Who ARTed: Weekly Art History for All Ages

By Kyle Wood

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Description

Art is for everyone and Who ARTed makes art history accessible for anyone who enjoys exploring visual arts in an audio medium. We mix a bit of humor with adequate research to tell the story behind the works and surprising facts that make the visual arts more interesting and relatable for everyone. With a strengths-based approach to art analysis, the goal of every episode is to find the good. Art is the product of human creativity. The capacity to think symbolically and express ourselves creatively is what makes humans special. It is how and why we got out of the trees. Art is a form of visual communication that helps us relate to others, understand our past, our present and envision a better future. Who ARTed is dedicated to equity celebrating the achievements of artists of all cultures. We appreciate artistry in all of its forms. From Leonardo da Vinci to Lego designers, Who ARTed is here to help you recognize the genius in all art forms one piece at a time. Hosted by Kyle Wood, a visual artist and art teacher, Who ARTed brings you weekly art history for all ages. Whether you are cramming for your art history exam, trying to learn a few facts so you can sound smart at fashionable dinner parties, or just looking to hear something with a more positive tone, we’ve got you covered.

Episode Date
Louis Daguerre | The World's First Photobomb (Encore)
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The history of photography has some really interesting and surprising facts. For example, the camera is about 2000 years older than photography. The earliest known camera obscuras were documented as far back as the 4th century BCE in China, while photography didn‘t really come about until the 18th Century. In the early 19th century, Louis Daguerre was working hard to improve the photographic method. His innovations helping to develop a latent image drastically cut down on exposure times making photography much more practical. Of course while I say it drastically cut down exposure times, it cut the times down from hours to minutes, but it was still too long to be practical for most people to be captured in a photo. The first photograph of people actually happened by accident as one man‘s decision to get his shoes shined in 1838 led to his likeness being captured in an image that would make history. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Make a Donation As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 12, 2022
Jim Davis | Garfield
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This is an encore presentation of my episode about Jim Davis, the creator of Garfield. My guest for this episode was Lindsey Little, creator of the Oni Girl comic. Here is her link tree for all the places to find her and her work https://linktr.ee/OniGirl Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Make a Donation As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 08, 2022
Jean-Honore Fragonard | The Swing
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The Swing, also sometimes called The Happy Accidents of The Swing, is a Rococo painting by Jean-Honore Fragonard. It is intended to be light-hearted and fun as it depicts people in a care free moment on a swing in the garden. Interestingly, while today's audiences would likely see riding on a swing as a wholesome activity, centuries ago it was considered to be a bit of a risque activity as clothing would move in the breeze giving glimpses of a lady's ankle. In fact, this painting was commissioned by an aristocrat who wanted a painting of himself looking up his mistress's skirt. For those listeners in high school, The Swing is on the AP Art History required artworks list. You can find more episodes covering those works on my Spotify playlist called AP Art History Cram Session. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Make a Donation As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 05, 2022
Matt Groening | Homer Simpson (encore)
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This is an encore presentation. I wanted to start 2021 with something fun, so I decided to do an episode about a classic episode of The Simpsons. In season 10 episode 19 titled Mom and Pop Art, Homer becomes an outsider artist. While much of the humor is derived from the premise that Homer Simpson is inept and could never be a decent artist, but I thought it would be fun to consider what kind of an artist Homer really is. His first sculpture was created accidentally from a failed attempt to build a backyard barbecue pit. After tastemakers declared the failed grill to be an artistic triumph, Homer leans in to his new career as an artist. Of course after the initial success that came so easily, Homer discovers that maintaining an art career is difficult as he presents a series of works that are considered too derivative of his earlier work as they all had the same feel behind them. This actually is one of the least true criticisms I observed in the satirical look at the art world. While in the Simpson‘s world art critics are fickle and looking to be constantly shocked, in reality one of the most sure paths to success is for an artist to develop a signature style so their work is easily identified to patrons. Consistency is crucial to an artist‘s marketability. Still Homer‘s falling out of favor led to a rare bit of introspection and growth for the character. Marge guides him through the museum and Homer applies his learning to creating one final masterpiece - The Grand Canals of Springfield. If you set aside the reckless destruction of property and the fact that such an act would have wreaked havoc endangering thousands of people and animals, it was actually a fairly interesting work. Ultimately, I consider Homer to be most interesting as a work of art rather than as an artist, but through any lens I find him delightful and thought provoking. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Make a Donation As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Aug 01, 2022
What's up with ROY G BIV? (encore)
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This is an encore presentation of my very first Fun Fact Friday mini episode. This week's Fun Fact is that the ROY G BIV model of a rainbow is somewhat arbitrary. The only reason people slip indigo between blue and violet is because Sir Isaac Newton wanted to have seven colors in order to match the musical scale. If you are interested in learning more about color or the other elements of art, check out my other show, Art Smart which is available on all the major podcast apps. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Make a Donation As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 29, 2022
Introducing Art Smart | Modern Art
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Art Smart season 2 began last week with an episode on Modern Art. If you like this episode, search for Art Smart on your podcast app and hear the next episode on Post Modern Art. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 27, 2022
Vincent van Gogh (part 2) | Starry Night
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This is an encore presentation of my episode on Vincent van Gogh and his painting, Starry Night. In this episode, I continued my discussion with Chuck Hoff about Vincent van Gogh. We covered the later part of his life and career after he moved to France. The painting we specifically focused our attention on was The Starry Night from 1889. During the episode, we also briefly discussed The Night Cafe and Starry Night Over the Rhone. Please remember to check out my other podcast, Art Smart on your favorite podcast app. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Make a Donation As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 25, 2022
The Nazca Lines
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This is an encore presentation of my episode covering a lesser known bit of art history - the Nazca Lines. In the Peru there are massive geoglyphs etched in the ground with the full design only visible from the sky leaving people to wonder how they were created around 500 CE and for whom to enjoy. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Buy me a coffee As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 22, 2022
Vincent van Gogh (part 1) | The Potato Eaters
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This is a two part episode about Vincent Van Gogh.Part 1 focuses on his early life and development up to his first masterpiece,The Potato Eaters from 1885. Next week we will discuss the mature phase of his career and how his style shifted upon moving to France. Remember this week I am also starting season 2 of Art Smart with new episodes coming every Wednesday. Please be sure to follow Art Smart on your favorite podcast app and leave a rating or review to help others discover the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 18, 2022
Edvard Munch - The Scream
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The Scream by Edvard Munch is one of the most famous artworks out there, and one of the most widely referenced. We see it in pop culture on t-shirts and posters, in the Simpsons and other cartoon parodies and one of the most famous scenes in the movie Home Alone saw Kevin mimic the pose of The Scream as he put on after shave. Of course, while we think we know the work, there is a lot people get wrong. For example, the painting isn't about a person screaming. Munch was painting his feeling of anxiety being overwhelmed as he heard the scream of nature all around him. Also, some say the figure in the painting was based on a Peruvian mummy that was on display around that time. For my second segment, we got a little-known fact about mummies from Andrew and Kate, the hosts of Let's Talk Petty. They have a few more episodes to go in their first season, and if you aren't familiar, check them out. I got hooked on the show when I came across their episode on the petty rivalry between Stuart Semple and Anish Kapoor. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Make a Donation As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 15, 2022
Introducing: Art Smart
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This is a bonus episode of my other show, Art Smart. Season 2 is coming July 20 with new episodes every Wednesday. In this bonus episode, I discussed the steps to make sense of any work of art. For season 2 of Art Smart, I will be making art history quick and easy. Each episode will focus on a different time period or movement in art covering the big ideas in broad strokes, then sharing a few artists and works to look at for a better understanding. Please follow Art Smart on your favorite podcast app and leave a rating or review to help others find the show. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Make a Donation As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 13, 2022
Njideka Akunyili Crosby (encore)
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For this episode, I talked to Janet Taylor, art teacher and writer for the Art of Education. She actually taught be about Njideka Akunyili Crosby, the contemporary Nigerian/American painter. Njiedeka Akunyili Crosby was born in 1983 in Enugu, Nigeria. Her father was a surgeon and mother was a professor of pharmacology. Her mother won the green card lottery allowing Njideka to come to the U.S. to study when she was 16. She spent a year studying and prepping for the SATs then went back to Nigeria to perform a year of service. After completing the year of service, she came back to the U.S. She took her first painting classes at a community college in Philadelphia then went on to Swarthmore. She was initially pre-med before deciding to pursue art. After Swarthmore, she went to the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art, then went on to get her MFA from Yale. A lot of her work focuses on straddling different worlds and her connections to Nigeria and the U.S. She uses painting with some collage methods like integration of fabric but particularly transfers. These methods not only integrate patterns and textures but also enrich the work through the connections to pop culture and other icons embedded as details to be discovered within her work. In 2017, she got the MacArthur genius grant which pretty much says it all right there. Her CV could make even the most accomplished among us question their adequacy. For this episode we looked at Predecessors from 2013. As always you can see the piece linked here in the show notes, or visit www.WhoArtEdPodcast.com to see this week‘s work as well as previous pieces and free resources for art teachers. If you enjoy the show, please help spread the word. Like, Subscribe and leave a review on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 11, 2022
Forgers Forging Forgeries
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The Guangzhou Academy of Fine Arts in southern China had over 140 works stolen from their collection, but nobody noticed for years. This is because the thief replaced every item he stole… with his own paintings. Now some guy working in a museum quietly helping himself to the collection of artworks then replacing them with his own copies seems pretty strange and bold, but this next bit brings the story to next-level bananas territory. According to Xiao theft and forgery were rampant. He said he noticed that people were stealing his forgeries and replacing them with their forgeries. It kinda makes you wonder if he was getting the originals or if he was forging a copy of a forgery. I mean he did steal and copy work by Zang Daqian, a landscape and still-life painter who was also considered to be a master forger himself. Xiao plead guilty in court, but warned that the lax security was causing big problems for the university’s collection. He said that he noticed fakes in there from his first day on the job and obviously quite a few more of them popping up throughout his time there.  My Fan Fact this week came from my friend over at The Big Balance podcast. You can find The Big Balance on Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Make a Donation As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. If you would like to share a fun fact for a future episode, email me at whoartedpodcast@gmail.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 08, 2022
Four American Artworks
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July 4 is America's celebration of independence from England. In honor of the holiday, I decided to make an episode covering a little bit about 4 artworks from American history. I started with a piece from the people who were here before the Europeans. I discussed a transformation mask from the northwest coast. Specifically, I was looking at work from the Kwakawak. In this episode I also shared about Houdon's neoclassical statue of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson's foray into architecture with Monticello, and Jacob Lawrence's 60 panel collection, The Migration Series. Images of the works can be found on www.whoartedpodcast.com along with Fragonard's painting of The Swing which I mentioned to draw a contrast between neoclassical art and the Rococo movement which came before it. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Make a Donation As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 04, 2022
Loving Vincent | A Film Made of Paintings
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A few years prior to the immersive experiences, filmmakers brought Vincent van Gogh's paintings to life in a completely new and different way. In 2017, Loving Vincent was a film made of oil paintings. Today Vincent van Gogh is sort of the model we hold in our minds for a tortured artist. He saw little to no commercial success in his lifetime. He struggled with addiction and mental health. He lived on the fringes of society inspired by other artists and impoverishing himself in his drive to create. He was known to go without food at times because he was spending all of his money on paint. And now we can see his dramatic tale unfold through paint. A team of 125 artists from around the world produced 65,000 paintings to animate the film. Film and animation basically work off the principle that if you have a bunch of pictures played back really quickly it overwhelms the eye. The human eye can not process more than ten pictures or frames per second so it stops looking like a series of pictures and instead looks like one picture that is moving. For Loving Vincent, the artists created an oil painting on canvas for each of the 65,000 frames. They recreated some of his masterpieces telling the dramatic tale through his best known works, in his style and his preferred medium of oils.  So how did they do all of this? Well, the storyboard for the movie included a number of Vincent van Gogh’s paintings. They recruited a team of 125 well-trained oil painters rather than traditional animators. A bit of the movie was made by rotoscoping which is a technique of basically drawing on top of a frame of film. Actors were filmed in front of a green screen. Editors made a composite shot replacing the green to put Vincent van Gogh’s paintings into the background. Now here is the tricky part. After the green screen and all that editing, they put every single frame of the film onto a canvas. It took six years, but they painted 65,000 frames on canvas. Today only about 1000 of the paintings remain because after a frame was painted and photographed for the film, they would typically re-use the canvas. Oil paints take a long time to dry so they would be able to make slight alterations to a wet painting for the next frame. It was a remarkable feat blending old and new media. You can see the trailer for Loving Vincent on YouTube Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Make a Donation If you have a fun fact you would like to share, please email it to whoartedpodcast@gmail.com As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jul 01, 2022
Shigeru Miyamoto | Mario
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In 1979, after some modest success a Japanese video game company opened an office in America. They started off in New York but eventually moved to Seattle. They wanted to break into the new North American market, but the game sales were lackluster. The head of the American division tried to keep them afloat and asked for more talent to be sent over from Japan. Most people at the top were involved in other projects, but they were able to find a young artist who was willing to develop a new game. His name was Shigeru Miyamoto and while he had not yet created a videogame, he would go on to create the flagship game became the symbol of the company and really home gaming. In the early days the character was a carpenter named jumpman. Then one day the landlord for the American offices came in to yell about how the rent was late and the staff thought he looked like their character so they started referring to Jumpman by a new name. They called him Mario. My guest this week is Matthew Bliss, host of The Dead Drop, a podcast sharing the latest video game news. It publishes twice a week and you can find him at www.deaddroppod.com Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Make a Donation As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 27, 2022
Jan van Eyck - The Arnolfini Portrait
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In the 1400s, influencers couldn’t simply scout a location, arrange the perfect lighting and pull out their camera phone to snap dozens of pics testing different angles to find the perfect shot demonstrating how much better their curated life is than the lived experience of the rest of us plebeians. No back then, if someone wanted a picture to go along with their smug sense of superiority, they needed to hire a painter and in 1434, Jan van Eyck painted one of the greatest testaments to the enduring power of carefully constructing a casually posed portrait. There is a lot of debate about the meaning and symbolism in the work, but a common interpretation is that this is a sort of wedding scene. The man is taking the hand of his wife. She is in the interior of the space near the bed reinforcing the gender roles of the time with the woman’s place being taking care of the home while he stands by the open window symbolizing his role in the outside world. The mirror in the background is said to represent the eye of God witnessing their union and the frame of the circular mirror has a dozen small scenes from the passion of Christ. The small dog could be seen as a symbol of fidelity, or some say simply it is another signifier of wealth as many wealthy women were given lap dogs as companions. The green of the dress symbolizes hope. Many speculate the hope of becoming a mother and while many viewers today believe the woman in the portrait appears to be pregnant, as we all know, one should never assume a woman is pregnant. Scholars say this was actually a fashionable look for the day. Clothing was very expensive. Their clothing was particularly expensive with fur lining etc. The idea back then was the more clothing, the more wealthy one must be, so no matter how ridiculous the silhouette may appear to contemporary audiences, in the 15th century, those strange bulges of fabric showed that this was a person who could afford to dress themselves. It was conspicuous consumption proving yet again that for as long as we have had a means to record what people looked like, those people have worked to dress themselves up and surround themselves with markers of their high status. While some see modern mass media as producing a more vain and shallow culture, I would argue van Eyck shows us people have always been feeding their egos and flaunting their privilege with material goods. At least now most people know better than to use animal fur to do it. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Make a Donation As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 24, 2022
Derrick Adams | Floater 73
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One of the things that really strikes me is that he is creating scenes of people being joyful. Adams says that part of the appeal of being an artist is getting to create the environments you would like to see and experience. I also think that there is something really nice about normalizing and even elevating fun and celebration. My guest this week was Goldie Robinson, an art teacher out of Atlanta. She was my guest on a previous episode about Alexander McQueen, and when I talked with her about coming back on the podcast, she suggested Derrick Adams. I am so glad she did because his work delivers some nice summer fun, but as with all great art, there is a ton more under the surface. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Make a Donation As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 20, 2022
MC Escher | Portrait of GA Escher (portrait of his father)
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I live in the United States where this weekend, people will be celebrating father’s day. I thought this would be great time to dedicate a mini episode to an artist who created a beautiful work for his father. I love MC Escher’s portrait of GA Escher not only because it shows us the Escher men had a strange proclivity for referring to humans by letters rather than names, but we see some similarities between the father and son as both wrote diligently in their journals throughout the process of its creation. This mini episode is about the portrait MC Escher lovingly created of his 92 year old father. He made 15 copies of the lithograph to be shared among the family. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Buy me a coffee As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 17, 2022
Roy Lichtenstein | Look Mickey
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In 1964, Life Magazine ran with Lichtenstein on the cover and the text read “Is He the Worst Artist in the U.S.?” Lichtenstein responded to criticism of his work saying “I think my paintings are critically transformed, but it would be difficult to prove it by any rational line of argument." Seems like kind of a weak defense. Basically, ‘I think my work is good, but there’s really no rational argument in favor of it.’ I mean its a bold move. I’ll give him that. He painted Look Mickey after his son taunted him saying he couldn’t paint something that good. There is something I really love about the idea that basically his entire career was the ultimate “so there” to a child. I mean doing your work out of spite is one thing, but doing it to spite your child, that’s some next level pettiness. My guest this week was The Real Michael Lee, a musician, graphic designer and comic artist based out of Iowa. You can find him at www.therealmichaellee.com and or go to his links page to check out all the different spaces he occupies online. In this episode, we dropped a lot of names. Take a minute to look through my back catalog to learn more about Jack Kirby, Pablo Picasso's Guernica, Diego Rivera, Ernie Barnes and Andy Warhol. As I said in the show, feel free to leave a comment on the message boards at Goodpods, the platform with the good sense to feature Who ARTed on their recommendations list and where I am frequently ranked number 1 for visual arts. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Buy me a coffee As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 13, 2022
Louis Daguerre | The Artist's Studio
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I have talked a bit about Daguerre and his photographic methods in a previous episode about the world’s first photobomb. Listeners may recall that the first photograph to feature a human happened by accident as Daguerre was taking a photograph of the view out his window. Those early photographs needed a long exposure. I’m talking around 15 minutes and few subjects could sit still for that long. This is why the first subjects of photos tended to be landscapes or still lives, you know, things that will be still for a long time. The plaster casts were a practical subject. They were also intended to send a message that photography was a new medium but it could handle the traditional subject matter. In this collection, we see an arrangement of casts of Venus, cupid, the wings, and heads of two cherubs. Above the cherub or putti heads which would have been associated with Phaethon son of Helios, we see the rams head, and the golden Ram in Greek mythology was a descendant of Helios, the sun god. Central to the composition, we see these references to Greek mythology making a connection between the new medium and classic subjects but more specifically, we are seeing references to the sun. When we break down photography, photo means light. Graphy is writing, The photographic process is making a picture with light. The sunlight triggers a chemical reaction causing silver compounds to darken. If you want to learn more about Daguerre and early photography, listen to my previous mini-episode about The World's First Photobomb. This week's Friday Follow recommendation is Art Ed Radio from The Art of Education University. This segment is not paid promotion. I simply want to share some of the things that I love. If you have a recommendation for something good I should check out, email me or reach out on social media. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Buy me a coffee As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 10, 2022
Meret Oppenheim | Object
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My guest this week is Janet Taylor, an artist and art teacher at the high school and college levels. Find her work and more about her at www.jatayolorart.com In 1936, Meret Oppenheim was having lunch with friends when they began to joke about wrapping things in fur. She went back to her studio later and wrapped a cup, saucer, and spoon in fur thus creating what many consider to be the quintessential Surrealist sculpture, Object. Meret Oppenheim was a highly talented artist. She moved to Paris at age 18, and she was almost immediately recognized for her brilliance. Artists like Hans Arp and Alberto Giacometti invited her to participate in group shows, Object was inspired by her lunch conversation with Pablo Picasso, and Object was purchased by MoMA. Unfortunately, Oppenheim also struggled with depression and stepped out of the limelight for some period. For over a decade, focused on art conservation work to pay the bills, but ironically destroyed much of the art that she was creating in her own studio. When she did return to exhibiting her work with renewed confidence, her brilliance was again recognized. Although she is largely associated with the Surrealist movement, she also tackled issues of gender in a lot of her work. As she accepted an award from the city of Basel, she said, “I think it is the duty of a woman to lead a life that expresses her disbelief in the validity of the taboos that have been imposed upon her kind for thousands of years. Nobody will give you freedom; you have to take it.” Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Buy me a coffee As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 06, 2022
The Peace Symbol
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In November of 1957, a small committee was formed. February 17, 1958, they held the first public meeting of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament. That same year, the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament asked the artist Gerald Holtom to create a symbol for the movement. The CND has been at the forefront of the peace movement in the UK and claims to be Europe’s biggest single-issue peace campaign. Holtom’s design though has become one of the most widely recognized symbols on the planet. I am talking of course of the peace sign.  More than one peace sign exists. There is a hand gesture comprised of a thumb holding down the ring finger and pinky as the index and middle fingers are splayed to form a “v” In some bit of irony, that hand gesture started on the battlefields of World War II. Allied soldiers held up the gesture signaling “v for victory” and sometime later, anti-war protesters adopted the gesture as a peace sign.  The universal symbol developed by Gerald Holtom though, is the other peace sign, the one consisting of a circle with a vertical line down the center and two diagonal lines forming an inverted v shape going from the center of the vertical line down to the bottom portion of the circle. Gerald Holtom made line drawings representing the flag semaphores of N and D for nuclear disarmament then put it into a circle to represent the globe and because let’s face it, the roundness looks nice. This week my FridayFollow Podcast Recomendation is Your Brain on Facts. Check it out at www.yourbrainonfacts.com or on your favorite podcast app. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Buy me a coffee As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jun 03, 2022
Jack Kirby | The Avengers
3181
My guest this week is The Real Michael Lee, a musician, graphic designer, illustrator and comic enthusiast (find him and all his social media at bit.ly/heartrml) . We had a great talk about Jack Kirby, the legendary comic book artist who made contributions to both Marvel and DC among others. Kirby was responsible for the development of several notable characters including The Fantastic Four, Thor, Captain America, Black Panther, and for this episode, we focused on his illustration of The Avengers. At age 14, Jack Kirby enrolled in Pratt. He later said he wasn’t the kind of student Pratt was interested in. They wanted people to work on their projects forever. He didn’t want to work on anything forever - he wanted to get things done. Throughout his career, Kirby was noted to be very fast in his work. He would put out about 5 pages a day. Kirby basically was all over the scene in the golden age of comics. Companies were springing up and going under or morphing into other companies and it seems like he basically worked with, for, or helped create all of them. Jack Kirby experimented with things like romance comics for a more mature audience and I think that wasn’t really breaking any rules because the rules hadn’t even been established yet. His work showed generations of artists how to create compelling visualizations of epic yet relatable heroes. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Buy me a coffee As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 30, 2022
The Aztec Sun Stone
626
The Sun Stone is probably the first bit of Aztec art I became familiar with even before I studied art. It has been widely represented in various forms of culture from the relatively recent Mexican folk art tradition of Amate paintings to pop culture such as Legends of the Hidden Temple which I must confess was one of my favorite Nickelodeon game shows in the 90s. On its face, we see a beautiful image full of symbols laid out in radial symmetry that is just so visually satisfying, But as we look a little closer and get to know the symbols, this stone image is a lot deeper and heavier than I realized. The Aztec Sun Stone is also often referred to as the Calendar Stone, but it wasn’t intended to function in the way we use calendars today. The image is a representation of Aztec mythology describing five consecutive worlds of the sun all carved into the elaborate radial stone glyph. While the calendar stone was not used to mark the passing of days and months, it does have a date represented at the top. 13 Reed represents the start of the fifth and final sun, as well as the year that Itzcoatl began his rule thus legitimizing his rule with a link between the divine and man in the year 1427CE When the Sun Stone was discovered, it was flipped upside down. It is believed that the Aztecs may have flipped it upside down in order to prevent the final cataclysm, the fall of the fifth sun. Flipping the stone would have been no easy feat considering it is about 3 and a half meters wide, almost a meter thick and weighs in at 25 tons although I suppose people will do whatever they can to fend off the end of the world. Now putting this into a historical context, remember that this stone was created in the 15th century and the late 15th century is when Columbus and other European explorers began to make contact with the Americas. About 100 years after The Sun Stone was created, the Spanish conquistadors did effectively end the Aztec civilization so their apocalyptic notion of the 5th sun being the final really wasn’t so far off. While the sun didn’t fall to the earth, it was the end of their era. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Buy me a coffee As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 27, 2022
Alma Thomas | Resurrection
2168
While Alma Thomas worked for decades as a teacher, but she continued pursuing her art. She took classes at American University in Washington. She showed her work in group exhibitions with other African American artists. While she obviously experienced some setbacks as a black woman, her work was not taking on feminist or racial themes. Her early works in the 1950s were generally academic, realistic works and while they were fine, they didn’t stand out too much. During this period though, as she was studying at American Universtiy she became more interested in color and abstraction.  In 1966 Howard University offered to put on a retrospective show of her work. She was actually considering giving up painting due to arthritis pain but with that tremendous opportunity, she wanted to produce something new. She looked out her window and was struck by the color. She watched the sunlight shift the colors on the trees and the flowers in her garden and she began working in a more expressionistic, abstract style. Ultimately, she is best known for her abstract works. Her style is characterized by mosaic like splashes of color somewhat like the impressionists, but also borrowing a bit from color field painters.  I think one of the most inspiring bits is she rose to prominence as an artist after three decades teaching (she taught junior high for 35 years). She continued pursuing her passion and demonstrated it is never too late to learn, grow and develop your talents.  In an interview in 1970, she said, “Creative art is for all time and is therefore independent of time. It is of all ages, of every land, and if by this we mean the creative spirit in man which produces a picture or a statue is common to the whole civilized world, independent of age, race and nationality; the statement may stand unchallenged.” Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Buy me a coffee As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 23, 2022
The Mysterious Mona Lisa
825
Leonardo da Vinci’s painting of The Mona Lisa, also called La Gioconda has captured society’s collective imagination. Her hold on the audience is so intense there is a widely known phenomenon called, The Mona Lisa Effect referring to the experience of feeling like the subject of an image is looking directly at the viewer no matter where one is standing in the room. Simply put, people feel like Mona Lisa is staring at them and her eyes follow them around the room. According to scientists at Bielefeld Unversity in Germany, La Gioconda does not look directly at the viewer. Her gaze is said to be about 15 degrees to the right looking at the viewer’s ear or over their shoulder. They concluded that ironically, The Mona Lisa does not demonstrate the Mona Lisa effect. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Buy me a coffee As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 20, 2022
Norman Rockwell | The Problem We All Live With
2290
Norman Rockwell is probably best known for his wholesome and nostalgic illustrations that graced the covers of The Saturday Evening Post for decades. His name has become shorthand for an idealized version of America but as we all know, in great art, there is always more than meets the eye. In this episode, we did not focus on Rockwell’s depictions of the American mythos. If you are interested in that stuff, check out my previous episode on Freedom from Want. For this episode, we focused on the hard truths Rockwell depicted in The Problem We All Live With. This is a piece about the struggle surrounding race, integration and equity and regardless of race, gender, ability, religion or other cultural identifiers, the struggle for equity is one we all live with because injustice for anyone is a harm to everyone. Norman Rockwell believed that our ideal of all people being treated fairly was important enough that he felt compelled to use his platform and his talents to call attention to it. My guest this week is Candido Crespo, fellow art teacher and host of Everyday Art Room from The Art of Education University. He is doing a ton of good work and here are the various places you can find him: https://linktr.ee/crespoarts Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Buy me a coffee As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 16, 2022
The Taj Mahal (Fun Fact Friday)
413
The Taj Mahal is one of the most beautiful man-made structures in the world. It is a UNESCO world heritage site considered to be one of the modern wonders of the world. The story behind its construction is equally beautiful as it is a tale of love and devotion between Shah Jahan and his wife Mumtaz Mahal who passed away shortly after giving birth to their fourteenth child. The Taj Mahal has a massive dome stretching 240 feet covered in marble. The are four thin white marble minarets to mark the four corners. Of course without cranes, getting giant slabs of marble to such heights was no easy task. A ramp would be constructed to bring the pieces up, and to keep the incline manageable the ramp used for this construction had to be about 10 miles long.  Shah Jahan never really got over the loss of his wife. He remained in mourning for years before his position was usurped by his fourth son. He was imprisoned in a fort in Agra in 1658. He was forbidden to leave and spent the final 8 years of his life in the fort looking out the window at the Taj Mahal. When he died in 1666, Shah Jahan was reunited with his beloved wife Mumtaz Mahal in the crypt beneath the Taj Mahal. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Buy me a coffee As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 13, 2022
Takashi Murakami | Mr Dobs (encore)
1800
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May 09, 2022
Olowe of Ise | Veranda Post (Fun Fact Friday)
488
The bulk of Olowe’s carvings seem to have been both decorative and functional artworks for the Yoruba kings and prominent families. One of his celebrated works for example is the veranda post that sits in the collection at the Art Institute of Chicago. In that piece we see the elongated neck and oval faces that were a part of his signature style. Traditionally Yoruba artists used scale and proportion to indicate hierarchy. The more important a figure, the larger they are within the composition. The status of the king’s senior wife is shown by her size while the king is seated central to the post. His crown eye level to the viewer and the king sits with his feat up above the ground signifying his transcendent nature. His eyes are cast down expressing a contemplative mood as he looks down on the world beyond. The crown has four ancestral faces signifying the legitimacy of his royal lineage, the divine line and wisdom running through it. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Buy me a coffee As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 06, 2022
Henri Matisse - The Dessert: Harmony in Red (Encore)
2009
This is an encore presentation of the episode about Henri Matisse and his painting The Dessert: Harmony in Red from 1908. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Buy me a coffee As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
May 02, 2022
Louis Sullivan & the Carson Pirie Scott Building (Fun Fact Friday)
531
In 1896, Louis Sullivan wrote about skyscrapers and architectural design in “The Tall Building Artistically Considered” This was the origin of the famous phrase, “form follows function.” What Sullivan actually said was “form must ever follow function” but regardless of phrasing, the meaning remains the same - architects should first consider how a building will be used then base the design on that.  I remember when I was in school hearing my art history professor describe the early modern architectural philosophy like a layer cake. Sullivan argued that the building should be considered in tiers. At the base level, the business should be easily accessible to the public. It should be light and open and the second story should also be easily accessed by stairways. Above that, there should be offices. The offices should be uniform. They should look the same to unify the design and because they are all serving the same purpose. This section can have as many stories as needed and desired, then finally the attic at the top. Sullivan argued the attic story should have distinctive molding or a cornice to add not only a decorative flourish but to mark an end point to the building. Simultaneously this decorative topper would serve to set the building apart from others in the skyline.  While the building bears Sullivan’s name today, and he was a very important and influential architect, he was not an easy man to work with. One of the things many people leave out of the story of this building is the fact that a different architect, Daniel Burnham was hired to complete the last phase of the building in 1906. Louis Sullivan had a reputation for being great artist but awful human and his career suffered because of it. In the end, Sullivan died penniless. Another great architect, Frank Lloyd Wright, actually took up a collection and paid for Sullivan’s burial and stone inscribed to pay tribute to Sullivan’s legacy. While the man may be gone, his words that “form must ever follow function” have been repeated in textbooks and etched in stone to live on influencing generations to come.  Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Buy me a coffee As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 29, 2022
Marcel Duchamp - Fountain (encore)
2327
Marcel Duchamp's Fountain was a controversial early readymade. It has been named one of the most influential artworks of the 20th century and it is on the list of required works for AP Art History students to learn about. Since the Art History AP test is just a few weeks away, I thought this would be a good time to drop an encore presentation giving a little bit of contextual information to understand how a toilet could make such a splash in the art world. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Buy me a coffee As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 25, 2022
Fun Fact Friday - Robert Smithson's Spiral Jetty
443
Robert Smithson decided to make monumental sculptures using perhaps the world’s oldest material, the earth itself, but he used modern tools to shape it in a way and on a scale rarely seen. Spiral Jetty is as the name would suggest, a spiral. Part of what makes it special is the enormousness of it. On the peninsula at Rozel Point on Utah’s Great Salt Lake, Smithson created his most famous monumental sculpture using over six thousand tons of black basalt rocks and earth from the site. The spiral forms a path out onto the lake. It is intended to be not only witnessed, but experienced. Walking the spiral would be an almost meditative act similar to circumambulating or walking around a hindu temple. The spiral allows people to walk out onto the lake. A small speck on a vast lake witnessing the entropy of nature as the water erodes the foundation. The gigantic piece built from thousands of tons of stone has been decaying from the moment it was built. It was a giant monument to nature demonstrating the concept of entropy. It was born out of a time of social upheaval and changing norms leaving in which people were rethinking the ways they related to both nature and the constructed environment which now that I’m saying it out loud could just as easily be a description of pretty much any time period as the only true constant is change. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Buy me a coffee As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 22, 2022
Claude Monet - Water Lilies
1867
The Impressionist movement was named after one of Claude Monet's paintings. In this episode, we discussed a bit about Monet and his life as well as one of his most famous series of works, Water Lilies. Monet loved painting his garden and over his lifetime, he created about 250 paintings of Water Lilies. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Buy me a coffee As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 18, 2022
Fun Fact Friday - The Last Supper by Leonardo da Vinci
608
One Leonardo da Vinci’s most famous works is not housed in a museum. It is in the Convent of Santa Maria in Milan Italy. It seems totally fitting for a depiction of the last supper was painted on the wall in the convent’s dining hall. Visitors today are often surprised by how enormous the work it. The People are life sized on this massive 15 by 29 foot painting. Another surprising fact is that while people flock to see Leonardo’s work on the wall of the convent, very little if any of what we see there today was actually painted by Leonardo. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Buy me a coffee As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 15, 2022
Season 3 Finale(ish) - Arts Madness Winner
1474
This is sort of the finale for season 3. I will be taking a short break but will continue releasing episodes on my regular schedule. I will be running some encore presentations for a few weeks, but I will continue to release new mini-episodes so it won't be all re-runs. The Friday mini-episodes will largely focus on artworks from the AP Art History list as at this time of year a lot of students are working to prep for the test and I want to do my part to help provide them with resources to the extent that I can.  After six weeks and thousands of votes cast, we have narrowed the field from 64 great artists to 1 ultimate Arts Madness champion. I read a few statements on why people chose this artist, followed by an encore presentation of the episode about this artist. Thank you all for participating in the tournament and I hope it helped you discover some new artists to inspire you.  Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com Connect with me: Website Twitter Instagram Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic Buy me a coffee Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 11, 2022
Fun Fact Friday - The Burghers of Calais
522
In America, a lot of high school students are studying for the AP Art History Exam to try to earn college credit. I am trying to make sure my podcast can be a helpful resource for learning about art history and in a lot of my fun fact mini episodes I cover works of art that are required for the test.  This mini episode covers a bit about Rodin and the story behind his piece, The Burghers of Calais. If you enjoy the show, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app to help others discover the show. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com Connect with me: Website Twitter Instagram Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic Buy me a coffee Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 08, 2022
Arts Madness Final Round
447
This week we have the finals for our Arts Madness Tournament. Katsushika Hokusai is up against Yayoi Kusama. To make exploring art history a little more fun for my fellow art teachers and their students, I put together an Arts Madness Tournament so listeners can weigh in on their favorite works. The final round is between Katsushika Hokusai and Yayoi Kusama. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com Connect with me: Website Twitter Instagram Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic Buy me a coffee Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 06, 2022
Arthur Boyd - Nebuchadnezzar on Fire Falling over a Waterfall
2265
This episode is about Arthur Boyd the Australian painter known for his use of symbols from mythology to express his philosophical views. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com Connect with me: Website Twitter Instagram Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic Buy me a coffee Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 04, 2022
Fun Fact Friday - The Apollo 11 Stones
328
This #FunFactFriday mini-episode is about the Apollo 11 stones, artifacts that show how far back humanity goes and named after a mission showing there is no limit to how far humanity may go in the future. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com Connect with me: Website Twitter Instagram Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic Buy me a coffee Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 01, 2022
Arts Madness Round 5
509
We are down to our final four artists in this year’s Arts Madness Tournament. This week I read a four of the statements issued by students around the US explaining why they picked these artists as their favorites to win the tournament. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com Connect with me: Website Twitter Instagram Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic Buy me a coffee Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 30, 2022
Ivan Albright - The Picture of Dorian Gray
2061
For this week's episode, I was joined by Kelly Henrikson, art teacher at Park Junior High, to talk about Ivan Albright.  Ivan Albright is considered to be a great macabre painter. He is known for his portraits and still lives that have a sense of rot showing the frailty of life. His style is considered magical realism. He meticulously rendered portraits that were unlike anything else in his day. In this episode, we discussed the painting he created for the film adaptation of Oscar Wilde's Picture of Dorian Gray.  The Picture of Dorian Gray is housed at The Art Institute of Chicago Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com Connect with me: Website Twitter Instagram Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic Buy me a coffee Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 28, 2022
Fun Fact Friday - Did Vincent Van Gogh Really Only Sell 1 Painting?
622
Vincent van Gogh is a legendary figure in art history. He is one of my favorite artists and his paintings sell for tens of millions of dollars today, but it is often said that he sold only one painting during his lifetime. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com Connect with me: Website Twitter Instagram Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic Buy me a coffee Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 25, 2022
Arts Madness Round 4
452
This is a bonus episode talking about some of the artists and matchups in this week’s round of the Arts Madness Tournament. Please vote for your favorites at www.whoartedpodcast.com Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com Connect with me: Website Twitter Instagram Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic Buy me a coffee Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 23, 2022
Alexander McQueen - Jellyfish Ensemble, 2010
2100
This week I spoke with Goldie Robinson, a k-12 art teacher from Georgia. She enlightened me about fashion and one of her favorite designers, Alexander McQueen. This episode covers a bit of art history and a category of art/culture that has been largely neglected on this podcast, fashion. We discussed Alexander McQueen's Jellyfish Ensemble which was part of a 2010 collection he created. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com Connect with me: Website Twitter Instagram Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic Buy me a coffee Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 21, 2022
Fun Fact Friday - Pablo Picasso, Art Thief? (encore)
671
This is a mini-episode about Pablo Picasso and his tendency to steal from those around him. He famously said, ”Good artists copy. Great artists steal” but even that quote may have been stolen from someone else. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com Connect with me: Website Twitter Instagram Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic Buy me a coffee Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 18, 2022
Arts Madness Round 3
427
This is a bonus episode covering which artists were eliminated in round 2 and which artists are facing off in round 3 of this year’s Arts Madness Tournament. Vote for your favorite artists at www.whoartedpodcast.com Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com Connect with me: Website Twitter Instagram Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic Buy me a coffee Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 16, 2022
KAWS - The KAWS Album
2490
Rebecca Potts Aguirre from Teaching Artist Podcast joined me to talk about the contemporary artist KAWS. We talked a bit about his background, his style and a few of his works including The KAWS Album. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com Connect with me: Website Twitter Instagram Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic Buy me a coffee Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 14, 2022
Fun Fact Friday - The Nazca Lines
443
This episode covers a lesser known bit of art history - the Nazca Lines. In the Peru there are massive geoglyphs etched in the ground with the full design only visible from the sky leaving people to wonder how they were created around 500 CE and for whom to enjoy. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Buy me a coffee As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 11, 2022
Arts Madness Round 2
482
This is a bonus episode covering some of the highlights from this year’s Arts Madness Tournament. Arts Madness is a great way to encourage kids to explore art history and learn about a variety of different artists. Please tell your art teacher friends to join in the fun with their classes and vote at www.whoartedpodcast.com Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Buy me a coffee As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 09, 2022
MC Escher - Circle Limit 3
2092
This week’s episode of Who ARTed is about MC Escher and his work Circle Limit 3. For this week's episode, I talked with David Pittman, an amazing teacher I am lucky to count among my friends. We discussed MC Escher and briefly touched on a few of his works including Circle Limit 3 from 1959. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com Connect with me: Website Twitter Instagram Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic Buy me a coffee Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 07, 2022
Fun Fact Friday - Killer Wallpaper (Encore)
456
This episode covers a little bit of odd art history. In the victorian era, a synthetic green pigment was developed using an arsenic compound. While it was popular, Scheele’s green also killed some people. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Buy me a coffee As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 04, 2022
Arts Madness Round 1
557
This is a mini episode highlighting some of the interesting matchups in Round 1 of my annual Arts Madness Tournament. Vote for your favorites and learn more about the artists at www.whoartedpodcast.com Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Buy me a coffee As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 02, 2022
Christo and Jeanne-Claude - The Floating Piers
2063
This episode covers an interesting bit of art history with Christo and Jeanne-Claude’s piece, The Floating Piers. It was a great pleasure to talk to Tim Bogatz, a great visual arts teacher and host of Art Ed Radio from The Art of Education University. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Buy me a coffee As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 28, 2022
Fun Fact Friday - Edmonia Lewis and The Death of Cleopatra
372
This is a#funfactfriday mini-episode about Edmonia Lewis and her sculpture The Death of Cleopatra. After it was exhibited in Philadelphia for the Centennial Exhibition, it was put into storage in Chicago. It would later sit in a saloon, mark the grave of a horse, and serve as an arts and crafts project for some local Boy Scouts before finally being professionally restored and displayed at the Smithsonian Museum of Art. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Buy me a coffee As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 25, 2022
Phyllida Barlow - Untitled: upturnedhouse2, 2012
1901
This episode is about Phyllida Barlow. I spoke with Greg Daniels, an art teacher out of the UK who runs www.theartteacher.net It was a pleasure talking to him and learning about a unique contemporary sculptor. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Buy me a coffee As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 21, 2022
Vermeer Was Using a Camera Before Photography Was a Thing
385
This episode is about Johannes Vermeer and the theory that he used a camera obscura to paint his incredibly detailed works such as The Girl with a Pearl Earing and The Music Lesson. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Buy me a coffee As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 18, 2022
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT: Arts Madness Tournament
254
This is a special announcement about my annual Art Madness tournament. This has become a tradition in my classroom to help students explore art history in a fun NCAA style tournament pitting 64 artists against each other in a series of head-to-head matchups until we get down to 1 ultimate Arts Madness champion. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 17, 2022
Klaus Nomi - Nomi Song
2051
This episode is about Klaus Nomi the New Wave performance artist who was known for his unique plastic suit and even more unique singing voice. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Buy me a coffee As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 14, 2022
Fun Fact Friday - The Renaissance Painter Who Played with his Food
439
Giuseppe Acrimboldo is best known for his quirky arrangements of food, foliage, animals and objects that form surreal portraits. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Buy me a coffee As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 11, 2022
Jim Dine - Confetti Heart 1, 1985
2359
This episode is about Jim Dine and his work Confetti Heart from 1985. Dine is well known for his numerous works utilizing hearts and other familiar symbols. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Buy me a coffee As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 07, 2022
The World’s Blackest Black - The Feud Between Stuart Semple and Anish Kapoor
556
This is a Fun Fact Friday mini-episode about the feud between Anish Kapoor and Stuart Semple. Scientists developed VANTA Black to absorb over 99% of visible light. The vertically aligned carbon nanotube array will trap the light creating a surreal effect like looking into a black hole. Anish Kapoor bought the exclusive right to use VANTA Black for artistic purposes. Stuart Semple doesn't really like Kapoor's monopoly on the material as it blocks other artists from experimenting and innovating. Who ARTed is an Airwave Media Podcast. Connect with me: Website | Twitter | Instagram | Tiktok Support the show: Merch from TeePublic | Buy me a coffee As always you can find images of the work being discussed at www.WhoARTedPodcast.com and of course, please leave a rating or review on your favorite podcast app. You might hear it read out on the show. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 04, 2022
Henri Matisse - The Dessert: Harmony in Red (The Red Room) 1908
2009
This episode is about Henri Matisse and his famous work, The Dessert: Harmony in Red (The Red Room) from 1908. We covered a bit of biography and developments in art history that influenced Matisse before discussing this specific piece. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 31, 2022
Raphael’s The School of Athens
496
This is a fun fact Friday mini episode about The School of Athens painted by Raphael in 1510 C.E. In this classic Rennaisance masterpiece, Raphael painted numerous classic Greek philosophers. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 28, 2022
Bonus: Art Smart - The Principles of Design
602
Introducing Art Smart. This is a preview of Art Smart, a podcast focusing on the Elements of Art and Principles of Design. You can find Art Smart on Apple Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 26, 2022
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec -Part 2 (At the Moulin Rouge)
2125
This episode is part 2 of my discussion about Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, the French Post Impressionist painter. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 24, 2022
The Erased Masterpiece - Robert Rauschenberg’s Erased de Kooning
636
This episode is about Erased de Kooning by Robert Rauschenberg Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 21, 2022
Henri de Toulouse Lautrec - Part 1 (Jane Avril Print)
1754
This is part 1 of my discussion of Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec. We covered a bit of his background and in this episode the discussion focused on one of his lithographs of his friend, the dancer Jane Avril. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 17, 2022
Rembrandt - The Night Watch
510
This episode is about Rembrandt’s painting The Night Watch. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 14, 2022
Andy Warhol - Grevy’s Zebra (Encore)
2114
This episode covers a bit about Any Warhol’s life and his artistic development, then we discuss a print from his endangered species series. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 10, 2022
Fun Fact Friday - Jan van Eyck’s Arnolfini Portrait
437
This is a little bit of art history about The Arnolfini Portrait by Jan van Eyck Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 07, 2022
Introducing Art Smart
653
This is a bonus show introducing Art Smart, the new podcast series focusing on the Elements of Art and the Principles of design. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 06, 2022
Grant Wood - American Gothic (Encore)
2460
This is a re-broadcast of last year’s episode on Grant Wood. We discussed his biography as well as his most famous painting, American Gothic. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 03, 2022
Fun Fact Friday - The Eiffel Tower
455
This is a fun fact mini-episode about the Eiffel Tower. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 31, 2021
Pablo Picasso - Guernica (encore)
1990
This episode is about Pablo Picasso and his work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 27, 2021
Fun Fact Friday - At the Moulin Rouge
472
This episode is about At the Moulin Rouge by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 24, 2021
Alexander Calder - Streetcar(Encore)
1995
This episode explores the life and work of Alexander Calder. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 20, 2021
Fun Fact Friday - Ugly Christmas Sweaters
398
Learn about Fair Isle designs, the traditional patterned knitwear that is often lumped in with the modern ”ugly Christmas sweater.” Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 17, 2021
Wassily Kandinsky - Yellow Red Blue (Encore)
1908
Wassily Kandinsky was a Russian artist and art theorist. He is known as one of the early pioneers of abstract art. Learn a bit about Kandinsky‘s background, his personal journey from a teacher of Law and Economics to one of the most influential artists of the 20th century as we discussed his biography and his painting Yellow Red Blue from 1925. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 13, 2021
Fun Fact Friday - Diego Rivera‘s Detroit Industry Murals
419
This episode is about Diego Rivera and one of his most iconic works, The Detroit Industry Murals. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 10, 2021
Jean-Michel Basquiat - Untitled Skull (Encore)
2025
This episode is about the life and the work of Jean-Michel Basquiat Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 06, 2021
Fun Fact Friday - The Terracotta Army
293
This is a mini-episode about China‘s first emperor, Qin Shi Huang, and his famous terra cotta army. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 03, 2021
Barbara Kruger - Don’t Be a Jerk(Encore)
1520
This episode covers a bit of the biography of Barbara Kruger, the contemporary artist best known for her works combining text and images. We looked at and discussed the piece, Don‘t Be a Jerk. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 29, 2021
Norman Rockwell - Freedom from Want
470
This episode is about Norman Rockwell and his painting, Freedom from Want. This image of an idealized family gathering has come to define Thanksgiving for many American households. Learn a little bit more about the piece, how and why it was created as well as how it seeped into the American consciousness. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 25, 2021
Walt Disney
2210
Walt Disney was one of the most influential artists in Western history. He not only excelled and pushed boundaries in his art form, but created new categories of art that shaped popular culture around the world. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 22, 2021
Fun Fact Friday - Dazzle Camouflage
444
During World War I and a little after, the British and Americans used a surprising tactic to camouflage their ships. Rather than trying to hide the ships, they painted bold, contrasting patterns to disorient the enemy. Dazzle Camouflage was very conspicuous but made it difficult to determine the range, speed, and direction of a ship. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 19, 2021
Auguste Rodin.- The Burghers of Calais
2571
This episode is about Auguste Rodin, the founder of modern sculpture. We discussed the development of Rodin as an artist as well as the historical event that inspired his piece, The Burghers of Calais. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 15, 2021
Fun Fact Friday - Lascaux Cave Art
492
This episode is about the cave art discovered in Lascaux, France in 1940. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 12, 2021
Rene Magritte - The False Mirror
1751
This episode is all about Rene Magritte. We discussed his life and in the second segment, we focused specifically on his piece, The False Mirror from 1929. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 08, 2021
Fun Fact Friday - Rangoli
265
This mini-episode is about rangoli. Since it is the start of Diwali, I thought it would be a great time to share a little information about the beautiful, colorful designs often seen in people‘s entryways during the festival. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 05, 2021
Keith Haring (encore)
1391
This episode is about Keith Haring. It is a re-edited encore presentation of one of the first episodes I recorded and one of the most special to me because it focused so much on the potential of artists to create positive change. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 01, 2021
Fun Fact Friday - The Mummy‘s Curse
605
This is about the idea of a mummy‘s curse associated with Howard Carter and his exhibition to explore and loot Tutankhamen‘s burial chamber. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 29, 2021
Jim Davis
2398
This episode is about Jim Davis, the creator of Garfield. We discuss his life and his work particularly looking at how Garfield evolved and the features that make him such a beloved character. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 25, 2021
Fun Fact Friday - The Scream
437
This episode is all about The Scream by Edvard Munch. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 22, 2021
AWESOME ANNOUNCEMENT - Art Explora Academy
220
Special Announcement - Who ARTed is featured in the media library of the new Art Explora Academy. The Art Explora Foundation created their online academy as a completely free learning platform for anyone interested in art history. Check it out at academy.artexplora.org Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 20, 2021
Dan Santat
2041
This episode is about the popular illustrator and author, Dan Santat. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 18, 2021
Fun Fact Friday - The World‘s Oldest Art
350
This episode is about a debated discovery of the oldest known work of art. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 15, 2021
Vincent Van Gogh (Part 2)
2686
In this episode, I continued my discussion with Chuck Hoff about Vincent van Gogh. We covered the later part of his life and career after he moved to France. The painting we specifically focused our attention on was The Starry Night from 1889. During the episode, we also briefly discussed The Night Cafe and Starry Night Over the Rhone. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 11, 2021
Fun Fact Friday - DayGlo Colors
523
This episode is about how DayGlo colors work and how they were developed by a pair of brothers in the 1930s. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 08, 2021
Vincent Van Gogh (Part 1)
2603
This is a two part episode about Vincent Van Gogh.Part 1 focuses on his early life and development up to his first masterpiece,The Potato Eaters from 1885. Next week we will discuss the mature phase of his career and how his style shifted upon moving to France. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 04, 2021
Fun Fact Friday - Take the Money and Run
590
In this fun fact Friday mini episode, learn about the controversial conceptual art piece, ”Take the Money and Run.” The artist, Jens Haaning was loaned $84,000 for use in re-creating two of his previous works, but Haansing thought it would be better to give them 2 blank canvases and keep the money. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 01, 2021
Salvador Dali
2129
Salvador Dali was among the oddest artists of the 20th century. He was known not only for his surrealist paintings, but also his surreal life. From his waxed mustache that is said to have outlived the artist, to antics like driving a Rolls Royce filled with cauliflower, Salvador Dali knew how to command people‘s attention. In this episode we discuss a bit about the man, the myth and his work, The Persistence of Memory from 1931. As always you can find more information at www.whoartedpodcast.com Please follow, like, leave a review and tell your friends. If you have a connection, correction or suggestion you would like to share, please email whoartedpodcast@gmail.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 27, 2021
Fun Fact Friday - Who Created The Smiley Face?
375
For this week‘s Fun Fact Friday mini episode, learn a little bit about the smiley face. The iconic image of a yellow circle with two dots and a smile actually has a surprising history. The design was commissioned to boost morale around the office at an insurance company and almost instantly became a sensation. While the image is world famous, Harvey Ball, the graphic designer who created it was largely forgotten. While one might expect he would have made millions of dollars off of his popular design, he actually only made $45 for the commissioned piece. He did go on to create World Smile Day which is dedicated to spreading positivity, smiles and acts of kindness. His foundation licenses his Smiley design to raise money for worthwhile charities. If you are looking for a way to celebrate World Smile Day on October 1, 2021, try making your own smiley or emoji. Art teachers can find a video lesson based on Harvey Ball on the teacher resources page of www.WhoARTedPodcast.com Reach out or follow Kyle Wood on social media. Instagram: Wood.Art.Ed Twitter: @WoodArtEd Email: WhoARTedPodcast@gmail.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 24, 2021
Takashi Murakami
1796
Takashi Murakami is one of the most prominent contemporary Japanese painters. I spoke with Toki from the podcast Japan Explained to get some insights into Murakami and how his work is a reflection of modern and traditional Japanese culture. Takashi Murakami is well known for his Superflat artwork. The Superflat movement was named for an exhibition of Murakami‘s work in the year 2000. Murakami‘s paintings often utilize outlines and flat colors that give the work the visually flat sense similar to traditional woodcut prints. Simultaneously the Superflat movement represents a flattening of society as barriers between cultures are broken down. In this episode, we discussed Murakami‘s background as well as his paintings of Mr. Dobs, a recurring figure in many of his works that serves as a sort of alter ego for the artist. As always you can find pictures of the work discussed along with other resources on website www.WhoARTedPodcast.com Keep in touch by emailing WhoARTedPodcast@gmail.com and if you like the podcast, please tell your friends, rate and review it wherever you listen. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 20, 2021
Fun Fact Friday - Jackson Pollock Rags to Riches
339
Jackson Pollock grew up in a family that struggled financially. He was expelled from two different high schools and bounced around doing odd jobs early in his adulthood. When Peggy Guggenheim started to collect his work, it was like Jackson Pollock won the lottery. With success in the fine art world, came financial success and one of the most interesting legacies of Jackson Pollock is his ability to pay it forward. In the 1990s, a woman bought a painting at a thrift store for $5. She was actually going to sell it at a garage sale later when it was identified as a Pollock original leading to a raise in the price from $5 to $50,000,000. This type of thing has actually happened more than once, so be sure to keep an eye out for hidden treasures in thrift stores and garage sales. If you like Who ARTed, please subscribe, leave a review and tell your friends. You can find more information, images and other resources at www.whoartedpodcast.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 17, 2021
Janet Sobel
2529
For the season opener, I was joined by Garret McCorkle of the podcast No Country for History. His podcast focuses on obscure bits of American history so we focused on an awesome, but largely forgotten American painter. Janet Sobel may not be a household name, but her work was amazing, innovative and influential. While Jackson Pollock is credited with inventing the drip painting method and pioneering the approach of all over painting, Sobel did it first. Not only did Sobel employ these methods about a year before Pollock, he was aware of her work. He saw Sobel‘s work in a gallery and commented about how she influenced him. Sadly, Janet Sobel moved away from New York and her rise in the art world was quickly halted. Hear all about her life and career as well as our discussion of her painting Milky Way. As always, you can find a picture of the work at www.whoartedpodcast.com You can follow Kyle Wood on Instagram (Wood.Art.Ed) and Twitter (@WoodArtEd). You can email WhoARTedPodcast@gmail.com to share your connections, corrections, suggest topics for future episodes etc. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 13, 2021
Season 3 Coming Soon
151
Season 3 of Who ARTed will start popping up in your feed on Monday, September 13. Tune in every week to hear the story behind the artwork. Every week we focus on a different artist starting with a little bit of their background before discussing one of their masterpieces so we can understand not only what they created, but why. Who ARTed is art history for all ages. The works and discussions stay clean and appropriate so all listeners to enjoy. Check out the website www.WhoArtEdPodcast.com for images of the works being discussed, resources for fellow art teachers and more. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 02, 2021
Season 2 Finale -REBROADCAST The Arts Madness Winner
1424
I am wrapping up this season with the conclusion to my Arts Madness Tournament. Over the last 6 weeks, voters have narrowed the field from 64 down to 1 ultimate artist. I really appreciated everyone who took the time to participate. Hopefully you have learned more about some of your favorite artists and discovered some new ones. This episode is rebroadcasting the episode on the tournament's winner.    Look for new episodes in your podcast feed when season 3 starts in the fall and as always you can find more at www.whoartedpodcast.com  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 12, 2021
Fun Fact Friday - From a King‘s Bathroom to an Iconic Museum
521
The Louvre is one of the most famous museums in the world with an expansive collection of some of the greatest masterpieces ever created. Interestingly, it did not start out that way. The building actually started as a medieval fortress. It had a moat, walls and a fortified tower in the center. Of course as Paris expanded, the fortifications moved to the exterior of the city and the Louvre was converted to a royal residence in the 14th century. The fortress was mostly demolished and extensive renovations were underway but people got distracted with the whole hundred years war going on and the Louvre basically was dormant for some time. In 1527, King Francois changed all that. He was a poet, a patron of the arts and he built up quite the collection. He acquired the Mona Lisa among other works and he is said to have hung the iconic masterpiece in his bathroom. Of course his bathroom was a little nicer than the average outhouse. His sprawling residence housed numerous works of art and eventually he started to display these works making them accessible to the public.   This will be the final new episode for this season of Who ARTed. I will rebroadcast either the Georgia O'Keeffe, or Yayoi Kusama episode on Monday depending on who wins the Arts Madness tournament, but then I will be taking a break for a while. I may do a run of a few mini episodes if I have time over the summer, but otherwise look for new episodes in your podcast feed when Season 3 starts in the fall.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 09, 2021
Georgia O‘Keeffe vs. Yayoi Kusama
1601
We are entering the final round of this year's Arts Madness Tournament. For those listeners outside the United States, every spring, there is a giant basketball tournament called, March Madness, as 64 different college teams compete. The Arts Madness Tournament is a shameless attempt to ride the coattails of the immensely popular NCAA basketball tournament, but with 64 diverse artists. For the last five weeks, listeners have voted for their favorites narrowing the field from 64 down to just two finalists: Georgia O'Keeffe and Yayoi Kusama.  One thing that I find particularly interesting in this matchup is that O'Keeffe and Kusama actually had a connection. While she was living in Japan thinking of becoming an artist, she was inspired by Georgia O'Keeffe and wrote to her. O'Keeffe responded offering her advice and encouragement. When Kusama was in New York, Georgia O'Keeffe actually came to her studio and offered her support even offering to provide Kusama a place to live. Kusama politely declined the invitation because while O'Keeffe was an established artist and could afford to stay in her beloved New Mexico desert home, Kusama was just starting out and needed to be in New York to be immersed in the art scene, make connections and establish her own career.  This episode replays the background information from each artist's full episodes recorded earlier this season. You can vote for your favorite at www.WhoArtEdPodcast.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 05, 2021
Fun Fact Friday - The Art World is Bananas
427
In 2019, Maurizio Cattelan displayed a piece at Art Basel Miami, and it grabbed headlines around the world. The artwork titled Comedian consisted of simply a banana duct taped to a wall. Cattelan was offering 3 editions of this work and actually sold two for $120,000 each. If that weren‘t enough, another artist at the show took the banana off the wall and ate it. David Datuna, a performance artist, performed an intervention he dubbed Hungry Artist consuming the banana that caused such a stir. Cattelan appears to have had a good sense of humor about the incident. Nobody pressed charges for vandalism or anything along those lines because the banana was not the point. Comedian was a conceptual piece, so patrons were not really buying a banana tapes to a wall. They bought a certificate of authenticity for the idea of taping a banana to a wall, so basically they paid $120,000 for an artwork made of a banana bought from a local grocery store for $0.30 and in the end, they may or may not actually get the banana. As always you can find more at www.WhoArtEdPodcast.com and if you enjoy the podcast, please follow Who Arted on Spotify, Stitcher, Apple Podcasts or wherever you listen. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Apr 02, 2021
Georgia O‘Keeffe
2018
Georgia O‘Keeffe is considered the mother of American modernism. Her influence actually reached beyond American borders. Yayoi Kusama was not only inspired by O‘Keeffe, but Georgia O‘Keeffe was generous enough to give her advice and even offer to allow her a place to stay and financial support early in Kusama‘s career. Georgia O‘Keeffe appears to have not only been a great artist, but also a great person. O‘Keeffe‘s greatest legacy is probably her unique perspective on nature. She painted around 200 pictures of flowers using a close cropped composition that made them appear as abstractions. While these paintings are often viewed in symbolic terms, O‘Keeffe always insisted her work was simply based on observation. For this episode we discussed her painting Blue Morning Glories from 1935. As always you can see the image and find more at www.whoartedpodcast.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 29, 2021
Fun Fact Friday - Georgia O‘Keeffe Painted in her Car
293
For this week's Fun Fact Friday mini episode, I am sharing an interesting little tidbit I found about Georgia O'Keeffe. While she is best known for her paintings of nature specifically, her most popular works are close cropped images of flowers or images inspired by the desert landscapes she encountered while living in New Mexico. While her work was all about nature, she painted those vast, open desert landscapes from the confines of a cramped Ford Model A car. She apparently developed a habit of transforming her car into a makeshift studio. She would remove the driver's seat, flip the passenger seat backwards so it would face the backseat. The back bench would serve as an easel as she sat in the rear facing passenger seat to paint. She did this in order to protect herself from the harsh sun, although I would imagine the interior of that car would also get quite hot baking out in the New Mexico desert. If you are interested in learning more about Georgia O'Keeffe, she will be the subject of the next full episode coming out on Monday. As always there is more fun art history to explore at www.whoartedpodcast.com  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 26, 2021
Felix Gonzalez-Torres
1932
Felix Gonzalez-Torres was a Cuban American artist who rose to prominence in the late 1980s and early 1990s with his poignant minimalist installations. His stack pieces of unlimited edition prints make the fine art gallery space more democratic. Patrons are not only able to touch and take a piece from the artist, but the viewer becomes a collaborator as every person who takes one of the prints changes the dimensions of the sculpture. Throughout his career, Felix Gonzalez-Torres was focused on art and community as well as cultural connections. In this episode, we discussed "Untitled" (Portrait of Ross in L.A.) from 1991.  The first time, I saw this piece, I was walking through a gallery and saw just a giant pile of candy. At first, I dismissed the work as a sign of everything wrong with contemporary art. I simply walked past thinking how ridiculous it was that simply pouring bags of candy on the floor would be considered worthy of a museum. Of course, as with most things I initially dismissed, I found upon further research that it was actually quite thoughtful and deliberately created. Felix Gonzalez-Torres's work was actually a big influence on my development as an artist and a teacher in getting me to think of art as not simply a static object created by an artist for others to look at, but rather something for all to participate in. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 22, 2021
Fun Fact Friday - Andy Warhol had a Mummy Foot
466
Andy Warhol was an odd dude with an expansive and extremely odd collection. He basically hoarded all he could with boxes of stuff that could fill warehouses. His collection ranged from the ordinary objects that were the subjects of his iconic pop art, to curious artifacts from history such as the mummified foot he kept in his studio. It is unclear where he got the foot, but a popular story is that he bought it from a flea market. While acquiring ancient Egyptian remains at a flea market may seem incredible today, there is actually a long history of mummies being used as decorations, party games, paper and they have even been ground up to be consumed as medicine or as pigment for paints. As always you can find more at www.whoartedpodcast.com  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 19, 2021
Andy Warhol
2114
For this week‘s episode, we focused on one of the most famous and influential Pop Artists of all time, Any Warhol. Andy Warhol was born, Any Warhola but later dropped the ‘a‘ because he loved mass production and tended to favor shortcuts, so I guess even his own name proved too much work. He said he dropped the name because his name was Czech and he thought Warhol was simpler. This change occurred right at the beginning of his career in 1949 as his first commissioned illustrations for Glamour Magazine was a collection of his shoe drawings and the art credits listed him as Andy Warhol. Andy loved mass media and used images found from newspapers and magazines as inspiration. He said he wanted to be a machine. He dubbed his studio ”The Factory” and he used methods to streamline and automate the creative process. He traced images for efficiency, he used screen printing to make it easier to copy his works for the repetitive series he was known for. While most printmakers work very carefully and meticulously to align their prints and ensure there will be no mistakes, Warhol actually celebrated to the flaws inherent in the printing process as it referenced the cheap tabloid feel he longed to create in so many of his works. While his work was often criticized as shallow and celebrating consumerism, he carefully thought about every aspect of his subjects and his process to create a deep and meaningful reflection of a culture that was largely shallow and fixated with throw away cultural icons. For this episode we looked at his zebra print which was a part of a series of 10 endangered species prints Warhol created in 1983. You can see the image at www.WhoArtEdPodcast.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 15, 2021
Fun Fact Friday - Purple
385
For this fun fact Friday mini episode, I discuss the color purple. Purple has long been associated with royalty and that is largely because purple dyes have been hard to come by. The time consuming, labor and resource intensive process of producing purple dyes made them very expensive and thus only people of wealth and power could afford such finery.  As always, you can find more to learn about on the website www.whoartedpodcast.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 12, 2021
Bisa Butler
1981
For this episode, I spoke with Dr. Rosemary Lee an artist far more serious and accomplished than myself to gain some insights into the work of Bisa Butler. Specifically we talked about The Safety Patrol from 2018. For images, and more go to www.WhoArtEdPodcast.com Bisa Butler is a contemporary American artist. She was born and raised in New Jersey. She attended Howard University where her primary studio concentration was painting. Later on, she worked as an art teacher, but one of the most significant impacts on her personal and professional life came when she was pregnant. For health reasons, she gave up oils and solvents during her pregnancy but she could not give up on making art. When her grandmother got sick Butler wanted to make something for her. She found an old wedding photo of her grandparents, and used that image as inspiration for a quilt. Butler continued working making portraits on quilts. Her subjects include both famous and forgotten figures. A lot of her imagery comes from found photographs. She says she prefers black and white images as they allow her to be more creative in her selection of color. Bisa Butler uses an appliqué method layering colorful fabrics to make quilts that look like paintings. Her method actually starts off similar to how one might construct a large scale painting or drawing. She projects the image and draws out the shapes for the various color separations to capture the range of values needed. She then carefully selects fabrics in a variety of colors, textures and patterns to suit the subject and she cuts/stitches them together to form her image. Her portraits are life size bringing the viewer face to face with forgotten and overlooked people from history. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 08, 2021
Fun Fact Friday- Blue
490
This is a part of my series of fun fact Friday mini episodes about different colors. This week you can learn a bit about the history of different pigments used to create blue in artworks. For a long time, blue pigment was more valuable than gold. Blue pigments were so labor intensive and expensive that some prominent artists like Michelangelo were said to have left some paintings unfinished because they could not afford more blue paint.  While we see blue all around us in the sky, the water, even people's eyes, blue pigments are relatively rare in nature. There is no blue pigment in people's eyes, just as the sky does not have blue pigment. Blue eyes, and the blue of the sky are just optical illusions produced by the shorter wavelengths of light scattering more readily through the gasses in earth's atmosphere or in the case of blue eyes, the way the light scatters through the fluid in the stroma of the iris.  As always, you can find more at www.WhoArtEdPodcast.com  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 05, 2021
Marcus Bromander
2033
Marcus Bromander is one of the co-creators and co-designers of the extremely popular game, Among Us. For this episode, I spoke with Jeff Arndt, a fellow art teacher, about Bromander and his work.  Although Among Us is an online game, it was actually inspired by Bromander's love of a game he played with his friends in real life when he was growing up. The social aspects of gaming have become particularly important during the global pandemic making Among Us a perfect game for this time as it has allowed for people to maintain connection with friends while social distancing. As always you can learn a bit more at www.whoartedpodcast.com  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 01, 2021
Fun Fact Friday - Green
420
Remember the voting in round 1 of the Arts Madness tournament will begin Monday, March 1. Visit www.WhoArtEdPodcast.com for more information. This week's Fun Fact Friday mini episode is about the color green. Learn a little more about associations with the color green as well as sources of green in nature, in food and a surprising fact about green eyes.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 26, 2021
Joe Mills
1759
For this week‘s episode I talked with Chuck Hoff about Joe Mills. Joe is an artist based out of Chicago and both Chuck and I were lucky enough to work with him years ago. Joe Mills was born in Kentucky but he came to Illinois for college. He studied industrial design at the University of Illinois and after college, he worked as a toy designer. A big turning point in his artistic development came when he moved to Australia in 2010. While in Australia, he missed his adopted home town of Chicago and he began creating work based on the city he loves. That Chicago themed work came to be his signature. Over the years he has captured many different subjects, but he focuses on his passions whether it is the city and the culture of communities around Chicago, or figures from pop culture. Mills creates work that is both meticulous and whimsical. He has the precision of an industrial designer combined with the creative and aesthetically pleasing style of a fine artist. For this episode we discussed his Chicago Factory piece to discuss. You can find the image and more at www.whoartedpodcast.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 22, 2021
Fun Fact Friday - Yellow
551
Voting for the Arts Madness tournament will begin March 1. Right now, you can check out all 64 artists and enter your prediction to win at www.WhoArtEdPodcast.com  This week's fun fact Friday mini episode is all about the color yellow. The ancient Egyptians associated yellow with gold, and gold was symbolic of the gods and the eternal. Consequently, they used quite a bit of yellow to decorate their tombs. Of course just as with orange, the yellow pigment favored by the Egyptians contained arsenic so kind of ironic as a connection to immortality and yet perfect for the decoration of a tomb.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 19, 2021
Duff Goldman
1714
For this episode I sat down with my good friend David Pittman to talk about the amazing work of Duff Goldman, the Ace of Cakes. Duff Goldman is a culinary artist well known for his incredible artistry with cakes. He is part baker, part sculptor, part painter but definitely one amazing artist. His actual name is Jeffery Goldman, but his brother mispronounced it as Duffy and the name stuck. Throughout his life, Duff moved around to different parts of the country: Michigan, Missouri, Massachusetts, California, Maryland but no matter where he was his love for cooking and his incredible work ethic remained constant. Because Duff is a celebrity baker it seemed only fitting that the episode focus on discussion of a piece from one of his shows, so we discussed the Bollywood inspired elephant cake from the competition between Duff and Buddy, another celebrity baker. As always you can find more at www.whoartedpodcast.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 15, 2021
Fun Fact Friday - Orange
453
I am continuing my fun fact series about colors. This episode is all about the color orange. I compiled a few fun facts about the color orange. For example, before the orange was brought to Europe in the 16th century, the color was simply referred to as yellow red. Orange has positive connections to warmth, energy and the divine all around the world. Orange pigment also has a long history of being highly toxic and it was only recently that artists shifted away from the use of chrome orange which was made with lead.  As always you can find more resources to continue learning at www.whoartedpodcast.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 12, 2021
Grant Wood
2460
Grant Wood was the American regionalist painter who rose to prominence almost overnight with his 1930 painting, American Gothic. In this episode, I spoke with Mike Divelbiss about Wood, his biography and his iconic work. Grant Wood was born in rural Iowa in 1891. His mother moved the family to the more urban Cedar Rapids in 1901 after his father passed away. Grant Wood showed a proclivity for the arts from an early age and after high school he pursued a broad based education at the Minneapolis Institute of Design and Handicraft. While he is best known today for his painting, Grant Wood worked in diverse media including functional art designing and building furniture as well as jewelry. In 1913, he moved to Chicago where he found work as a silversmith and eventually opened his own shop. During that time, he continued his education studying at The School of the Art Institute of Chicago. A few years later, he moved back to Iowa to help take care of his mother and he found work as an art teacher. While teaching art, he also served as the local jack of all trades artist. He was commissioned to make a stained glass piece honoring veterans of World War I in addition to building furniture, painting etc. In 1930, Grant Wood submitted American Gothic in an exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago. The piece was immediately popular and acquired by the museum. This elevated Wood‘s stature in the art world and opened opportunities for him such as teaching at the University of Iowa. He used his prominence to continue to do good in his community starting an artist colony, and during The Great Depression, he led the government jobs program overseeing artists painting murals around Iowa. American Gothic has been an interesting icon of American and particularly midwestern art for decades. In Iowa, there was an immediate backlash to the piece by people who felt it portrayed them in an unflattering light. Of course as years went on, in the grips of the depression, the painting came to be viewed more as portraying the strength and quiet dignity of working people. Personally I would argue that there is truth in both interpretations. I would argue that Grant Wood has a deep love and fondness for his subjects and his community, but infused his work with a little bit of the caustic humor that is typical of the culture. He is a bit playful with his work on some level making fun of some of the stiffness of some of conventions of the art world and what he viewed as the absurd and pretentious ”gothic” window on a small rural home (interesting fact, the window that Wood found so pretentious was actually functional and purchased from a Sears catalog) but simultaneously he has a deep love and affection for everyone and everything he is portraying in his work. You can find a picture of American Gothic linked here, and as always on the website www.WhoArtEdPodcast.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 08, 2021
Fun Fact Friday - Red
397
Last week I began a series of mini episodes exploring color. For this week's episode, I share some interesting bits about the color red. The color red is associated with both love and anger. While many mistakenly believe red will anger a bull, people looking at the color red have been known to experience an increase in their heart rate. Listen to this mini episode to find out a little more about the color red. If you enjoy the podcast, please like, subscribe and leave a review. Follow me on twitter @WoodArtEd and find more on the website www.WhoArtEdPodcast.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 05, 2021
Claude Monet
1859
The Impressionist movement has been appealing to art lovers for about 150 years. While Claude Monet was not the sole inventor of the style, the movement was actually named after one of his paintings. Claude Monet was born in 1840. The 19th century brought us innovations that drastically changed how artists saw their role and their process. The advent of photography allowed artists to shift their focus away from use of paint as a means of recording what important people, places and things looked like. Artists started to shift their focus toward being more creative in their paintings focusing on color, and the expressive qualities that a camera could not capture. The tube of paint was also a 19th century invention. While it does not seem like such a big deal, the tube of paint made a wider range of hues available to artists and made those paints more portable. Monet and the Impressionists were well known to love painting outside. They stood in the landscape carefully capturing the colors as they saw them rather than staying in the studio painting from memory. While audiences today might look at paintings by Monet and other Impressionists as pleasant compositions that are fairly realistic, at the time, Impressionist paintings were revolutionary and viewed as scandalously sloppy when compared to the more traditional works that would have been seen in the Paris Salon. For this episode, we discussed one of Monet‘s water lilies paintings from what is perhaps his best known and most beloved series. Check out Water Lilies for 1906 at this link or on the website www.WhoArtEdPodcast.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 01, 2021
Fun Fact Friday - What is Color?
430
For this week's mini episode, I wanted to take a little time to explain what color is and how we perceive color. This is going to be the first in a series of mini episodes about colors. I wanted to get some of the initial science out of the way before going into deeper dives about the histories and interesting facts behind individual colors and how artists have created those colors throughout history.  As always, if you enjoy this episode, please like, subscribe and leave a review. For my fellow art teachers, I keep every episode clean and school appropriate so you can use this podcast as a resource to help your students explore art history. You can find images and free resources including a virtual gallery you can embed in your classroom site at www.whoartedpodcast.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 29, 2021
Ernie Barnes
2355
Not a lot of great painters were also professional football players. Ernie Barnes was an American artist who grew up in the South during the Jim Crowe era. Despite the numerous challenges, he worked hard, her persisted and he succeeded. As a teenager, a coach mentored Barnes helping him to become captain of the football team and a state champion at shot put. He attended a historically black university on an athletic scholarship but he majored in art. After college, Barnes went on to play pro football, but the owner of the New York Jets saw that Ernie Barnes was more valuable applying his talents to the canvas rather than the field. In the 1960s, Barnes quickly started gaining critical acclaim. His first show in New York sold out. His paintings not only hung in galleries, but also in pop culture on album covers and perhaps most famously on the television series Good Times. For this episode, my good friend and fellow elementary art teacher, Chuck Hoff discussed the history, and the incredible artistry of Ernie Barnes. We referenced a few pieces, but primarily focused our analysis on his painting The American Dream. As always you can find the work being discussed and other resources on the website www.WhoArtEdPodcast.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 25, 2021
Fun Fact Friday - The Curious Case of Nat Tate
392
The art world is full of interesting characters. In so many ways, the artist‘s biography can be as important as their work. Nat Tate was an interesting character introduced to critics and tastemakers in 1998 when David Bowie hosted a dinner party to help launch a new book Nat Tate: Am American Artist 1928-1960. While the book has the sleepy title of a non-fiction book, it was actually a novel framed as a biography. Nat Tate was a tragic abstract expressionistic painter who destroyed 99% of his work before his untimely death. It was a compelling narrative of art and an artist lost to history. It was also pure fiction. While Bowie enlisted the help of a Picasso biographer to tell tales of Tate‘s interactions with Picasso, Braque and others, Nat Tate never existed. A week later, a journalist published a story of how important figures in the art world fell victim to this hoax. Oddly while Nat Tate was not real, there are real ”surviving” artworks attributed to him. In 2011, Sotheby‘s auctioned off a Nat Tate painting, Bridge No. 114, which sold for over 7000 pounds.  As always you can see the work at www.WhoArtEdPodcast.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 22, 2021
Homer Simpson
2259
I wanted to start 2021 with something fun, so I decided to do an episode about a classic episode of The Simpsons. In season 10 episode 19 titled Mom and Pop Art, Homer becomes an outsider artist. While much of the humor is derived from the premise that Homer Simpson is inept and could never be a decent artist, but I thought it would be fun to consider what kind of an artist Homer really is. His first sculpture was created accidentally from a failed attempt to build a backyard barbecue pit. After tastemakers declared the failed grill to be an artistic triumph, Homer leans in to his new career as an artist. Of course after the initial success that came so easily, Homer discovers that maintaining an art career is difficult as he presents a series of works that are considered too derivative of his earlier work as they all had the same feel behind them. This actually is one of the least true criticisms I observed in the satirical look at the art world. While in the Simpson‘s world art critics are fickle and looking to be constantly shocked, in reality one of the most sure paths to success is for an artist to develop a signature style so their work is easily identified to patrons. Consistency is crucial to an artist‘s marketability. Still Homer‘s falling out of favor led to a rare bit of introspection and growth for the character. Marge guides him through the museum and Homer applies his learning to creating one final masterpiece - The Grand Canals of Springfield. If you set aside the reckless destruction of property and the fact that such an act would have wreaked havoc endangering thousands of people and animals, it was actually a fairly interesting work. Ultimately, I consider Homer to be most interesting as a work of art rather than as an artist, but through any lens I find him delightful and thought provoking. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 18, 2021
Season 2 Recap (Part 2)
940
This is a second mini episode recapping the takeaways from the artists covered thus far in season 2. In this episode, I share my takeaways from the episodes about Phil Hansen, Wassily Kandinsky, Pablo Picasso, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Charuvi Agrawal, and Njideka Akunyili Crosby.  The second half of season 2 will start on Monday, January 18th.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 28, 2020
Season 2 Recap (Part 1)
542
I will be taking a bit of a break. This week and next week will be the podcast equivalent of a clip show as I will rundown just the main takeaways I had from each artist I discussed throughout this season. In this episode I talked about the first five episodes which were about Marcel Duchamp, Burton Morris, Yayoi Kusama, Alexander Calder, and Barbara Kruger. Next week, I will run down the rest of the artists featured thus far. New episodes will be back in your feed starting Monday, January 18th.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 21, 2020
Fun Fact Friday - Art Was An Olympic Event
592
Few people know this, but Art used to be an Olympic event. Starting in the 1912 games, artists could win Olympic gold, silver and bronze medals in five categories of art.  For more information and resources, check out the website www.WhoArtEdPodcast.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 18, 2020
Njideka Akunyili Crosby
2128
For this episode, I talked to Janet Taylor, art teacher and writer for the Art of Education. She actually taught be about Njideka Akunyili Crosby, the contemporary Nigerian/American painter. Njiedeka Akunyili Crosby was born in 1983 in Enugu, Nigeria. Her father was a surgeon and mother was a professor of pharmacology. Her mother won the green card lottery allowing Njideka to come to the U.S. to study when she was 16. She spent a year studying and prepping for the SATs then went back to Nigeria to perform a year of service. After completing the year of service, she came back to the U.S. She took her first painting classes at a community college in Philadelphia then went on to Swarthmore. She was initially pre-med before deciding to pursue art. After Swarthmore, she went to the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Art, then went on to get her MFA from Yale. A lot of her work focuses on straddling different worlds and her connections to Nigeria and the U.S. She uses painting with some collage methods like integration of fabric but particularly transfers. These methods not only integrate patterns and textures but also enrich the work through the connections to pop culture and other icons embedded as details to be discovered within her work. In 2017, she got the MacArthur genius grant which pretty much says it all right there. Her CV could make even the most accomplished among us question their adequacy. For this episode we looked at Predecessors from 2013. As always you can see the piece linked here in the show notes, or visit www.WhoArtEdPodcast.com to see this week‘s work as well as previous pieces and free resources for art teachers. If you enjoy the show, please help spread the word. Like, Subscribe and leave a review on iTunes or wherever you get your podcasts. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 14, 2020
Fun Fact Friday - Michelangelo Stunk
469
Michelangelo is one of the most celebrated artists in history. He is known for having created some of the finest masterpieces in the world including the painting on the Sistine Chapel and the statue of David. As talented people become historical figures over the centuries, a lot of their humanity can be lost in historical accounts that feature only their highlights. I generally believe in giving people the generous edit and focusing on their good aspects, but going too far in mythologizing an artist or anyone else can be unhelpful. To focus only on their brilliance and ignore their struggles and shortcomings can be frustrating and cut short the growth of future generations of artists under the shadow of larger than life ”old masters.” With that in mind, I share that while Michelangelo‘s art was absolutely beautiful, the artist himself was kind of gross. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 11, 2020
Charuvi Agrawal
2100
Charuvi Agrawal is a contemporary artist from India. She is tremendously talented as a painter, sculptor and animator. She is probably best known for two incredible works based on Hanuman. Shortly after finishing her Masters in computer animation, she opened her own studio Charuvi Design Labs and spent 3 years developing a 3D animated film about Hanuman which gained widespread critical acclaim. Following that project, Agrawal created a jaw dropping sound sculpture, a 25 foot tall sculpture of Hanuman consisting of 26,000 hanging bells. As always you can find images of the work being discussed and more resources for art lovers and art teachers at www.WhoArtEdPodcast.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 07, 2020
Fun Fact Friday - The Erased Masterpiece
636
For this week‘s fun fact friday, learn about how Robert Rauschenberg created a famous work of art simply by erasing another artist‘s drawing. The piece is called ”Erased de Kooning Drawing” from 1953.  This work is often misunderstood as an act of aggression or disrespect as Rauschenberg figuratively and quite literally erases Willem de Kooning‘s work, but actually this work was meant to be a celebration of de Kooning. Rauschenberg knew that the piece would only work if he were erasing a significant work by a great artist. De Kooning reluctantly agreed and gave a drawing for the younger artist to erase. Over the course of 2 months, Rauschenberg meticulously wore through numerous erasers until all that was left were a few smudges on an otherwise blank paper. Ultimately, we will never know what was originally on that paper, but de Kooning indicated it was a high quality piece and something he would miss. He felt that was important to the project. Now viewers are left to imagine what great drawing was once on that paper. The erased drawing creates an an absence or a loss that is somehow more empty than a new white page and in doing so it has elevated de Kooning‘s drawing to a space of legend freed from the page to now live inside the viewer‘s imagination. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 04, 2020
Jean-Michel Basquiat
2025
Jean-Michel Basquiat became a star of the art world in the 1980s. He grew up in New York and started making a name for himself through his collaborative graffiti project SAMO. In 1980, SAMO was dead and a young Basquiat was poised to take the art world by storm. His biography is the kind of story one would find hard to believe if laid out as the plot to a book or movie. He showed tremendous promise from an early age. He learned to read and write by the age of four. His mother nurtured his talents taking him to museums, providing him books to read to feed his appetite for more learning. Unfortunately, by his teenage years, while he was fluent in 3 languages, he was also struggling with his mother‘s mental illness and the need for her to be in care away from the family. He was a high school dropout and homeless in the late 1970s, but in the 1980s, he was painting in expensive Armani suits and throwing hundred dollar bills out of his limo to panhandlers on the street. In 2017, one of Basquiat‘s paintings set a record for the most expensive painting by an American artist when it sold for $110.5 million. In this episode of Who ARTed, we discuss the life and work of Jean-Michel Basquiat. As always you can find images of the work and other resources on the website www.WhoArtEdPodcast.com and if you like the podcast, please help spread the word, leave a review and all that. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 30, 2020
Fun Fact Friday -It Really Seems Like Leonardo da Vinci Had ADHD
641
To be accurate, this one is a little more of a ”Fun Speculation Friday” as we will never know for a fact whether he had ADHD. He was not diagnosed in his lifetime and no credible diagnostician would pretend that they definitively prove someone had a disorder 500 years after they died. Still to consider him as an artist with a disability makes Leonardo da Vinci even more inspiring. Leonardo da Vinci is one of the most talented artist the world has ever known. He is frequently held up as the ideal ”Renaissance man” because of his notebooks full of scientific study, observations and plans for different inventions. The thing is, he never got around to editing, organizing or publishing those notes in order to help others learn and build off of his study. He never got around to building his machines. The majority of his work went unfinished. While many great artists from history created hundreds or thousands of works, Leonardo only appears to have completed a few dozen and he was notorious for taking absurdly long to do so. It took him over a decade to complete the Mona Lisa. He spent 3 years painting The Last Supper and he only finished that work after his patron threatened to cut off his funding. That distractibility and constant thirst for knowledge on a wide range of topics likely made him frustrating to work with, but it is also what made him brilliant. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 27, 2020
Pablo Picasso
2050
Pablo Picasso is arguable one of the most talented and influential artists of the 20th century. He is certainly one of the most famous and successful. The name Picasso has become synonymous with artistic greatness, but the reality is not always quite as great as the myth. For all of his undeniable skill and talent, Pablo Picasso was a deeply flawed human being. His legacy is tarnished to some extent by his terrible treatment of women and his own family. I was hesitant to do an episode on Picasso for a long time because I generally want this podcast to have a positive tone and focus primarily on the better aspects of art. I tried to cover a bit of his artistic legacy and brilliance while acknowledging but not getting overly bogged down in the depressing details of his personal shortcomings. For this episode we focused on Guernica from 1937. It was Picasso‘s massive painting created as a response to the horrific violence of the bombing of the town of Guernica during the Spanish Civil War. The German Nazis and Italian fascists were involved in the Spanish Civil War and Picasso painted Guernica at the request of Spanish Nationalists. He exhibited the painting at the Paris International Exhibition at the Spanish Pavilion. Nazi Germany had a huge pavilion at the same exhibition which had to make things a little awkward. Guernica was exhibited in other venues throughout the world to raise money for Spanish war relief and to convey his antiwar/anti violence political stance. As always, you can find the image linked within the show notes or look on the website www.WhoArtEdPodcast.com where fellow art teachers can also find numerous resources that can be helpful in the classroom. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 23, 2020
Fun Fact Friday - The World‘s First Photobomb
727
The history of photography has some really interesting and surprising facts. For example, the camera is about 2000 years older than photography. The earliest known camera obscuras were documented as far back as the 4th century BCE in China, while photography didn‘t really come about until the 18th Century. In the early 19th century, Louis Daguerre was working hard to improve the photographic method. His innovations helping to develop a latent image drastically cut down on exposure times making photography much more practical. Of course while I say it drastically cut down exposure times, it cut the times down from hours to minutes, but it was still too long to be practical for most people to be captured in a photo. The first photograph of people actually happened by accident as one man‘s decision to get his shoes shined in 1838 led to his likeness being captured in an image that would make history. For images and more resources, check out www.WhoArtEdPodcast.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 20, 2020
Wassily Kandinsky
1968
Wassily Kandinsky was a Russian artist and art theorist. He is known as one of the early pioneers of abstract art. Learn a bit about Kandinsky‘s background, his personal journey from a teacher of Law and Economics to one of the most influential artists of the 20th century. Wassily Kandinsky is said to have had a condition known as synesthesia in which sound and color were linked sensory experiences. As a child he described hearing the paint his as he mixed colors. As an adult, he spoke of visual arts in musical terms. We discussed his unique vision as expressed in the piece Yellow Red Blue, 1925. Who ARTed is an art history podcast for all ages. Kyle Wood has been teaching elementary art for well over a decade helping to break things down and explain art history in a way that listeners of any age can understand and appreciate. For more information and resources of particular interest to fellow art teachers, check out the website www.WhoArtEdPodcast.com Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 16, 2020
Fun Fact Friday - The Primary Colors: Way More Complicated Than You Thought
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For this week‘s Fun Fact Friday, I wanted to share a little bit about the Primary Colors. In Art class, we are traditionally taught that all the colors we see are a combination of just red, yellow and blue. This is true to some extent, but teaching that there are just three primary colors and that you can make any color you want using red, yellow and blue gives people an incomplete picture. The fact is there are actually different sets of primary colors depending on what colored medium one is working with. Also, if we are being technically accurate, whether using additive or subtractive color the optimal primaries are not red, yellow and blue. If you enjoy this podcast, please like subscribe and leave a review on Apple Podcasts or wherever you are listening. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 13, 2020
Phil Hansen
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For images and resources, go to www.WhoArtEdPodcast.com For this week's episode I spoke with Kelly Beach about the contemporary American artist, Phil Hansen. The specific work being discussed was Hansen's piece Cobain, from his Goodbye Art 2 series. Hansen's work focuses largely on the creative process and overcoming obstacles. Hansen himself struggled with a tremor that hindered his artistic career until he learned to "embrace the shake" and change his methods, change his mindset and opened up a whole new world of possibilities.  If you enjoy the podcast, please like, subscribe, leave a review and help spread the word. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 09, 2020
Fun Fact Friday - Pablo Picasso: Art Thief
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For more information and resources, go to www.WhoArtEdPodcast.com  Pablo Picasso is credited with numerous quotes including, "Good artists copy. Great artists steal." Interestingly, he may have stolen that idea from T.S. Elliot. It is not entirely clear whether Picasso ever did actually say the oft quoted line, but Elliot is definitely documented to have said "Immature poets imitate; mature poets steal; bad poets deface what they take, and good poets make it into something better, or at least something different." The quote is not the only instance of Picasso's questionable practices with regard to other people's property whether physical or intellectual. Diego Rivera accused Picasso of plagiarizing his work. The police even suspected Picasso of stealing The Mona Lisa in 1911, and while he did not take Leonardo da Vinci's masterpiece, Picasso was in possession of other art stolen from the Louvre. If you enjoy the Who ARTed Podcast, please like, subscribe, leave a review and help spread the word of this thoroughly adequate podcast. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 06, 2020
Barbara Kruger
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For images and more to explore, go to www.WhoArtEdPodcast.com  For this episode, we talked about the Barabara Kruger. She is known for her collages using text often on top of found images in a way that confronts the viewer raising questions about the conduct of our culture. Her work is often political without being prescriptive. She raises questions and poses problems for the viewer to think about, but often leaves it to the viewer to make up his or her mind about the issue. In this episode, we talked about the popular piece, Don't be a Jerk, which was first made early in her career, but she was commissioned by MoMA to make another version of it in 1996, and in 2017 it was printed on skateboard decks.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 02, 2020
Spooktacular Bonus - The Art of the Lego Hidden Side
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As always you can find more information and resources on my website WhoARTedPodcast.com I thought it would be fun to do a bonus episode this Halloween focusing on the artistry behind the spooky, fun Lego Hidden Side collection. For those who are unfamiliar, the Hidden Side is Lego's augmented reality theme with delightful transformational elements. The sets focus on the paranormal and there are physical manifestations of hauntings in the real world play with the sets as well as a free app allowing players to can the set with their phone and hunt for ghosts or be a ghost haunting the town. It is a delightful combination of multiple artistic disciplines as sculptors, graphic designers, writers, animators all worked to create a masterful collection that engages the audience on multiple levels in the real and virtual worlds. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 31, 2020
Fun Fact Friday - Killer Wallpaper
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For more information and resources check my website www.WhoARTedPodcast.com  This week's fun fact Friday episode focuses on Scheele's green which was a popular green pigment in the victorian era. Unfortunately, while the green was beautiful, it was also deadly because Scheele's green was derived from arsenic. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 30, 2020
Alexander Calder
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As always you can find a picture of the work and more at www.WhoArtEdPodcast.com  For this week's episode we learn a bit about Alexander Calder, the mechanical engineer who became a pioneer of kinetic sculpture. The specific work we looked at in this episode is Streetcar from 1951. It is one of many mobiles Calder created over his career. While he did have other amazing work including his wire sculptures that are just masterfully created drawings in air, as well as toys, jewelry, stabile sculptures, set designs and more, he is best known for his mobiles so we used a piece representative of his most famous innovation when discussing the artist and his legacy. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 26, 2020
Fun Fact Friday - The Lego House
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As always, you can find pictures and more information at www.WhoArtEdPodcast.com For this week's fun fact friday, you can learn about everyone's first and favorite modular building material Lego, and how in 2009 on man (with the help of corporate sponsors and a few thousand volunteers) built a livable house out of Lego complete with working plumbing.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 23, 2020
Yayoi Kusama
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To see the work discussed in this episode, visit www.WhoArtEdPodcast.com Yayoi Kusama is among the most popular contemporary artists. In addition to her beautiful paintings, Kusama makes installations, sculptures, poetry, fashion. She has done a bit of everything in the art world and audiences have loved her work for decades. Her infinity room installations are particularly popular as the mirrored rooms create a sensation of a space that extends forever. For this episode, the specific work discussed was her installation, Love is Calling.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 19, 2020
Fun Fact Friday - The Feud Between Stuart Semple and Anish Kapoor
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For more information and resources you can visit www.WhoArtEdPodcast.com  In this minisode, we learn about some of the petty behavior of "sophisticated" artists. Anish Kapoor has the exclusive rights to use vantablack, the world's blackest black, for artistic purposes. Many in the art world found it infuriating that someone in a creative field would stop others from accessing materials thus stifling innovation. Some were more bothered by the uninspired ways that Kapoor squandered this material. Stuart Semple fought back in was that are in some ways petty, but always amusing. Learn a bit about their feud in this episode, and if you want to learn more about Semple, purchase some of his pigments, or participate in #Pinktober visit his website Culture Hustle. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 16, 2020
Burton Morris
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Go to www.WhoArtEdPodcast.com to see the work being discussed. This week we talked about the American Pop Art painter, Burton Morris. His work has gained quite a bit of notoriety as it was featured on the hit NBC sitcom Friends. In this episode we discuss a bit about his background, his style and we do a closer look at his nightstand portrait of Andy Warhol. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 12, 2020
Fun Fact Friday - What‘s up with ROY G BIV?
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This season I thought it would be nice to do a series of minisodes on Fridays. The Fun Fact Friday series will consist of short episodes with little anecdotes about art history and interesting connections to science. This week's Fun Fact is that the ROY G BIV model of a rainbow is somewhat arbitrary. The only reason people slip indigo between blue and violet is because Sir Isaac Newton wanted to have seven colors in order to match the musical scale. As always you can find more information and resources at www.whoartedpodcast.com  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 09, 2020
Marcel Duchamp
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For pictures of the works being discussed, go to www.WhoArtEdPodcast.com For Season 2, I decided to start by taking a deep dive into Fountain from 1917. Marcel Duchamp started his career as a painter, but his greatest legacy is the readymade which caused artists, critics and audiences to question what art is, what it could be and opened the door to all sorts of innovations for generations of artists who followed. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 05, 2020
New Season, New Graphic, New Website
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Season 2 is will have 20 episodes released weekly starting Monday, October 5th. In addition to the new graphic, there is a new website WhoArtEdPodcast.com where you can find images of the work being discussed in each episode, a preview of season 2 episode 1, teacher resources and you can look at my artwork to judge the critic. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Sep 28, 2020
Season 1 Finale - Arts Madness
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I created a google site for Arts Madness 2020- a tournament of 64 different artists. https://sites.google.com/naperville203.org/artsmadness2020 This episode gives a quick overview of all 64 different artists. Please join in the fun and vote for your favorites. Each week, there will be another round of head to head matchups until we get down to just one ultimate winner.  This will be the final episode for season 1 as school closures, social distancing etc. have given me too many responsibilities to keep going with the podcast also. Season 2 will start in the fall Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 19, 2020
Jen Stark
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I met with my friend Jeff Arndt, the art teacher at Ranch View Elementary, and we decided to record a quick episode while we were setting up an art show at city hall. For this episode we discussed Jen Stark and her piece Inside Out from 2014.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Mar 05, 2020
OK Go
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For this episode, I thought it would be fun to do something a little different. We looked at the work of OK Go, specifically their video for The One Moment. It serves as a fun and accessible piece to start to break down how an audience can make sense of performance art. You can see their video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QvW61K2s0tA Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 28, 2020
Bobbi Cyr
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In this episode I spoke with Mrs. Pradel about Bobbi Cyr, a local artist known for her paintings and prints featuring hand lettering. Click here to see the specific piece we discussed in the episode. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 21, 2020
Carl Larsson
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Every episode explores a different artist/work first with a discussion of the context, then looking at one specific piece and finally we share our takeaways to further one's own artistic practice. In this episode we looked at the Swedish painter, Carl Larsson and his watercolor The Kitchen from 1898. Click here to view the work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 13, 2020
Diego Velazquez
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In this episode, I talked with Rita Woker about Diego Velazquez and his masterpiece, Las Meninas. It was a great privilege to learn from Woker's insights as a person who has seen the work first hand in Spain and her ability to share not only what she knows of the piece from her research, but the experience of seeing such a monumental painting. Click here to see Las Meninas. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Feb 06, 2020
Mid Season Review - 10 Takeaways from the first 10 Episodes
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This episode shares the 10 bits of advice I would pass on based on what I have learned over the course of the first ten episodes. Click here to view the collection of works discussed throughout the first half of the season and reviewed in this episode. I will be taking a short break and returning with ten more episodes to finish the season starting on Thursday February 6.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 09, 2020
Frida Kahlo
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For this episode, we discussed Frida Kahlo and her Self Portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird from 1940. In each episode, we have 3 segments: In Situ where we discuss the context and biographical information, In Gallery where we discuss one specific piece and finally In Studio where we share our takeaways and advice for artists to apply to their own work based on what we learned from this artist. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Jan 02, 2020
Leonardo da Vinci
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For this episode, we discussed Leonardo da Vinci, the artist known to embody the Renaissance ideal of study and mastery of diverse topics. First we discussed the historical context and a little bit about his biography, then for our In Gallery segment, we discussed one of Leonardo's most famous masterpieces, The Mona Lisa.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 26, 2019
Romare Bearden
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For this episode, we focused on Romare Bearden and his collage The Return of Odysseus (Homage to Pinturricchio and Benin). My guest was Hugh Boger, the principal of Scott Elementary School as we discussed the personal history of the artist as well as the social context, we discussed his collage and then share our takeaways.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 19, 2019
Chuck Close
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For this episode, I sat down to talk with Chuck Hoff, an amazing art teacher who has mentored me and and collaborated on numerous projects. We talked about one of his favorite artists, Chuck Close, and share some of Close's background and the obstacles he has overcome to be one of the most prominent photorealist painters today. We discussed his set portrait from 2001. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 12, 2019
Keith Haring
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For this episode we discussed the work and legacy of Keith Haring. He rose to prominence for his Pop Art in the 1980s, but even decades later his work still feels fresh and young because so many of his themes and his imagery are timeless and universal. The specific work discussed in this episode is Best Buddies Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Dec 05, 2019
Alfonse Mucha
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This episode focuses on Alfonse Mucha, the Art Nouveau painter and printmaker. We specifically are looking at the poster of the actress Sarah Bernhardt for her play Gismonda from 1894. That piece really elevated Mucha's career and captures the elements key to his influential style.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 28, 2019
Yannima Pikarli Tommy Watson
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Yannima Pikarli, more commonly known as Tommy Watson, was an indigenous Australian painter known for his wonderful sense of color. In this episode we discuss a bit about Tommy Watson's background, aboriginal art in general, and we discuss one of his paintings, Ngura Pulka from 2005 Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 21, 2019
Mukenga (African Mask)
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African masks have a rich tradition dating back thousands of years. For this episode, we sat down to talk a bit about African masks in general and contrasted the approaches of western and non-western artists then we did a bit of a deeper dive analyzing the Mukenga mask on display at The Art Institute of Chicago. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 14, 2019
Katsushika Hokusai
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In this episode we look at the iconic woodcut print, The Great Wave Off Kanagawa by Katsushika Hokusai. This piece was part of his series 36 Views of Mount Fuji and has been appreciated internationally for almost 200 years. Listen as we discuss a bit of the art history, analyze the piece and share our takeaways.  Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Nov 07, 2019
Georges Seurat
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Georges Seurat is best known for his painting, Sunday on la Grande Jatte. In this episode, we discuss the pointillist masterpiece. Every episode features 3 sections in which we discuss the context in which the piece was created, what we see and connections we make as we examine the piece, and finally our takeaways or advice artists can apply to their own work. Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices
Oct 31, 2019