are scarce, the nation’s suffering a devastating drought and Afghans are going hungry. As WSJ’s Sune Engel Rasmussen explains, Afghans are resorting to increasingly desperate measures to survive, such as selling kidneys. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 26, 2022
Elon Musk is Actually Buying Twitter
962
Twitter announced today that it plans to sell itself to Elon Musk for $44 billion. WSJ’s Liz Hoffman explains the unusual nature of how the deal came together and what it could mean for Twitter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 25, 2022
The Quick End to CNN+
1191
In late March, CNN launched its new streaming service, CNN+. But less than a month later, it’s shutting down. WSJ’s Joe Flint explains how this expensive project became the collateral damage of a corporate takeover. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 22, 2022
How Biden Plans to Tackle Student Debt
1021
The Biden administration announced plans this week to reduce the student loan burden for millions of people in the U.S. WSJ’s Gabriel T. Rubin explains how the plan involves retooling an existing program that has enrolled millions of people but provided few with relief. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 21, 2022
Will France Elect a Far-Right President?
1178
France votes for its next president on Sunday and polls show far-right candidate Marine Le Pen closing in on incumbent centrist, Emmanuel Macron. WSJ's Noemie Bisserbe explains why a Le Pen victory could upend French and European politics. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 20, 2022
Starbucks CEO Faces Brewing Union Efforts
1201
After a Starbucks store in New York state successfully unionized last year, a movement has begun at the coffee giant's stores across the country — one that CEO Howard Schultz is hoping to tamp down. WSJ’s Heather Haddon unpacks what the company is doing to fight back, and a Starbucks worker explains their interest in unionization. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 19, 2022
Amazon Takes On SpaceX in Battle for Space Internet
1234
Amazon's Project Kuiper is planning dozens of launches to send satellites into space in order to sell internet to consumers on Earth. But it's up against a big competitor: Elon Musk’s Starlink. WSJ’s Micah Maidenberg explains the promise of the technology and why it might be hard to succeed. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 18, 2022
Red-Flag Laws, Their Application and One Mother’s Experience
1132
A year ago, Brandon Hole killed eight people at a FedEx facility in Indianapolis. His mother, Sheila, had tried to get law enforcement to take away his firearms. WSJ’s Zusha Elinson explains the red-flag laws that could have helped stop this mass shooting. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 15, 2022
Elon Musk’s $43 Billion Offer to Buy Twitter
1069
After buying a sizable amount of Twitter’s shares, Elon Musk is now gunning for the entire company. Today, he announced a bid to buy Twitter for about $43 billion. As WSJ’s Tim Higgins explains, Musk is framing the move less as an investment, and more as a fight for free speech. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 14, 2022
Russia's Central Banker Dismantles What She Built
1057
Elvira Nabiullina, governor of the Russian Central Bank, has spent decades working to integrate Russia into the global economy. But Russia's invasion of Ukraine, and the sanctions it triggered, have pushed Russia's economy into crisis. WSJ's Alexander Osipovich explains how Nabiullina's strategies to stabilize Russia's economy undermine many policies she once championed. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 13, 2022
Why Workers Can’t Get Enough Hours, Even in a Jobs Boom
987
American workers quit a record 47 million jobs in 2021. Despite conventional wisdom, they’re not always leaving to pursue their dreams. Instead, many employees aren’t getting enough hours. WSJ’s Te-Ping Chen explains why. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 12, 2022
Why So Many Russians Are Going to Turkey
939
Since the invasion of Ukraine, thousands of Russians have flown to Turkey, many arriving with cash in their suitcases. WSJ’s Jared Malsin explains why Turkey — a member of NATO — has been so welcoming to Russians while the rest of Europe closes its doors. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 11, 2022
The Basquiat Sisters on Managing One of Art's Hottest Brands
1452
Jean-Michel Basquiat's art has sold for over $100 million and his name and work has been licensed for all kinds of merchandise, from Gap to Coach. WSJ’s Kelly Crow talks with Basquiat's two sisters, who are now managing his estate, about how they’re running the business of Basquiat and a new show that will reveal unseen art. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 08, 2022
One Ukrainian Factory Owner Joins the War Effort
961
Shamil Malachiyev helps run his family's business: one of the largest grain mills in southern Ukraine. He explains how his business has been forced to adapt to war and how he's pitching in on the fight against the Russians. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 07, 2022
Elon Musk's Twitter Surprise
1085
Elon Musk, the world's richest man, announced this week that he is now Twitter's largest shareholder and has a seat on the board. WSJ's Rob Copeland and Dave Michaels explain what that means for the social media platform, and what it might mean for Elon Musk. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 06, 2022
Carl Icahn, Activist Investor, Takes on Pork
990
Activist investor Carl Icahn has made billions of dollars taking stakes in companies and pressuring them to make changes. Now, Icahn is doing that again, but this time it’s not about making money. It’s about the treatment of pregnant pigs in pork supply chains. WSJ’s Cara Lombardo explains why he’s doing it — and whether it’ll work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 05, 2022
‘We Just Took Down Amazon:’ Activist on Amazon’s First U.S. Union
1105
On Friday, workers at an Amazon warehouse in Staten Island, New York voted to unionize. Chris Smalls, the man who’s led the unionization effort, reflects on how the Amazon Labor Union got here, what’s next and how his grassroots efforts could serve as a blueprint for other workers. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 04, 2022
An Undercover Operation to Reveal an Alleged Ponzi Scheme
1316
Over the last few weeks, the Federal Bureau of Investigation has been investigating an alleged Ponzi scheme that attracted hundreds of investors. The alleged fraud was uncovered by a group of whistleblowers and an undercover businessman looking for a shot at redemption. One of the whistleblowers, the undercover businessman himself and WSJ's Ben Foldy recount the events. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 01, 2022
Bribes, Cartels, and Extradition: How a Honduran President Became a U.S. Target
1145
Former President Juan Orlando Hernández promised to combat corruption, violence and drug cartels. But U.S. prosecutors allege he took bribes from drug cartels and "allowed brutal violence to be committed without consequence." WSJ's José de Córdoba explains why the U.S. wants to bring Hernández to trial in an American court. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 31, 2022
The TikTok That Changed College Hoops
1135
University of Oregon forward Sedona Prince’s viral TikTok from the 2021 NCAA women’s tournament led to a gender-equity investigation in college basketball. WSJ reporter Rachel Bachman details how it also resulted in big changes in this year's women's championships. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 30, 2022
The Beef Between Cattle Ranchers and Meatpackers
1018
While beef prices are up at the meat counter, cattle ranchers aren't cashing in. Some blame America’s meat-processing giants, which they say underpay for livestock. We talk to Trey Wasserburger about how he and fellow Nebraska ranchers are fighting back by building their own meat packing plant. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 29, 2022
The Supply Chain Saga at One Port
1030
Last year, Covid led to enormous slowdowns along the supply chain, especially at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach. WSJ's Paul Berger explains how one terminal overcame its backlog, and how a union negotiation on the horizon could back everything up once again. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 28, 2022
Why Uber Is Hailing New York City Cabs
1104
When Uber first started over a decade ago, the company had one huge competitor: The taxi industry. But after both businesses began to stall, the two former enemies began making nice. WSJ's Preetika Rana explains what caused Uber to team up with New York City's yellow cabs, and the company's bigger taxi ambitions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 25, 2022
Iran’s Secret System to Avoid Sanctions
1091
The U.S. and other Western nations have imposed harsh sanctions on Iran. But the country has built a clandestine financial system in order to endure them. WSJ’s Ian Talley explains how Iran did it, and what it means for Western influence. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 24, 2022
War in Ukraine Hits Global Food Supplies
1057
As Russian forces rampage through Ukraine, farmers are facing a growing list of barriers to planting and tending to their crops. That’s bad news for countries around the world that rely on Ukrainian imports. WSJ’s Alistair Macdonald explains the repercussions on global food supplies and a farmer talks about how his operations are faring during the war. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 23, 2022
The Online Sleuths Fighting Russian Disinformation
1075
The investigative group Bellingcat has won awards and international recognition for its work exposing misdeeds of authoritarian governments. We talk with Bellingcat’s executive director, Christo Grozev, about the group’s focus on Russian disinformation and alleged war crimes in Ukraine. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 22, 2022
How Disney's CEO Got Caught in Florida's Fight Over Gay Rights
1244
Since taking over Disney in early 2020, Bob Chapek has presided over a difficult period for the company. Now, a bill in Florida has become another stumbling block for the embattled CEO. WSJ's Robbie Whelan looks at Chapek's tenure — and why he was reluctant to speak out against a bill critics are calling "Don't Say Gay." Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 21, 2022
Inside Chernobyl’s Hostage Crisis
1367
When Russia invaded Ukraine, it took control of the abandoned Chernobyl power plant, the site of worst nuclear disaster in history. Now, around 200 workers are being held hostage at the site by Russian forces. The WSJ’s Joe Parkinson breaks down the situation, and we speak with an off-duty employee of the power plant. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 18, 2022
As Saudi Arabia Cools on the U.S., It Warms to China
1020
President Joe Biden wants Saudi Arabia to pump more oil, to alleviate global supply concerns amid sanctions on Russia. But the U.S.-Saudi relationship has grown so strained that Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman is refusing to take Biden’s call. Now, the kingdom has turned its attention toward another buyer: China. WSJ’s Stephen Kalin explains why Saudi Arabia is growing cold on the U.S. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 17, 2022
Inflation at the Only Grocer in Town
1077
Inflation is forcing Frank Timberlake, owner of Rich Square Market in rural North Carolina, to raise prices on many of his products. The store is the only grocery around for miles, and many customers are on fixed incomes. Timberlake and WSJ's Valerie Bauerlein explain how inflation is squeezing the store's customers and the business. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 16, 2022
Can Poland’s Economy Absorb Millions of Ukrainians?
970
Nearly two million Ukrainians have flooded into Poland in the last few weeks. While Polish people have welcomed the refugees with open arms, politicians are warning that the country’s systems are getting overwhelmed. WSJ’s Drew Hinshaw describes the scene on the ground in Poland’s capital and the effect of this mass migration on Poland’s economy.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 15, 2022
Oatly Pioneered Oat Milk. Now it’s Struggling to Keep Up.
1202
With its cheeky advertising, Oatly helped invent the oat milk market. But now it’s having a hard time keeping up with all the demand it helped create. WSJ’s Khadeeja Safdar and Jesse Newman tell the story of the company’s rise and recent troubles. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 14, 2022
A Russian Car Maker Falls Back Into Soviet-Era Isolation
1097
This week, production of Lada cars, the icons of Russia’s auto industry, ground to a halt as Western sanctions cut off auto parts and supplies. WSJ's Nick Kostov tells the story of the famous car maker and explains why it offers a glimpse into the evolution of the Russian economy. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 11, 2022
How Crypto Became Part of the War
1027
Since the invasion, cryptocurrency use has increased in both Russia and Ukraine. Michael Chobanian, the founder of the largest crypto exchange fund in Ukraine, explains how his company is soliciting donations for the Ukrainian war effort. And WSJ's Paul Vigna reports on Russians' renewed interest in cryptocurrency as the ruble tumbles. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 10, 2022
An Unexpected Strategy to Bring Gas Prices Down
983
The United States banned Russian oil yesterday, its latest retribution against the invasion of Ukraine. The move is designed to hurt Russia's Vladimir Putin but is also likely to push America's soaring gas prices even higher. Journalist Patricia Garip says the U.S. is now looking for ways to replace the Russian oil and is turning to an unlikely source: Venezuela. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 09, 2022
Russia's Media Crackdown: 'The Future is Pretty Dark'
1312
Russia's only independent TV news channel, TV Rain, shut down last week amid a media crackdown in the country. A new law outlaws publishing what Russian authorities consider false information about the Ukraine invasion. TV Rain's editor-in-chief, Tikhon Dzyadko, who has fled the country, talks to The Journal about independent journalism in Russia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 08, 2022
Facebook's $10 Billion Advertising Exodus
1067
Last month, Facebook's parent, Meta Platforms, forecasted the company would lose $10 billion in advertising revenue this year. Small business owner Martha Krueger explains why she stopped using the platforms, and WSJ reporter Salvador Rodriguez talks about how the company plans to address the exodus. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 07, 2022
The War in Ukraine Hits American Gas Prices
983
President Biden had hoped to insulate Americans from the economic fallout of sanctioning Russia, one of the world's biggest oil producers. But oil prices have jumped more than 25 percent this week alone. WSJ's Tim Puko explains why prices keep rising and what, if anything, Biden can do about it. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 04, 2022
Yachts, Soccer and Sanctioning Russian Oligarchs
1356
This week, governments around the world have slapped sanctions on prominent Russian billionaires in retaliation for Russia's invasion of Ukraine. WSJ's Max Colchester explains the push to scrutinize these Russian billionaires and looks at the debate around sanctioning one oligarch: Chelsea soccer team owner, Roman Abramovich.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 03, 2022
Russians, and Putin, Face the Fallout of War
1076
As repercussions mount for the invasion of Ukraine, ordinary Russians are starting to feel the impact. WSJ's Ann M. Simmons details what it's like on the ground in Moscow and explains whether economic sanctions are having any effect on Russian President Vladimir Putin. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 02, 2022
A Ukrainian Tech CEO Reckons With War
1066
Since the Russian invasion, Ukrainian tech CEO Vitaly Sedler has been organizing efforts to move employees from conflict zones to safety. His company, Intellias, is one of Ukraine's biggest tech companies and is part of a burgeoning tech sector in the country. Sedler talks to The Journal about what it's like to run a business in a country at war. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 01, 2022
The Financial Punishment of Russia
1112
Over the weekend, countries around the world ratcheted up their punishment of Russia for its invasion of Ukraine. Newly announced sanctions could severely cripple the Russian economy in what's being called the biggest economic attack in history. WSJ's Laurence Norman breaks down the new measures. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 28, 2022
The Man Leading Ukraine
934
Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky said he was remaining in his nation's capital, Kyiv, even as Russian troops closed in. He urged Ukrainians to fight against the invasion. WSJ's James Marson explains how the embattled Ukrainian leader, a one-time TV star, is now standing up to Russia. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 25, 2022
As Russia Invades, Ukrainians Weigh Fight or Flight
1174
Russia launched a full-scale invasion across Ukraine on Thursday. Now, Ukrainians are deciding between fleeing west or fighting back. We hear from one man who's leaving and one who's heading to the front lines. Plus, WSJ's Brett Forrest and James Marson detail what's happening on the ground in Ukraine and what to expect next. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 24, 2022
How Putin Has Planned For Sanctions
1120
Western leaders have threatened sweeping sanctions if Russia continues advancing into Ukraine. But can even the toughest sanctions avert full-scale war? WSJ's Ann M. Simmons and Georgi Kantchev describe the sanctions that could be coming and how Russia has prepared for this moment. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 23, 2022
The Labor Dispute That Has Baseball on Hold
1236
Spring training for the baseball season was supposed to be underway this week. Instead, players and owners are locked in a labor dispute over their contract. WSJ's Jared Diamond explains why players' demands for more pay could be costly for baseball. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 22, 2022
How an Art World Outsider Landed a $69 Million Sale
1377
After selling an NFT for $69 million, the digital artist known as Beeple says he's not trying to "blow up" the contemporary art world. And WSJ's Kelly Crow explains how a new technology led to a historic sale. This episode originally published in March 2021. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 21, 2022
Why NATO Is at the Center of the Russia-Ukraine Conflict
1175
Russia continues to amass troops on the Ukrainian border, threatening an invasion. One of Russia's demands is that Ukraine never join NATO, the longstanding Western alliance. WSJ's Yaroslav Trofimov explains NATO's history with Russia, and why President Vladimir Putin considers its expansion a threat. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 18, 2022
NBC's Olympic Bet on Peacock
1162
When NBCUniversal launched its streaming service, Peacock, in 2020, it had a rocky start. Now it's trying to regain its footing by live-streaming the Winter Olympics, along with new shows and movies. As WSJ's Lillian Rizzo explains, the stakes are high for NBC and its parent company, Comcast, to get it right. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 17, 2022
Remington's Surprising Sandy Hook Settlement
1045
Families of nine victims of the Sandy Hook mass shooting announced yesterday that they would receive a $73 million settlement from Remington, the parent company of the manufacturer of the gun used in the shooting. WSJ's Zusha Elinson explains the families' novel legal strategy and why it paid off. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 16, 2022
How The Government Tied One Couple to Billions in Stolen Bitcoin
1173
A couple was charged last week with conspiring to launder bitcoins stolen in one of the biggest hacks in crypto history. WSJ's Paul Vigna explains how the feds followed the crypto money trail to the two thirty-something New Yorkers. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 15, 2022
Canada's Trucker Protests
1028
Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau invoked emergency powers to end demonstrations against Covid-19 restrictions and vaccine mandates, a day after police cleared protesters from a bridge between the U.S. and Canada. WSJ's Paul Vieira explains the roots of the trucker-led demonstrations and why they've been going on for so long. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 14, 2022
If Russia Invades Ukraine, Can the U.S. Deliver on Sanctions?
1042
On Friday, a top White House official warned that Russia could invade Ukraine at any time. President Biden has promised tough sanctions if Russia does invade, but Russia's economic ties with Germany could limit the bite of those measures. WSJ's Bojan Pancevski explains Germany's growing reliance on Russian gas and how it could complicate the West's response. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 11, 2022
The Coach Accusing the NFL of Discrimination
992
As the Super Bowl approaches, the National Football League is tackling some big issues off the field. In a lawsuit against the league and three specific teams, former Miami Dolphins head coach Brian Flores alleges racial discrimination in hiring. As WSJ's Andrew Beaton explains, the suit highlights a diversity issue the NFL has been trying to fix for years. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 10, 2022
Frontier, Spirit and the Future of Low-Cost Airlines
1033
This week, Frontier announced its plan to buy Spirit Airlines. If approved, the merger would create the fifth-largest commercial airline in the US. WSJ's Alison Sider looks at the story behind the deal and the man who has worked for years to make it happen. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 09, 2022
A Fight for the Fed's Future
1201
Lawmakers last week questioned President Biden's picks for the Federal Reserve. Biden and the Democrats say the diverse slate of nominees will bring a new perspective to the central bank, but Republicans worry some nominees will politicize the Fed. WSJ's Amara Omeokwe outlines the philosophical debate over the Fed's role in the economy. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 08, 2022
The Business of Dua Lipa
989
Dua Lipa is one of the biggest pop stars of the past two years. WSJ Magazine contributor Alan Light - and Dua Lipa herself - explain how a pivotal decision in 2020 helped fuel her success, and why she's decided to launch a newsletter and a podcast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 07, 2022
The Shock Exit of CNN's President
1222
CNN president Jeff Zucker suddenly resigned on Wednesday after announcing he had failed to disclose his romantic relationship with another senior executive. WSJ's Ben Mullin traces Zucker's long career and impact on CNN, and explores where the network goes from here. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 04, 2022
The Real Cost of 15 Minute Grocery Delivery
1084
A battle among fast grocery delivery companies is raging in New York and other U.S. cities. With millions of dollars of venture capital funding, startups are flocking to get products out to customers in under 20 minutes, but at what cost? WSJ's Eliot Brown breaks down the numbers and explains why this trend could have a short shelf life. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 03, 2022
Why U.S. Sponsors Are Keeping a Low Profile This Olympics
1098
In the leadup to the 2018 Winter Games, U.S. Olympic sponsors unveiled high-profile ad campaigns. But this year, they're keeping mum. WSJ's Stu Woo explains how tensions between the US and China over human rights have put U.S. Olympic sponsors in a bind. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 02, 2022
Is This the End of the SAT?
1133
The pandemic forced many colleges to make standardized entrance exams like the SAT optional. Now, a lot of them are choosing to make the tests optional longer term. WSJ's Douglas Belkin explains the forces motivating them, and an admissions officer in South Carolina describes how the trends affect his school. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 01, 2022
Google's Plan to Change Online Ads Isn't Going Well
1052
Last week, Google announced it is overhauling its plans for targeted online advertising after pushback from privacy advocates. The company's new plan is called Google Topics and aims to give marketers less granular information about web users than under the tech giant's earlier proposal. WSJ's Sam Schechner talks about what the new proposal means for Google, advertisers and regulators around the world. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 31, 2022
Neil Young, Joe Rogan and Spotify's Balancing Act
1293
Earlier this week, rock star Neil Young asked Spotify to remove his music from its streaming service. He said it was in protest of covid misinformation on The Joe Rogan Experience, Spotify's most popular podcast. WSJ's Anne Steele explains how Spotify's big bet on the controversial podcaster complicates the company's plans to dominate the audio space. Spotify owns Gimlet, which coproduces this podcast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 28, 2022
Investors are Buying Up Homes. Cincinnati is Pushing Back
961
Since the 2008 financial crisis, institutional investors have bought up thousands of homes around the country to rent out, crimping the supply of available homes for average buyers. But a new gambit by an economic development agency in Cincinnati aims to put a dent in that dynamic. We speak to its CEO and WSJ's Konrad Putzier about the stakes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 27, 2022
Why Russia Fears Ukrainian National Pride
1147
With Russian troops amassing at Ukraine's border, many Ukrainians say they're willing to take up arms against Russia. WSJ's James Marson visited Kyiv, spoke to some prominent leaders and explains how a new sense of Ukrainian identity is playing into the current tensions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 26, 2022
Peloton's Wild Ride
1118
Fitness company Peloton was once a pandemic favorite with booming sales and a surging stock price. But recently, it's suffered a reversal of fortune. WSJ Heard on the Street columnist Laura Forman explains what happened and why she saw the fall coming. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 25, 2022
The Fight Over the U.S. 5G Rollout
1039
Communications giants AT&T and Verizon have been investing billions of dollars into their 5G networks. But aviation regulators have warned for several years that certain 5G signals may interfere with some equipment on aircraft. WSJ's Drew FitzGerald unpacks how the U.S. government failed to avert a pitched battle over the 5G rollout. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 24, 2022
Is Now the Moment for the Four-Day Workweek?
1077
Earlier this month, Bolt, a startup in Silicon Valley, announced that employees can permanently work a four-day workweek. The company's founder and CEO tells The Journal why, and WSJ's Patrick Thomas explains how the four-day workweek went from an abstract idea to something employers across the country are now offering their staff. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 21, 2022
Grammys CEO on How He's Tackling One Challenge After Another
1008
The Grammys has come under fire in recent years for a lack of diversity among its members and its nominees. We speak with Grammy CEO Harvey Mason Jr. about how he's trying to rebuild trust among artists while at the same time respond to the pandemic's disruption of the awards ceremony. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 20, 2022
Why Microsoft Is Paying $75 Billion for Activision Blizzard
991
On Tuesday, Microsoft announced its biggest acquisition ever: It'll buy the video gaming juggernaut Activision Blizzard for $75 billion. Microsoft's betting the deal will help it build a new way to sell games to consumers, which it calls the "Netflix of games." WSJ's Aaron Tilley explains Microsoft's strategy and the risks it contains. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 19, 2022
Canada's Historic Settlement with Indigenous Peoples
994
Earlier this month, Canada reached a landmark preliminary settlement with members of its indigenous community, capping a 15-year legal battle over child welfare resources. Cindy Blackstock, an advocate who vaulted the case onto the national stage, explains what drove the initial complaint, and WSJ's Kim Mackrael unpacks the importance of the $32 billion settlement, the largest in Canada's history. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 18, 2022
The Stock Trading Scandals at the Federal Reserve
1172
Three top officials have recently retired early from the Federal Reserve amid controversy surrounding personal stock trading activity. WSJ's Nick Timiraos explains what's led to the worst reputational crisis at the Fed in decades. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 14, 2022
Why This Week's Child-Tax-Credit Checks Aren't Coming
1186
Democrats gambled that their expanded child tax credit would be so popular, Congress wouldn't let it lapse. It just lapsed. WSJ's Richard Rubin explains why the monthly checks for parents are ending, and dad Jamie Herrington discusses what it means for his family. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 13, 2022
The Obscure Players Keeping the NBA in Business
1134
More than half of the NBA's players have tested positive for Covid-19 this season as the highly contagious Omicron variant sweeps the country. WSJ's Ben Cohen explains how the NBA has had to tap into its developmental league to keep the games going, and what it means for the players getting their first big break. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 12, 2022
Workers Are Burnt Out. Can Companies Fix It?
1314
Workplace burnout is on the rise, with resignations at an all-time high. WSJ's Ray A. Smith reports that employers are scrambling to find ways to combat it. And we hear from a woman who says professional burnout sent her to the hospital. Plus, the president of Bumble, the dating app, explains why his company gave employees a week off last year. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 11, 2022
Pfizer's CEO on Omicron, a Fourth Shot and 2022
1111
Pfizer has sold and distributed billions of doses of its Covid-19 vaccine, generating an estimated $36 billion in sales last year. CEO Albert Bourla talks to The Journal about Omicron and how Pfizer is approaching the virus as we enter the third year of the pandemic. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 10, 2022
What's Russia Doing in Kazakhstan?
1012
After a steep rise in gas prices, violent protests broke out in the Central Asian nation of Kazakhstan. Dozens have been killed, most of the country's government has resigned and, now, Russian-led forces are entering the country to intervene. WSJ's James Marson traces the roots of these protests. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 07, 2022
Why At-Home Covid-19 Tests Are So Hard to Find
1119
Months after they first came on the market, at-home Covid-19 tests are still scarce in some parts of the country. But it didn't have to be this way. WSJ's Brianna Abbott unpacks the decisions and circumstances that led to the at-home testing shortage. And healthcare CEO Zachariah Reitano explains how he found tests for his customers. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 06, 2022
How College Professors Got Caught Up in U.S.-China Tensions
1218
The Department of Justice has charged about two dozen academic researchers in the U.S. over suspicions they may be secretly helping China. But WSJ's Aruna Viswanatha explains universities see the government's actions as intimidation and an attack on open research. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 05, 2022
Elizabeth Holmes Found Guilty
960
Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes promised investors that her company could revolutionize blood tests. But after 11 wire-fraud charges and 15 weeks of a court trial, yesterday a jury found Holmes guilty on four counts. WSJ's Sara Randazzo, who has been in the courtroom, explains what this means for Holmes and why this trial was a referendum on how Silicon Valley startups raise cash. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 04, 2022
Mariah Carey on the Rise of Her Christmas Anthem
1267
Mariah Carey released "All I Want for Christmas Is You" in 1994 to moderate success. Today, the song is a megahit and Christmas playlist staple. What happened? WSJ's John Jurgensen called up the "Queen of Christmas" to find out. This episode was originally published on December 11, 2020. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 24, 2021
How The 'Apes' Took Over AMC
1583
AMC, the world's largest movie-theater chain, is now over 80% owned by everyday investors. Which means CEO Adam Aron has a new boss: The 'apes.' WSJ's Alexander Gladstone and Erich Schwartzel introduce the online movement that saved AMC. And self-declared 'ape' investor David Dumas explains why he jumped in. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 23, 2021
Purdue's $4.5 Billion Opioid Settlement Got Thrown Out. Now What?
1067
Last week, a federal judge overturned a roughly $4.5 billion settlement between OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma and members of the Sackler family, who own the company. WSJ's Jonathan Randles explains why the ruling was surprising and what it means for people who sued Purdue, like Ryan Hampton. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 22, 2021
The Man in the Middle of the Fight Over Jan. 6
1096
Lawmakers investigating the Jan. 6 attack on the Capitol believe former chief of staff Mark Meadows holds critical knowledge about how the Trump administration responded that day. But Meadows, like several other former Trump allies, refuses to testify. WSJ's Siobhan Hughes explains why lawmakers want to talk to him. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 21, 2021
A Toy Maker Battles the Global Supply Chain
1018
Toymaker John Hansen III needs his products in stock by the holidays. This year, manufacturing delays, port backups, and a trucking shortage made getting goods from China to the U.S. harder than ever. Hansen describes how cascading supply-chain failures delayed an order of chess sets by a year, and explains what the backups mean for his business. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 20, 2021
The Shadow Crisis Unfolding in One Doctor's Clinic
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Dr. Christine Hancock is a primary care doctor in Washington state. Early in the pandemic, Dr. Hancock thought her patients would be hit hard by Covid-19. But she has seen a different crisis play out where isolation and health care delays have led to complications and deaths. WSJ's Anna Wilde Mathews has spoken with Dr. Hancock throughout the pandemic and reflects on the doctor's story. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 17, 2021
Dr. Anthony Fauci on Omicron and the Covid-19 Stalemate
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Dr. Anthony Fauci, America's top infectious disease official, says we are at a stalemate in the war against Covid-19. New coronavirus cases in the United Kingdom just hit a record high as the Omicron variant spreads. And U.S. deaths from the virus have surpassed 800,000, even as vaccines become more widely available. We speak with Dr. Fauci about the war against coronavirus and whether we can ever win it. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 16, 2021
Can 'Immersive' Van Gogh Beat the Real Thing?
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The painter Vincent Van Gogh is having a moment. Right now, multiple companies are battling to sell tickets to dozens of immersive shows of his work, which involve virtual-reality headsets and large-scale projections. WSJ's Kelly Crow tells the story behind this new way of viewing art and why it is creating a challenge for museums. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 15, 2021
The Fed's Shifting Inflation Message
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For months, the Federal Reserve has predicted that inflation was "transitory" - that it would go away on its own. But recently, Fed officials have backed away from that buzzword. WSJ's Nick Timiraos explains what that tiny word choice reveals about the Fed's changing thinking on the future of the U.S. economy. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 14, 2021
Will Omicron Require New Covid Vaccines?
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Since the identification of the Omicron variant, vaccine makers - like Pfizer and Moderna - have been racing to figure out if the existing Covid-19 vaccines are effective against it or whether they should develop new, Omicron-targeted vaccines. WSJ's Denise Roland explains what scientists have to consider. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 13, 2021
Back Stage at a Metaverse Concert
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Pop star Tai Verdes is the latest among a slew of stars performing concerts in the metaverse, a virtual world growing in popularity. Verdes and WSJ's Anne Steele explain why the music industry is diving in. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 10, 2021
New Zealand's Jacinda Ardern on Her Change in Covid Strategy
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New Zealand ended its Covid-19 elimination strategy after an outbreak triggered a months-long lockdown in the country's largest city. Now, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has put in place a phased reopening plan. We talk with Ardern about the economic cost of the country's elimination strategy and what new variants mean for its plans. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 09, 2021
Inside the Trial of Elizabeth Holmes
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Today the defense rested in the trial of Elizabeth Holmes, the former CEO of Theranos. WSJ's Sara Randazzo takes us inside the trial, from the prosecution's arguments to the moment Holmes took the stand herself. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 08, 2021
Elon Musk on Why He Wants More Robots and Less Government
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What does the world's richest person think about the role of government and the future of robots and space travel? Elon Musk, CEO of Tesla and SpaceX, shared his views in a wide-ranging interview with WSJ's Joanna Stern. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 07, 2021
How the Pandemic Helped Fix Retail
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Some in the retail industry thought the pandemic could end in-store shopping as we know it. But brick-and-mortar retailers weren't destroyed, and many managed to emerge from the pandemic stronger. WSJ's Suzanne Kapner explains why. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 06, 2021
The Designer Who Made Streetwear Luxury
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Designer Virgil Abloh became the first Black American to hold a top creative job at a major luxury label. Abloh, who was artistic director of menswear at Louis Vuitton, was able to turn ordinary streetwear like hoodies and sneakers into high fashion, commanding big price tags and drawing celebrity customers. WSJ's Jacob Gallagher unpacks the legacy of Virgil Abloh, who died earlier this week at age 41. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 03, 2021
The Fallout From Turkey's Economic Experiment
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Turkish President Erdogan is pushing ahead with an unusual economic plan for his country that is based on slashing the value of the currency. As the Turkish lira has plunged, inflation has spiked and Turkish citizens have taken to the streets. WSJ's Jared Malsin reports on the situation from Istanbul. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 02, 2021
How Gas Prices Are Weighing on Biden's Climate Agenda
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Gasoline prices are on the rise. To avoid a political backlash, President Biden is pushing to increase the global oil supply in hopes that will eventually help consumers at the pump. But as WSJ's Timothy Puko explains, the move has risks, given Biden's climate agenda. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 01, 2021
The Rise of Binance - And The Effort to Reel It In
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Binance, the world's biggest cryptocurrency trading platform, surged by operating from nowhere in particular - without offices, licenses, or headquarters. Now, WSJ's Caitlin Ostroff explains, global regulators are taking a closer look. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 30, 2021
Why South Africa Sounded the Alarm Over Omicron
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On Friday, the World Health Organization labeled a new variant of the coronavirus, called Omicron, as a variant of concern. WSJ's Gabriele Steinhauser explains how scientists in South Africa noticed it so quickly, and what's known about Omicron so far. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 29, 2021
The Biotech Startup that Became an FBI Target
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We are bringing you the complete story of uBiome. It was a biotech company with promise: charismatic leaders, an exciting product and lots of venture-capital funding. So why did the FBI end up raiding its office? And why is the government calling its leaders fugitives? WSJ's Amy Dockser Marcus tells the story of uBiome's spectacular downfall. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 24, 2021
A Player Goes Missing, and Women's Tennis Takes on China
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A post on tennis player Peng Shuai's social-media account made a startling accusation: that a former top official of the Chinese Communist Party had sexually assaulted her. Then, she disappeared from public view for more than two weeks. WSJ's Joshua Robinson explains how the head of the Women's Tennis Association is speaking out against China and putting the organization's business on the line. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 23, 2021
Why Older Americans Are Fleeing the Workforce
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Compared with pre-pandemic estimates, hundreds of thousands more Americans have retired in the last 18 months. We hear from two recent retirees, and we talk to WSJ's Amara Omeokwe about what the wave of retirement could mean for the economy. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 22, 2021
A Videogame Giant Confronts a Culture Crisis
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Activision Blizzard, one of the world's biggest videogame makers, is facing multiple investigations over sexual harassment and workplace misconduct. WSJ's Kirsten Grind looks at the CEO helming the company, Bobby Kotick, and his knowledge of the allegations. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 19, 2021
How Puff Bar Became the Most Popular Vape for Kids
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Last year, the FDA cracked down on flavored vapes in hopes of combatting a rise in teen vaping. But thanks to a loophole in the FDA's rule, sweet, fruity flavors are still around. WSJ's Jennifer Maloney details how a product called Puff Bar has become the top-selling vape among kids. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 18, 2021
Ford and GM's Battle for the Hottest Electric Vehicle Startup
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Rivian, the Amazon-backed electric vehicle company, went public earlier this month in the biggest IPO since 2014. But before that, Detroit giants General Motors Corp. and Ford Motor Co. fought over partnering with Rivian, earning one of the legacy carmakers a multi-billion dollar payout. WSJ's Mike Colias tells the story of the high-stakes battle. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 17, 2021
Taylor Swift's Push to Change Music Ownership
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In 2019, Taylor Swift announced she would re-record her first six albums after they fell into the hands of talent agent Scooter Braun. Last week she debuted her version of her album Red. It broke streaming records. WSJ's Anne Steele says this decision is not only making Taylor money but also inspiring other artists to do the same -- and that record labels are pushing back. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 16, 2021
The End of the GE Era
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With a reputation as the company whose leaders knew how to run any kind of business, General Electric once made everything from lightbulbs to jet engines. Then, last week, the storied American company announced it was breaking up. WSJ's Thomas Gryta tells the story of how GE's management philosophy fell back down to earth. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 15, 2021
What Went Wrong at uBiome, Part 2
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uBiome raised millions of dollars in venture funding with the promise that insurance companies would pay for its customers' microbiome tests. But that pursuit ultimately led to an FBI raid and a federal indictment alleging a fraud scheme. WSJ's Amy Dockser Marcus tells the story of uBiome's spectacular downfall. Plus, we try to track down uBiome's leaders, Jessica Richman and Zac Apte, who the government says are fugitives. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 12, 2021
The Labor Shortage That's Causing More Labor Shortages
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One reason people can't go back to work is because they can't find childcare, and they can't find childcare because there's a shortage of childcare workers. WSJ's Kris Maher explains why the economics of the industry make it so difficult to raise wages, and the CEO of a childcare program in Philadelphia explains how hard she's tried to hire teachers. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 10, 2021
How Zillow Failed at Flipping Homes
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Zillow started buying and selling homes directly a few years ago, hoping to make money on each transaction. But last week, the company said it was exiting the business and laying off 25% of its staff. WSJ's Will Parker explains why the company failed at home buying, a line of business Zillow once predicted could generate $20 billion a year. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 09, 2021
Teens Are Developing Tics. Doctors Say TikTok May Be A Factor.
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Over the last year, there's been a sharp increase in teen girls seeking medical help for involuntary tics. Kayla Johnsen is one of them. She shares her story, and a neurologist explains why doctors think the social media app TikTok may be behind the medical phenomenon. Plus, WSJ's Julie Jargon traces the origin of the Tourette influencers whose videos may have sparked the surge. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 08, 2021
What Went Wrong at uBiome, Part 1
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uBiome was a biotech company with promise: charismatic leaders, an exciting product and lots of venture-capital funding. So why did the FBI end up raiding its office? And how did its leaders end up labeled as fugitives by the government? WSJ's Amy Dockser Marcus tells us the story. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 05, 2021
The Fight Over Climate Change's Price Tag
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A key part of the 2015 Paris climate accord was a pledge by wealthy countries to provide $100 billion a year to help developing countries fight climate change. WSJ's Matthew Dalton explains how the failure to keep that promise is challenging the COP26 climate summit this week in Glasgow. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 04, 2021
Why the Feds Want to Stop a Major Publishing Merger
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The Department of Justice yesterday sued to block Penguin Random House, the world's largest book publisher, from buying rival Simon & Schuster for more than $2 billion. WSJ's Jeffrey A. Trachtenberg explains how the industry has consolidated in recent years and why the government says it wants to block the deal for the sake of authors. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 03, 2021
Facebook Rebrands to Meta
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Facebook announced last week that it was changing its name to Meta Platforms Inc., a name inspired by a futuristic technology that doesn't fully exist yet: the metaverse. WSJ's Deepa Seetharaman explains what the metaverse is and why Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is betting big on it. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 02, 2021
The Covid Treatment That Comes in a Pill Bottle
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Pharmaceutical giant Merck has developed a drug against Covid, the first treatment that wouldn't require hospitalization. But WSJ's Jared S. Hopkins tells us distributing it equitably around the world will be a challenge. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 01, 2021
Formula One Gets Fuel From Netflix
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After years of struggling to attract new fans, Formula One is suddenly finding tons of them. The reason? A reality TV show on Netflix, called "Drive to Survive." WSJ's Joshua Robinson explains how a show he likens to "The Real Housewives of Monte Carlo" made F1 a model for modern sports marketing. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 29, 2021
Why a Ransomware Group Is Pretending to Be a Real Company
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A major hacking group has been recruiting tech talent by setting up a fake cybersecurity company, according to researchers. WSJ's Robert McMillan details how the ransomware group is recruiting workers and what it says about the state of ransomware attacks. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 28, 2021
The Facebook Files, Part 8: A New Enforcement Strategy
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Facebook has professed a commitment to neutrality and upholding free speech on its platform for years. But internal documents reviewed by the Wall Street Journal show the company is increasingly targeting specific groups it deems dangerous. WSJ's Jeff Horwitz explains how Facebook's actions toward the Patriot Party movement stopped it from going viral. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 27, 2021
The Man Behind the Latest Push to Unionize Amazon
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An Amazon employee group formed by warehouse workers in Staten Island filed Monday to hold a vote on unionization. We speak with Chris Smalls, the president of the group, about why he's trying to establish the first union in the U.S. for Amazon employees. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 26, 2021
Biden's Climate Ambitions Die in the Senate
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Democrats in Congress have been trying to pass a multitrillion-dollar spending bill, which includes a major piece of President Joe Biden's climate agenda. But in the face of opposition from a single senator, the climate provision is dead. WSJ's Siobhan Hughes explains where this leaves the U.S. in its fight against climate change. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 25, 2021
To Solve Labor Shortage, Companies Turn to Automation
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Despite wage growth, the labor force participation rate remains near its lowest level since the 1970s. In the face of this shortage, companies are turning to a possible solution: automation. We talk to the CEO of a hospital system in Nevada that is hoping new technology can help the nursing shortage, and WSJ's Josh Mitchell explains what increased investment in tech will mean for the economy and workers. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 22, 2021
The Chappelle Controversy Tests Netflix
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After Netflix released its latest Dave Chappelle special earlier this month, the company faced strong criticism from the transgender community and its own employees. WSJ's Joe Flint explains how the controversy has challenged Netflix's culture of 'radical candor' and we go on the ground at the Netflix employee walkout. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 21, 2021
Sen. Klobuchar Says Congress Is Losing Patience With Tech Giants
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After a whistleblower shared internal Facebook documents, lawmakers renewed calls to regulate social media companies. But concerns over the influence tech giants exert on society extend far beyond Facebook. We spoke with Sen. Amy Klobuchar about how she hopes to rein in tech companies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 20, 2021
The Facebook Files, Part 7: The AI Challenge
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Facebook's top executives, including CEO Mark Zuckerberg, have touted the company's progress at using artificial intelligence to police harmful content on its platform. But internally, documents show there were deep concerns about what Facebook's AI could do. In the seventh episode of The Facebook Files, WSJ's Deepa Seetharaman discusses what Facebook's AI can really do and ways in which it still falls short. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 19, 2021
Google's CEO on the Future of Work
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As CEO of Alphabet, Google's parent company, Sundar Pichai is responsible for a massive, 144,000-person workforce. Right now, he's grappling with big issues, like how tech should be regulated, how to rein in cybercrime and how (or whether) workers return to the office. WSJ's Editor in Chief, Matt Murray, asks him about these issues and more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 18, 2021
The Vaccine That Took 40 Years to Make
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The World Health Organization last week recommended the first-ever vaccine for wide use against malaria, one of the world's deadliest diseases. Paul Kofi Awuffor, a public health worker in Ghana, shares how the vaccine can change lives, and WSJ's Denise Roland explains this historic landmark in public health. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 15, 2021
The Global Supply Chain Is Broken
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Since the pandemic started last year, the disruptions to the global supply chain have only gotten worse. Delays at America's busiest commercial port, Los Angeles, are wreaking havoc on manufacturing and retail, leading the White House to get involved. WSJ's Sarah Nassauer and Costas Paris explain what the logjam means and how it can be fixed. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 14, 2021
136 Countries Agree to a Global Minimum Tax
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More than 100 countries agreed last week to a 15% global minimum corporate tax. WSJ's Richard Rubin details how the deal came together, and WSJ's Paul Hannon explains why Ireland - which has long had some of the lowest tax rates in Europe - finally got on board. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 13, 2021
How 'Squid Game' Became a Megahit
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"Squid Game" is on track to become Netflix's biggest show ever. WSJ's Timothy Martin explains the show's origins and why Netflix has invested so heavily in Korean content. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 12, 2021
The Unraveling of the Murdaugh Dynasty
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Over Labor Day weekend, an attempted murder was reported to police in Hampton County, S.C. involving the scion of a powerful local family. The victim, Alex Murdaugh, later said he attempted to stage his own murder to try to collect insurance money. WSJ's Valerie Bauerlein looks at this case and other events that threaten to undermine the Murdaugh dynasty. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 08, 2021
The Day Facebook Logged Off
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On Monday, Facebook, Instagram and WhatsApp went offline for billions of people around the world. To fix it, Facebook's employees had to physically drive to data centers to address the problem. WSJ's Robert McMillan explains the cascade of failures that caused it to happen. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 07, 2021
A Huawei Exec, Two Canadians And The Deal That Got Them Home
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In 2018, Canadian authorities arrested Huawei finance chief Meng Wanzhou on behalf of the United States. Days later, the Chinese government arrested two Canadians in retaliation. WSJ's Jacquie McNish has been covering the ordeal and the high stakes detainee exchange that took place in September. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 06, 2021
What Secret Tapes Reveal About the College Admissions Scandal
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College counselor Rick Singer pleaded guilty to helping wealthy parents like Lori Loughlin and Felicity Huffman cheat the college admissions system. In 2018, the federal government began wiretapping his cellphone. WSJ's Melissa Korn and Jennifer Levitz dissect the tapes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 05, 2021
The Facebook Files, Part 6: The Whistleblower
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At the heart of the Facebook Files series is a cache of internal company documents. And behind the release of those documents is a person: Frances Haugen. In Part 6, we sit down for an extended conversation with Frances. She tells us about her time at Facebook, what led her to speak out and what she hopes to achieve by disclosing internal Facebook documents. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 03, 2021
The Federal Law That 138 Judges Have Broken
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For the last year, a team at the Wall Street Journal has been investigating the financial holdings of federal judges across the country. This week, the team reported that more than 130 judges violated U.S. law by overseeing court cases that involved companies in which they or their family had a financial interest. WSJ's James Grimaldi explains the investigation and introduces us to the judge with the most conflicts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 01, 2021
One Restaurant Owner's Answer to the Labor Shortage
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The restaurant industry around the country is having a hard time finding enough workers. So, Amanda Cohen, who runs a restaurant called Dirt Candy in Manhattan, decided to dramatically overhaul her business in order to raise wages. Since then, not only has she been able to retain staff, she's also managed to increase profits. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 30, 2021
The Facebook Files, Part 5: The Push To Attract Younger Users
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In the fifth part of our series looking deep inside Facebook, we examine the company's efforts to win over young children. Reporter Georgia Wells discusses what Facebook's internal documents reveal about the company's years-long efforts to study and design products for kids. And we look ahead to tomorrow's Senate hearing, where lawmakers are expected to question a Facebook executive about the company's research into the effects of its products on teen mental health. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 29, 2021
China's Evergrande Crisis
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Evergrande built homes for China's growing middle class for more than two decades. Now, the property developer is running out of money. WSJ's Quentin Webb explains how years of piling on debt brought Evergrande to a crisis point, and what its potential collapse could mean for China. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 28, 2021
The Long Journey to Del Rio
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Last week, roughly 16,000 migrants showed up in Del Rio, Texas. Most of them were Haitian, but they didn't come directly from Haiti. They've been on a long journey. WSJ's Alicia Caldwell and Juan Montes explain how these Haitians reached Texas and what they're encountering at the border. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 27, 2021
Harry and Meghan, Hollywood Royalty?
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Since Prince Harry and Meghan Markle quit the royal family, the couple have been building a Hollywood production company and signed deals with Netflix and Spotify. WSJ's Erich Schwartzel explains how this royal career shift has been going. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 24, 2021
Xi Jinping Is Rewriting the Rules of China's Economy
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The Chinese government is cracking down on big private corporations and reining in their power. WSJ's Lingling Wei shares her analysis which suggests this recent development is coming from China's President Xi Jinping's personal ideological shift from capitalism towards a Mao-style socialism. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 23, 2021
The Snub That Made France Furious
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Last week, the U.S. announced a new multibillion-dollar deal to supply nuclear submarines to Australia. There was just one problem: Australia had already inked a submarine deal with France. WSJ's Matthew Dalton explains the sub snub and what it means for U.S.-France relations. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 22, 2021
Why 'Buy Now, Pay Later' Is Popping Up Everywhere
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A growing number of retailers are offering customers the ability to buy a product and pay for it later in installments. WSJ's AnnaMaria Andriotis explains why the approach has become so popular and whether it's likely to stick around. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 21, 2021
The Dogfight Over Dogecoin
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Dogecoin began as a joke cryptocurrency in 2013, but this year its price has soared, and now its market cap stands at about $30 billion. WSJ's Caitlin Ostroff says two competing organizations that both call themselves the Dogecoin Foundation are vying for the coin's trademark and its future. Representatives from both groups make their case about who should be dogecoin's steward going forward. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 20, 2021
The Facebook Files, Part 4: The Outrage Algorithm
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In the fourth episode of our investigative series based on an extensive array of internal Facebook documents, we explore the fallout of a major algorithm change the company made in 2018. The documents outline how an emphasis on engagement incentivized the spread of divisive, sensational content and misinformation. WSJ's Keach Hagey and Jeff Horwitz explain how attempts from within the company to undo some of the damage were often thwarted. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 18, 2021
The Facebook Files, Part 3: 'This Shouldn't Happen on Facebook'
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In the third episode of our investigative series based on an extensive array of internal Facebook documents, we look at a persistent problem on the platform: human trafficking. WSJ's Justin Scheck describes documents showing that Facebook has closely studied how human traffickers use the platform to ensnare victims and advertise illegal sex services. The documents also show Facebook's response to these findings, which is often inadequate or nothing at all. We also hear from Patricia Wanja Kimani, a Kenyan woman who was trafficked to Saudi Arabia after responding to a job post on Facebook. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 18, 2021
'Moneyball' Meets Firefighting
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To combat increasingly extreme wildfires, firefighters are taking cues from the world of sports analytics. WSJ's Dan Frosch explains how the "Moneyball" sports data revolution is making its way into firefighting and why increasingly unpredictable fires are putting new computer models to the test. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 17, 2021
Will the Vaccine Mandate Affect the Labor Shortage?
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Jack Schron has been encouraging his employees to get vaccinated. He also worries a vaccine mandate might cause them to quit. The manufacturing company president explains what the Biden administration's vaccine mandate could mean for him, and WSJ's Eric Morath discusses its impact on the labor market. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 16, 2021
How to Stop a $45 Billion Crime Spree
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A brazen kind of shoplifting is plaguing America's retail stores, where people fill up garbage bags with items and simply walk out the door. WSJ's Rebecca Ballhaus explains how organized crime rings orchestrate the shoplifting. And Ben Dugan, the head of CVS' investigative unit, describes what he does to fight crime at his stores. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 15, 2021
The Facebook Files, Part 2: 'We Make Body Image Issues Worse'
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In the second episode in our investigative series, we turn to research that Facebook has kept private: its internal studies on the effects of Instagram, one of its core products, on teen mental health. WSJ's Georgia Wells details the company's findings, which show that Instagram can be harmful for young users, particularly teen girls. Plus, Instagram head Adam Mosseri explains why he thinks there's no "silver bullet" for this problem. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 14, 2021
The Facebook Files, Part 1: The Whitelist
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The Facebook Files, an investigative series from The Wall Street Journal, dives into an extensive array of internal Facebook documents, giving an unparalleled look inside the social media giant. In our first episode, WSJ's Jeff Horwitz explains how high-profile users from celebrities to politicians are shielded from the site's rules and protected from enforcement measures. The company does this in secret, even as CEO Mark Zuckerberg says publicly that all users are treated equally. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 13, 2021
How the Afghan Women's Soccer Team Escaped the Taliban
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As the Taliban took control of Afghanistan, members of the country's women's soccer team - once symbols of a new Afghanistan - knew they needed to escape. WSJ's Drew Hinshaw tells the story of how the team's former captain, Khalida Popal, hatched a daring plan for their evacuation. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 10, 2021
The Dashed Hopes of a Swift Economic Rebound
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Economists, CEOs and many others predicted earlier this summer that the economy would recover around Labor Day. But the Delta variant has changed all of that. WSJ's Eric Morath explains how the highly contagious strain is affecting business and job growth. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 09, 2021
The Business of Forecasting Fashion
1027
The pandemic has disrupted a lot of things - including how people dress. We talk with WGSN fashion forecaster Francesca Muston about how the uncertain times have made predicting fashion trends more difficult and how other forces like climate change may shape fashion choices in the long term. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 08, 2021
Scholastic's Succession Drama
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Scholastic, which is famous for children's books like Harry Potter and Clifford the Big Red Dog, has been controlled by the same family for more than a century. Then, the CEO unexpectedly died in June and his will had a controversial decision on succession. WSJ's Shalini Ramachandran on the drama that unfolded. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 07, 2021
The Man Who Chose to Get Covid
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Jake Hopkins, a university student in the U.K., decided earlier this year to do something most people in the world have been trying to avoid: he volunteered to get Covid-19. Jake signed up for a human challenge trial that intentionally infects participants with the virus. He shares recordings from his experience in the controversial study, and WSJ's Jenny Strasburg explains the researchers' goals. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 03, 2021
The First Country to Adopt Bitcoin
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In June, the president of El Salvador made an announcement that shocked the nation: It would become the first country to adopt bitcoin as a national currency. As "B-day" approaches, WSJ's Santiago Perez headed to El Salvador to hear how Salvadorans are feeling about the change. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 02, 2021
Sexual Assault Allegations Surface at ABC News
1131
A lawsuit filed last week alleges that a former top producer at Good Morning America, Michael Corn, assaulted at least two women at ABC News, and that the company did not take disciplinary action against him. Corn and ABC dispute the claims. WSJ's Joe Flint breaks down the allegations and explains how they come at a pivotal moment for ABC News. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 01, 2021
Why the Biggest SPAC Ever Is Faltering
1028
Famed activist investor William Ackman raised $4 billion for a blank-check company last year, enough to merge with a big, proven start-up. But he still hasn't found a company to buy, and is now suggesting he might return all of his investors' money. WSJ's Cara Lombardo tells us why Ackman is falling short. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 31, 2021
United States v. Elizabeth Holmes
1125
Six years ago, a WSJ investigation raised serious questions about the blood-testing startup Theranos. This week, the company's founder Elizabeth Holmes will go on trial for fraud. WSJ editor Michael Siconolfi remembers what it was like to help break the Theranos story, and legal reporter Sara Randazzo explains what to expect from the much-anticipated trial. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 30, 2021
Taliban Takeover Throws Afghan Economy Into Chaos
974
Since the Taliban took control of Afghanistan, foreign aid has stopped flowing, the business community is fleeing, and banks have limited how much money people can withdraw. WSJ's Yaroslav Trofimov explains why the Afghan economy is in turmoil and what the Taliban might do to restore it. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 27, 2021
How Amtrak's CEO Plans to Spend $66 Billion
1009
Congress is nearing passage of the largest investment in public transit ever. About $66 billion of that money is slated to go to Amtrak, America's passenger rail company. Amtrak's CEO sat down with Ryan to talk about where he intends to spend that money. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 26, 2021
Afghan Women Brace for Taliban Rule
1030
Since the Taliban's takeover of Afghanistan, many women around the country have been living in fear, despite the Taliban's assurances they'll respect women's rights. WSJ's Margherita Stancati talks about the threats women face, and Afghan photographer Fatimah Hossaini explains her decision to flee the country. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 25, 2021
Why OnlyFans Banned Sexual Content
1073
OnlyFans, an adult social-media platform, built a thriving business selling sexually explicit content. So why did it just ban sex? WSJ's Georgia Wells explains the financial backstory to the company's surprising move, and an OnlyFans creator weighs in on what it could mean for her. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 24, 2021
The Growing Market of Not Cutting Down Trees
951
The main way to make money from trees used to be chopping them down and selling them to sawmills. But now, people are getting paid to do the opposite. WSJ's Ryan Dezember explains the economics of the carbon offset market and why it's finally taking root. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 23, 2021
The Fight Over BuzzFeed's Move to Go Public
1038
BuzzFeed has been trying to go public for years. When it finally struck a deal to do so earlier this year, the media company left its biggest shareholder -- NBCUniversal -- facing a huge loss. WSJ's Ben Mullin explains how changes in digital media fortunes brought BuzzFeed to this moment. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 20, 2021
The Investigation Into Tesla's Crashes
911
The nation's top auto safety regulator announced this week that it was investigating Tesla's assisted driving technologies after a series of crashes. WSJ's Rebecca Elliott explains what prompted the probe of Autopilot, as it's called, and what it could mean for the auto industry. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 19, 2021
Why a Texas School District Is Defying the Governor
1014
Schools across the country are reopening just as the Delta variant is causing a surge of Covid-19 cases. But some states, including Texas, have blocked school districts from taking certain safety precautions. We spoke to Dallas superintendent Dr. Michael Hinojosa about how he's navigating Covid-19 and the politics around it. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 18, 2021
Apple Exec Defends iPhone's Latest Update
1185
When Apple announced new iPhone software to combat child pornography, it set off a firestorm over privacy. WSJ's Joanna Stern talked to Apple software chief Craig Federighi about why it sparked controversy and what it actually does. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 17, 2021
Taliban Seize Power in Afghanistan
1215
After almost 20 years of war, the U.S. withdrew its remaining troops from Afghanistan. In a matter of weeks, the Taliban have taken control of the country. WSJ's Sune Rasmussen explains how the Taliban were able to move so quickly and describes the chaos and fear gripping Afghanistan today. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 16, 2021
What's Behind Amazon's Review Problem
1008
On Amazon's massive online marketplace, third-party sellers live and die by customer reviews. WSJ's Nicole Nguyen explains how and why sellers risk getting kicked off Amazon to improve their reviews, and we hear from one customer who found out just how far some companies are willing to go. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 13, 2021
CDC Director Explains the Agency's Reversal on Masks
1142
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has come under fire this summer for reversing its masking recommendations as the Delta variant threatens COVID-19 vaccine efficacy. Now, CDC Director Rochelle Walensky speaks out in an exclusive interview with WSJ reporters Sarah Toy and Sabrina Siddiqui. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 12, 2021
How Lebanon's Economy Imploded
1089
In the span of a year and a half, Lebanon went from a middle-income economy to a country in financial free fall. WSJ's Nazih Osseiran explains the cycle of monetary policy, inflation, and government mismanagement that set off one of the worst economic collapses in 150 years. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 11, 2021
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo Resigns
1135
New York Governor Andrew Cuomo resigned today, following the release of a report that alleged he sexually harassed several women. Cuomo will depart office in 14 days and Lieutenant Governor Kathy Hochul will take his place for the remainder of his term. WSJ's James Fanelli details the allegations against Cuomo and describes the woman who will be replacing him. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 10, 2021
The Clash Between Facebook and Independent Researchers
1009
Last week, Facebook suspended the personal accounts of an NYU Ph.D. candidate and some members of her research team. They were studying how well the social media platform was identifying political ads. WSJ's Jeff Horwitz explains what the dispute means for the broader community of outside researchers. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 09, 2021
How Kidnapping Became Big Business in Nigeria
1483
In 2014, the terrorist group Boko Haram kidnapped 276 schoolgirls in Nigeria. It gave rise to a viral Twitter movement #BringBackOurGirls and would eventually inspire hundreds of similar kidnappings in the years that followed. The WSJ's Drew Hinshaw and Joe Parkinson explain how criminal groups are building a kidnapping for ransom industry in Nigeria. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 06, 2021
Anthony Fauci: Delta Variant Has 'Exposed Our Vulnerability'
1313
At a critical moment in the fight against the Covid-19 pandemic, leading White House infectious disease specialist Dr. Anthony Fauci sat down to talk with The Journal about the increased risks of the Delta variant, whether children should go back to school and how to bring the vaccine-hesitant on board. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 05, 2021
Why Scarlett Johansson Is Suing Disney Over 'Black Widow'
1176
Disney released the latest Marvel movie, "Black Widow," in theaters and on its streaming service, Disney+. The movie's star, Scarlett Johansson, sued Disney, alleging the decision cost her millions. WSJ's Joe Flint explains how the showdown could affect the industry. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 04, 2021
The Tricky Calculus Behind Vaccine Mandates
1095
As the Delta variant spreads, more companies are requiring their employees to get vaccinated. WSJ's Chip Cutter discusses the legal precedents behind these policies, and an HR executive explains how her company handled the issue. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 03, 2021
Used Car Prices Are Defying Gravity
894
Used cars are more expensive now than they've ever been, and car dealerships are having to go to great lengths to find inventory. WSJ's Nora Naughton explains the shortages that are driving up prices and what it means for dealers and consumers. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 02, 2021
Biden's New FTC Chair Squares Off With Big Tech
961
Even before her appointment, Federal Trade Commission Chair Lina Khan had made a name for herself by criticizing Amazon's market dominance. Her stance has already provoked backlash from the tech industry and congressional Republicans. WSJ's Ryan Tracy explains. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 30, 2021
Simone Biles and the Power of Saying No
1126
Earlier this week, star gymnast Simone Biles pulled out of two Olympic competitions after she experienced a dangerous case of the "twisties." WSJ's Louise Radnofsky explains how one of the Olympics's biggest stars is helping change attitudes towards mental health and physical safety. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 29, 2021
Robinhood's Unconventional IPO
952
Robinhood built its business around the idea of making it easier than ever for everyday people to invest. Now the company's betting it can "democratize" initial public offerings, too - including its own. WSJ's Peter Rudegeair explains the thinking behind Robinhood's unconventional IPO this week. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 28, 2021
The Fed Chair Helped Save the Economy. Will He Keep His Job?
1057
Jerome Powell has led the U.S. economy through its pandemic-induced crash and turbulent recovery. But with his first term ending soon, WSJ's Nick Timiraos says some in Washington are questioning whether Powell should be reappointed. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 27, 2021
Unrest, Covid and Economic Despair in South Africa
949
Covid has taken a toll on South Africa. Successive lockdowns have led to deep economic suffering across the country. And when political protests broke out recently, the economic hardship took a violent turn leading to riots and looting. WSJ's Gabriele Steinhauser explains how South Africa could be a warning to other countries. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 26, 2021
Simone Biles Is USA Gymnastics' Biggest Star - And Critic
1073
Superstar gymnast Simone Biles could become the first woman since 1968 to repeat as the gold medalist in the individual all-around competition. But WSJ's Louise Radnofsky says that, for Biles, continuing to compete at the sport's highest level is also about keeping a spotlight on the crimes committed by former team doctor Larry Nassar. As the last self-identified survivor on the team, Biles is still pushing for more answers from USA Gymnastics. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 23, 2021
An Ad Executive's New Challenge: Selling the Vaccine
1139
Last year, PJ Pereira got a big assignment: to help market new Covid-19 vaccines to the public. Pereira explains what he learned trying to convince vaccine-hesitant Americans to get the shot. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 22, 2021
Wall Street CEOs Say Working From Home Isn't Working
930
Major banks performed well while employees worked remotely. But executives at some banks are bringing their workers back to the office full time. WSJ's David Benoit explains what it could mean for the industry and the rest of corporate America. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 21, 2021
Who's in Charge of Fixing Miami's Aging Condos?
1260
Many of Miami's condo buildings are vulnerable to the same kind of structural issues as Champlain Towers South, which collapsed last month. WSJ's Laura Kusisto explains why it's often untrained volunteer condo boards that are in charge of repairs. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 20, 2021
Bezos' Blue Origin Takes Off
1028
Blue Origin is set to launch founder Jeff Bezos into space tomorrow, about a week after Virgin Galactic sent its own founder to the stars. WSJ's Micah Maidenberg explains how Blue Origin stacks up in the commercial space race. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 19, 2021
The Man Behind Biden's Push for More Competition
1250
Legal scholar Tim Wu has spent years pushing for greater regulation of big American companies. To get his ideas into the mainstream, Wu has done everything from run for office to ride on a roller coaster with Stephen Colbert. WSJ's Ryan Tracy details how Wu's ideas made their way into President Biden's executive order to increase business competition. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 16, 2021
Is Graduate School Worth the Price?
1202
New federal data show that many graduate students don't make nearly enough money to pay back their student loans. WSJ's Melissa Korn explains why some graduates of elite schools, like Columbia University, seem to have the worst outcomes. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 15, 2021
Cuba's Protests Have an Anthem
1185
For the first time in 60 years, mass demonstrations are sweeping Cuba. Protesters are chanting one slogan: 'patria y vida,' or, 'homeland and life.' The phrase - a counterpoint to the revolutionary slogan 'homeland or death' - comes from a song written by Cuban dissidents. WSJ's Santiago Perez dives into the origins of the artist dissident movement and the song that defines this moment. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 14, 2021
Didi's IPO Gets Caught In China's Tech Crackdown
1061
After Didi launched a successful IPO in New York last month, Beijing took punitive action against the ride hailing giant. It also established new rules for Chinese companies that want to list overseas. WSJ's Patrick Barta explains what that means for future economic cooperation between the U.S. and China. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 13, 2021
When an Online Conspiracy Theory Turns Deadly
1674
Christopher Hallett built a business providing online legal advice in custody cases. His main offering was built on a conspiracy theory. But this conspiracy theory ended in murder. WSJ's Georgia Wells and Justin Scheck tell the tale. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 12, 2021
The Quest to Find a Lost Purple Heart
1456
A Marine died in Fallujah at the height of the Iraq War. Years later, his family found out his Purple Heart was listed on an auction site. WSJ's Ben Kesling, who once served in the same company as the Marine, tells the story of how he helped track it down. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 02, 2021
Hollywood's Fast and Furious Reopening
1268
F9, the latest Fast and Furious movie, is a major test of the movie industry's ability to rebound after the pandemic. WSJ's Erich Schwartzel explains how the franchise grew so large, and why it became so important to Hollywood. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 01, 2021
The Mixed Signals from the Collapsed Condo's Past
1089
Last week's building collapse near Miami was an event without modern precedent. Its cause remains a mystery. But building records, eyewitness accounts, and expert assessments are offering possible clues. WSJ's Jon Kamp details the potential warning signs from the history of Champlain Towers South. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 30, 2021
Environmental Investing Frenzy Stretches Meaning of 'Green'
1059
Investors are pouring money into "green" companies, but what actually makes a company green? WSJ's Justin Scheck tells the story of The Metals Company, a deep sea mining startup that's set to go public at $2.9 billion. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 29, 2021
Oath Keepers and the Business of Extremism
1260
The Oath Keepers, a right-wing militia group, had a large presence at the Jan. 6 riot at the U.S. Capitol. Now, a WSJ investigation has revealed the group's funding sources and financial struggles. WSJ's Rebecca Ballhaus explains. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 28, 2021
The Company That Said: We Failed
1225
At an antitrust trial, executives from tobacco giant Altria have been speaking in unusually frank terms about the company's closed e-cigarette business. They've testified that the company failed to innovate. WSJ's Jennifer Maloney explains why Altria is making this unusual defense. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 25, 2021
Britney Spears Wants Her Life (And Money) Back
1093
For the past 13 years, pop star Britney Spears has lived under a legal arrangement that's given her father control over her finances and her life. Yesterday, Spears spoke out publicly against the conservatorship for the first time. WSJ's Neil Shah details Spears's fight to break free. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 24, 2021
Travel Is Back. So Why Is American Airlines Canceling Flights?
1135
As the country resumes flying in droves, the air travel industry is struggling to keep up. American Airlines cancelled hundreds of flights in recent days due to labor shortages. WSJ's Alison Sider explains why carriers are cancelling flights and calling back retired staff. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 23, 2021
iPhones, iPads, and iClinics? Apple's Foray Into Healthcare
1222
Apple has been trying for years to reinvent the healthcare system. In 2016, the company started operating its own health clinics for employees as a testing ground. But, WSJ's Rolfe Winkler explains, Apple's had a hard time accomplishing its ambitions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 22, 2021
Why Is Everyone Quitting?
1080
Americans are quitting their jobs at record rates. But why? WSJ's Lauren Weber dives into the reasons that Americans have decided to walk away from their careers during a pandemic and breaks down what it means for the economy. Plus, two quitters open up about their decision. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 21, 2021
To The Moon, Part 5: The Comedown
2143
Stocks, it turns out, don't only go up. On the final episode of To The Moon, we follow the GameStop rocket ship as it returns to Earth, and we learn how the traders who poured their money into the stock fared-and why they don't want to quit trading. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 20, 2021
Congress's Case to Break Up Amazon
1899
Last week, Congress introduced legislation that, if passed, could force Amazon to break up. The bills come after a 15-month investigation into whether big tech has monopoly power in the economy. WSJ's Dana Mattioli speaks to Representatives David Cicilline (D., RI) and Ken Buck (R., Col.) about the investigation and why they believe these laws should be passed. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 17, 2021
The Firm Tanking Some of Wall Street's Hottest Stocks
977
Hindenburg Research is a small investment firm that is having a big impact. Its critical reports about some of the hottest startups have pushed stock prices lower, allowing the firm to profit. WSJ's Amrith Ramkumar talks about the firm, its strategy and what happened to Lordstown Motors. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 16, 2021
The Ruthless Group Behind Ransomware Attacks on Hospitals
1031
A Wall Street Journal investigation has found that one hacking group - called Ryuk - is behind hundreds of attacks on U.S. health care facilities. WSJ's Kevin Poulsen details the rise of Ryuk, and one hospital administrator shares what it's like to be a victim of one of their attacks. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 15, 2021
The Fundamental Flaw (and Alleged Deception) of MoviePass
1158
In 2019, MoviePass declared bankruptcy. The company had offered unlimited movie tickets to customers for a low monthly fee but never found a successful business model. Last week, the Federal Trade Commission alleged that MoviePass executives deceived customers to try to save the business. WSJ's Ben Fritz unspools one of the most audacious stories in Hollywood. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 14, 2021
To The Moon, Part 4: Diamond Hands
1764
Individual investors banded together online to send GameStop soaring in January. Many of those investors were inspired by one man, Keith Gill, aka DeepF-ingValue, aka Roaring Kitty. On episode four of To The Moon, we hear how WSJ reporter Julia Verlaine tracked down Gill, and we trace how his arguments inspired legions of GameStop investors to buy... and hold. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 13, 2021
A New Alzheimer's Drug Brings Hope and Controversy
1376
The FDA this week approved the first new Alzheimer's treatment in nearly 20 years. But it almost didn't make it to market. WSJ's Joseph Walker untangles the complex story behind the drug Aduhelm and why its approval is raising questions. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 11, 2021
The New Corporate Diversity Strategy: Tie it to Executive Pay
939
Companies are using a new approach to push their executives to prioritize diversity: Tying it to their pay. WSJ's Emily Glazer explains how this tactic came about, and former executive Steven Davis talks about the role boards can play in improving diversity. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 10, 2021
Can Food Delivery Make Money?
1072
Despite a surge in business during the pandemic, food delivery companies like Uber, DoorDash and Grubhub still aren't profitable. WSJ's Preetika Rana explains how these companies are pivoting away from delivering food to make money. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 09, 2021
Why Crypto Is Key to Stopping Ransomware
988
Ransomware attacks have been hitting U.S. companies hard. But yesterday, law enforcement officials made a big announcement: they recovered more than $2 million from the group behind last month's Colonial Pipeline hack. WSJ's David Uberti details how the U.S. government is fighting back against hackers and explains why going after cryptocurrency is a key part of the strategy. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 08, 2021
The Unintended Consequences of China's One-Child Policy
1031
In 1980, China implemented its one-child policy to curb a swiftly growing population. After raising the cap to two in 2015, last week it was increased to three. WSJ's Jonathan Cheng on the purpose of the original policy and why the government is trying to reverse it now. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 07, 2021
To The Moon, Part 3: A People's History of Investing
1682
Decades ago, trading was the domain of the wealthy elite, but two innovators would change that. The first made investing accessible to the masses. The second made it fun. On episode three of To The Moon, we meet the disruptors who made the markets ready for the GameStop moment. You can find episodes 1 and 2 of this series in The Journal feed, published last Sunday. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 06, 2021
Why Suing Amazon Just Got Easier
1065
Companies have been including arbitration agreements in their terms of service for years, preventing customers from filing lawsuits. Recently, Amazon removed the arbitration clause from its terms of service and told customers they can sue the company instead. WSJ's Sara Randazzo explains what led the company to make the change. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 04, 2021
Will Americans Buy an Electric Truck?
1008
For years, the best-selling vehicle in the U.S. has been Ford's F-150 pickup truck. Now, Ford's making an electric version. WSJ's Mike Colias and Dan Neil explain why Ford's making the move and why it's a big test for the future of electric vehicles. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 03, 2021
Why a Grand Plan to Vaccinate the World Unraveled
1090
Early last year, a few vaccine experts created a group that would help make sure all countries had access to covid vaccines. Called Covax, this initiative hit problem after problem. WSJ's Gabriele Steinhauser explains how this ambitious plan came undone. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 02, 2021
Amazon Bags the MGM Lion
1035
Amazon announced last week it is buying the Hollywood movie studio MGM for $8.4 billion, including debt. WSJ's Erich Schwartzel explains how Amazon hopes the studio will help it compete in the intensifying streaming wars. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 01, 2021
To The Moon, Part 2: 'The Birth of the Yolo'
1790
A man in a wolf mask. A wild gamble. A fortune passed on from a deceased uncle. Years before the world learned about WallStreetBets, WallStreetBets learned about the YOLO. On episode two of To The Moon, we meet the guy who started it all. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 30, 2021
To The Moon, Part 1: 'How Much Do Islands Cost?'
1722
When GameStop's stock surged this winter, Wall Street was shocked to learn that a bunch of amateur investors had all piled in. Who were these people and where had they come from? On episode one of To The Moon, we meet the force that shook Wall Street and hear what it's like to suddenly see $800,000 in your account. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 30, 2021
Conspiracy Theory or Science? The Lab Leak Theory is Back
1077
The origins of Covid-19 are still unknown, but the possibility that it could have escaped from a Chinese lab is back in the news. WSJ's Betsy McKay explains why this idea is getting renewed attention. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 28, 2021
How Internet Buzz Drove a SPAC Even Higher
1113
Early this year, a storm of intrigue brewed online around the electric vehicle company Lucid Motors and its potential merger with a SPAC. WSJ's Eliot Brown explains how the buzz helped drive the valuation sky high and ultimately left some investors burned. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 27, 2021
Biden's Plan for Police Reform: The Consent Decree
1183
A year after the murder of George Floyd, the Justice Department is stepping up its oversight of local police departments. Last month, the DOJ opened investigations into police conduct in Minneapolis and Louisville. WSJ's Sadie Gurman talks to Associate Attorney General Vanita Gupta about why the federal government is doing this, and the head of Newark, N.J. police talks about what it's like when the federal government steps in. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 26, 2021
An Activist Investor and the Showdown Over Exxon's Future
1109
An activist investor is trying to take over four seats on Exxon's board of directors, arguing the company should cut its emissions by 2050. But Exxon is pushing back. WSJ's Christopher M. Matthews previews the shareholder meeting showdown, where the fight will be decided. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 25, 2021
Inflation Is Happening. Should You Be Worried?
1174
Inflation is the highest it's been in over a decade. WSJ's Jon Hilsenrath explains why the Federal Reserve says everything is under control while some other economists fret. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 24, 2021
Introducing: To The Moon
112
In January, a group of Redditors started pouring their savings into the stock of GameStop, a struggling video game retailer. Overnight, everything Wall Street thought it understood about how small-time traders invest changed. While the moment may have surprised Wall Street, it was years in the making. This is a trailer for our series, To The Moon. Out May 30th. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 24, 2021
Four Years Trapped on a Cargo Ship
1530
Sailor Mohammad Aisha was stuck on a cargo ship near the mouth of the Suez Canal for four years - alone for much of that time. WSJ's Joe Parkinson tells the story of how this could happen and how he survived. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 21, 2021
Hertz Rewards Its True Believers
1134
A strange thing happened last year after the rental car company Hertz filed for bankruptcy: its stock took off. Old hands on Wall Street thought that the people buying the stock - individual investors with no ties to institutions - were making a bad bet. But now, WSJ's Alexander Gladstone says, the little guys are getting the last laugh and seeing a big windfall. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 20, 2021
What's Wrong With the Car Market?
994
Car sales have been skyrocketing, but dealers have a big worry: they're running low on cars to sell. The problem isn't expected to be resolved anytime soon. WSJ's Mike Colias explains how a tiny computer chip at the end of the auto industry's long and complex supply chain is causing big problems. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 19, 2021
AT&T Abandons Its Hollywood Dreams
1045
When AT&T bought Time Warner and DirecTV, it set out to build a media empire that could take on companies like Netflix and Disney. But after three years and a $100 billion price tag, AT&T is giving up on that dream. WSJ's Marcelo Prince says without media assets, AT&T is back to being the utility it once was. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 18, 2021
No Credit Score, No Problem?
973
Banks could begin issuing credit cards to people without credit scores thanks to an effort by a banking regulator to make lending more racially equitable. WSJ's AnnaMaria Andriotis tells the story of how Black Lives Matter protests sparked the effort and explains how the lending would work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 17, 2021
Instagram for Kids Isn't Getting Many Likes
1041
Facebook has proposed making a version of Instagram for children under 13, and the idea has prompted an outcry from lawmakers and regulators on both sides of the aisle. WSJ's Brad Reagan on Facebook's plan and New Jersey's Attorney General on why he is against it. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 14, 2021
Ransomware, a Pipeline and a Gas Shortage
1032
Colonial Pipeline supplies fuel to more than a dozen states. Last Friday, a ransomware attack forced its shutdown, causing a massive shortage of gasoline. WSJ's Robert McMillan says the group behind the attack, Darkside, and others like it represent a broader threat to corporate America and the country's infrastructure. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 13, 2021
The NFT Craze Explained
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NFTs, or non-fungible tokens, have made a multi-billion dollar market out of digital items like pixelated cats, basketball highlight videos and even tweets. WSJ's Caitlin Ostroff explains the history of the technology and why NFTs could move beyond digital collectibles into the physical world. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 12, 2021
WeWork's CEO on the Future of Work
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WeWork CEO Sandeep Mathrani took charge of the office space company just as the pandemic hit. He's now on the brink of bringing WeWork public. We speak to Mathrani about his time at WeWork, his relationship with cofounder Adam Neumann, and the future of office work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 11, 2021
The Covid Vaccine Patent Problem
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The U.S. government reversed course last week and said it would support waiving patent protections for Covid-19 vaccines, over the objections of the pharmaceutical industry. WSJ's Yuka Hayashi explains how we got to this point. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 10, 2021
When Elon Musk Moves In Next Door
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Elon Musk's SpaceX has been building out its operations in Boca Chica, Texas and pressuring residents to sell their homes. WSJ's Nancy Keates explains why some residents are pushing back, and a homeowner explains the challenges of living next to a launchpad. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 07, 2021
Chevron and the Amazon: A 28-year Legal Battle
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Oil giant Chevron has been locked in a decades-long legal battle with people living in the Ecuadorian Amazon, who claim they were harmed by oil drilling. After a $9.5 billion judgment in Ecuador in 2011, the company has fought back hard. WSJ's Sara Randazzo tells the story, and the plaintiff's lawyer, Steven Donziger, speaks about the case while under house arrest. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 06, 2021
'It's on Fire': Why the Housing Market Is Booming
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Housing prices around the country have been skyrocketing. WSJ's Nicole Friedman explains what makes the hot market so unusual. And a real estate agent and a prospective buyer from Boise, Idaho, share how the boom is changing their city. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 05, 2021
India's Social Media Crackdown
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As Covid-19 cases were spiking in India, the government said it had removed dozens of social media posts relating to the outbreak. WSJ's Newley Purnell traces the ongoing conflict between the government and global tech giants over freedom of speech in the world's largest democracy. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 04, 2021
Three Women of Color on Their Pandemic Finances
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Black and Latina women have been disproportionally affected by job losses during the pandemic. They're also one of the most financially fragile groups in this country. We talk with three women of color about what getting laid off in the pandemic has meant for them. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 03, 2021
The 'Jeopardy!' Showrunner on the Search for a New Host
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After longtime "Jeopardy!" host Alex Trebek died last November, the show has been running a public search for a replacement, with guest hosts like Aaron Rodgers and LeVar Burton. We talk with the show's executive producer, Mike Richards, about how the search is going. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 30, 2021
The Strange Economics of the Lumber Market
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There's a disconnect in the lumber market. The price of lumber is the highest it's ever been, but the price of the timber - the raw material - is at record lows. WSJ's Ryan Dezember on the paradox of the lumber market and tree farmer Joe Hopkins on how he's getting through this strange moment. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 29, 2021
Inside the World's Worst Covid Outbreak Yet
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WSJ's Shan Li covered the pandemic's start in Wuhan, China. Now, she is in the midst of the world's worst outbreak yet, in India. Shan told us about what it's like on the ground as numbers rise dramatically and resources are in short supply. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 28, 2021
Energy Secretary Granholm on the Future of Oil
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The Biden administration has made big promises to fight climate change. U.S. Secretary of Energy Jennifer Granholm discusses the push for clean energy and what it means for the U.S. oil and gas industry. Plus, WSJ's Russell Gold explores what's next for oil companies. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 27, 2021