The Economist Podcasts

By The Economist

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Subscribers: 10470
Reviews: 33


 Apr 26, 2022

andrewbetts
 Dec 6, 2021
Excellent news source in digestable chunks


 Nov 18, 2021

Brian
 Jul 21, 2021
Very informative.

Harvinder
 May 21, 2021
Smart & insightful, given today's climate of mainly propaganda news. 5* no question. I would have given it only 4* five years ago, when news reporting use to have some honesty. Wish it was a little less right of centre

Description

Every weekday our global network of correspondents makes sense of the stories beneath the headlines. We bring you surprising trends and tales from around the world, current affairs, business and finance—as well as science and technology.


Episode Date
Luna landing: Crypto chaos
00:24:07

Stablecoins are essential to the financial plumbing of the cryptocurrency world. They’re pegged to a real-world asset, usually the dollar. But when that peg breaks, things can turn ugly in a hurry. Much of India is suffering through a particularly blistering and costly heatwave. And Indonesians’ love of songbirds is threatening wild bird populations within and beyond Indonesia itself. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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May 17, 2022
Editor’s Picks: May 16th 2022
00:29:16

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the forces that stand to transform India’s economy over the next decade (11:06), how surveilling workers could enhance productivity (21:07), and full-genome screening for newborn babies is now on the cards.

 

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May 16, 2022
Not stuck in neutral: Sweden, Finland and NATO
00:22:50

Neither Finland nor Sweden ever joined NATO, the Western military alliance formed in 1949: Finland for pragmatic reasons and Sweden for ideological ones. But Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has prompted both to change course. Facebook’s appeal is waning – to both users and investors. And for the first time, a telescope has captured images of the black hole at the centre of our galaxy. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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May 16, 2022
Checks and Balance: Voting wars
00:45:06

Primary season is in full swing but more than a third of voters and a majority of Republicans still believe the last election was stolen. At the centre of this struggle is Georgia, which in 2020 had the tightest presidential election results in the country. It has since passed restrictive new voting laws, locking both Republicans and Democrats into a fierce fight over electoral fairness. We explore why the parties have so much power over the running of elections in America and ask what it will take to restore voters’ faith in their own democracy. 


John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Idrees Kahloon. Idrees has been reporting from Georgia where he spoke to Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger about what’s at stake for Georgia voters this time around. We look back at why the mechanics of how Americans vote have changed so much and so frequently over time. And we hear from Nse Ufot, head of the New Georgia Project, a voter-registration organisation, about the impact of new voting laws on the coming elections. 


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May 13, 2022
Arm Scandi: Britain’s mutual-defence pact
00:27:44

Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s collective-defence deal with Swedish and Finnish leaders represents a shift in the European order—and Britain’s post-Brexit place in it. Our correspondent visits Great Zimbabwe, a long-overlooked archaeological site of stunning proportions whose secrets are only now being revealed. And a look at the weird sensory thrill of ASMR through a new exhibition. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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May 13, 2022
The Economist Asks: What if America reverts to abortion bans?
00:28:28

For 50 years, women in America have had a constitutional right to terminate a pregnancy. Now, a leaked draft opinion suggests that the Supreme Court will overturn Roe v Wade. Anne McElvoy asks Mary Ziegler, a legal historian, about the origins of the landmark legislation and what would happen if Roe is cast aside. Plus, does the Supreme Court need reforming?


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May 12, 2022
Entrenched: stalemate in Ukraine’s east
00:25:24

Russia’s bid to conquer the eastern region of Donbas is proceeding at a snail’s pace. All over Ukraine resistance continues and a grinding, prolonged conflict looms. Police reform remains controversial in America even two years after George Floyd’s murder. We visit two alternative-policing efforts to see how things might change. And examining the cultural chronicle tucked within Britain’s rules-of-the-road handbook. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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May 12, 2022
Money Talks: Out of gas
00:33:40

Russia’s trade surplus has continued to grow, even in the wake of Western sanctions. It’s now forecast to be double what it was last year. That’s prompted an acknowledgement among Western countries that more needs to be done to squeeze the country economically. Recently, the G7 announced plans to completely wean itself off of Russian oil; the European Union is trying to follow suit. But that still leaves a gigantic loophole: natural gas.

In this week’s episode, host Mike Bird goes back to a key point in the 1970s to find out how Germany, Europe’s largest economy, became so reliant on Russian gas. Our European economics editor Christian Odendahl and our Berlin bureau chief Vendeline Von Bredow examine the geopolitical fallout from Germany’s misguided energy policy. And Georg Zachmann of the Bruegel Institute explains why liquified natural gas could potentially be part of the short-term solution.

Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks 

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May 11, 2022
It’s a family affair: Sri Lanka’s protests turn deadly
00:23:27

Demonstrations that eventually ousted the prime minister have cost lives, but the protest mood is not fading: many want every member of the storied Rajapaksa family out of government. We examine an effort to develop undersea GPS and learn why a watery sat-nav would be so useful. And why 1972 was such a formative year for music in Brazil.

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May 11, 2022
Babbage: An app a day keeps the doctor away
00:44:17

Wearable devices, such as fitness trackers and smartwatches, can measure a growing array of health indicators. Machine learning can filter that torrent of data to reveal a continuous, quantified picture of you and your health. But wearables linked to health apps are not only able to help diagnose diseases—they are beginning to treat them too. We explore the technology that promises to revolutionise health care. Alok Jha hosts.


Listen to our recent episodes on the use of wearable technologies in health care at economist.com/babbagewearables.


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May 10, 2022
Out like a Lam: Hong Kong’s new leader
00:21:02

John Lee, the successor to Chief Executive Carrie Lam, won by a predictable landslide: he is just the sort of law-and-order type party leaders in Beijing wanted. As the rich world emerges from the pandemic, surges in activity abound—particularly the opening of new businesses. And ahead of the Eurovision Song Contest semi-finals, we hear about this year’s entrants from Ukraine.

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May 10, 2022
Editor’s Picks: May 9th 2022
00:24:12

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how to save the supreme court from itself, how wearable technology promises to revolutionise health care (10:29) and our Bartleby columnist on why working from anywhere isn't realistic (18:29)

 

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May 09, 2022
Under-armed sweat: America’s “arsenal of democracy”
00:22:36

America accounts for the lion’s share of weaponry sent to Ukraine. But that may leave it short of arms in onward conflicts; boosting production is not as easy as it may seem. The widespread cost-of-living crunch is particularly acute in Britain; we visit a food bank to see how people are coping. And the surprising demographic trends shaping contemporary California.

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May 09, 2022
Checks and Balance: After Roe
00:47:05

A leaked draft opinion suggests that the Supreme Court is preparing to overturn Roe v Wade. But the verdict will not end fights over abortion in America. Both pro-choice and anti-abortion movements are furiously preparing for what comes next. What will the post-Roe era look like? And if the justices do overturn a 50-year-old precedent and hand decisions on abortion back to the states, what might the Supreme Court do next?


The Economist’s Steven Mazie explains what the leak reveals about the inner workings of America’s highest court. Our correspondent Stevie Hertz visits Illinois and Missouri to find out what the end of Roe will mean in practice. She speaks to Dr Colleen McNicholas, regional chief medical officer of Planned Parenthood, Michele Landeau, head of the Missouri Abortion Fund, and anti-abortion lawyer and state representative Mary Elizabeth Coleman. And David French, a conservative Christian writer and author of “Divided We Fall”, considers whether the reasoning that could overturn Roe might be applied to other constitutional liberties in America.


John Prideaux hosts with Mian Ridge and Jon Fasman. 


For full access to print, digital and audio editions as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod


The original version of this episode contained an unverified statement about the impact of proposed anti-abortion legislation on access to some forms of contraception. This has now been removed.

 

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May 06, 2022
The son shines: elections in the Philippines
00:26:19

Voters in the Philippines choose a new president on Monday. The likely winner is a scion of one of the country’s most controversial families. Exxon struck oil off the coast of Guyana a few years back. How will becoming a petrostate change this small country on South America’s northern coast? And koalas are adorable but imperilled—by development, stray dogs and now, a quickly spreading bacterial infection.

 

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May 06, 2022
The Economist Asks: Could the Ukraine war turn nuclear?
00:26:26

In ten weeks of conflict Vladimir Putin has not been afraid to rattle the nuclear sabre. Western leaders have responded by tempering their own rhetoric – but the risk of nuclear war is greater than it has been for more than half a century. Anne McElvoy asks Rose Gottemoeller, a former deputy secretary-general at NATO, whether Russia will launch nuclear weapons and, if it did, what the West should do. And, has NATO proved its worth?


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May 05, 2022
Powell’s points presentation: the Fed raises rates
00:21:54

Prices in America are rising faster than at any time in the past 40 years. In response, the Federal Reserve has made its steepest interest-rate hike in 20 years. Will it be enough to tame inflation while not tipping America into recession? Shanghai’s residents are growing restive after a long lockdown. And Nelson Mandela’s name and legacy are being used to sell a growing range of consumer goods.

 

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May 05, 2022
Money Talks: Proxy wars
00:33:29

A record number of company shareholders have put forward resolutions at annual meetings this year, pressuring companies on everything from their environmental practices to political donations. Host Alice Fulwood asks our US business editor Charlotte Howard why the new frontline in corporate purpose has shifted to proxy battles. Plus, our US audio correspondent Stevie Hertz heads to Nebraska to find out more about a contentious resolution to unseat Warren Buffett from Berkshire Hathaway. And Thomas DiNapoli, the head of one of America’s largest pension funds, explains why the fund is supporting resolutions on everything from worker’s rights at Starbucks to racial equity at Amazon this year and weighs in on the spat between Disney and Florida Governor Ron DeSantis.

Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks 

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May 04, 2022
Stormont weather: elections in Northern Ireland
00:24:59

Voters in the UK head to the polls for local elections tomorrow. In Northern Ireland, a party that does not want the country to exist appears poised to win the largest number of seats. Why a Nebraskan company’s annual general meeting has become known as “the Woodstock of capitalism.” And how the art of cattle trading is getting a 21st century makeover.

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May 04, 2022
Babbage: Bill Gates's plan to prevent the next pandemic
00:33:38

New diseases are inevitable, but pandemics are not. As the threat from covid-19 recedes, how can the world stop new pathogens from becoming health emergencies? Business leader and philanthropist Bill Gates has long warned of the risk that a novel virus would go global. He tells Geoff Carr, The Economist’s science and technology editor, about his plan to pandemic-proof the planet. Alok Jha hosts.


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May 03, 2022
Roe-ing away: Abortion rights in America
00:27:22

A leaked draft opinion shows America’s Supreme Court is ready to let states outlaw abortion. We explore the implications for American politics, and the rights of millions of American women. Around 85% of the world’s population lives in countries, often democracies at peace, where press freedom has declined over the past five years. And remembering the typist of Oskar Schindler’s list.

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May 03, 2022
Editor’s Picks: May 2nd 2022
00:21:56

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how rotten is Russia’s army? France’s re-elected president prepares for a tough second term (10:30) and a struggle over artistic freedom suggests a better way out of the culture wars (15:25). 

 

 

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May 02, 2022
ROC and a hard place: Taiwan’s lessons from Ukraine
00:22:25

Much like Ukraine, Taiwan has a well-armed neighbour that does not think it exists as a state: China. We ask what both sides are learning from Russia’s invasion. A heavy-handed string of arrests following a flare-up of gang violence in El Salvador is unlikely to change matters. And an analysis reveals the connection between weather and whether voters support climate-change legislation. 

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May 02, 2022
Checks and Balance: Welcome to Pennsylvania
00:43:24


The race for Pennsylvania’s open Senate seat is wild, and between now and the midterm elections we’ll be regularly checking in. The first major milestone, the primaries, is a few weeks away. What can the Pennsylvania Senate race tell us about the future direction of American politics?  


Local journalist John Micek gives us a tour of his home state. The Economist’s James Bennet profiles the Democratic candidates. And veteran political consultant Christopher Nicholas examines what it takes for a Republican to win


John Prideaux presents with Charlotte Howard and Idrees Kahloon.


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Apr 29, 2022
General disarray: Russia’s military failures
00:22:13

Before the invasion of Ukraine, Russia’s armed forces were believed to be lean, modern and fighting fit. We ask why they have performed so poorly. A life sentence for a Turkish activist portends heightened repression as President Recep Tayyip Erdogan heads for a tough election. And celebrating master harmonica player Toots Thielemans on the centenary of his birth. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Apr 29, 2022
The Economist Asks: Will Russia’s war criminals face justice?
00:24:39

Evidence of Russian war crimes litters the landscape of Ukraine. But it’s a long trudge from the battlefields to the courtroom. Anne McElvoy asks Oona Hathaway, an expert on law and warfare and a professor at Yale University, whether the perpetrators will be held accountable. Could Vladimir Putin and others be prosecuted by a Nuremberg-style tribunal? Plus, should America join the International Criminal Court?


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Apr 28, 2022
Pipe down: Russia cuts gas to Poland and Bulgaria
00:22:51

By shutting off gas to Poland and Bulgaria, Russia has made an aggressive move that may draw yet more European sanctions. How might the escalation end? The popularity of Singapore’s ruling party has slipped, a bit, so it has selected a kinder, gentler leader ahead of elections in 2025. And why the delayed Art Biennale in Venice was worth the wait. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Apr 28, 2022
Money Talks: Breaking the bank? Part two
00:34:42

Thirty years ago, rich-world central banks started winning the fight against inflation. More recently, they have begun to fight new battles, including against climate change or inequality. As the old enemy of inflation returns, in this two-part series, host Soumaya Keynes asks if central banks are fighting on too many fronts. 

In part two, Simon Rabinovitch, our US economics editor, asks former president of the New York Federal Reserve William Dudley and former economic advisor to President Barack Obama Jason Furman why the Fed failed to act on rising prices. Plus, our finance editor Rachana Shanbhogue and economics editor Henry Curr debate what can be done now and what lessons the Fed’s failure can hold for other central banks around the world.

Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks 

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Apr 27, 2022
Strong suits: climate litigation
00:23:32

Activists are tired of waiting for governments and companies to act on climate change. So increasingly they’re taking the matter to court—with success. Egypt’s leaders claim the country is open for business, but the army has a growing stranglehold on the private sector. And even the trails up Mount Everest are being affected by the war in Ukraine.

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Apr 27, 2022
Babbage: Editing the code of life
00:41:48

In 2012, the discovery of the gene-editing tool CRISPR-Cas9 revolutionised scientists’ ability to modify DNA. Ten years on, host Alok Jha speaks to Jennifer Doudna, the Nobel laureate who pioneered the technology. She explains how CRISPR could transform healthcare and the food supply—and help with the fight against climate change. Plus, how does she grapple with the ethical questions raised by the technology she helped to invent?


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Apr 26, 2022
A bird in the hand: Elon Musk buys Twitter
00:23:36

The world’s richest man now has the keys to one of the most influential social-media platforms. Can it be the free-speech wonderland he is aiming for? Should it? In America marriages involving those under the age of consent remain surprisingly common; we examine why reform remains distant. And a look at the push to redesign outdated, clunky spacesuits. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Apr 26, 2022
Editor’s Picks: April 25th 2022
00:24:36

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, why the Federal Reserve has made a historic mistake on inflation. Also, what Taiwan can learn from Ukraine about resisting invasion (10:40) and, Elon Musk’s Twitter saga is capitalism gone rogue (17:15).

 

 

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Apr 25, 2022
Le Pen pusher: Macron wins again
00:27:28

Emmanuel Macron’s re-election is historic and, for many, a relief. But, as we discuss in the final instalment of our French-election series, the campaign revealed divisions that will trouble his second term, and that he must now try to heal. A staggering flow of foreign weaponry has been a significant factor in Ukraine’s resistance; we examine the geopolitical implications of all that hardware. And the pricey phenomenon of Britain’s personalised licence plates.

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Apr 25, 2022
Checks and Balance: Wilted greens
00:45:46

President Biden came to office promising a clean energy revolution that would both slash emissions and strengthen the economy. But that priority has been overtaken by the need to control high oil prices and look tough on Russia. How has the war in Ukraine changed Mr Biden’s energy calculus—and what’s left of the green agenda?


We ask Jason Bordoff, energy adviser to President Obama and founder of Columbia University's Climate School, whether America now has to choose between energy security and tackling climate change. We go back to the year a president with no majority managed to pass sweeping environmental bills. And our correspondent Aryn Braun investigates what California’s record as a green laboratory reveals about states' ability to act on their own. She talks to Anthony Rendon, speaker of the California state assembly, Lauren Sanchez, chief climate adviser to Governor Newsom, and Mary Nichols, former head of the California Air Resources Board.


Charlotte Howard hosts with Vijay Vaitheeswaran, our energy and climate innovation editor, and Idrees Kahloon, our Washington DC bureau chief.


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Apr 22, 2022
Rwanda-on-Thames: Britain’s asylum proposal
00:23:51

BRITAIN’S GOVERNMENT has proposed sending asylum-seekers to Rwanda. The plan has been widely criticised as expensive and ineffective—but the greater danger is that the plan works. New research suggests that diversification, rather than boosting domestic production, may keep supply chains resilient. And our correspondent considers the legacy of Charles Mingus, an American composer and bassist born 100 years ago today.

 

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Apr 22, 2022
The Economist Asks: Carl Bildt
00:29:51

The war in Ukraine has driven Finland and Sweden to rethink their long-held position on neutrality. Anne McElvoy asks the former Swedish prime minister whether the two countries will join Nato. Will membership bring stability and security to Europe and how should the Nordic neighbours manage their relations with Russia? Plus, he relives the history lesson he received from the former German chancellor Helmut Kohl. 


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Apr 21, 2022
Knocking on hell’s Dvornikov: the battle for Donbas
00:25:37

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has entered a new phase, and its forces in Ukraine have a new commander—one with a history of targeting civilians. The next few weeks are likely to see huge, bloody battles for control of the eastern Donbas region. As Sunday’s presidential run-off vote approaches our French-election series profiles the incumbent, Emmanuel Macron. And why smell preferences vary little across cultures.

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Apr 21, 2022
Money Talks: Breaking the bank? Part one
00:34:49

Thirty years ago, rich-world central banks started winning the fight against inflation. More recently, they have begun to fight new battles, including against climate change or inequality. As the old enemy of inflation returns, in this two-part series, host Soumaya Keynes asks if central banks are fighting on too many fronts. 

In part one, Rachana Shanbhogue, our finance editor and author of a new Special Report on central banks, explains why the remit of central banks has expanded. Plus, former Federal Reserve Governor Sarah Bloom Raskin gives us the inside story on her decision to withdraw her contentious nomination to run the central bank’s regulatory efforts, after pushback from Republican Senators over her views on climate change and monetary policy. 

Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at economist.com/moneytalks 

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Apr 20, 2022
Sana’a sunrise: A ceasefire in Yemen
00:23:02

In Yemen, fighting between Houthi rebels and a Saudi-led coalition has led to hundreds of thousands of deaths. Recently, a ceasefire has taken hold — but whether it presages the war’s end or further fighting remains unclear. A new film about Kashmir has proven popular among Indian politicians, largely because it supports their Hindu-nationalist narrative. And why cricket is taking off in Brazil.

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Apr 20, 2022
Babbage: A new age of nuclear power?
00:42:11

The war in Ukraine is causing countries to rethink their dependence on Russian energy. Some governments are turning to nuclear power. While unpopular, it is one of the safest and most sustainable forms of energy—and an essential weapon in the fight against climate change. Can innovations in technology and engineering help to revive the nuclear industry? Alok Jha hosts.


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Apr 19, 2022
In neither camp: Neutrality and war
00:22:20

ONE-THIRD of the world’s population lives in countries backing neither Russia nor Ukraine. The Biden administration has tried to persuade them off the fence, without much success. In Egypt, social mores make it tricky for women to live alone—so they have devised clever tactics to avoid unwelcome attention. And why residents of New Jersey are banned from pumping their own petrol—for now.

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Apr 19, 2022
Editor’s Picks: April 18th 2022
00:24:27

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, what is China getting wrong? Also, why the world should stand up to Putin (10:43). And, crypto and web3: libertarian dream, or socialist Utopia? (18:27)

 

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Apr 18, 2022
Running for cover: our Ukraine-refugees special
00:27:13

The war in Ukraine has created the greatest flux of refugees in Europe since the second world war. We visit Poland, where the response has been remarkably smooth, and a New York neighbourhood that is no stranger to émigrés from the region. And we consider the displaced who are largely overlooked: why are so many Russians exiling themselves in Turkey?

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Apr 18, 2022
Checks and Balance: French lessons
00:45:18

A liberal and a nationalist are facing off for the presidency of France after a first round in which most voters opted for anti-establishment candidates. Both finalists have redrawn the country’s political map and the polls are tight. Emmanuel Macron’s struggles are a cautionary tale for political centrists everywhere. But could the foibles of the French system offer lessons for America’s partisan gridlock? 


Our Paris bureau chief Sophie Pedder lays out how the result will reshape the relationship with America’s oldest ally. We find out how France ditched its electoral college. And we talk to Gérard Araud, French ambassador to the United States from 2014-19, about which political system would win in a fight. 


John Prideaux hosts with Idrees Kahloon, our Washington DC bureau chief, and Charlotte Howard, New York bureau chief and US business editor.

 

To read, watch and listen to all our coverage of the French election go to www.economist.com/french-election-2022 and you can subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod

 

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Apr 15, 2022
Girls interrupted: Afghanistan
00:23:47

When the Taliban resumed power, there were hopes that women might not be as excluded, repressed and abused as they were previously. Those hopes have faded. As smartphone sales plateau, tech giants are furiously searching for new platforms to conquer. Augmented and virtual reality are the new battlefields. And the rise of giga-everything: how the scale of science drives linguistic innovation. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Apr 15, 2022
The Economist Asks: Bob Menendez
00:24:32

President Joe Biden began his presidency wanting “stable and predictable” relations with Russia. As war in Ukraine rages on, Anne McElvoy asks Senator Bob Menendez how it will test US foreign policy. The chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee discusses the potency of sanctions and measures anti-Nato sentiment in Congress. Plus, how should President Biden handle the bond between Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping?


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Apr 14, 2022
Food haul: aid trickles into Tigray
00:21:56

A ceasefire agreed weeks ago should have mitigated the suffering of starving Ethiopians caught up in war; we ask why so little aid has got through. Rebuilding Ukraine’s infrastructure and economy will require staggering sums—and a vast, international plan of action. And South Africa’s lockdown-era alcohol bans had a curious knock-on effect: crippling shortages of a beloved yeasty goo.

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Apr 14, 2022
Money Talks: Clearing the rouble
00:34:03

In the wake of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, western nations imposed historic sanctions meant to cripple Russia's economy. In the immediate aftermath, Russia’s currency, the rouble, plummeted. Yet over the past six weeks, something strange happened. Instead of continuing its downward trajectory, by some measures, the rouble instead became the world’s best performing currency in March. Our host Mike Bird investigates what the rouble’s supposed strength can tell us about the impact of economic sanctions on Russia.

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Apr 13, 2022
Just fine: Boris Johnson and “partygate”
00:23:38

Police have served Britain’s prime minister, among others, with a fine for breaching the lockdown rules he instituted. He may yet again emerge unscathed, but Britain’s politics is damaged nonetheless. Florida’s natural environment has made it one of America’s fastest-growing states, yet environmental challenges represent its biggest long-term challenge. And Ukraine’s most famous rock star joins the war effort.

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Apr 13, 2022
Babbage: Can the 1.5°C climate target survive?
00:39:23

In its latest report, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change warned that the window to fulfil UN climate targets is vanishing. Emissions must peak by 2025 if the world is to meet the Paris Agreement goals. Decisions made this year could determine whether or not that will be possible. Amid war in Ukraine and a deepening energy crisis, will the clean-energy transition happen fast enough?


Vijay Vaitheeswaran hosts, with The Economist’s environment editor Catherine Brahic, and Oliver Morton, The Economist’s briefings editor.


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Apr 12, 2022
A stretch and a run: Brazil’s ex-president returns
00:22:20

Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva left office with a sky-high approval rating, having raised millions from poverty—but was then convicted of corruption. Now he wants his old job back. Forced labour in Uzbekistan’s cotton fields, once widespread, is swiftly vanishing. And an old hypothesis confirmed: birds get more colourful the closer they live to the equator.

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Apr 12, 2022
Editor’s Picks: April 11th 2022
00:29:12

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, why Emmanuel Macron’s fate matters beyond France, war crimes in Ukraine (11:05) and we explore the new headset wars between tech firms (16:05).

 


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Apr 11, 2022
Le Pen is mightier than before: France’s election
00:25:09

President Emmanuel Macron and Marine Le Pen of the nationalist-populist National Rally party will advance to a run-off; in the continuation of our series, we ask what to expect in an unexpectedly tight race. Russian military communications have proven easy to intercept, leading to poor co-ordination and heavy battlefield losses. And South Korea’s millennials are frantically hunting for Pokémon-themed snacks.

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Apr 11, 2022
Laïcité, extrémité, fragilité: our French-election series in full
00:54:42

The first round of the presidential election is on Sunday and our first-ever series has been following the race closely. This compendium of the first six dispatches looks at the candidates, their platforms and the sharply shifting political landscape in France. 

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Apr 09, 2022
Checks and Balance: Florida, man!
00:43:53

Florida was once dismissed as peripheral—a greying, golfing appendage to continental America. But the Sunshine State is now the country’s top migration destination and the 15th-largest economy in the world. How is this remarkable boom transforming the politics of a crucial swing state? And what lessons does Florida’s low-tax, low-spend model hold for the rest of America?

 

John Prideaux hosts with Jon Fasman and Alexandra Suich Bass, who has been driving the length and breadth of the state to talk to Florida natives and new arrivals alike. We go back to the 1970s to find out how the Democrats lost touch with so many Florida voters. And we hear from Francis Suarez, the Republican mayor of Miami, about whether his city’s success is a model—or an exception.


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Archive material courtesy of Miami Dade College’s Wolfson Archives

 

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Apr 08, 2022
Gota the trouble: Sri Lanka’s crises
00:24:00

Through ineptitude and bad timing, President Gotabaya Rajapaksa—known as Gota—has driven his country toward ruin. Its people want him out. Russian forces have occupied Kherson since early March. We hear a report from the ground about life under foreign occupation. And tasting awamori, a Japanese spirit that distillers may lift from the doldrums simply by watering it down. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Apr 08, 2022
The Economist Asks: Ingrida Simonyte
00:26:55

Host Anne McElvoy asks the prime minister of Lithuania if today’s Russia threatens the Baltic states – and how does she assess the strengths and weaknesses of Nato’s defence? Her country took the step to ban Russian gas, but will the rest of the European Union follow suit? Plus, why does she think it’s “delusional” to assume diplomacy works with Vladimir Putin?


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Apr 07, 2022
Nasty, brutish and long? The war’s next stage
00:26:21

Russian troops have withdrawn from suburban Kyiv to focus on the eastern Donbas region. With Western weapons for Ukraine flowing in, a grinding war of attrition looms. For our French-election series we meet members of Marine Le Pen’s National Rally, which has found success by shifting the focus away from its extremist image. And why a bid to rename Turkey will be so fraught. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Apr 07, 2022
Money Talks: State of the unions
00:37:57

We go inside two historic Amazon union votes in America. One, in Staten Island, New York, where our US audio correspondent Stevie Hertz follows the twists and turns of the first-ever successful vote to unionise a warehouse. The other was in Bessemer, Alabama. Our Mountain West correspondent Aryn Braun explains why a second run of last year’s failed vote looks set to end in defeat once again, but why the threat to Amazon’s business model persists. Then, our US business editor Charlotte Howard and senior economics writer Callum Williams ask if this is a watershed moment or a high water mark for workers’ power, given America’s tight labour market.

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Apr 06, 2022
Zero's intolerance: Shanghai’s messy lockdown
00:22:33

China’s zero-covid policy is being stretched to breaking point as the virus makes its way through the city. Supplies are low, residents are angry and there is no end in sight. The debate about air conditioning in America’s sweltering prisons will only heat up further. And how a dispute about time from exactly a century ago remains timely today. Additional audio provided courtesy of Matthew Florianz. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Apr 06, 2022
Babbage: How do you solve a problem like malaria?
00:39:47

Squashing malaria could, over the next three decades, save as many lives as covid-19 has taken. We explore new ways to fight infections: from the introduction of the first malaria vaccines, to genetically modified mosquitoes. What would it take to vanquish one of the world’s deadliest diseases? Alok Jha hosts.


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Apr 05, 2022
Bodies in the streets: Russian atrocities
00:23:22

Our correspondent reports from towns around Kyiv, where Russian forces appear to have committed war crimes, including summary executions and random murders. The last instalment of a once-in-a-decade climate report suggests that meeting the more ambitious temperature goals set in Paris requires a “handbrake turn” on global emissions. And why Britain’s car washes are a rare example of “re-automation”. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Apr 05, 2022
Editor’s Picks: April 4th 2022
00:23:26

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, why a Ukrainian victory would transform the security of Europe, a terrible plane crash prompts a revealing anti-media backlash in China (11:20) and the serious business of social influencers (18:30).

 

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Apr 04, 2022
No-confidence interval: Pakistan’s embattled PM
00:21:09

Prime Minister Imran Khan seems to be trying everything to avoid an ouster. The powerful military brass may simply want a new leader who is less hostile to the West. Calls for tough sanctions on Russian oil are multiplying. But demand for it has already plummeted—and China and India sniff a bargain. And the earthworm invasion beneath North America’s soil. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Apr 04, 2022
Checks and Balance: Credit where it’s due
00:42:45

Last year it looked like America had found the solution to child poverty: spend more. The expanded child tax credit is thought to have lifted around 3.7m children out of poverty. But the legislation expired and rates shot back up. How did America find the answer to a long-running problem, only to abandon it?  


Senator Michael Bennet tells us why he’s been a long-time proponent of the policy. And The Economist’s Stevie Hertz visits a food bank in the Bronx to find out how the payments helped families in need. 


John Prideaux presents with Idrees Kahloon and Charlotte Howard. 


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Apr 01, 2022
All opposed, say nothing: Hungary’s election
00:22:47

Viktor Orban’s eight-year assault on the country’s institutions will help his bid for re-election. But the poll is far bigger than Hungary: it is a verdict on autocracies everywhere. Britain welcomes the fees from its staggering number of Chinese university students; we examine the risks that dependence poses. And a prescient Ukrainian war film gets a new lease on life.

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Apr 01, 2022
The Economist Asks: Volodymyr Zelensky
00:24:01

At his headquarters in Kyiv, Ukraine’s president tells Zanny Minton Beddoes, The Economist’s editor-in-chief, and Russia editor Arkady Ostrovsky why his country must defeat Vladimir Putin. He explains how people power is the secret to Ukrainian resistance and urges international partners to send in more military equipment. Plus, what does a Ukrainian victory look like?


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Mar 31, 2022
Oil and vodka: Russia’s resilient economy
00:22:43

After Russia invaded Ukraine, Western businesses pulled out and governments imposed punishing sanctions. But Russia’s economy is proving surprisingly resilient. In the instalment of our French election series, we travel to Provence to better understand the campaign of the hard-right candidate Eric Zemmour, who has tapped into and stoked anti-Muslim sentiment. And why Lebanon’s plastic surgeons are thriving amid an economic mess.

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Mar 31, 2022
Money Talks: The new superpowers
00:36:32

The transition to greener energy will shift the balance of power from oil and gas-producing countries to those with abundant deposits of materials needed for electricity grids, batteries and solar panels. Our Schumpeter columnist, Henry Tricks, and finance correspondent, Matthieu Favas, analyse who will be the winners and losers, the scale of investment needed to extract these minerals, and how history shows that sudden wealth from natural resources can be more of a curse than a blessing for the stability of nations.


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Mar 30, 2022
Capital outflow: Russia changes tack
00:25:26

It appears that Russian forces are withdrawing from Kyiv, Ukraine’s capital, to focus on the eastern region of Donbas. We examine what the shifting tactics signify. A court in Singapore has refused to strike a colonial-era anti-gay law from its books, despite the fact it is never enforced; we ask why. And what’s behind Bolivia’s preponderance of contraband Japanese cars.

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Mar 30, 2022
Babbage: How to communicate in a war zone
00:42:48

Destroying an opponent’s ability to communicate is an elementary military tactic. We examine the technologies helping Ukraine to stay connected: from SpaceX’s satellite-internet service, to shortwave radio. Also, what role is social media playing on the front line and in the information war? Alok Jha hosts.


Keep up-to-date with the developing situation in Ukraine at economist.com/ukraine-crisis


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Additional audio courtesy of Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty.

 

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Mar 29, 2022
Talk in Turkey: Russia-Ukraine peace negotiations
00:20:37

Negotiators are again meeting face-to-face, this time in Istanbul. There is little hope of reaching an agreement at this stage—and even less that it would be adhered to. The metal cages appearing atop Russian tanks are intended to counteract anti-tank munitions; in practice their biggest effects seem to be psychological. And the extraordinary heatwave hitting the Antarctic.

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Mar 29, 2022
Editor’s Picks: March 28th 2022
00:33:54

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, why energy insecurity is here to stay, an uncertain outlook across Ukraine (10:42), and understanding Russia’s president (20:01).

 

 

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Mar 28, 2022
In the war room: our exclusive visit to Zelensky’s “fortress”
00:25:07

Our editors traverse layers of security to reach the situation room where Ukraine’s president is so often seen addressing the world. They ask about his decision to stay in Kyiv, which countries are proving most helpful and whether he always had all those green clothes. They find a man who speaks of determination and honesty, and whose sense of humour remains remarkably undimmed.

Find an edited transcript of the interview here

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Mar 28, 2022
Checks and Balance: Tsars and stripes
00:43:00

President Biden is in Europe, meeting with allies as the conflict in Ukraine reaches the one month mark.  His administration has supported the fight against Russia with sanctions and military aid, but the president made it clear from the start he won’t deploy US troops. Is the war in Ukraine a turning point for US foreign policy?


The Economist’s Anton La Guardia considers America’s response so far.  We go back to the time President Obama made a foreign policy u-turn.  And Republican strategist Sarah Longwell explains how the conflict has changed how voters feel about Russia. 


John Prideaux presents with Charlotte Howard and Jon Fasman.


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Mar 25, 2022
Under fire: Life in Kharkiv
00:26:42

For the past month, one of our editors has spoken daily with a young man in Kharkiv. Today he discusses his family's decision to leave their hometown for somewhere safer. Ketanji Brown Jackson, President Joe Biden’s nominee to the Supreme Court, faced questioning this week from a Senate Committee. And we look back at Oscars hosts gone by.

 

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Mar 25, 2022
The Economist Asks: What more should the West do to help Ukraine?
00:29:11

As the war in Ukraine enters its second month, Nato and European leaders have pledged to send in more weapons and to ramp up sanctions against Russia. But is it enough? Anne McElvoy assesses the strength of those promises with Marie Yovanovitch, a former US ambassador to Ukraine. Plus, Edward Carr, The Economist’s deputy editor, discusses which diplomatic strains are yet to test Western unity.


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Mar 24, 2022
What little remains: The destruction of Mariupol
00:21:42

For weeks, Russian forces have besieged the Ukrainian port city of Mariupol. Up to 90% of its structures have been destroyed, and while thousands have fled, plenty remain--without food, water, medicine or electricity. Najib Razak, once Malaysia’s prime minister, left office embroiled in scandal. Now he’s back on the campaign trail. And Oman has set strict sartorial standards around the dishdasha, its national dress.

 

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Mar 24, 2022
Money Talks: War of Interdependence
00:31:18


What impact will the war in Ukraine have on the world economy and globalisation? Will it reshape the existing economic order built over decades? Host Rachana Shanbhogue asks Gita Gopinath, the First Deputy Managing Director of the International Monetary Fund. And how will geopolitics, further disruptions to supply chains and an upswing in covid cases affect China's economy? The Economist's China economics editor, Simon Cox, and China business and finance editor, Don Weinland, assess whether China's determination to follow a zero-covid policy will hamper its prospects.


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Mar 23, 2022
Vlad the in-jailer: Alexei Navalny sentenced
00:23:02

Alexei Navalny returned to Russia after being poisoned in an assassination attempt that many believe came from the Kremlin. He was immediately arrested, and yesterday his prison sentence was extended for nine years. But if Vladimir Putin hopes that ends his influence, he may be mistaken. The world has turned against Russian artists. And a new exhibition explores African-American contributions to the American table.

 

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Mar 23, 2022
Babbage: The pandemic, two years on
00:36:30

Two years after a pandemic was declared, the coronavirus crisis is far from over. Host Alok Jha speaks to Sir Jeremy Farrar, the director of the Wellcome Trust, one of the world's largest medical research foundations. Sir Jeremy has been at the heart of the global fight against covid-19. He assesses China’s zero-covid policy, and explores what lies ahead for the pandemic. Also, Natasha Loder, The Economist’s health policy editor, examines the ongoing vaccination effort.


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Mar 22, 2022
Russian to judgment: Putin accused of war crimes
00:23:48

Joe Biden, among others, has called Vladimir Putin “a war criminal.” International tribunals have tried and convicted war criminals from Rwanda and Serbia: will Russia’s president suffer the same fate? The war in Ukraine will disrupt the world’s wheat market, with potentially grave political consequences in the Middle East. And three public-works projects in Mexico are stirring controversy.

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Mar 22, 2022
Editor’s Picks: March 21st 2022
00:25:13

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: how the war in Ukraine determines China’s view of the world (9:45), confronting Russia shows the tension between free trade and freedom (16:42), and who are the corporate winners and losers in Russia’s war​​ 

 

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Mar 21, 2022
Blood will out: Russian mercenaries
00:22:10

Russian forces advancing on Kyiv have stalled. Ukraine has refused the demand to surrender Mariupol. But it’s not just Russian regular troops fighting: we look at Russia’s use of mercenaries. Lithuania allowed Taiwan to open a representative office in Vilnius, and is now facing the wrath of China. And included in the exodus of Ukrainians are plenty of four-legged companions. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Mar 21, 2022
Checks and Balance: One million
00:42:56

Two years on, even cautious Democrats are feeling confident that America is entering a new, less severe phase of the covid-19 pandemic. But, depending on how you measure it, America's death toll from the coronavirus has just passed a horrendous milestone—one million. How did America handle covid-19?  


The Economist’s Sondre Solstad takes us through the data. We look at how Florida has dealt with the pandemic. And The Economist’s Tamara Gilkes Borr examines why America was unprepared for the onslaught of the virus.


John Prideaux presents with Charlotte Howard and Idrees Kahloon. 


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Mar 18, 2022
Mention the war: Germany awakes
00:26:02

For decades, Germany was doctrinally pacifist: a legacy left over from the second world war. Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has changed that, seemingly overnight. As Russia’s military advance has stalled, it has turned its firepower against civilian targets, resulting in widespread death, but also in the destruction of Ukraine’s cultural legacy. And remembering one of the many brave, ordinary Ukrainians, fallen in defence of their country.

 

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Mar 18, 2022
The Economist Asks: Andrei Kozyrev
00:26:53

Host Anne McElvoy asks the former Russian foreign minister how war in Ukraine will change Vladimir Putin’s standing at home and abroad. They discuss the remarkable acts of dissent happening around Russia and what methods Western leaders should use to negotiate with Mr Putin. Plus, what are the chances for democracy returning to Russia? 


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Mar 17, 2022
Shock and war: global prices rise
00:24:09

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has pushed global prices, which were already climbing, even higher. As America’s central bank raises its target interest rate for the first time in four years, we break down the challenges facing central bankers. In the fourth instalment of our French election series, we look at how the conflict has changed the race. And Russia’s seizure of the Chernobyl nuclear plant ends three decades of scientific research.

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Mar 17, 2022
Money Talks: Grain damage
00:34:42

Russia's invasion of Ukraine is creating one of the worst disruptions to the supply of wheat since the first world war. As prices spike, the damage from this shock will ripple right across the world⁠—affecting corn, vegetable oil, fertilisers and many other agricultural products. Can other countries fill the shortfall and who will be worst affected? Henry Tricks, our Schumpeter columnist, asks The Economist's Matthieu Favas and Charlotte Howard how serious a food crisis the world is facing.


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Mar 16, 2022
Bear hug? China’s take on Ukraine
00:24:22

China appears content to let the carnage continue in Ukraine, anticipating a win for Vladimir Putin. Its real concern is avoiding an apparent win for America and the West. Never mind fears that cryptocurrencies might help Russia dodge sanctions: they are far better at helping to finance Ukraine’s efforts. And the cyborg cockroaches that may one day aid search-and-rescue operations.

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Mar 16, 2022
Babbage: The fountain of youth
00:39:50

Billions of dollars are being pumped into technologies that hope to reduce the effects of ageing. Host Alok Jha explores the latest research in the field—from regenerating organs to rejuvenating cells—and whether these efforts could help to conquer debilitating human diseases. Is anti-ageing more than just a pipe-dream for Silicon Valley startups? 


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Mar 15, 2022
Capital accounts: on the ground in Kyiv
00:24:39

Our correspondent finds Ukraine's capital already accustomed to an eerie war footing. People are getting married and playing music, even as medicine runs out and a new volunteer army braces for fighting. Australia’s barely fathomable floods show freakish weather is becoming increasingly common there. And the case for reforming how grammar is taught.

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Mar 15, 2022
Editor’s Picks: March 14th 2022
00:22:46

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, why Vladimir Putin is resorting to repression at home; (10:15) how war and sanctions have caused commodities chaos; (16:35) and why Xi Jinping has placed a bet on Russia.

 

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Mar 14, 2022
Abject lesson: the siege of Mariupol
00:23:31

To the west, strikes near Poland have rattled NATO partners. But look to the south-east to see what Russia intends for the Ukrainian cities it encircles. Chile’s new president Gabriel Boric is just the latest leftist to take office in the region; we examine the “pink tide” that is coming in. And why British retail workers are sporting body cameras. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Mar 14, 2022
Checks and Balance: City limits
00:42:19

Since the founding of America, its people and its economy have moved steadily westwards and, later, southwards. Recently, people and businesses have flocked to Sun Belt states, while cities in America’s old industrial heartland are struggling. What makes American cities boom and bust?


The Economist’s Simon Rabinovitch compares two places on divergent paths. We find out about a city that turned its fortunes around. And community organiser Ian Beniston explains how he’s trying to fix his Ohio hometown.  


John Prideaux presents with Charlotte Howard and Jon Fasman. 


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Mar 11, 2022
Defog of war: your questions answered
00:28:34

We tackle some of the many questions on the war in Ukraine that listeners sent in this week—why no-fly zones are a perilous idea, how weapons are making their way into Ukraine, why mud is a growing tactical concern, the implications of oil-and-gas embargoes and much more. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Mar 11, 2022
The Economist Asks: Malala Yousafzai
00:22:50

Amid the war in Ukraine and a humanitarian crisis in Afghanistan, the Nobel peace-prize laureate urges more progress in equal access to education. She tells The Economist’s editor-in-chief Zanny Minton Beddoes how keeping girls in school can benefit economies and societies. And, how has the pandemic affected the gender gap?


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Mar 10, 2022
A non-member states: Finland’s ex-PM on NATO
00:22:57

Perched at Russia’s north-western corner, the country has plenty of history dealing with neighbourly aggression. We speak with Alexander Stubb, a former prime minister, about his views on European security. After a nasty campaign season, South Korea has a new president, Yoon Suk-Yeol. We examine the myriad challenges he faces. And how to spot Parkinson’s disease early—with an electronic nose.

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Mar 10, 2022
Money Talks: Houston, we have a problem
00:42:46

As America and Britain announced embargoes on Russian energy, our global energy and climate innovation editor Vijay Vaitheeswaran talked to oil and gas industry leaders in Houston where jaws dropped and prices soared. He asks Jose Fernandez, US undersecretary of state for economic growth, and Fatih Birol, head of the International Energy Agency, whether the West can afford to ban Russian oil. As governments scramble to plug the shortfall, we talk to Scott Sheffield, head of Pioneer Natural Resources, and Vicki Hollub, chief executive of Occidental Petroleum, about whether this could be American shale’s big moment. And Bob Dudley, former boss of BP who now heads the Oil and Gas Climate Initiative, argues the rush for energy security doesn't necessarily put the energy transition on hold. 


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Mar 09, 2022
Strikes, fear: an update from Kharkiv
00:26:40

After failing to take Ukraine’s second city, Russian forces continue to pummel it with air, artillery and missile strikes. We speak again with an increasingly despondent Kharkiv native. Many schoolyard games have deep histories, conveying culture down the generations; these days they are adapting to the pandemic era. And the revival of Mexico’s murals with a purpose. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Mar 09, 2022
Babbage: Can tech improve your sleep?
00:35:27

A sleep deficit in the rich world has led to a boom in the sleep-tech industry. This week, we investigate the products designed to help consumers monitor and improve their slumber. And, what innovations could transform sleep in the future? Alok Jha hosts.


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Mar 08, 2022
War stories: the view from Russia
00:24:04

With the propaganda machine at fever pitch, not everyone in Russia agrees on—much less agrees with—what is going on in Ukraine. Dissent is being met with increasing repression. A wave of jihadism is crashing across the states of West Africa and the battle lines are moving south. And reasons for both hope and concern in our annual glass-ceiling index.

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Mar 08, 2022
Editor’s Picks: March 7th 2022
00:21:22

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: the horror ahead in Ukraine, why climate change must be adapted to as well as opposed (11:25) and why France needs a proper debate ahead of its presidential election (15:40)

 

Keep up-to-date with the developing situation in Ukraine at economist.com/ukraine-crisis

 

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Mar 07, 2022
Bear trapped: the sanctions on Russia
00:25:36

The West’s co-ordinated financial weaponry is starting to bite, opening a new age of economic conflict; once-unthinkable oil embargoes seem now to be on the table. Taiwan is another democratic country with a big, bullying neighbour; we examine how the war has sparked introspection. And celebrating Pier Paolo Pasolini, a polymathic auteur unjustly known only for his most controversial film.

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Mar 07, 2022
Checks and Balance: Cup of Joe
00:41:40

Joe Biden gave his first State of the Union address against a difficult backdrop. Inflation is soaring, covid variants have extended the death toll of the pandemic and the signature piece of his domestic agenda is stuck. Now he has the conflict in Ukraine to deal with. Can Joe Biden rescue his presidency


The Economist’s James Astill assesses the president’s track record. We go back to another State of the Union given by a president in a bind. And The Economist’s Elliott Morris digs into voter sentiment. 


John Prideaux presents with Charlotte Howard and Idrees Kahloon.


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Mar 04, 2022
Rushing from Russians: Ukraine’s refugees
00:24:54

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has triggered a refugee crisis in Europe. More than a million people have left; millions more could follow. Turkey’s reasonably stable relationship with Russia may not survive the war. And remembering a champion of Yaghan language and culture, at South America’s southernmost tip. 

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Mar 04, 2022
The Economist Asks: What will Vladimir Putin do next?
00:35:50

As the war in Ukraine enters a bloodier phase, Anne McElvoy assesses what moves the Russian president will make. She asks General Sir Nick Carter, the former chief of Britain’s defence staff, how urban warfare could shape the conflict and how Nato’s strategy might evolve. Plus, leading Russia expert Fiona Hill provides insight into the psyche of the Kremlin strongman and what would persuade him to call a ceasefire. 


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Mar 03, 2022
Climate of fear: the IPCC’s new report
00:24:53

A new report shows that climate change is already causing widespread, tangible damage, and argues that adaptation is now as important as mitigation. A once-promising candidate for the French presidency sees her campaign sputter. And why America needs to shore up the postal service’s finances. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Mar 03, 2022
Money Talks: Sanctioning behaviour
00:38:20

In response to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, the West imposed unprecedented financial sanctions, effectively freezing the reserve assets of Russia. This triggered chaos in Russia's economy and prompted president Vladimir Putin to make nuclear threats, sending shock waves around the world. Will Russia weaponise energy and cut off its oil and gas supplies to the West? And, having crossed the Rubicon, the West has a new potent weapon—its use is being watched very carefully by China.


The Economist’s global energy and climate innovation editor, Vijay Vaitheeswaran, hosts with senior editor Matthew Valencia, business affairs editor Patrick Foulis and Juan Zarate, American former deputy national security adviser and author of “Treasury’s War”.


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Mar 02, 2022
All that Xi wants: China’s Ukraine dilemma
00:20:44

After backing Russia’s grievances against NATO, China now finds itself treading a very fine line on Ukraine. There are often reasons to be suspicious of a country’s covid-death tally; we examine research showing how fraud can be spotted mathematically. And why women are less likely than men to be corrupt. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Mar 02, 2022
Babbage: The threat of cyber-warfare
00:42:19

The conflict in Ukraine has brought renewed fear of a global cyber-war. We explain the technology behind the digital threat and its role in modern warfare. And, why hasn’t Russia carried out large-scale cyber-attacks so far? Alok Jha hosts.


Keep up-to-date with the developing situation in Ukraine at economist.com/ukraine-crisis


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Mar 01, 2022
Square in their sights: Kharkiv under siege
00:25:56

The levelling of Freedom Square in Ukraine’s second city is powerfully symbolic. One resident has been speaking to us daily since the invasion began. In the American West, minerals crucial to a clean-energy transition abound. We examine the opposition to a looming new mining boom. And a revealing meal with our food columnist: we have big news about “The Intelligence”.

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Mar 01, 2022
Editor’s Picks: February 28th 2022
00:22:29

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, where will Vladimir Putin stop? Plus, the economic consequences of the war in Ukraine (10:35) and how parallels with Taiwan are shaping Asian views of the conflict (16:35) 

 

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Feb 28, 2022
The battlefield broadens: Ukraine resists
00:24:24

On the ground, Ukrainian resistance is holding—so far—and Vladimir Putin’s nuclear posturing reveals a crumbling of his plans. Meanwhile the international response grows more serious and more united. We examine President Joe Biden’s savvy Supreme Court pick, Ketanji Brown Jackson. And how to get around the fact that eyewitness testimony can be fuzzy or change over time. 

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Feb 28, 2022
Checks and Balance: Russia invades Ukraine
00:46:11

There is war in Europe. America has spent the past decade trying to pivot its geopolitical attention to Asia, away from its old allies in the West. But the crisis, and now conflict, in Ukraine has pulled it back in, showing how reliant Europe still is on the support of its friend across the Atlantic. How far will America go in standing up to Russian aggression?  


Ex-CIA operative John Sipher takes us through the intelligence playbook. We find out about a forgotten founder of NATO. And John Tefft, a former US ambassador to Ukraine and Russia, examines what Vladimir Putin wants.  


John Prideaux presents with Charlotte Howard and Idrees Kahloon. 


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Feb 25, 2022
Capital offence: the battle for Ukraine
00:25:23

As promised, Ukraine’s forces are fighting back tenaciously against a Russian invasion on multiple fronts—but Kyiv, the capital, is now squarely in the invaders’ sights. In England, the last covid restrictions were lifted entirely this week; we consider the calculations many leaders are making in this phase of the pandemic. And an assessment of romantic comedies as a cultural force.

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Feb 25, 2022
The Economist Asks: War in Ukraine – what happens next?
00:31:10

Russian tanks have poured into Ukraine in what is all-out war. Host Anne McElvoy asks The Economist's editor-in-chief Zanny Minton Beddoes, defence editor Shashank Joshi and business affairs editor Patrick Foulis whether Ukraine's defensive capabilities can withstand Russian forces, and we assess Vladimir Putin's endgame. Also, we analyse the financial fallout of war and the effectiveness of Western-imposed sanctions.


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Feb 24, 2022
It begins: Russia invades Ukraine
00:21:18

Ukrainians woke to the sound of sirens. Volleys of cruise missiles, artillery, widespread reports of explosions: a large-scale invasion appears to be under way. Our correspondent in Kyiv reports on the mood and on what is known so far. And we examine the sharp rise in carjackings in America, asking why so many young people end up behind the wheel. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Feb 24, 2022
Money Talks: Barbarians at the crossroads
00:33:53

Low interest rates and barely-there regulation have made the past decade a golden age for private financial markets. Once a niche pursuit, the industry is supersizing and adopting myriad new strategies to profit from different types of assets—and attract new investors. As alternative assets enter the mainstream, The Economist’s Matthew Valencia and host Alice Fulwood ask how long the private-markets party can continue.


With John Connaughton, head of private equity at Bain Capital; Anne Glover, chief executive of Amadeus Capital Partners and a member of Yale University’s investment committee; and Alisa Wood, head of private markets and real-asset strategies at KKR.


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Feb 23, 2022
Given choice: Colombia’s abortion-law change
00:22:05

In little more than a year, three of Latin America’s four most populous countries have expanded access to abortion. We ask what is driving that change in the region. Austin is the destination for many fleeing Silicon Valley; our correspondent examines the risks posed to the hot new tech spot. And the sugarloaf pineapple: the lucrative fruit of Benin’s branding labours. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Feb 23, 2022
Babbage: Rise of the robots
00:36:52

Relations between people and robots are being reset. Host Alok Jha explores why the pace of automation is likely to accelerate, and what it means for societies and jobs. We also ask how advancements in AI and robotics can improve collaboration between humans and machines.


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Feb 22, 2022
Putting his first boot forward: Russian troops move
00:23:02

President Vladimir Putin has declared the independence of the two Ukrainian provinces of Donbas—and sent in "peacekeepers". We ask what is next. The African Union was founded two decades ago this year; its early integration and diplomatic successes have since sharply faded. And our deep, interactive dive into Spotify reveals the slipping global dominance of English-language lyrics.

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Feb 22, 2022
Editor’s Picks: February 21st 2022
00:21:15

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, why—war or not—Vladimir Putin has miscalculated; how Justin Trudeau’s crackdown on protests in Canada could make things worse (9:25) and, in “The Power of the Dog”, the Western rides again (15:00)


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Feb 21, 2022
Trial run: genocide claims against Myanmar
00:24:04

The Gambia’s first-of-its-kind case at the International Court of Justice might bring a rebuke and shine light on Myanmar’s brutal tactics. It might not, alas, bring succour for the Rohingyas. Our correspondent considers a grand geopolitical gamble from exactly 50 years ago, seeking lessons for today from Richard Nixon’s visit to China. And research reveals that noise stresses plants out. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Feb 21, 2022
Checks and Balance: The seats of their edge
00:40:51

Once a decade, American states have the chance to redraw boundaries for electoral districts. The temptation to create biased maps–called “gerrymanders”–has long been irresistible. Those drawn in the wake of the 2020 census are currently being finalised. How could redistricting be made more fair?

 

Harvard’s Nick Stephanopoulos assesses the latest maps. We explore a redistricting cycle that didn’t go as planned. And Davin Rosborough of the American Civil Liberties Union tells us about a gerrymandering battle in Alabama.

 

Jon Fasman presents with Charlotte Howard and Elliott Morris. 

 

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Feb 18, 2022
On the brinkmanship: a special episode on Ukraine and Russia
00:26:30

We unpick the week’s torrent of headlines; an invasion may yet come but either way President Vladimir Putin has already harmed Russia. The country’s digital self-isolation project is quietly forging ahead; we examine its home-grown “tech stack” with everything from chips up to apps. And we hear from a Ukrainian woman whose life has been upended by the conflict’s uncertainties.

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Feb 18, 2022
The Economist Asks: Ro Khanna
00:24:37

The Democratic congressman for Silicon Valley represents a district home to tech industry titans. Anne McElvoy asks him how their power can be checked. Can Capitol Hill regulate online hate speech without impinging on free speech? Plus, how does the deputy whip of the Congressional Progressive Caucus see his wing’s relationship with the rest of the party?

 

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Feb 17, 2022
Sharpest tools, in a box: miniature vaccine factories
00:22:23

BioNTech, the German firm behind the first licensed coronavirus jab, reveals its attempts to stuff its technology into shipping containers—to be used where they are most needed. In the second instalment of our French-election series, we ask what is left of the country’s left. And, as the Olympics wrap up, putting numbers to judges' biases that favour their compatriots. 

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Feb 17, 2022
Money Talks: How high?
00:38:24

Persistently high inflation has brought back fears of a wage-price spiral. Our economics team Soumaya Keynes, Simon Rabinovitch and Callum Williams explore how expectations of high inflation become reality. We look at the data on whether workers or firms are winning the battle over wages. And, as they reach for all the tools at their disposal, are central banks still in control?


With Julia Coronado, founder of MacroPolicy Perspectives; Ethan Harris, head of global economics at Bank of America; Dario Perkins, head of global macro at TS Lombard; and Ricardo Reis of the London School of Economics.


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Feb 16, 2022
Judge, jury and executive: another power-grab in Tunisia
00:21:54

Last summer President Kais Saied nobbled the legislature; now he has abolished the judiciary. We ask where the country is headed, and why there is so little protest. Brazil’s modern-art scene, born a century ago this week, flourished despite rocky politics—but the current president has a chokehold on it. And the Thai army’s quixotic mission to evict Bangkok’s legendary street-food hawkers. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Feb 16, 2022
Babbage: A Starship is born
00:41:27

Elon Musk’s rocketry firm SpaceX has announced that its monstrous, dirt-cheap Starship rocket will soon be ready for its maiden voyage into orbit. Host Alok Jha explores the project’s potential impact on space travel, scientific discoveries and human connectedness on Earth. We also examine the business philosophy that has helped SpaceX innovate, and the risks that could hinder its ambitions.


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Feb 15, 2022
Yen here before: Japan’s “new capitalism”
00:20:41

Today’s figures showing the first annual economic growth in three years may seem promising. But the grand plans of Prime Minister Kishida Fumio resemble past policies that have not worked. The finely tuned government of Bosnia is under grave threat from some of the same forces that caused its brutal war. And why roadkill is now on the menu in Wyoming.

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Feb 15, 2022
Editor’s Picks: February 14th 2022
00:23:24

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, what would happen if financial markets crashed? We also profile China’s thinker-in-chief (11:25) and explore how new spinal implants allow the paralysed to walk, swim and cycle again (18:45)

 

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Feb 14, 2022
Not trucking around: Canada’s protests spread
00:22:25

It has become much more than a fight against proof-of-vaccination strictures. The anti-government mood has spread in Canada and abroad. What happens next? Haiti has received billions upon billions in foreign assistance but its situation remains dire; we ask why all that aid has not aided much. And Reader’s Digest, a surprisingly influential American snappy-excerpts magazine, turns 100.

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Feb 14, 2022
​​Checks and Balance: Affirmative reaction
00:42:35

Next term the Supreme Court will hear two cases challenging race-conscious admissions programmes. The court’s conservative supermajority is likely to rule for the plaintiffs. What difference would a ban on affirmative action make to higher education in America?

 

The Economist’s Tamara Gilkes Borr explains how she switched from opposing to supporting affirmative action. We tell the story of the man who coined the term. And The Economist’s Steve Mazie takes us through the Supreme Court cases, and considers if the process for replacing Justice Stephen Breyer is a form of affirmative action.

 

John Prideaux presents with Charlotte Howard and Idrees Kahloon.


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Feb 11, 2022
Withdrawal symptoms: Afghanistan goes hungry
00:23:51

Since American forces left, pessimism has skyrocketed—and with good reason. Starvation is driving Afghans to sell their organs and even their children in order to eat. The artificial snow of this year’s winter Olympics is unsustainable and environmentally troubling; we meet a “snow consultant” pioneering a better way. And remembering Lata Mangeshkar, who gave voice to a newly liberated India.

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Feb 11, 2022
The Economist Asks: Senator Tim Scott
00:29:21

As the Republican Party prepares for crucial mid-term elections in November, host Anne McElvoy asks Senator Tim Scott what the GOP now stands for as it deals with the fallout from the 2020 election. The party’s only African-American senator discusses racial discrimination, police reform and Donald Trump’s chances.

 

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Feb 10, 2022
Which way UP: India’s bellwether election
00:23:12

The state-legislature poll in Uttar Pradesh is in effect a vote on Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s increasingly stringent Hindu-national agenda—and will hint at his party’s chances in 2024. Oil majors are getting points for selling off their dirtiest oil-and-gas operations; we ask who is buying them. And which countries are up and which are down in our annual Democracy Index. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Feb 10, 2022
Money Talks: The next financial crisis
00:39:49

Over the past 15 years power and risk in financial markets have shifted radically. New investors have flooded in and, buoyed by pandemic stimulus, most have had an incredible ride. But as policymakers put the brakes on, global financial markets are starting to wobble. How might this new high-tech, bank-light system fare under a serious stress test?


Mike Bird hosts with Alice Fulwood, The Economist’s US finance correspondent; Greg Jensen, co-chief investment officer of Bridgewater Associates; Robert Shiller, professor of economics at Yale University and author of “Narrative Economics”; and The Economist’s Buttonwood columnist, John O’Sullivan.


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Feb 09, 2022
The quiet man of Europe: Olaf Scholz
00:24:13

So far Germany’s new chancellor has been all but invisible at home and on the international stage. We examine the motives behind his reticence—and his abilities during a European crisis. As space becomes a battleground and satellites become targets, new research aims to bring nuclear power to bear. And visiting a red-hot art exhibition in three ways at once. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Feb 09, 2022
Babbage: What is web3?
00:40:54

Web3 is the latest Silicon Valley buzzword, referring to a third iteration of the internet built on blockchain technology. Backers say it will reinvent cyberspace but scepticism is growing. Host Kenneth Cukier investigates the hype and the potential.


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Feb 08, 2022
FAANGer danger: big tech takes a beating
00:22:49

 For years, the big tech firms Facebook, Apple, Amazon, Netflix and Google were seen as a collective good bet; investors will soon judge them each on their merits—or demerits. After Israel’s creation, Jews were shunned in the Arab world; that now seems to be changing, and quickly. And, on the frozen ground at Ukraine’s border, there will be mud.

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Feb 08, 2022
Editor’s Picks: February 7th 2022
00:21:27

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: how high will interest rates go? Also, what Spotify should learn from the Joe Rogan affair (10:15) and how to read body language in the post-pandemic workplace (15:45).

 

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Feb 07, 2022
Fission creep: Iran nuclear talks resume
00:22:48

After protracted negotiations, at last a conclusion appears nigh—but depending on whom you ask, a breakthrough is as likely as a breakdown. The regime in Bangladesh has been growing more brutal, yet some American sanctions seem to have had a swift and surprising effect. And Japan focuses on healthier, happier sunset years.

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Feb 07, 2022
Checks and Balance: The workforce is strong
00:42:55

The labour market has rebounded from its pandemic-induced slump with gusto. As bosses worry about a shortage of employees, firms are having to get creative in order to fill vacancies. Will the employment boom reshape the relationship between American workers and companies?


Charlotte Howard meets a group of Starbucks employees trying to unionise. We go back to a time of great change for the American workforce. And Professor Daron Acemoglu from MIT explains if robots could make up the shortfall in the labour market.


John Prideaux presents with Jon Fasman.  


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Feb 04, 2022
Skin in the Games: Beijing’s nervy Olympics
00:25:32

Our correspondent describes the fraught effort to attend the opening ceremony. It is a pageant highlighting a divided world, with party leaders aiming for zero covid, zero mistakes and zero dissent. An investigation reveals the brutal treatment meted out by Libya’s coast guard dealing with Europe-bound migrants—an outfit bankrolled by the European Union itself. And America’s gun-owners become surprisingly diverse.

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Feb 04, 2022
The Economist Asks: Will there be war or peace in Ukraine?
00:39:58

Host Anne McElvoy assesses Moscow’s readiness for conflict and Kyiv’s defensive capabilities with Oleksander Danylyuk, Ukraine’s former national security chief. And Anne asks Shashank Joshi, the Economist’s defence editor, and Arkady Ostrovsky, our Russia editor,  what war would mean for the world and if diplomacy could end the tensions. Plus, our culture editor Andrew Miller takes a longer view of Ukrainian independence movements. 


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Feb 03, 2022
A model result: our French-election series begins
00:24:19

In the first instalment of the series, we unveil our forecast model and visit one of the quiet suburbs where the vote’s outcome will probably be decided. Debt has soared as borrowing costs stayed low; we examine who will foot the enormous interest bills as rates rise. And the one place where marriages increased in the pandemic era. 

You can find all of our ongoing coverage of the French election at https://www.economist.com/french-election-2022

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Feb 03, 2022
Money Talks: Caged tiger
00:38:57

As China celebrates the lunar new year and the winter Olympics open in Beijing, host Mike Bird and Simon Cox, our China economics editor, size up the looming threats to economic growth. Against the mounting costs of a zero-tolerance approach to the pandemic and a sharp slowdown in the property sector, can Xi Jinping deliver on his promise of “common prosperity” for all?


With Don Weinland, The Economist’s China business and finance editor; Angela Zhang, director of the Centre for Chinese Law at Hong Kong University and author of “Chinese Antitrust Exceptionalism”; and Zhu Ning, a professor at the Shanghai Advanced Institute of Finance and author of “China’s Guaranteed Bubble”.


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Feb 02, 2022
Action pact: NATO’s Ukraine role
00:23:20

Our correspondent speaks with Jens Stoltenberg, NATO’s secretary-general, who says the alliance’s involvement in de-escalating Russia tensions is a sign of its resurgent relevance. After tortuous votes, Italy’s lawmakers elected a president: the incumbent who did not want the job. No posts have changed, but the political balance surely has. And we meet the nuns racking up followers on TikTok. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Feb 02, 2022
Babbage: Hide and seek
00:32:35

Technology is profoundly changing warfare. On a battlefield packed with sophisticated sensors, is it possible to avoid being seen and killed? Host Shashank Joshi examines the tech that’s turning combat into an intense competition between hiding and finding. And, how to update the ancient art of deception for the digital age.


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Feb 01, 2022
Do as I say, except at my dos: Boris Johnson’s parties
00:23:10

A long-awaited report confirms rumours that have consumed Boris Johnson’s premiership. He may be weakened, but early signs suggest he will not fall. One year after Myanmar’s military coup, the protest mood has not faded; the murderous junta is failing to rule and the country is falling apart. And the pain of losing one’s native tongue in a foreign land.

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Feb 01, 2022
Editor’s Picks: January 31st 2022
00:23:33

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: why a war in Ukraine could have global consequences, how to assess the case for environmental justice (9:27) and does every job have to have a higher purpose? (17:09)

 

 

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Jan 31, 2022
Sunshine statement: Ron DeSantis’s Florida
00:24:04

Talk of a presidential run for the governor is growing. We examine the state’s rightward lurch as a bellwether of his intent and his political strength. Our correspondent finds that divorce is getting easier, cheaper and a little less adversarial across the rich world. And the wider ecosystem risks posed by the looming extinction of the Sumatran rhino.

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Jan 31, 2022
Checks and Balance: LSDecriminalise
00:43:42

Voters in Oregon have approved a law allowing people to take psilocybin, the psychedelic substance in magic mushrooms. Users will be able to apply to go to a licensed facility and take the drug with the help of a trained supervisor. The evidence suggests that this could successfully treat mental health issues. Should psychedelics be more widely available


Veteran Jesse Gould explains how an ayahuasca trip helped to cure his PTSD. We go back to an outlandish covert CIA operation. And Harvard’s Dr Mason Marks tells us if Oregon’s approach could be replicated elsewhere.


John Prideaux presents with Jon Fasman and Charlotte Howard. 


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Jan 28, 2022
Insecurities in securities: why markets are sliding
00:22:47

Huge swings and downward trends: markets are forward-looking, and it is clear they do not see much to look forward to in 2022. Warnings about infectious bugs resistant to antibiotics have long been around; to see the effects just look to South Asia. And our data journalists reveal another benefit of widespread veganism: huge tracts of habitable land. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Jan 28, 2022
The Economist Asks: Maggie Gyllenhaal
00:21:27

As awards season gets underway, Anne McElvoy asks the Oscar-nominated actor and filmmaker how streaming platforms will change cinema. The director of “The Lost Daughter” reveals why she chose to adapt Elena Ferrante’s novel and what drew her to the messy mothers at the centre of the story. Plus, has she spoken to the famously enigmatic Italian writer? 


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Jan 27, 2022
On the edge of his seat: Stephen Breyer
00:22:42

The departure of one of America’s Supreme Court justices is an opportunity for President Joe Biden to choose a replacement, but the clock is ticking. We ask who might be in the running. West Africa’s latest coup, in Burkina Faso, bodes ill for an already stumbling campaign against jihadism in the region. And why countries change their capitals. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Jan 27, 2022
Money Talks: The energy weapon
00:31:15

What happens if Vladimir Putin invades Ukraine again, the West hits Russia with sanctions, and Mr Putin retaliates by shutting down supply of Russian gas? The Economist’s global energy & climate innovation editor Vijay Vaitheeswaran explores how this would rock energy markets from American shale oil to Chinese imports of LNG. What are the lessons from the last time Russia turned off the taps and how could Europe, already facing record prices, wean itself off its dependency?


With Thane Gustafson, professor of energy policy at Georgetown University and author of “Klimat: Russia in the Age of Climate Change”; Amy Myers Jaffe, director of the climate policy lab at Tufts University and author of “Energy’s Digital Future”; and Daniel Yergin, vice president of IHS Markit and author of “The New Map: Energy, Climate, and the Clash of Nations”.


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Jan 26, 2022
Twist of faith: religious hatred in India
00:22:45

As the country celebrates its secular constitution, we examine the rising bigotry of Hindu nationalists—at best tolerated and at worst encouraged by the ruling party. China’s propagandists are onto something: after years of dull jingoism, the entertainment they put out now is glossy, big-budget and ever more watchable. And why South-East Asia’s obsession with otters poses a threat to them.

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Jan 26, 2022
Babbage: Sequencing the future
00:33:38

Genomic sequencing has risen to prominence during the pandemic. But the technology has vast potential to transform many aspects of human health. Host Alok Jha investigates the rise of the genome and personalised medicine.


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Jan 25, 2022
What’s it good for? Putin’s Ukraine calculus
00:22:36

More Russian troops piling in. Embassy staff pulling out. American forces on alert and sober diplomacy still on the docket. We examine Vladimir Putin's ways, means and motivations. The Omicron variant is making its mark in Mexico, a place that our correspondent says never really shut down. And considering the merits and the risks of work-related drinks. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Jan 25, 2022
The World Ahead: Technologies to watch
00:19:57

The rapid development and roll-out of coronavirus vaccines has been a reminder of the power of science and technology to change the world. Host Tom Standage considers some of the technologies to watch in 2022, from 3D-printed housing and heat pumps to flying electric taxis and meetings in the metaverse. 


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Jan 24, 2022
Prime mover? Mario Draghi and the Italian presidency
00:21:36

This week’s secretive votes will determine the next president and the current prime minister looks to be a favourite. But that move would be bad for Italy. Many African countries that are rife with resources remain persistently underdeveloped; we dig into the reasons. And we meet the chefs bringing unsung Native American cuisine to the table.

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Jan 24, 2022
Editor’s Picks: January 24th 2022
00:22:53

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the parable of Boris Johnson, and what it says about the country he governs. Also, America’s tech giants’ ambitious investments (10:05) and do vaccine mandates actually work? (19:10)

 

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Jan 24, 2022
Checks and Balance: Left side story
00:41:00

Joe Biden voters are more likely to have a negative view of the United States than those who voted for Donald Trump, according to new research from The Economist. A year since his inauguration, is this miserablism largely a result of President Biden’s recent woes, or is there something inherently gloomy in the left’s mindset?  


The Economist’s Daniella Raz sifts through the poll findings. We go back to the time when a liberal philosopher imagined a dark future for America. And political psychologist Peter Ditto examines what makes liberal brains tick.  


John Prideaux presents with Jon Fasman and Charlotte Howard. 


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Jan 21, 2022
Unsustainable envelopment goals: China’s zero-covid fight
00:20:04

The Omicron variant is destined to test the limits of a policy that has already proved costly: consumption, growth and confidence are all flagging. The effects of Russia’s gulag did not stop when the labour camps closed: there appear to be long-term benefits for nearby areas. And why cycling in the Arab world is on the rise.

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Jan 21, 2022
The Economist Asks: Carl Bernstein
00:26:04

The veteran reporter was a teenager when he first walked into a newsroom. He tells Anne McElvoy how that moment led him to become one half of the most famous bylines in journalism. They discuss the decline in trust in the media and echoes of Watergate in American politics today. And the author of “Chasing History” reflects on a painful moment from his past being turned into a film. 


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Jan 20, 2022
Heavyweight-price fight: how to beat global inflation
00:24:27

Shoppers across the developed world face sharply rising prices, and leaders are reaching for all manner of remedies—but that’s what central banks are for. Behind the story of Myanmar’s brutal military leadership is a slow stream of defectors; our correspondent meets the support network they rely on. And cover songs muddle the notion of who can call it their tune.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Jan 20, 2022
Money Talks: Moonshooters
00:31:41

This week Microsoft announced its biggest ever deal, spending $69bn on games publisher Activision Blizzard to advance its ambitions in gaming and the metaverse. The world’s most powerful tech companies are racing to splash their cash on frontier technologies. We crunch the numbers on where they are investing their billions and ask whether these new corporate moonshots will supercharge productivity or further entrench the giants’ dominance in the future.


Rachana Shanbhogue hosts, with Kevin Scott, chief technology officer of Microsoft, and Margrethe Vestager, competition commissioner for the European Union. 


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Jan 19, 2022
Drilling into the numbers: ExxonMobil
00:22:56

America’s biggest oil firm has long been recalcitrant on climate matters, so its new net-zero targets may seem surprising. We examine the substance of its pledges—and motivations. For an economist, tipping is an odd practice; whether you love it or hate it may be a question of control. And how unusual Novak Djokovic’s refusenik vaccine stance is among elite athletes. Additional audio courtesy of Tennis Australia. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Jan 19, 2022
Babbage: Havana syndrome
00:39:47

New cases of Havana syndrome are baffling scientists. Alok Jha investigates the theories behind the mysterious malady plaguing Western diplomats. Are microwave weapons to blame, or could the illness have psychological origins?


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Jan 18, 2022
Through deny of a needle: vaccine mandates
00:22:51

Austria is set to enact a bold policy of levying fines on the unvaccinated. We look at what is driving governments to such measures, and whether they will work. Japan’s shift in thinking about its growing elderly population holds lessons for countries set for a similar demographic shift. And why the Mormon church is struggling to retain its foreign converts.

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Jan 18, 2022
The World Ahead: Following the money
00:28:09

Inflation in America has reached its highest level in four decades. What is the outlook for 2022? Host Tom Standage asks former US treasury secretary Larry Summers. Meanwhile, China is pushing ahead with its plans for a “central bank digital currency”. How do such digital coins stack up against cryptocurrencies?


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Jan 17, 2022
But who’s counting? Voting rights in America
00:23:04

Democrats will spend the week battling for a tightening of laws on casting votes; that will overshadow Republicans’ worrying push into how those votes are counted and certified. Earthquakes remain damnably unpredictable, but new research suggests a route to early-warning systems. And why hammams, the declining bathhouses of the Arab world, will cling on despite even the challenge of covid-19. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Jan 17, 2022
Editor’s Picks: January 17th 2022
00:24:34

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, beware the bossy state, Britain’s party-animal prime minister (11:45) and, why America and China are one military accident away from disaster (18:00)

 

 

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Jan 17, 2022
Checks and Balance: “Refund the police”
00:41:45

After George Floyd’s murder protestors took to the streets, angry about racially-motivated brutality and discrimination. They urged authorities to “defund the police” and over 20 cities listened. But now, with rising murder rates, many of those same places are increasing investment in law enforcement. Can you “refund” and reform the police at the same time?  


Mayor of Portland, Oregon Ted Wheeler tells us why his city is raising its police budget. We go back to a war on crime that’s been largely forgotten. And criminal justice reformer David Muhammad discusses the best ways to cut crime while also fixing policing.


John Prideaux presents with Charlotte Howard and Jon Fasman.  


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Jan 14, 2022
His royal minus: Prince Andrew
00:23:20

The queen’s second son has been stripped of his titles—an apparent bid to insulate the crown from his legal troubles. But dangers to the prince and to the monarchy remain. A blockade of Mali, intended to force a return to democratic order, may worsen security and entrench foreign influences. And the genre of “eco-horror” evolves alongside environment-driven anxieties.

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Jan 14, 2022
The Economist Asks: Mandy Patinkin
00:24:07

The Broadway legend has entertained audiences for four decades. He tells Anne McElvoy why he combines acting and activism and how he became a late-life TikTok sensation. And the star of “Homeland” reveals the personal story that inspired him to highlight Europe’s refugee crisis. Also, he gives us a burst of song from his days working with the late Stephen Sondheim.

 

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Jan 13, 2022
In vino, veritas: Boris Johnson under fire
00:22:47

While Britons followed covid strictures, the prime minister’s residence hosted boozy gatherings; widespread fury hints that his prevarications this time may be his last as leader. Religious institutions struggled during the pandemic, as all businesses did—so they are selling assets and courting new customers in innovative ways. And road rage is common, but in America it is getting decidedly deadlier. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Jan 13, 2022
Money Talks: The bossy state
00:34:42

Governments around the world are deciding it is time to bring big business to heel. Host Rachana Shanbhogue and The Economist’s business editor Jan Piotrowski explore the new age of state interventionism. A suite of old tools is being dusted off and reimagined—from a return to picking winners to turning the century-old global tax system on its head. The big state is back in business.


With Oren Cass, director of American Compass; Sarah Miller, founder of the American Economic Liberties Project; Christiane Arndt-Bascle, head of regulatory performance at the OECD; and Professor Michael Devereux, director of the Centre for Business Taxes at Oxford University.


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Jan 12, 2022
Not in the same class: America and schools
00:22:09

The country’s children have missed more in-person learning than those in most of the rich world—to their cost. We ask why battles about schooling rage on. Rodrigo Duterte, the Philippine president, came to power on big promises; few were fulfilled. We ask about the skimpy legacy he leaves behind. And a look at the metaverse’s red-hot property market.

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Jan 12, 2022
Babbage: The smartwatch will see you now
00:42:31

A new tech boom is disrupting medicine. We investigate how wearable trackers, such as the Fitbit or Apple Watch, could transform health care. And, could the devices help prevent the next pandemic? Kenneth Cukier hosts. 


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Jan 11, 2022
Talking out his asks: Putin’s NATO demands
00:21:55

This week’s flurry of diplomacy aims to address what Vladimir Putin, Russia’s president, says he wants. He cannot get it. Does an invasion of Ukraine hang in the balance? At an annual jamboree of economists our correspondent finds an unusual focus on the future—in particular the future of home working. And why Cuba has an enormous trade in grey-market garlic.

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Jan 11, 2022
The World Ahead: On the borderline
00:17:44

China is unlikely to reopen its borders in 2022 as it continues its zero-covid policy. What will the long-term impact of the pandemic be on tourism and business travel? Meanwhile, the tourist map of South-East Asia will look very different in 2022 as the number of destinations adopting the “sandbox” model is set to grow. Tom Standage hosts. 


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Jan 10, 2022
Hope for the crest: an Omicron wave hits India
00:21:35

The country has the world’s worst estimated covid-death total—but as another variant takes hold there are reasons for optimism. Mexico’s president has some old-fashioned notions about energy, and his pet legislation would make it both dirtier and costlier. And the Orient Express was itself a murder victim, just one line in a continent-spanning rail network that may yet be revived.

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Jan 10, 2022
Editor’s Picks: January 10th 2022
00:18:45

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how to talk to Mr Putin, the rise of performative work (9:45) and the lingering effects of covid-19 on elite footballers (15:00)

 

 

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Jan 10, 2022
Checks and Balance: Capitol punishment
00:44:50

“The former president of the United States has created and spread a web of lies about the 2020 election.” Joe Biden had harsh words for Donald Trump in a speech marking the anniversary of the Capitol attack. What has the House Select Committee set up to investigate January 6th discovered so far? 


The Economist’s James Astill combs through the committee’s findings. We trace the link between the disputed election of 1876 and the insurrection. And anti-Trump Republican Sarah Longwell assesses her party’s response to the events of a year ago.


John Prideaux presents with Jon Fasman and Charlotte Howard. 


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Jan 07, 2022
Fuel to the flames: uprising in Kazakhstan
00:23:13

What started as a fuel-price skirmish has engulfed the entire country; now Russian-led troops have been summoned to help. How did things escalate so quickly? The spike in global house prices has several pandemic-related causes—but do not expect them to fall much when those factors fade. And our obituaries editor reflects on the life of Britain’s first transgender activist. 

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Jan 07, 2022
The Economist Asks: Robert Kaplan
00:27:22

The new year presents President Biden with a raft of foreign-policy challenges – from Russian troops on Ukraine’s border, to an aggressive China in the Taiwan Strait. Host Anne McElvoy asks a leading geopolitical thinker how the United States will face the tests to its power in 2022. Plus, the author of “The Revenge of Geography” assesses America’s willingness to go to war and the influence domestic factors will have on diplomacy.


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Jan 06, 2022
Capitol crimes: one year after America’s insurrection
00:23:37

The insurrection’s horrors might have marked a turning point for Donald Trump’s supporters and enablers. Not so; the people and the politics remain as divided as they were one year ago. We examine why, despite the rampant uncertainty that should lift it, gold had a terrible 2021. And London’s farcical attempt to draw consumers to a famed shopping district. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Jan 06, 2022
Money Talks: Rags to riches
00:29:18

How did second-hand clothes become fashion’s hottest buy? Online resale and rental firms are changing the calculus on what it means to buy fashion “as an investment”. Host Alice Fulwood speaks to entrepreneurs and economists to find out how technology is creating new markets and why consumers are saying out with the new and in with the old.


With Eshita Kabra-Davies, founder of By Rotation; Francesca Muston, vice president of fashion at forecaster WGSN; James Reinhart, founder of thredUP; Professor Alvin Roth, economist at Stanford University and Julie Wainwright, founder of The RealReal.


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Jan 05, 2022
Stop the presses! Hong Kong’s media crackdown
00:22:11

The closure of two independent, Chinese-language media outlets all but completes the push to silence pro-democracy press; we ask what is next for the territory. Sudan’s military seems as uninterested in civilian help with governing as legions of protesters are in military leadership. What could end the standoff? And why sanctions on Iran are affecting the purity of saffron. 

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Jan 05, 2022
Babbage: Everyone’s going to the Moon
00:27:38

A new age of lunar exploration is dawning, bringing opportunity and geopolitical jostling. We explore the science and economics of the next space race. Also, correspondent Alok Jha investigates how to avoid conflict on missions to Mars. Kenneth Cukier hosts.


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With thanks to NASA for additional audio used in this episode.

 

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Jan 04, 2022
Holmes stretch: Theranos’s founder convicted
00:21:34

Elizabeth Holmes has been found guilty of fraud. We ask what lessons her downfall holds for Theranos’s high-profile backers—and for a startup culture of hype before science. As Apple crosses a $3trn valuation we examine the motives for its stop-start forays into the competitive streaming-video business. And what lies behind the curious resurgence of syphilis.

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Jan 04, 2022
The World Ahead: COP-out?
00:32:13

After a major UN climate summit, momentum behind climate policy often falters. But will that happen in 2022 in the wake of COP26? Climate cooperation is leading to some unlikely alliances and new reports on the impact of global warming underline greater urgency. Will significant action follow? Tom Standage hosts.


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Jan 03, 2022
Separate weighs: Brexit, one year on
00:22:00

Trade is down, red tape is up, details of regulatory harmony are still being hammered out. Britain may be less divided about it, but the benefits of the divorce are still to be seized. For the clinically vulnerable, covid restrictions go beyond government mandates; our correspondent shares a personal view. And a visit to mainland Singapore’s last rural village.

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Jan 03, 2022
Editor’s Picks: January 3rd 2022
00:32:20

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how to think about the threat to American democracy, which economies have done best and worst during the pandemic (10:33) and whether video games really are addictive (17:34)

 

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Jan 03, 2022
Checks and Balance: Three chords and the truth
00:45:10

Morgan Wallen became one of the stories of 2021 after he was caught using a racial slur. Banned from radio, the country music star’s sales and streams spiked anyway. The affair reinforced a stereotype of the genre as home to hillbilly bigotry. But country is changing and its politics were always more complex than its popularity in Republican heartlands indicates. What does the story tell us about America’s shifting views of class and identity?


Nadine Hubbs of the University of Michigan unpicks Wallen’s story and tells us how streaming and social media are revolutionising country music. And we find out how embracing country propelled Richard Nixon to the presidency.


John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Jon Fasman.


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Dec 31, 2021
The Economist Asks: 2021
00:26:40

We look back to some of our favourite moments and guests from the past 12 months—featuring conversations about how our work lives are changing and business is transforming. From technological breakthroughs to shifting workplaces, you’ll hear from six guests we wanted to revisit—Kai-Fu Lee, Joanna Coles and Melora Hardin, Whitney Wolfe Herd, Indra Nooyi, and Ray Dalio. Also features a calming gift of meditation for all our listeners. Anne McElvoy hosts.

 

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Dec 30, 2021
All she wrote: our obituaries editor reflects on 2021
00:25:00

From Prince Philip to Desmond Tutu, from an anti-racism campaigner and member of the Auschwitz Girls’ Orchestra to a war surgeon focused on civilians to an impoverished Ethiopian whose school for the poor educated 120,000 students: our obituaries editor reflects on the famed and the lesser-known figures who died in 2021. 

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Dec 30, 2021
A few bright spots: our country of the year
00:20:10

Each year The Economist selects its country of the year: a place that has improved the most. Improvement, though, was damnably rare in 2021. We run through our nominations and the shortlist, and take a close look at why the winner won. And we examine what has gone on in South and South-East Asia, which offered no contenders whatsoever.

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Dec 29, 2021
You bet your dollar-bottomed: Erdogan’s next gambit
00:23:20

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s idea for saving the lira by backing deposits with dollars means the Turkish taxpayer will end up bailing out the Turkish depositor. Our correspondent finds striking insights in 40 years’-worth of humdrum submissions to a unique sociology project. And Saudi Arabia’s multi-billion-dollar push into the cinema industry it outlawed for decades.

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Dec 28, 2021
Editor’s Picks: December 27th 2021
00:28:49

A taste of the special Christmas double issue of The Economist. This week: Hong Kong’s parents face up to an uncertain future for their children. And the rise and rise of an unfairly ignored building material—corrugated iron (14:50)

 

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Dec 27, 2021
Beginning of the endemic? Omicron’s spread
00:22:20

The lightning-fast spread of a seemingly milder coronavirus variant may represent a shift from pandemic to endemic; we ask how that would change global responses. Concern about video-game addictiveness is as old as video games themselves—but the business models of modern gaming may be magnifying the problem. And newly publicised photographs shed light on Bangladesh’s brutal war for independence.

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Dec 27, 2021
Checks and Balance: Merry Quizmas
00:39:01

On this special holiday episode the team highlights the stories we didn’t get a chance to cover on the podcast this year. Plus a couple of mystery quiz masters from The Economist family join, and listeners try to out-fox our trivia champion Jon Fasman with questions of their own.  


John Prideaux presents with Charlotte Howard and Jon Fasman. 


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Dec 24, 2021
The Economist Asks: Anya Hindmarch
00:22:49

The designer is rethinking sustainability and style, but can luxury fashion really be green? She talks to Anne McElvoy about making sought-after handbags out of recycled plastic bottles and biodegradable leather and assesses whether renting clothes is the solution to the environmental impact of changing trends. And which political heavyweight – known for handbagging – inspired her to go into business? 


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Dec 23, 2021
No safety in numbers: security in Haiti
00:24:05

The security situation is hopeless, following violent unrest and a presidential assassination—as one family’s epic and ultimately failed attempt to leave reveals. The sum total of the missing banknotes in the world is staggering, but what is worrying is that no one seems interested in finding it all. And meeting the man who unwittingly became Sherlock Holmes’s secretary.

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Dec 23, 2021
Money Talks: 2021 unwrapped
00:32:57

From Ever Given to Evergrande, via empty crisp packets and the metaverse, host Henry Tricks leads a brave band of The Economist’s finest through the tribulations and triumphs of the past year in business, finance and economics. The team unpack the data that made their jaws drop, face baffling clues to mystery items and offer their predictions—and hopes—for 2022. 


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Dec 22, 2021
Relocation, relocation, relocation: America’s internal migration
00:24:08

The flood of people out of cities is unlike anything since the suburbanisation of the 1950s; we examine the inevitable economic and political consequences. After years of reporting our correspondent concludes that the mutual disdain of a country’s northern and southern halves is a curious human universal. And a sojourn to fact-check Julius Caesar’s accounts of his triumphs in France.

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Dec 22, 2021
Babbage: A new look at the cosmos
00:39:43

The James Webb Space Telescope launches this week. It promises to transform human understanding of the universe. By gazing deep into space, it will see billions of years back in time. But is the long-delayed project worth the $10-billion price tag? And, science correspondent Gilead Amit asks NASA’s head of science Thomas Zurbuchen about the mission’s impact on the agency. Alok Jha hosts.


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With thanks to Don Giller for supplying additional audio.

 

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Dec 21, 2021
All about that base: Japan’s security policy
00:24:25

In recent years the country has found itself in a sharply different geopolitical environment, responding by building bases and security-partner ties as never before. Our correspondent meets perhaps the last living offspring of an American slave, whose stories paint a picture of the civil-rights movement right up to today. And Thailand’s changing cannabis policy, best seen through its restaurants’ menus.

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Dec 21, 2021
The World Ahead: The new space race
00:23:40

Space was one of the only tourist destinations in 2021 that boomed. What are the prospects for extraterrestrial travel in 2022? Host Tom Standage talks to Sian Proctor, the first African-American woman to pilot a spacecraft, who took part in the first all-civilian orbital mission. And, how does science fiction relate to the new reality of space exploration?


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Dec 20, 2021
Back to the USSR: Russia and Ukraine
00:23:54

As border tensions continue to build, our Russia editor looks back to the fall of the Soviet Union to explain why Russia has never accepted Ukraine’s independence. Eating out has only become more expensive through the decades, yet the diners keep coming; we examine the long history and economics of restaurants. And our staff picks for 2021’s best books.

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Dec 20, 2021
Editor’s Picks: December 20th 2021
00:36:19

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the Christmas double issue of The Economist. This week: has the new normal already arrived? Plus, meet the lords of the metaverse (10:10) and, a century apart, two men with very different dreams contend for Europe’s future (17:50).

 

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Dec 20, 2021
Checks and Balance: Nuclear option
00:42:24

Nuclear is responsible for nearly 20% of America’s power generation and about half of its clean energy. It’s greener than fossil fuels and more reliable than renewables. Yet safety fears remain and plants are being closed. Will the climate crisis force America to reconsider nuclear power?


The Economist’s Aryn Braun reports from a coal town welcoming a new atomic plant. We go back to America’s worst nuclear accident. And The Economist’s Vijay Vaitheeswaran considers what the energy future might look like. 


John Prideaux presents with Charlotte Howard and Jon Fasman.  


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Dec 17, 2021
Centre of no attention: Chile’s presidential election
00:23:20

As the vote’s second round has neared, the candidates have shifted, a bit, from their positions at opposite ends of the political spectrum. Which radical vision for the country will win out? The transition to electric vehicles may well stall, unless the chicken-and-egg problem of public chargers can be cracked. And a soaring history of “birdmen”, successful and otherwise.

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Dec 17, 2021
The Economist Asks: Anish Kapoor
00:26:36

The sculptor is one of the most recognisable figures in contemporary art. Over his four-decade career, how have conversations about representation and appropriation changed? He talks to Anne McElvoy about cancel culture and the risks of tokenism for creative institutions. The Turner prize winner also assesses whether public art needs to be popular and the controversy around his use of the blackest black ever created.


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Dec 16, 2021
Money printer slow brrr: the Fed turns down the taps
00:20:40

America’s central bank plans to pinch off its massive bond-buying programme much faster in a bid to stall inflation; our correspondent says it is perhaps a late-arriving signal—but a promising one. Loneliness is a growing problem in the rich world but seems particularly acute among American men. And why aged artists are increasingly taking over the December music charts.

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Dec 16, 2021
Money Talks: Meet the cryptokings
00:35:34

Four men hold the keys to a $2trn market. Our finance correspondent Matthieu Favas speaks to some of the most powerful people in the world of cryptocurrencies—the founders of the most important crypto exchanges—to find out what it takes to stay on top in the most volatile market of all. We examine their strategies against a looming reckoning with regulators and ask whether their visions for how crypto will change the world could become reality. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts. 


With Brian Armstrong of Coinbase, Sam Bankman-Fried of FTX and Changpeng Zhao of Binance.


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Dec 15, 2021
In full swing: Ethiopia’s shifting civil war
00:24:17

More than a year after a rebellion Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed promised to put down in weeks, the balance of power keeps swinging—and neighbouring states may soon be drawn in. To the chagrin of libertarian crypto types, regulators are weighing in on an industry now worth trillions. And the fed-up North Korean wives earning more than their husbands.

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Dec 15, 2021
Babbage: Unpacking Omicron
00:29:46

The world is desperate to understand the variant, which is poised to overtake Delta in parts of Europe. We ask how experts make sense of emerging data to project Omicron's impact. Also, Professor Sir David Spiegelhalter explains why scientists have drawn widely differing conclusions from covid-19 statistics. And, we reveal the winners of our final book giveaway of the year. Kenneth Cukier hosts.


To keep up-to-date with our coverage of the Omicron variant, go to economist.com/omicron.


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Dec 14, 2021
Twister of fate? Tornadoes and climate change
00:23:43

Many have been quick to link the tornado catastrophe in America’s Upland South to climate change; we ask why that is a tricky connection to draw. Citizenship of Gulf states has long been difficult to acquire, even for lifelong residents. That is slowly changing—for a slice of the elite. And the kerfuffle surrounding the repurposing of Britain’s red phone boxes.

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Dec 14, 2021
The World Ahead: Working it out
00:24:35

Why will 2022 be the year of the worker? Workers around the world suffered hardship in 2020 and 2021, but labour markets across the rich world have outperformed expectations.

For workers the work from home experiment has gone fairly well and they have more bargaining power than they have had for years. But how can employers ensure that the future of work is fair for all? Tom Standage hosts. 


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Dec 13, 2021
Protein shake-up: getting to know Omicron
00:20:13

The latest “variant of concern” has spread far—and fast. We examine what has been learned about it at equally striking speed, and ask what to look out for next. South-East Asia has long had a methamphetamine problem; so-called compulsory treatment centres are only making matters worse. And the effort to make a minuscule lemur science’s next super-model

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Dec 13, 2021
Editor’s Picks: December 13th 2021
00:23:55

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: what would America fight for? Also, why two years after a famous election victory, Boris Johnson’s would-be radical administration has run into the ground (09:20). And we explore how Beijing’s Winter Olympics may hasten China’s break with the West (17:10).

 

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Dec 13, 2021
Checks and Balance: Taiwan wonder
00:39:24

Taiwan is arguably America’s defining foreign-policy challenge. The calibrated ambiguity over whether the US would defend the island democracy from a Chinese attack is hard to sustain as China’s power grows. Would the US go to war over Taiwan?


The Economist's Beijing bureau chief David Rennie assesses the likelihood of a Chinese attack on Taiwan. We look back at the origins of America’s ambiguous Taiwan policy. And Anton La Guardia, our diplomatic editor, spots Washington doves. 


The Economist's US editor John Prideaux hosts with Jon Fasman, US digital editor and New York Bureau Chief Charlotte Howard. 


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Dec 10, 2021
Unsafe as houses? Evergrande and China’s big plans
00:24:07

The wildly indebted property firm has defaulted at last. That poses big risks as China’s leadership works to refashion financial markets and draw in foreign investors. We visit the world’s largest lithium reserves, asking why Bolivia has not yet made the most of them—and whether it still might. And the Chopin concert aimed at calming Poland’s refugee tensions.

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Dec 10, 2021
The Economist Asks: Richard Moore
00:32:02

In a rare interview, the head of Britain’s Secret Intelligence Service spells out his plans to modernise MI6. He tells Anne McElvoy and Shashank Joshi, The Economist’s defence editor, why China is his most pressing priority. The spymaster wants to recruit diverse talent, but how is he encouraging ethnic minorities to join the ranks? And what does “C” make of his big-screen counterpart “M” in the James Bond films?


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Dec 09, 2021
Ain’t no party: scandals hobble Britain’s government
00:22:06

At two years into Boris Johnson’s premiership, yet more scandal ensures attention will still stray from the sweeping agenda of change he promised. An archaeological find in the state of Tamil Nadu rewrites the timeline of civilisation in India—raising questions of identity in a charged political atmosphere. And the man listening intently to the staggering variety of Beijing’s birds.

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Dec 09, 2021
Money Talks: The not-so-great resignation
00:28:36

The idea that the pandemic has prompted people to quit their jobs en masse fills corporate earnings calls, headlines and social media. But do the data hold up? Host Patrick Lane investigates what is really going on in the labour market. Will the Biden administration usher in a new age for America’s formidable unions? And we visit a would-be paradise for digital nomads. 


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Dec 08, 2021
CDU later: Angela Merkel’s successor
00:22:55

For the first time in 16 years Mrs Merkel’s Christian Democratic Union is out of Germany’s government. We ask what to expect from Olaf Scholz, the new chancellor. China’s leadership wants to boost the birth rate but discriminates against single mothers; we examine a slow push for equality. And mental-health apps are booming, but the risks are many and the benefits uncertain. Have your say about “The Intelligence” in our survey here. www.economist.com/intelligencesurvey. And for full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Dec 08, 2021
Babbage: Goodbye darkness, my old friend
00:29:19

Thousands of satellites are being propelled into low-Earth orbit to provide internet access. Host Alok Jha investigates the impact on astronomy, as companies such as SpaceX multiply their constellations. What can be done to protect the night sky? 


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Dec 07, 2021
Off the warpath: America 80 years after Pearl Harbour
00:22:48

The Japanese attack set America on a course toward military hegemony; recent administrations have walked it back. We ask what the country would fight for now. A clash of priorities between national and city-level politicians the world over makes for fraught politics on car ownership. And our columnist envisages how the office will compete with home in a post-pandemic world.Have your say about “The Intelligence” in our survey here www.economist.com/intelligencesurvey. And for full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Dec 07, 2021
The World Ahead: Year three
00:26:54

In wealthy and well-vaccinated countries, year three of the pandemic will be better than year two. But in countries that are poorer, less well vaccinated or both, the deleterious effects of the virus will linger. A disparity of outcomes between rich and poor countries will emerge. Meanwhile, tests and treatments for “long covid” are on the horizon and the mRNA technology used in some covid vaccines could be applied to other diseases. So could there be a “covid dividend”?


Host Tom Standage talks to The Economist's Edward Carr, Natasha Loder and Slavea Chankova.


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Dec 06, 2021
The first sentence of the story: Aung San Suu Kyi
00:22:11

Myanmar’s ousted leader has been sentenced to four years in prison; more guilty verdicts are expected soon. That will only fuel unrest that has not ceased since a coup in February. Scrutiny of Interpol’s new president adds to concerns that the supranational agency is in authoritarians’ pockets. And governments start to back the “seasteading” of libertarians’ dreams.

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Dec 06, 2021
Editor’s Picks: December 6th 2021
00:23:40

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: what the Omicron variant means for the world economy, what experiments with “free banking” in the 18th and 19th centuries reveal about the future of stablecoins (10:53) and how the legacy of Stalin’s gulag continues to shape Russian fortunes (18:16) 

 

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Dec 06, 2021
Checks and Balance: Courting controversy
00:42:11

The Supreme Court looks poised to place dramatic limits on abortion rights. Liberals worry this signals a conservative takeover of the nation’s laws, but the justices deny that they are politicians in robes. How is the Supreme Court reshaping America?


The Economist’s Steve Mazie explains what another case on the docket reveals about the court’s conservative wing. We go back to a surprising ruling on gay rights. And former Trump official Sarah Isgur tells us what the right thinks of the court.


Jon Fasman presents with Charlotte Howard. 


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Dec 03, 2021
Taiwan thing after another: the Solomon Islands
00:20:44

The archipelago’s diplomatic pivot to China has added an international dimension to the latest flare-up of domestic tensions. We ask how this tiny state figures into far larger geopolitics. British law permits medical cannabis for children with epilepsy—so why are so few able to get it? And a Formula 1 race may mark the end of Saudi Arabia’s alcohol ban.

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Dec 03, 2021
The Economist Asks: Eric Cantor
00:27:04

The former House majority leader and Virginia congressman assesses whether the Republican Party needs Donald Trump to win. The one-time rising star of the GOP talks to Anne McElvoy about the lessons learnt from losing his seat to a Tea-Party challenger. Is bipartisanship broken or can his old frenemy President Joe Biden fix it? 


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Dec 02, 2021
Roe blow? SCOTUS weighs abortion rights
00:24:02

The conservative supermajority on America’s Supreme Court looks likely to strip back rights enshrined since the Roe v Wade ruling in 1973. Beset by natural disasters, Puerto Rico did not seem ready for a pandemic—but our correspondent finds it has done better than the rest of America. And an intriguing new idea in the mystery of how Earth got its water. Have your say about “The Intelligence” in our survey here www.economist.com/intelligencesurvey. And for full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

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Dec 02, 2021
Money Talks: Omicronomics
00:31:01

China’s economy is slowing while America’s overheats, prompting Jerome Powell to suggest this week that the Fed could act faster than planned. As the Omicron variant triggers a fresh wave of travel restrictions, is the world economy caught between a rock and a hard place? Host Patrick Lane and Henry Curr, our economics editor, assess the threats to global growth.


With Carmen Reinhart, senior vice-president and chief economist of the World Bank group, and Wang Tao, chief China economist and head of Asia research for UBS, an investment bank.


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Dec 01, 2021
The house that Jack built: Twitter’s founder departs
00:19:35

Jack Dorsey’s departure from the social-media giant reflects the growing primacy of engineering talent, and the waning mythology of the big-tech founder. Ukraine’s military has become much better at battling Russian-backed separatists since the annexation of Crimea—but now a far graver kind of war looms. And the Economist Intelligence Unit’s latest list of the world’s most expensive cities.

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Dec 01, 2021
Babbage: Omicron and on
00:28:32

Countries are scrambling to stop the Omicron variant of the coronavirus. We search for scientific clues to understand how it will shape the pandemic. Professor Sharon Peacock, one of the world’s top variant hunters, predicts Omicron will be more transmissible than previous strains. And, will Omicron supplant the Delta variant globally? Correspondent Hal Hodson looks to immunology for answers.


Alok Jha hosts, with The Economist’s health policy editor, Natasha Loder and deputy editor, Edward Carr.


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Nov 30, 2021
Centrifugal forces: Iran nuclear talks resume
00:22:51

Things were all smiles after negotiations resumed—but it is difficult to see how a middle ground can be reached in Iran’s nuclear ambitions. Apple’s surprise move to permit repairs to its hardware reflects the growing “right to repair” movement, and a shift in the notion of tech ownership. And the “grab lists” that museum curators prefer not to talk about. Have your say about “The Intelligence” in our survey here 

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Nov 30, 2021
The World Ahead: The eagle and the dragon
00:22:53

The rivalry between China and America will intensify in 2022 as each side strives to demonstrate the superiority of its system of government. As China uses its stage-managed Communist Party congress to cement Xi Jinping in power, Joe Biden and the Democratic Party are expected to face a drubbing in America’s mid-term elections. Editor-in-Chief Zanny Minton Beddoes, US editor John Prideaux and host Tom Standage assess the competition between the two superpowers. 


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Nov 29, 2021
Priority letter: the Omicron variant
00:21:02

Governments’ rapid responses to a new coronavirus strain were wise. But much is still to be learned about the Omicron variant before longer-term policies can be prescribed. Vietnam’s government wants to create internationally competitive firms, and a growing new class of billionaires suggests the plan is working. And research suggests that social distancing comes naturally to bees under pathogenic threat.

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Nov 29, 2021
Editor’s Picks: November 29th 2021
00:28:49