Economist Radio

By The Economist

Listen to a podcast, please open Podcast Republic app. Available on Google Play Store.


Category: News & Politics

Open in Apple Podcasts


Open RSS feed


Open Website


Rate for this podcast

Subscribers: 8815
Reviews: 29


 Apr 14, 2021

Podcast lover
 Mar 31, 2021
Too much background music, too many sound effects - just ends up sounding noisy. Keep it simple. As far as current affairs podcasts are concerned, FT and Monocle are much better.

chris
 Mar 10, 2021
Please stop forcing Jeffrey Sachs into my podcast feed!!!


 Feb 11, 2021

Rik
 Feb 10, 2021
A well-balanced compilation of the Economist's news offerings. Very useful is you want to get a broad, concise overview of current affairs across the world.

Description

The Economist was founded in 1843 "to throw white light on the subjects within its range". For more from The Economist visit http://shop.economist.com/collections/audio


Episode Date
The Economist Asks: Henry Kissinger
00:42:00

How does the best-known veteran of foreign policy view the great global standoff today? Henry Kissinger is a titan of US politics — as Secretary of State and National Security Advisor in the Nixon and Ford administrations he brokered detente with the Soviet Union and orchestrated a breakthrough presidential visit to China in 1972. Incumbents have sought his insight long after he left the White House. Anne McElvoy asks him about the current threats to world order, how to handle Vladimir Putin and Xi Jinping, and what he would have done differently when in office. And, following an Economist advert, are plane companions ever too inhibited to talk to him? 


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 22, 2021
Growth negligence: India’s covid-19 failings
00:19:48

Mass gatherings and in-person voting continue, even as new case numbers smash records and fatalities spiral in public view. We ask how a seeming pandemic success has turned so suddenly tragic. Chad’s president of three decades has been killed; that has implications for regional violence far beyond the country’s borders. And a deep dive on the international sea-cucumber trade.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 22, 2021
Babbage: Promising the earth
00:29:55

President Biden is hosting a virtual summit with world leaders on Thursday 22nd April aiming to convince countries to take bolder action on climate change. Does this mark a new era for American leadership on climate? With China and America at odds over human rights, security and economic competition, can they work together against this common threat? And will countries take sufficient action to meet the challenge at hand? Charlotte Howard hosts 


A note for our listeners: from May 4th 2021 Babbage will be published every Tuesday.


For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our new weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 21, 2021
Insuperable: Europe’s football fiasco
00:24:07

A “Super League” plan wrong-footed fans, clubs, even governments. We examine what the failed bid says about the sport’s economics. We return to the George Floyd case and the landmark conviction of his murderer. The Kurds have long sought their own state in the Middle East; that now looks as unlikely as ever. And why spelling is so persistently counter-intuitive.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 21, 2021
Money Talks: Less stick more carrot
00:27:22

As America and its allies threaten more penalties against Russia over the treatment of opposition leader Alexei Navalny, does the West’s overdependence on economic sanctions risk making them ineffective? Also, why India is proving an attractive—and clever—investor in poor countries concerned about Chinese influence. And, do plans for a football Super League risk an own goal? Patrick Lane hosts 


A note for our listeners: from May 5th 2021 Money Talks will be published every Wednesday.


For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 20, 2021
A case rests, a city does not: Derek Chauvin’s trial
00:22:13

The former police officer involved in George Floyd’s death awaits a verdict. What would conviction mean in a case emblematic of a far wider racial-justice movement? Internal migration has left a third of China’s young people separated from one or both parents—with serious costs and risks to those children. And the bid to make the art of tasting the province of engineering.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 20, 2021
The Jab: Can Europe turn the corner?
00:35:11

The continent is suffering a third wave of covid-19 after the European Commission’s vaccine roll out stalled. French President Emmanuelle Macron has said Europe “lacked ambition” in its vaccine efforts. How can European countries catch up?

 

Alok Jha and Natasha Loder are joined by Sophie Pedder, The Economist’s Paris bureau chief, Stanley Pignal, European business and finance correspondent, and Sondre Solstad, senior data journalist.

 

For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/thejabpod. Sign up for our new weekly science and data newsletters at economist.com/simplyscience and economist.com/offthecharts

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 19, 2021
Lai of the land: Hong Kong’s democrats quashed
00:21:12

Some of the territory’s most outspoken activists—from media mogul Jimmy Lai to “father of democracy” Martin Lee—have been sentenced. We look at what’s left of Hong Kong’s protest spirit. Scientists have been making hybrid animal “chimeras” for decades, but newly developed human-monkey embryos raise serious ethical questions. And how the Arab world is changing channels as propaganda consumes Egyptian television.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 19, 2021
Editor’s Picks: April 19th 2021
00:24:43

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, from United Kingdom to Untied Kingdom, corporations and democracy in America (09:00) and Myanmar: Asia’s next failed state (17:10).


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 18, 2021
Checks and Balance: CEOutrage
00:42:48

American companies used to keep quiet about politics, relying on behind the scenes donations and lobbying. But they are increasingly speaking out on a range of issues— most recently on Georgia’s restrictive new voting laws.

 

Jeffrey Sonnenfeld, of the Yale School of Management, organised a recent meeting of CEOs and says this is a great opportunity for businesses. Henry Tricks, The Economist’s Schumpeter columnist, surveys the history of corporate activism and we explore international comparisons.


John Prideaux, our US editor, hosts, with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, US digital editor.


For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/USpod

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 16, 2021
The path of increased resistance: Myanmar
00:21:47

Protests against February’s military coup are only growing, even as the army becomes more murderous. The economy is paralysed. What can be done to put the country back together? In Cuba, the end of the Castro-family era is nigh; a new leader inherits a cratered economy and an ambitious vaccine-development effort. And some surprising road-fatality statistics from America. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 16, 2021
The Economist Asks: Francis Suarez
00:24:24

How do you reinvent a city? The mayor of Miami is on a mission to turn his city into the world’s foremost tech and financial hub. Anne McElvoy explores whether he can tempt entrepreneurs and investors away from Silicon Valley and Wall Street and how he will improve the lives of Miamians. Mayor Suarez talks about his ambitions in the Republican Party and reveals why he did not vote for Donald Trump.


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 15, 2021
Boots off the ground: America’s Afghanistan drawdown
00:20:56

Few believe President Joe Biden’s withdrawal plan is wise; it is already prompting allied forces to go. We ask about the risks of that untimely vacuum. Much climate-change angst focuses on carbon dioxide, but addressing sources of methane would be an easy way to slow warming—and even to save money. And Bhutan’s world-beating vaccination drive took just one week. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 15, 2021
Babbage: Where it began
00:35:11

Almost a year and a half since the discovery of the virus that causes covid-19, The Economist’s health policy editor, Natasha Loder, investigates one of the pandemic’s most compelling mysteries: where did SARS-CoV-2 come from? Peter Daszak, who was part of the World Health Organisation’s controversial fact-finding mission to China, explains what evidence they gathered from Wuhan’s animal markets and the city’s microbiology laboratories. 


For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our new weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 14, 2021
Arms’ reach: Russia flexes at Ukraine border
00:22:00

The troops and hardware piling up at the border are probably just posturing. But look closely: Russia’s military is swiftly getting better-equipped and better-trained. Outsized inflation numbers in America are partly a statistical quirk—but also a sign of the tricky balance pandemic-era policymakers must navigate. And why you may soon be getting a lift from a flying taxi. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 14, 2021
Money Talks: Politics in the boardroom
00:26:56

From voting rights to climate change, companies are under pressure to speak out—is it wise to mix business and politics? Also, China’s state control over tech giants like Ant Group is growing. Trillions of dollars in market value are at stake. And, as crypto-marketplace Coinbase prepares to list and bitcoin’s value surges, we take a look at the currency’s hidden costs. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts


For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 13, 2021
Fission expedition: nuclear-site attack in Iran
00:21:22

An apparent act of sabotage at an Iranian nuclear site, blamed on Israel, has complicated the prospect of America returning to the 2015 nuclear deal; we ask what happens next. Many of Europe’s public-service broadcasters are being squeezed by populist movements and illiberal governments. How to keep them independent? And an effort to translate Latvia’s short but dense ancient poems.  For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 13, 2021
The Jab: How to persuade the sceptics?
00:39:17

All adults in America are now eligible for a covid-19 vaccine. Around 30% of those polled in the country, however, are hesitant to take the jab. A shortage of vaccines will soon become a shortage of arms. What is the best way to persuade reluctant citizens to get inoculated?

 

We speak to Heidi Larson, anthropologist at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and founding director of the Vaccine Confidence Project, about the similarities between vaccine hesitancy today and the 19th century. Crystal Son, director of healthcare analytics at Civis Analytics, on why vaccine safety messaging is ineffective.

 

Alok Jha and Natasha Loder are joined by Edward Carr, The Economist’s deputy editor, and Tamara Gilkes Borr, US policy correspondent.

 

For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/thejabpod. Sign up for our new weekly science and data newsletters at economist.com/simplyscience and economist.com/offthecharts

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 12, 2021
Plagued by uncertainty: German politics
00:21:58

As the country wrestles with another covid-19 wave, the battle to succeed Chancellor Angela Merkel is building. We look at the political and epidemiological races. Prince Philip was a loyal consort to Britain’s queen for seven decades; our correspondent recalls meeting him at a difficult time for the family. And why Kenyans are at last indulging in their own coffee.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 12, 2021
Editor’s Picks: April 12th 2021
00:21:15

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, riding high in a workers’ world, the Amazon effect on live sport (9:45) and even transience is mutating (17:35).

 

Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 11, 2021
Checks and Balance: Space race
00:40:12

American house prices have risen more steeply during the pandemic than at any time in the last 15 years. Buyers are swapping big cities for suburbs and smaller, sunnier cities in the South and Mountain West. How might this reshuffle change America's politics?


In this episode we’ll take the temperature of the global housing boom, find out how highway construction transformed American politics, and hear how incomers are changing Colorado Springs - one of the winners in the population shift.


The Economist’s data journalist James Fransham and Denver correspondent Aryn Braun join, along with John Suthers, mayor of Colorado Springs. 


John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Jon Fasman.


For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/USpod

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 09, 2021
Like a tonne of bricks: violence in Northern Ireland
00:22:36

The ostensible reason for continuing clashes relates to a well-attended funeral. But the terms of Brexit have raised tempers, inflaming centuries-old tensions; we ask what might calm them. Alexei Navalny’s condition is worsening in prison: does it really serve the Kremlin’s interests to let him perish? And “poetry slams” are a welcome release in the Democratic Republic of Congo. 

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 09, 2021
The Economist Asks: Paul Theroux
00:25:17

What can a travel writer learn from staying at home? Anne McElvoy asks the prolific travel author Paul Theroux about the virtues of being homebound during the pandemic. The author of "Under the Wave at Waimea" reveals that his friend and one-time foe V.S. Naipaul inspired a character in his new book about big-wave surfing in Hawaii. Also, verbal fencing with his sons Louis and Marcel and his ultimate travel destination. 


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 08, 2021
Clotting factors: the AstraZeneca vaccine
00:22:50

British and European regulators have addressed a possible link with blood clots. Expect more rare side-effects to emerge; what seems clear for now is that the vaccine’s benefits outweigh any risks. A new analysis shows that a racist American film from 1915 left a long legacy of racial violence. And a shady history of the function and fashion of sunglasses.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 08, 2021
Babbage: Finger on the pulse of bias
00:22:40

Hospitals routinely measure patients' blood-oxygen levels to determine the severity of covid-19. Why do these and other medical devices and treatments work less well for non-white people and women? Also, if you can have microwave ovens—why not microwave boilers for central heating? And, we explore how bees run vaccination campaigns too. Kenneth Cukier hosts


For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our new weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 07, 2021
Deaths spiral: America’s spike in murders
00:19:30

Estimates suggest that last year’s rise in murder rates was the greatest in perhaps half a century, reversing a long decline; we ask what is behind it. Amid Europe’s woefully slow vaccine rollouts, Serbia stands out as an unlikely success story. And the pandemic’s natural experiment on the ideal number of working hours.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 07, 2021
Money Talks: The future of work
00:21:45

The pandemic has fuelled an explosion of unemployment and a transformation in how many people work, especially in richer countries. We consider the many reasons for optimism about the labour market and the prospects for working from home. And, we talk to David Autor, a labour economist at MIT, about the effect of covid-19 on automation. Simon Long hosts 


For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 06, 2021
Crown and thorn: Jordan’s royal ruckus
00:21:13

Pressure on the king’s half-brother may represent a mere family feud, but Prince Hamzah’s complaints resonate with the country’s people. We ask what will happen next. Study the fast-growing list of India’s billionaires: who has joined it and who has left are signs of the country’s shifting economy. And an indigenous group’s tall order in Vancouver’s property market. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 06, 2021
The Jab: Can distribution be fair?
00:40:07

More than a billion doses of covid-19 vaccine have been made. Now comes the hard part: ensuring every country in the world has access to them. Can distribution be made more equitable? 

 

Alok Jha and Natasha Loder are joined by Edward Carr, The Economist’s deputy editor, and Sondre Solstad, senior data journalist.

 

With Seth Berkley of GAVI, the Vaccine Alliance, and John Nkengasong, director of the Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention.

 

For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/thejabpod. Sign up for our new weekly science and data newsletters at economist.com/simplyscience and economist.com/offthecharts 

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 05, 2021
He said, Xi said: America-China ructions
00:23:17

The Biden administration’s early moves suggest no “reset” in relations; we recall a time when the game of ping-pong brought the countries back to the table. Although economics has transformed in the past quarter-century, the way it is taught has not; we examine efforts to rewrite the textbooks. And a forgotten album by British-Pakistani teenagers gets another lease of life. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffe

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 05, 2021
Editor’s Picks: April 5th 2021
00:21:32

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how Europe has mishandled the pandemic, supply chains make the world safer (10:07), and flying taxis take off, at last (17:09). 

 

 

Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 04, 2021
Checks and Balance: Chain reaction
00:31:37

A container ship stuck in the Suez canal, tensions with China, and the vaccine race have combined to make America’s supply chains look vulnerable. President Biden has ordered a security review and his infrastructure plan includes measures to protect them. What are the politics of this new mantra of resilience? 


The Economist’s US business editor Vijay Vaitheeswaran and Soumaya Keynes, our trade and globalisation editor, join the discussion.


John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Jon Fasman.


For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/USpod

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 02, 2021
Battle acts: France beefs up its forces
00:21:39

After years of peacekeeping and counter-insurgency campaigns, the country is getting tooled up and trained up for serious military conflict. The “baby bust” brought on by the pandemic has changed global population predictions; we look into the down sides of a world with fewer people. And the Benin Bronzes have become a focal point for the art world’s restitution push. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 02, 2021
The Economist Asks: Aaron Sorkin
00:21:41

How important is truth in historical TV drama? Anne McElvoy asks the Oscar-winning screenwriter about the difference between journalistic accuracy and artistic truth, how he uses that tension in his latest film "The Trial of the Chicago 7" and why he loves courtroom dramas. The creator of "The West Wing" also explains why that series still captivates audiences and whether he would write a drama set on a Zoom call.

 

Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 01, 2021
Cresting: India’s second covid-19 wave
00:21:16

Case numbers are on the rise—at a more worrying rate even than the first wave. We ask why, and what is being done to slow the spread. As revenues at wildlife-tourism spots have dried up, so has security—and now poaching is even more rampant than before. And scientists’ increasingly audacious bids to see around corners. 

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 01, 2021
Babbage: Early warning
00:25:22

How can technology be used to forecast future pandemics? We speak to the researchers creating an observatory to spot incipient health crises before they take off. Is data the ultimate weapon in the fight against covid-19 and future viruses? And, the rapid genetic sequencing of SARS-CoV-2 made early testing possible—but testing infrastructure needs to be improved. Kenneth Cukier hosts.


For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our new weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 31, 2021
Takeaway lessons: Deliveroo’s listing disappoints
00:19:14

The tepid debut of Britain’s dominant food-delivery app signals doubts not only about the gig economy but also about London’s ability to lure tech-firm listings. Chinese officials love to deploy “cloud seeding” to water the country’s parched lands, but even if it works, it distracts from better water-management policies. And why tweets so often come back to haunt their authors.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 31, 2021
Money Talks: The next generation
00:28:44

The EU’s €750bn recovery fund aims to rejuvenate the old continent, but ten months in it faces legal challenges and is yet to pay out a cent. Sustainable investing has been accused of “greenwashing”: we crunch the numbers to find out the real impact. And, ahead of Deliveroo’s IPO, our correspondents take to two wheels to investigate the economics of food delivery. Patrick Lane hosts.


With Paolo Gentiloni, European commissioner for economy and former prime minister of Italy, and Tariq Fancy, former chief investment officer for sustainable investing at BlackRock.


For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 30, 2021
High threat-count: boycotts in China
00:23:00

Western fashion brands are in Chinese consumers’ crosshairs, the victims of political wranglings over sanctions and human-rights issues—a spat that may soon consume other industries. A striking number of people in the criminal-justice system have had traumatic brain injuries; our correspondent investigates how much that link has been overlooked. And why the audio app Clubhouse has stormed the Middle East.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 30, 2021
The Jab: How will science benefit?
00:39:54

The concerted and rapid efforts to counter covid-19 have turbo-charged scientific progress. How can this new knowledge be applied to treat future threats to human health? 

 

Gregg Glenn, head of research and development at Novavax on why that vaccine is effective against variants. 

 

Alok Jha, The Economist's science correspondent, hosts with our health policy editor, Natasha Loder. Oliver Morton, briefings editor, Cuba correspondent Roseanne Lake and James Fransham from our data team join them.

 

For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/thejabpod. Sign up for our new weekly science and data newsletters at economist.com/simplyscience and economist.com/offthecharts  

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 29, 2021
The World Ahead: Live and direct
00:23:11

How have live events, including sports, music and conferences, changed in response to the pandemic—and which changes will endure, both for in-person and remote attendees? And what do empty stadiums reveal about referees’ bias? Tom Standage hosts.

 

Subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer 

 

Music by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC by 4.0)

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 29, 2021
The smell of gas: insurgency in Mozambique
00:21:17

In a province that is home to a massive natural-gas project, a long-simmering insurgency has burst into horrific violence; we ask why the government seems to have lost control. Our correspondent visits Minneapolis, where the police officer accused of murdering George Floyd goes on trial today. And the existential threat to a bird that has forgotten how to sing love songs.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 29, 2021
Editor’s Picks: March 29th 2021
00:42:42

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: science after the pandemic, Rwanda: paragon or prison? (9:10) And Herbie goes electric (33:55) 

 

 

Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 28, 2021
Checks and Balance: Size matters
00:39:49

President Biden wants a big infrastructure bill to follow the stimulus cash he has handed out. It would add up to a $5 trillion overhaul of America. A splurge on this scale has long been taboo in mainstream politics. Is big government back?


The Economist’s public policy editor Sacha Nauta and Henry Curr, our economics editor, join the discussion.


John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Jon Fasman.


For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/USpod

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 26, 2021
Growth and stagnation: Bangladesh’s first 50 years
00:21:14

The country has empowered its women, established itself as a garment-industry powerhouse and vastly improved public health—but its politics remains troubled. The pandemic has not reduced average global happiness, but rather reshaped it: the old are more content and the young less so. And a look at the staggering costs of the Suez Canal blockage. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 26, 2021
The Economist Asks: Ursula Burns
00:21:21

Is it time for diversity quotas? Ursula Burns, the first black woman to lead a Fortune 500 company, tells The Economist’s editor-in-chief Zanny Minton Beddoes why she thinks businesses will not diversify without quotas. The former CEO of Xerox also argues that business leaders have the edge over presidents when it comes to closing the skills gap and explains why she became an engineer rather than a nun. 


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 25, 2021
Export-control panel: the EU meets on vaccines
00:22:27

European leaders will address the thorny question of vaccine-export controls today. We look at the row with Britain and what it means for the broader relationship with the EU. Our correspondent visits Congo-Brazzaville as the president of nearly 37 years triumphs again—at a continuing cost to his people. And research suggests that Europe’s most inbred rulers were the least adept.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 25, 2021
Babbage: Shooting out the messenger
00:26:25

The pandemic has fueled the rapid advancement of emerging biotechnologies. The Economist’s science editor explores the potential of RNA beyond covid-19. Also, theoretical physicist Carlo Rovelli explains the implications of quantum physics on our interactions with objects. And, creating self-healing materials where roads repair themselves. Kenneth Cukier hosts


For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our new weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 24, 2021
Can’t take a hike: more economic turmoil in Turkey
00:21:37

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan just does not like interest-rate rises. So he has again sacked a central-bank governor given to imposing them—again, to his own peril. America’s love of free markets extends also to the business of sperm donation; our correspondent discusses the risks that come with so little regulation. And the opera composer who is shaking up stereotypes.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 24, 2021
Money Talks: Over the great wall
00:26:46

Against the backdrop of sanctions and retaliations, China's capital markets are increasingly interwoven with global finance—what will this mean for foreign investors? Plus, will President Joe Biden’s fiscal stimulus trigger a dreaded return to high inflation—with global consequences? And, a new generation of workers' unions takes on the tech giants. Simon Long hosts.


For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 23, 2021
Always be their Bibi? Israel votes, again
00:20:35

It’s the fourth poll in two years, but a stable government is still far from guaranteed. We examine the firm grip Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu still has on Israeli politics. In the Philippines, children have been cooped up at home for a year—but citizens seem to buy into the government’s rationale. And the real history of the chocolate chip cookie.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 23, 2021
The Jab: Will America do better than Europe?
00:44:41

The EU was slow to roll out covid-19 vaccines, then destroyed confidence in the Astrazeneca vaccine and is now embroiled in a row over supplies. Will America avoid Europe's pitfalls? Dr Anthony Fauci, chief medical adviser to President Biden, explains vaccination progress in America, the plateau of new infections and his plan to combat new variants. Also, how does America's federal system affect the vaccination programme?


Alok Jha, The Economist's science correspondent, hosts with our health policy editor, Natasha Loder. Edward Carr, The Economist's deputy editor and our New York correspondent Rosemarie Ward join them.


For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/thejabpod. Sign up for our new weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience and data newsletter at economist.com/offthecharts

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 22, 2021
Not-purchasing power: boycotts in Myanmar
00:20:18

As demonstrations against February’s coup continue, many are trying a subtler form of resistance: starving army-owned businesses of revenue. We ask whether the ploy will work. Snippets of Neanderthal DNA survive in most humans—and they are a mixed blessing as regards the risks of covid-19. And, not for the first time, Britain’s census questions reveal the preoccupations of a nation.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 22, 2021
Editor’s Picks: March 22nd 2021
00:39:36

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how to deal with China, Biden’s border bind (12:01) and how the pandemic has changed the shape of global happiness (27:34). Zanny Minton Beddoes hosts.

 

 

Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 22, 2021
Checks and Balance: No vacancy
00:43:53

“Don’t come over” is Joe Biden’s message to migrants. Rumours that it’s easier to enter the United States since he became president are fuelling a humanitarian crisis at the southern border. The president needs a firmer grip on the issue, but his favoured centre ground is barren. How should he respond?


The Economist’s Alexandra Suich Bass reports from South Texas, we look back on Ronald Reagan’s big immigration reform, and speak to Ali Noorani of the National Immigration Forum.


John Prideaux, our US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, US digital editor.


For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/USpod

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 19, 2021
Another race question: murder in Atlanta
00:19:29

A shooting in the city left eight dead, six of them women of East Asian descent. We examine the past and present of anti-Asian sentiment in America. Frontex, Europe’s border-enforcement agency, is rising in clout and requisitioning more kit; we look at the closest the bloc has come to having a standing army. And why managers should tackle nonsensical workplace rules.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 19, 2021
The Economist Asks: Joanna Coles & Melora Hardin
00:30:37

Record numbers of women are considering leaving the workforce due to the pressures of the pandemic. How can successful women help their successors through the glass ceiling? Host Anne McElvoy talks to Joanna Coles, CEO of Northern Star Investments and former chief content officer of Hearst magazines, and Melora Hardin, star of “The Bold Type” and “The Office”, about why audiences enjoy portrayals of monstrous women bosses and the best—and worst—career advice they have received. Plus, has the pandemic slain the stiletto? 


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 18, 2021
Forces to be reckoned with: Afghan peace talks
00:22:34

Negotiations in Moscow may at last forge agreement between the Afghan government and Taliban insurgents; that, in turn, would inform America’s long-promised drawdown. The International Criminal Court can investigate crimes against humans, but there is a push to make injury to the environment a high crime, too. And a look at Britney Spears’s conservatorship, a legal arrangement ripe for abuse. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 18, 2021
Babbage: Baidu it
00:24:27

As the Chinese tech giant Baidu prepares for a secondary listing on the Hong Kong stock exchange, how will Baidu’s rise influence technological innovation in China and beyond? Also, the humidity inside facemasks is helpful in fighting covid-19, not just preventing transmission. And Dr Tolullah Oni, an urban epidemiologist, on improving health in rapidly growing cities. Kenneth Cukier hosts 



For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our new weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 17, 2021
Harms weigh: AstraZeneca vaccine fears
00:22:22

Scattered reports of blood clots have sparked curbs across Europe, even though the jab is almost certainly safe. We take a hard look at the risks in relative terms. After Canada arrested a Huawei executive in 2018, China detained two Canadians—we examine the hostage diplomacy still playing out. And how “non-fungible tokens” may benefit digital artists of all sorts. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 17, 2021
Money Talks: The retail revolution
00:29:41

The shopping industry is in a state of flux. Smartphones and social media are enabling a data-driven transformation that is only just getting started. Host Henry Tricks investigates whether the future of shopping will be ruled by giants and how personal data will increasingly shape not just what gets bought, and where, but even what gets made. Could a new generation of consumers change capitalism for the better?


With David Liu, vice president of strategy at Pinduoduo, Harley Finkelstein, president of Shopify, Nilam Ganenthiran, president of Instacart, and Katie Hunt, cofounder of Showfields.


For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 16, 2021
Earning them: Stripe’s monster valuation
00:20:24

The firm got in early providing online-payment software to tech startups. Now it’s the most valuable Silicon Valley darling yet. We look at its future prospects. New York Governor Andrew Cuomo faces a raft of allegations and widespread calls to quit; our correspondent reckons he will not go anywhere without a fight. And the Kabul beauty trend that keeps growing.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 16, 2021
The Jab: How will behaviour change?
00:40:10

The world has stumbled through the pandemic by nationalising risk. In heavily infected countries citizens have been ordered to stay home for weeks at a time. As covid-19 vaccination programmes spread, governments must gradually restore choice to the individual. How?


We speak to Ozlem Tureci and Ugur Sahin—the couple who co-founded BioNTech which created the first covid-19 vaccine to get regulatory approval. 


Alok Jha, The Economist's science correspondent, hosts with our health policy editor, Natasha Loder. The Economist's deputy editor Edward Carr, Europe correspondent Vendeline Von Bredow and Dan Rosenheck from our data team join them.


For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/thejabpod. Sign up for our new weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience and data newsletter at economist.com/offthecharts

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 15, 2021
Redrawing the map: a fragmented Syria
00:22:29

As the country marks ten years of civil war, the economy is crippled; it has broken up into statelets and ethnic enclaves that may never be reunified. Violence against women is sparking a global wave of protest. We examine why it is more widespread, and more damaging, in the poor world. And the creature that can shed its entire body. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 15, 2021
Editor’s Picks: March 15th 2021
00:28:22

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: Joe Biden’s economic experiment, Rupert Murdoch at 90 (09:50) and, the art of coining new words (21:50) 


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 15, 2021
Checks and Balance: Fixer upper
00:41:26

President Biden’s vast economic rescue package has passed without scrutiny or input from Republicans. Meanwhile House Democrats’ plan to protect voting rights will founder so long as the Senate has the filibuster. What’s the best way to fix American democracy?


Our Washington correspondent Idrees Kahloon joins the discussion and we hear from Congresswomen Katie Porter, a proponent of the voting reform bill. The Economist’s Matt Steinglass explores the eccentricity of the supermajority.


John Prideaux, our US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, US digital editor.


For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/USpod

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 12, 2021
Casting the net wider: remaking the welfare state
00:22:43

As the Biden administration fires a $1.9trn pandemic-relief bazooka, we consider how governments might rethink welfare: providing more-flexible benefits, investing in human capital and acting as an insurer against the gravest risks. The simple pleasure of human touch, so constrained of late, is not an emotional luxury—it’s a physical need. And why it’s so hard to coin a word.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 12, 2021
The Economist Asks: Philippa Perry
00:28:23

During the pandemic, how can we better parent our children? Psychotherapist and writer Philippa Perry talks to Anne McElvoy about the mental-health consequences for the 1.6 billion students kept out of school during the pandemic. Plus, why the idea of quality time is a “cop-out” and feeling sad is part of being human. 


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 11, 2021
Nuclear inaction: the legacy of Fukushima
00:22:35

The cleanup effort in and around the melted-down power plant is still progressing, but rebuilding communities—and, crucially, trust—is proving far more difficult. As Rupert Murdoch turns 90 we look at how his businesses are faring, and how they are likely to be run by his heirs. And the Victorian strongman who was arguably the world’s first fitness influencer. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 11, 2021
Babbage: Coronavirus, a year on
00:23:40

A year ago the World Health Organisation declared the coronavirus outbreak a pandemic. The Economist’s health-care correspondent reflects on the future path of covid-19 infections. Also, how have past pandemics shaped today's society? And, epidemiologist Professor Dame Anne Johnson explores the opportunities for the “new normal”. Kenneth Cukier hosts


For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our new weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 10, 2021
Whither permitting? Vaccine passports
00:18:51

Formalising systems to divide the vaccinated from the unvaccinated is neither as risky nor as useful as many people think. In any case, vaccine passports are coming. On the anniversary of Tibet’s uprising, we examine how pressure on Tibetan Buddhism is rising, with dark parallels to Uyghur Muslims’ plight. And why it’s time to close the gate on duty-free shopping.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 10, 2021
Money Talks: SPAC to the future
00:26:17

Special-purpose acquisition companies are Wall Street’s latest craze, attracting everyone from celebrities to retail investors. An alternative to the traditional IPO, SPACs could transform tech investing and supercharge innovation. They are even shaping the post-Brexit battle to be Europe’s financial capital. But are these “blank-cheque firms” a mania, a useful innovation, or both? Simon Long hosts.


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 09, 2021
Reconciled to it: America’s stimulus bill
00:21:27

Thanks to a parliamentary contortion called reconciliation, the $1.9trn covid-relief plan is likely to sail through—we examine what is in it and what its passage portends for lawmaking in the Biden era. Unrest is unusual in Senegal, but citizens are out in force; we ask about the roots of the protest mood. And what ever happened to bespoke ringtones?

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 09, 2021
The Jab: Trial and error?
00:37:20

Large scale covid-19 vaccine trials have taken place at exceptional speed with unprecedented scrutiny. How do they work? And why are the results so politically charged? 


We speak to Andrew Catchpole, lead scientist on the first trial to infect volunteers with the virus intentionally. Jason Palmer, presenter of The Intelligence, assists in a trial. 


Alok Jha, The Economist's science correspondent, hosts with our health policy editor, Natasha Loder. Slavea Chankova, The Economist's health-care correspondent, and James Fransham, from our data team, join them.


For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/thejabpod. Sign up for our new weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience and data newsletter at economist.com/offthecharts

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 08, 2021
Despair and disparities: covid-19 consumes Brazil
00:22:50

State and local pandemic responses are scattershot; a national effort is all but nonexistent. A creeping sense of fatalism makes for peril far beyond the country’s borders. Aggregate American jobs numbers are promising, but our correspondent digs deeper to find how much harder women have it in the labour force. And the interview set to widen Britain’s royal rift. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 08, 2021
Editor’s Picks: March 8th 2021
00:32:06

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how to make a social safety net for the post-covid world, the lessons of Fukushima (9:) And two nations under God (16:30).

 

Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 08, 2021
Checks and Balance: Sequel opportunities
00:39:38

Donald Trump has emerged from purdah at a meeting of conservative activists, hinting at another presidential run. Even in defeat the former President retains control of a party united in antipathy to liberal elites. Where does cleaving to culture leave Republicans?


We look at the legacy of Rush Limbaugh, who pioneered Trump’s brand of anti-elitism, and speak to Maryland Governor Larry Hogan, one of America’s most popular Republicans.


John Prideaux, our US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, US digital editor.


For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/USpod

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 05, 2021
Rubber-stamping ground: China’s parliament meets
00:21:18

The National People’s Congress kicked off with two big signals of Beijing’s intentions: a return to economic-growth targets and a plan to eradicate Hong Kong’s vestiges of democracy. On the first-ever papal visit to Iraq, Pope Francis hopes to give succour to the country’s beleaguered Christians. And the continued tribulations of the nightclub scene.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 05, 2021
The Economist Asks: Sir Kazuo Ishiguro
00:31:06

What can artificial intelligence reveal about what it means to be human? Host Anne McElvoy asks the Nobel prize-winning author of "The Remains of the Day” about his new book, "Klara and the Sun", in which he argues that people's relationship to machines will eventually change the way they think of themselves as individuals. But does he think only humans are capable of love? And what do he and his author daughter argue about?

 

For full access to print, digital and audio editions subscribe to The Economist at:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 04, 2021
Exit stages left: America and the Middle East
00:21:24

The Biden administration would like to pull back from the region; America’s strategic interests have changed, as have regional dynamics. We examine the careful exit that is possible. To evade censors China’s cinephiles often turn to pirated versions of foreign films, but the volunteers who subtitle them are under increasing pressure. And researchers make a connection with the dream world. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 04, 2021
Babbage: Variations on a gene
00:24:10

As global vaccination efforts continue, how is the coronavirus mutating to stay ahead? The head of Britain's covid-19 genomics consortium explains why genetic sequencing is crucial. Also, how studying individual cancer genes may improve precision treatments. And an AI for an eye—host Kenneth Cukier investigates the potential of AI in medicine first hand.



Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 03, 2021
Owing to the pandemic: Britain’s budget
00:22:05

The finance minister has a plan that will keep many safeguards in place—for now. We ask how the country will then dig itself out of a financial hole. As countries aim for net-zero emissions, how to pick the policies that do the most good for the least cash? And why every fruit tree in Zanzibar has an owner. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 03, 2021
Money Talks: Bonds, shaken and stirred
00:25:24

Last week’s turmoil in the bond market has calmed for now, but fears of inflation mean more turbulence ahead. Plus, how poor countries trying to secure debt relief are caught in a minefield of lenders’ competing priorities and egos. And, host Simon Long takes a lesson from a former hostage negotiator in the secrets of successful listening.


For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 02, 2021
A dark picture emerges: atrocities in Ethiopia
00:22:15

It is becoming more certain that war crimes are being committed in the northern region of Tigray. Yet, despite increasing international pressure, there is little hope the suffering will soon end. In China anti-capitalist sentiment is growing online; overworked youth have a decidedly Maoist view of the country’s biggest businesses and tycoons. And the uphill struggles of France’s skiing industry.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 02, 2021
The Jab: Will there be enough vaccines?
00:40:02

It is one thing to design and test covid-19 vaccines. It is another to make them at sufficient scale to generate the billions of doses needed to vaccinate the world’s population. How are the vaccines produced, why is production so variable and will it meet demand this year?


We speak to Adar Poonawalla, CEO of the Serum Institute of India, the world's biggest supplier of vaccines. The Economist’s technology correspondent Hal Hodson explains why some vaccines take longer to produce than others. James Fransham from our data team discusses when supply will meet demand.


Alok Jha, The Economist's science correspondent, hosts with our health policy editor, Natasha Loder. Oliver Morton, The Economist's briefing editor, joins them.


For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/thejabpod. Sign up for our new weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience and data newsletter at economist.com/offthecharts

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 01, 2021
Coup fighters: Myanmar’s persistent protesters
00:20:59

The temperature keeps rising: as demonstrations continue to grow, the army is becoming more brutal. We ask how the country can escape the cycle of violence. In a pandemic, laws against misinformation have their merits—but are also easily put to work for censorious governments. And why British dependencies want to get growing in the medical-marijuana game.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 01, 2021
Editor’s Picks: March 1st 2021
00:29:57

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the superpowers' tug of war for South-East Asia, America digital markets shift towards oligopolies (09:48) the future of homeschooling post pandemic (18:54)


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 01, 2021
Checks and Balance: Back problems
00:41:26

“America is back” President Biden has told allies. Hard power, including a fearsome nuclear weapons arsenal, is the foundation of America’s global influence. But many Democrats would like to demilitarise foreign policy. Can Joe Biden live up to his own rhetoric as he tries to re-engage with the world? 


We hear from Shashank Joshi, The Economist’s defence editor, and Fiona Hill, who advised President Trump on Russia. Our obituaries editor Ann Wroe profiles George Shultz, architect of the first arms control treaty. 


John Prideaux, our US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, US digital editor.


For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/USpod

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 26, 2021
Mutual-appreciation anxiety: Putin and Erdogan
00:20:30

The presidents of Turkey and Russia make an odd couple; their former empires have clashed over centuries. We look at the fragile—but nonetheless worrisome—alliance between Vladimir Putin and Recep Tayyip Erdogan. India’s economy is recovering but a longstanding drag on growth persists: the overwhelming fraction of women absent from the labour force. And an unlikely protest anthem rattles Cuba’s regime. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 26, 2021
The Economist Asks: Fiona Hill
00:31:25

How should President Joe Biden deal with President Vladimir Putin? At a point of “acute confrontation” between America and Russia, Fiona Hill, former official at the US National Security Council and expert on Russia, tells Anne McElvoy how post-Trump relations might look. Also, why Russian opposition figurehead Alexei Navalny is like Harry Potter— challenging a ruthless leader. Also, was Hill herself poisoned on a research trip in Russia in 2002?


For full access to the print, digital and audio editions of The Economist subscribe at www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 25, 2021
Hell for Tether: a cryptocurrency crimped
00:22:01

The notionally dollar-pegged “stablecoin” quietly underpins many crypto-market moves. We ask what the currency issuer’s clash with New York authorities means for the wider crypto craze. In many African countries, parliamentarians are asked to fill public-service gaps—at great personal cost. We examine moves toward a fairer forking out of funds. And why physical-education exams are popping up in China.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 25, 2021
Babbage: Collusions and collisions
00:26:50

After Facebook reached a deal with Australia, the tech giants are coming under fire once again -- this time from each other. Are their cosy monopolies under threat? Also, The Economist’s defence editor investigates the multi-billion dollar industry which exploits vulnerabilities in vital software. And, how whales could help the study of seismology in the ocean. Kenneth Cukier hosts 



Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 24, 2021
Let the games be thin: Tokyo’s Olympic tussles
00:21:12

Planners are in a corner. Delaying or cancelling the summer tournament looks like defeat; pressing ahead looks like a danger. We take a look at the sporting chances. Britain has decarbonised faster than any other rich country, but getting to “net zero” will be a whole lot harder. And why South Koreans have such trouble with noisy neighbours.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 24, 2021
Money Talks: Pricing pollution
00:26:09

Could the success of the world’s biggest carbon market provide a model for the world? Plus, Cristina Junqueira, cofounder of Nubank, a Brazilian digital bank, on how the pandemic is supercharging the fintech revolution. And, why sports cards’ leap from the schoolyard to the stock exchange reveals the growing financial power of social networks. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts.


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 23, 2021
Confirmation biases: Biden’s cabinet picks
00:20:19

President Joe Biden’s top posts are shaping up as Senate confirmation hearings continue—but some controversial nominations await a vote. We look at who is on the docket. Politics in the Democratic Republic of Congo has become messy, at the expense of some promised and much-needed reforms. And why the global rap scene is picking up a London accent. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 23, 2021
The Jab: Are the vaccines effective enough?
00:36:05

Three vaccines have been approved by stringent regulators. Ten are being used in one or more countries. How do they work and are they effective enough against new variants of the coronavirus?


Sarah Gilbert, inventor of the Oxford/Astrazeneca vaccine, tells us adapting to new variants should be easy. The Economist’s Beijing bureau chief David Rennie reports from China, which faces a huge test of its homegrown vaccine technology as it tries to re-open. James Fransham from our data team on how far the variants have spread.


Alok Jha, The Economist's science correspondent, hosts with our health policy editor, Natasha Loder. Slavea Chankova, The Economist's health-care correspondent, joins them.


For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/thejabpod and sign up for our new weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 22, 2021
The World Ahead: When cities breathe out
00:20:13

Covid-19 has dented the prosperity, populations and popularity of big cities around the world. But adapting to shocks is what great cities do. How will urban centres change in the post-pandemic world and what are the political implications of a shift towards more remote working from suburban areas? Tom Standage hosts.

 

Subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 22, 2021
Contrary to popular opinion: Mexico’s president
00:19:50

Andrés Manuel López Obrador roared into office with a grand “fourth transformation” agenda. Even after two years of policy failures and power-grabbing, he remains wildly popular. An eye-catching new report implores economists to take biodiversity into account—and puts some sobering limits on growth. And a chat through the state of the art in conversational computers.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 22, 2021
Editor’s Picks: February 22nd 2021
00:19:44

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, America’s ambitious attempt to deal with climate change, why SPACs are a useful way to take firms public (08:52) and how data on inbred nobles support a leader-driven theory of history (15:16)

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 22, 2021
Checks and Balance: The switch
00:45:49

Plans to overhaul American energy will soon come before Congress. There will never be a better chance for Joe Biden to show real ambition on climate. If the blackouts in Texas are any guide, it would not just be the world that thanks him, but Americans, too. But the politics of greening America are never easy. What might the new president get done?


We hear from John Kerry, Mr Biden’s climate envoy, Varshini Prakash of Sunrise, a movement of young climate activists who helped get the new president elected, and from West Virginia Senator Joe Manchin, whose vote will be crucial in passing new laws.


John Prideaux, our US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, US digital editor.


For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/USpod

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 19, 2021
Have I not news for you: Facebook’s Australian battle
00:21:47

A media code that would obligate tech giants to pay for linking to news stories looks set to pass. In response, Facebook pre-emptively took down those links—and a whole lot more. So-called honour killings persist in the Arab world; we examine the support for such murders and look at attempts to reform lax laws. And remembering the jazz-fusion giant Chick Corea.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 19, 2021
The Economist Asks: Herbert Diess
00:28:43

When will the electric car rule the road? Herbert Diess, the chief executive of Germany's Volkswagen Group, talks to Anne McElvoy and Simon Wright, The Economist’s Industry editor, about its plans to switch from the internal-combustion engine to electrification. More than a dozen countries have set a date for when they will prohibit sales of fossil-fuelled cars -- but are these plans realistic? He also tells us why his daughter doesn’t own a car and who he thinks will win the electrification race.


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 18, 2021
Watts the problem: Texas’s energy failings
00:23:30

Crippling blackouts can be explained in part by the state’s unique energy market, but the disaster exposes wider failures that must be confronted amid a changing climate. Today’s landing of another Mars rover broadens the hunt for evidence of extraterrestrial life—an effort that is expanding faster and farther than ever before. And soft rock shakes off its milquetoast manner.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

Listen and subscribe to “The Jab from Economist Radio”, our new weekly podcast at the sharp end of the global vaccination race.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 18, 2021
Babbage: Hard reboot
00:25:24

Intel is the world’s biggest chipmaker. So why is it underperforming—and can its new boss turn the company around? As the search for life on Mars hots up, astrophysicist Avi Loeb argues science has already detected evidence of intelligent extraterrestrial life. And, why parents of daughters are more likely to divorce than those with sons. Kenneth Cukier hosts 


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 17, 2021
The next of 1,000 cuts: Hong Kong activists on trial
00:20:27

It is not violent young protesters in the dock: the accused are the architects of the territory’s democracy. Our correspondent examines the city’s descent into authoritarian rule. In Colombia, activists are disappearing or being killed at a horrific rate. We ask why, and what can be done. And weighing up Oregon’s daring drug-decriminalisation experiment.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 17, 2021
Money Talks: Return of the wheelie-bag
00:23:53

Globetrotting had never been easier—then the pandemic brought it to a standstill. The Economist’s industry editor Simon Wright investigates how mass travel has changed the world and what it will take to get people moving again. Could this shock to the system be an opportunity to make the future of tourism greener, safer and more enjoyable?


With Michael O’Leary, CEO of Ryanair, James Liang, chairman of CTrip and Trip.com, Gloria Guevara, president of the World Travel and Tourism Council, and Brian Pearce, chief economist of the International Air Transport Association.


Subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 16, 2021
Desert stands: France in the Sahel
00:22:31

Terror groups and separatists run riot in the sprawling region, and France has had some success in keeping the peace. But how, and when, to draw down its troops? Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, the World Trade Organisation’s history-making new leader, has quite the task ahead to rebuild trust in and among the institution’s members. And the worrying shifts in subsea soundscapes. Additional audio courtesy Jana Winderen. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 16, 2021
The Jab: How well will vaccines work?
00:40:10

The race between infections and injections is in its most crucial phase. What life is like on the other side of the pandemic depends on three things: how well vaccines work, whether there are enough and how many people take them.


Michael Osterholm, an epidemiologist who has advised President Biden, tells us the world stands at an inflection point. After getting his jab in Jerusalem, our correspondent there says the vision of the future Israel offers other countries is not as rosy as it first seemed. James Fransham from The Economist data team unpicks the vaccination numbers so far. 


Alok Jha, The Economist's science correspondent, hosts with our health policy editor, Natasha Loder. Edward Carr, The Economist's deputy editor, joins them.


For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe here: economist.com/thejabpod


Subscribe to our new weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience and data newsletter at www.economist.com/offthecharts

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 15, 2021
No Capitol punishment: Trump’s acquittal
00:24:05

Donald Trump was all but certain to be cleared in his Senate trial, and so it went. But the few Republican votes to convict are telling. What next for the former president? A look into Swiss efforts to track down a missing $230m raises disturbing questions. And why women aren’t getting the laughs as stand-up comedy grows in China.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

Listen and subscribe to “The Jab from Economist Radio”, our new weekly podcast at the sharp end of the global vaccination race.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 15, 2021
Editor’s Picks: February 15th 2021
00:24:42

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: how to cope with endemic covid-19, the persecution of the Uyghurs (11:40) and the perks and perils of business leaders (16:50)

 

Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 15, 2021
Checks and Balance: Lacking class
00:39:53

Nearly half America’s children are yet to return to the classroom a year after the pandemic began. President Biden says it’s a national emergency, but he has already diluted a pledge to reopen the majority of schools in his first 100 days. Why is getting back to school so hard?


We hear from The Economist’s US policy correspondent Tamara Gilkes Borr and Adam Roberts, our Midwest correspondent.


John Prideaux, our US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, US digital editor.


For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/USpod

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 12, 2021
Exit-stage plight: Brexit’s costs come due
00:22:35

Stock-trading is shifting to the continent; businesses are bound up in red tape; border issues are still simmering. There is far more than mere “teething problems” as Britain and Europe adjust to their new relationship. Our correspondent looks at the slippery nature of risk by speaking with wing-suited daredevils. And in Kenya the flower-industry bounce-back is blooming great news.For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 12, 2021
The Economist Asks: Christine Lagarde
00:27:27

What next for the euro area? Christine Lagarde, the president of the European Central Bank and the former head of the IMF tells The Economist's editor-in-chief, Zanny Minton Beddoes, why the continent needs more fiscal support in coming years, why she isn't worried about inflation, and why climate change matters for monetary policy. China is already testing a digital currency -- but a virtual euro may not be too far off. And why women make better leaders. 


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer


 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 11, 2021
The coup is on the other foot: Myanmar
00:22:46

A power-grab by the army’s commander, Min Aung Hlaing, is not turning out to be easy: the greatest protest movement in a generation is gathering steam. Debates over trans rights are particularly fraught in criminal-justice systems. We examine the balancing act going on in America. And a historical tour of autocrats’ luxuriant bathrooms reveals there’s a lot to loos. 

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 11, 2021
Babbage: Go with your gut
00:23:09

The human microbiome consists of trillions of microorganisms like bacteria, viruses and fungi. Scientists are researching how these tiny creatures could be linked to Parkinson’s disease, diabetes and other diseases. Also, how understanding soil microbiomes could help combat climate change. Kenneth Cukier hosts. 


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer


And subscribe to our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 10, 2021
Like hell out of a bat: SARS-CoV-2’s origin
00:20:59

The World Health Organisation unveiled preliminary findings, suggesting the coronavirus probably jumped to humans via an intermediary animal and all but ruling out a laboratory leak. We examine the many remaining questions. Nefarious regimes find it ever easier to reach across borders, subjecting dissidents to repression and surveillance abroad. And why it’s so hard to buy a car in Algeria. 

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

“The Jab from Economist Radio” is our new weekly podcast at the sharp end of the global vaccination race. Listen to the trailer and subscribe now

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 10, 2021
Money Talks: Twin peaks
00:24:28

As the price of oil rises, so too does the value of the battery metals that could replace it. Host Patrick Lane asks what’s driving these competing bets on the fuels of the future. Plus, the rise of the hairy zombies: why some of the most pandemic-battered shares in USA Inc are confident of an afterlife. And, how remote work is playing havoc with American taxes. 


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 09, 2021
Very long covid: the lasting risks to Africa
00:21:28

So far it seems the continent has weathered the pandemic well. But current numbers mask a future reckoning that is likely to have dire human and economic costs. We look into the “predatory trading” that in part explains recent, frenzied action in stockmarkets. And a surprising discovery about the plastics that sink to the oceans’ depths. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 09, 2021
The Jab: Trailer
00:01:39

In this new weekly podcast series, The Economist unlocks the science, data and politics behind the most ambitious inoculation programme the world has ever seen.


Alok Jha, The Economist’s science correspondent, hosts with Natasha Loder, our health policy editor. Each week our reporters and data journalists join them in conversation, along with scientists around the world. They inject the perfect dose of insight and analysis into the global effort to escape the pandemic. 


“The Jab from Economist Radio” will be published every Monday, initially for 12 weeks. It is the latest addition to our slate of podcasts which includes the award-winning podcasts “The Intelligence”, “The Economist Asks”, "Money Talks", “Checks and Balance” and "Babbage".


For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe here: economist.com/thejabpod

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 08, 2021
The art of the done deal: Trump on trial, again
00:22:51

The second impeachment trial of Donald Trump will make history, but its outcome is assured. We ask what the proceedings say about the Republican Party. China’s youth are making their own way, even as the Communist regime tries to win greater loyalty from them; we examine the country’s future leaders. And another, overlooked pandemic: that of loneliness at work. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 08, 2021
Editor’s Picks: February 8th 2021
00:24:19

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: the real revolution on Wall Street, Africa’s long covid (10:20) and who is to blame for short-termism? (18:40)

 

 

Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 08, 2021
Checks and Balance: Camera operators
00:44:24

Congress is flexing its muscles. The new president needs to pass a bumper stimulus plan. The old one faces trial in the Senate. Stakes are high for both parties, as the leadership vies with fringe members ever more adept at hogging attention. How will the new Congress work?


We speak to Idrees Kahloon, The Economist’s Washington correspondent. Josh Holmes, a former aide to the Republican Senate leader, and Sarah Bryner of the Center for Responsive Politics also join.


John Prideaux, our US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, US digital editor.


For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/USpod

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 05, 2021
Ballot bonanza: Latin America’s year of elections
00:21:01

Ecuador’s elections on Sunday kick off a packed year of polls in the region. Democracy’s foothold in South America looks assured; in Central America, less so. Engineers are vastly improving the core technologies in televisions. We preview the viewing pleasure to come. And remembering Nikolai Antoshkin, a Soviet general who faced unknowable danger to save untold lives.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 05, 2021
The Economist Asks: Heather Cox Richardson
00:28:46

What does American history tell us about politics now? Anne McElvoy asks the professor at Boston College and author of the popular newsletter "Letters from an American". Using the sweep of history since the civil war, she brings a long view to febrile US politics and explains why she thinks the GOP is like a car driven into a deep ditch. Also her personal connection to the sea shanty—the nautical songs taking over social media.


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 04, 2021
Cheques notes: getting America’s stimulus right
00:21:50

Congress is on the cusp of pushing through a $1.9trn stimulus bill. But would it be money well spent? We examine the economics. Nearly half of India’s students attend cheap, efficient private schools that have been hit harder by the pandemic than the state-run kind. And the latest bid to clean up Earth’s celestial neighbourhood—and how to finance it.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 04, 2021
Babbage: Clash of the titans
00:27:18

As Facebook and Apple go head-to-head over privacy, the impact could be felt across the digital world. We ask Michael Wooldridge, a leading AI researcher, whether artificial intelligence is the answer to the world’s problems, the seed of humanity’s eventual destruction—or neither. And the world would look very different without the LED: we speak to one of the engineers behind this illuminating technology. Kenneth Cukier hosts 


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 03, 2021
Rise above the cloud: Amazon’s new chief executive
00:20:11

Jeff Bezos is relinquishing the reins—partly—of the firm he founded. We take a look at Andy Jassy, who will replace him as chief executive at a profitable but tricky time. Our annual Democracy Index isn’t brimming with great news; we examine how democratic norms are faring worldwide. And the capture of the biggest drug lord you’ve probably never heard of. 

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 03, 2021
Money Talks: UnStoppable
00:27:50

The GameStop saga continues—does it reveal a cheat code to how to beat the stockmarket, or is it a sign of a deeper transformation at work in the financial system? Plus, property is the biggest asset market in the world and nowhere bigger than in China. Host Simon Long asks how long China’s property boom can hold. And, our Buttonwood columnist shares some hard truths about investing in bricks and mortar. 


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 02, 2021
As a general rules: Myanmar’s coup
00:20:45

The army already had plenty of political power, but following a landslide election loss it dramatically seized more. After five years of democracy, will the country abide a return to military rule? The wind-power boom has driven a scramble for balsa wood—harming the Ecuadoreans who live where it grows. And a better way to test the language skills of would-be citizens. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 02, 2021
More needles in the haystack: vaccine candidates proliferate
00:22:00

That a coronavirus vaccine could be developed in a year is astonishing—and promising candidates just keep coming. How will the virus’s variants change the dynamic? Palestine may at last hold elections, after 15 years of promises. But Mahmoud Abbas, the incumbent president, may end up as the only viable candidate. And the probable first big market for lab-grown meat.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 01, 2021
Editor’s Picks: February 1st 2021
00:23:45

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: who will go nuclear next?, new leadership is needed in the West Bank and Gaza (9:45) and can Boeing fly without government help? (15:35) 

 

Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 01, 2021
Checks and Balance: Sleeves up
00:42:25

Around 85% of Americans need to be vaccinated for the country to return to normal. Much rests on how quickly the Biden administration can get shots into the arms of those most at risk from covid-19. Racial equity is a priority for the new president. What are the barriers to faster and fairer vaccine roll-out?


We hear from two doctors administering the vaccines: Martin Stallone of Cayuga Medical Centre and Seiji Hayashi, a family physician in Washington DC. The Economist’s US policy correspondent Tamara Gilkes Borr also contributes.


John Prideaux, our US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, US digital editor.


For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/USpod

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 29, 2021
Tug of warheads: the nuclear order
00:21:35

Successful arms-control diplomacy has kept proliferation at bay for decades. But many states now have nuclear ambitions; we look at an increasingly worrying shift. Rapid development in sub-Saharan Africa has led to a “double burden” of malnutrition: obesity is skyrocketing even as undernourishment continues. And the riches and the tensions to be found at a Greenland rare-earth-minerals mine. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 29, 2021
The Economist Asks: What happened in Wuhan?
00:27:50

A year ago the Chinese city of 11 million people cut itself off to contain the spread of a deadly virus. Hao Wu, the director of "76 Days" a documentary about the Wuhan lockdown, talks to Anne McElvoy about the first casualties, life under quarantine and the personal impact of covid-19. Why did Hao Wu avoid politics in the film and why has he been trolled for making it?  Also The Economist's Beijing bureau chief, and Chaguan columnist David Rennie, on how Chinese people's view of democracy has been eroded by the virus.


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer


And read more of our coronavirus coverage here

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 28, 2021
Conte’s inferno: political crisis in Italy
00:20:57

The president is scrambling to pull together a workable government following Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte’s resignation—and the instability has big implications for Europe’s post-pandemic plans. We examine the staggering rise of shares in GameStop and the day traders trying to stick it to the hedge-funders. And the sport of back-country skiing gets a lift in America.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 28, 2021
Babbage: Is the model looking good?
00:24:28

As initial data arrives from countries with high vaccination rates, how will the covid-19 vaccines affect the need for lockdowns? Epidemiologist Professor Mark Woolhouse explains his models of the future of the virus. Plus: a new way of getting concentrated oxygen out of the air and Britain's state-run strategies for capitalising on the growing space economy. Kenneth Cukier hosts.


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 27, 2021
Vials and tribulations: the EU’s vaccine push
00:19:56

The European Union’s vaccine rollout was slow and fragmented even before pharma companies warned of supply shortfalls; we ask what’s gone wrong. Australia’s proposed law that would force tech titans to pay news providers is just one front in a battle that might upend a foundational principle of the internet. And the bawdy baked goods that have captured Egyptians’ attention. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 27, 2021
Money Talks: The chips are down
00:26:14

The vast semiconductor industry is booming but faces new stresses that recently stalled production lines worldwide and could threaten the stability of the global economy. President Biden’s “Buy American” executive order aims to create jobs and boost resilience—but will Americans actually benefit? And, economist Mariana Mazzucato makes the case for a modern “moonshot”. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts.


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 26, 2021
Party down: Vietnam’s Communist leaders meet
00:21:03

At this week’s five-yearly congress there will be pride in the handling of the pandemic—but broader discontent and mounting protests should worry party bigwigs. We ask our education correspondent why so many American schools remain empty and what the long-run costs will be. And differentiating the difficult character of Patricia Highsmith from the litany of difficult characters she conjured.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 26, 2021
The World Ahead: Lockdown lessons
00:25:20

The pandemic has forced universities to move teaching online. Tom Standage asks if attitudes are shifting among students, and academics, towards remote learning. What could this mean for the future of higher education? How would it affect the business models of some universities? And how might online-learning tools evolve in a future, as lifelong learning becomes the new normal?

 

Subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer 

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 25, 2021
Vlad tidings: demonstrations across Russia
00:20:34

The arrest of Kremlin critic Alexei Navalny—and an exposé he released alleging deep corruption—fuelled vast weekend protests, chipping away at President Vladimir Putin’s legitimacy. Having left the European Union Britain must find a new foreign-policy foothold in the world; we examine its options and its moves so far. And a shocking revelation about haggis ahead of Scotland’s Burns Night celebrations. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 25, 2021
Editor’s Picks: January 25th 2021
00:18:09

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: what to expect from a Biden presidency, famine crimes in Ethiopia (8:40) and lessons in listening from a hostage negotiator (13:14).

 

Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 25, 2021
Checks and Balance: Ctrl Alt Delete
00:38:45

Joe Biden faces multiple crises after four years that often resembled a denial-of-service attack on American governance. How will the new administration reboot Washington?

 

Washington residents reflect on an unusual inauguration, we look back to previous presidencies birthed in crises, and speak to Kathryn Dunn Tenpas of the Brookings Institution about repairing the machinery of government.


John Prideaux, our US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, US digital editor.


The Economist data team tracks Joe Biden’s first 100 days


For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/USpod

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 22, 2021
Biting the hands that would feed: Ethiopia
00:18:52

There are signs that the federal government is obstructing humanitarian aid to the war-torn region of Tigray, putting millions of civilians at risk of famine. We draw lessons from Israel’s vaccine rollout to predict what still lies ahead for many countries. And what can be learned by striking a deal with Bali’s larcenous monkeys. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 22, 2021
The Economist Asks: Cindy McCain
00:28:10

Can President Biden revive bipartisanship in America? Anne McElvoy asks the widow of Republican Senator John McCain and member of the Biden-Harris transition advisory council if Joe Biden can achieve his hopes of ‘unity’ in a divided America. After the violence at the Senate on the 6th of January, does the GOP still represent Mrs. McCain’s values and is America constitutionally strong? And, is she the next US ambassador to London? 

 

Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 21, 2021
Much to repair: Biden’s first day on the job
00:22:07

The watchword was unity as Joe Biden took office—he struck a calming tone and got immediately to work. We analyse the gargantuan tasks that lie ahead. Messaging services such as WhatsApp provide a needed online forum; as users flood to new apps we examine questions of privacy and security. And the Parisian street artist depicting brutal protests to unsettling effect.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 21, 2021
Babbage: Photon opportunity
00:23:43

How has Albert Einstein’s work on photons ushered in a golden age of light? Oliver Morton, The Economist's briefings editor, explores why the laser's applications have been spectacular and how solar power became the cheapest source of electricity in many countries. Also, he talks to the scientists scanning the skies with the largest digital camera in the world.


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 20, 2021
Costly disbelief: covid-19 ravages Brazil again
00:20:29

Desperate scenes in the city of Manaus may foretell a dire wave throughout the country. A misguided sense of “herd immunity” has worsened matters, as has the president’s persistent scepticism. We examine history to see how lasers progressed from practical impossibility to utter ubiquity—and the scientific frontiers they are still illuminating. And how clams are protecting lives in Poland. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 20, 2021
Money Talks: Biden, it’s time
00:24:36

What will the new president’s plans mean for the American economy—and for its partners and rivals around the world? Sabine Weyand, of the European Commission’s department for international trade, explains how the EU hopes to rebalance the global trading order in the post-Trump era. And host Simon Long asks why, despite a return to growth, the Communist Party is busy reining in China Inc.


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 19, 2021
Hell no, we won’t grow: Indian farmers’ mass protests
00:21:33

Hundreds of thousands of farmers have participated in protests around Delhi, demonstrating against laws that they say threaten their livelihoods. We ask how the standoff will end. Today America will designate Yemen’s Houthi militants as terrorists, but that is likely only to harm a population already facing starvation. And what’s behind a boom in African comics. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 19, 2021
Landed, in trouble: Alexei Navalny returns to Russia
00:20:52

The opposition leader was detained as soon as he arrived—but President Vladimir Putin has no good options for dealing with his most vocal opponent. Germany’s ruling CDU party has a new leader; we examine the challenges that lie ahead for him, his party and his country. And the kerfuffle behind an American-made film relegated to the Golden Globes’ foreign-language category. 

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 18, 2021
Editor’s Picks: January 18th 2021
00:28:31

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: Donald Trump’s reckoning, the new era of innovation (9:20), and Mikhail Gorbachev’s afterlife (16:45). 

 

 

Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 18, 2021
Checks and Balance: On mute
00:44:57

In the last week of his presidency Donald Trump is being purged from the political mainstream. Congress has impeached him again. He has been booted off social media. A major golf tournament has been pulled from one of his courses. How should Donald Trump and his followers be held to account for damaging American democracy?


We speak to Elizabeth Neumann, who led the counterterrorism office at the Department of Homeland Security, and Megan Squire, a professor of computer science at Elon University who tracks online extremism. The Economist correspondents Steven Mazie and Leo Mirani also join us.


John Prideaux, our US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard and Jon Fasman, US digital editor.


For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/USpod

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 15, 2021
Bold Wine in new battles: Uganda’s election
00:19:34

After a violent campaign in which the opposition candidate Bobi Wine was extensively intimidated, authorities imposed an internet blackout. President Yoweri Museveni will almost certainly cling to power—a worry for Uganda and the wider region. Wikipedia turns 20 today; we ask how, against long odds, it has survived and grown. And the video game that’s sparking a moral panic in Afghanistan.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 15, 2021
The Economist Asks: Jimmy Wales
00:27:14

As Wikipedia turns 20, we ask its founder Jimmy Wales how “the free encyclopedia that anyone can edit” really works. Also, as creator of another tech giant, does he reckon social media is still a force for good? And were some major platforms right to ban President Trump from communicating on them? He also confides his homeschooling tips.  


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer


 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 14, 2021
Two-timer: Trump impeached, again
00:20:35

Some House Republicans broke ranks, joining Democrats to hand President Donald Trump an ignominious distinction. Our deputy editor lays out why the Senate should now convict and remove him. Under South Africa’s ruling ANC party a powerful black middle class bloomed, but the party’s fiscal mismanagement threatens their loyalty. And the boom in “spirits” with no booze but plenty of branding. 

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 14, 2021
Babbage: Innovation’s new wave
00:27:13

Covid-19 has catalysed scientific advancement and boosted technological optimism. Could innovation be the answer to decades of slowing growth in Western countries? Also, why magnetic tape still reigns supreme in “cold” data storage. And how effective are traditional herbal remedies at treating tropical diseases? 


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 13, 2021
Trial ensnarer: human-rights law’s new tool
00:20:20

War criminals and their ilk often evade justice solely because of squabbling over who can be tried where. But a rise in “universal jurisdiction” trials is tightening the net. Recent lockdowns’ hits to global economies are not nearly as deep as they were the first time around; we explore why. And Cambodian rat-catchers reckon with boom and bust. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 13, 2021
Money Talks: Testing their metals
00:25:52

Despite the economic catastrophe of the pandemic, prices of goods such as copper, iron ore and soya beans are surging; just how far can commodities climb? Also, how the Brexit trade agreement will reshape business on both sides of the Channel. And, the economic cost of covid-19 is impossible to calculate—but host Patrick Lane has a go anyway.


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 12, 2021
You don’t say: tech’s Trump bans
00:22:12

Moves to shutter the president’s accounts and to crimp corners of the internet given to right-wing extremism raise thorny questions, both about free speech and social-media firms’ business models. Our public-policy editor takes a broad look at girlhood: how women’s adolescence has changed for the better but is challenged mightily by covid-19. And science’s bid to save more snake-bite victims’ lives.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 12, 2021
Wrest wing: the bid to oust Trump
00:21:25

Today Democratic lawmakers will begin attempts to remove President Donald Trump. It could fail, or be delayed—or Republicans could see a political opportunity. Even amid a global vaccination drive, the hunt for covid-19 treatments continues; we examine two existing arthritis drugs that appear to save lives. And the synthesiser that conquered music in the 1980s and then stuck around. Additional audio courtesy of Nate Mars and Daniel Reid. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 11, 2021
Editor’s Picks: January 11th 2021
00:24:27

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: the shame and the opportunity of Trump’s legacy, how to deal with China (8:50), and why the crazy upward march in stock prices might just continue (15:45).

 

Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 11, 2021
Checks and Balance: American carnage
00:43:46

President Trump stood on the Capitol steps at his inauguration and promised to stop “this American carnage.” Four years later a violent mob stormed the Capitol building in an attempt to overturn his election defeat. Will this jarring spectacle make breaking with Mr Trump easier for Republicans? 


We hear from historian Rick Perlstein, The Economist’s Washington bureau chief James Astill and Washington correspondent Idrees Kahloon.


John Prideaux, our US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, US digital editor.


For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/USpod

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 08, 2021
The longer arm of the law: Hong Kong
00:23:50

A national-security law imposed by Beijing had not, until this week, bared its teeth; the arrests of dozens of pro-democracy figures reveals how much it can crimp opposition. At the American Economics Association’s annual shindig, a scholar implores economists to recalibrate just how self-interested they take people to be. And the inspiring life and untimely death of a beloved, goat-herding refugee. 

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 08, 2021
The Economist Asks: Margaret MacMillan
00:27:24

After the shocking scenes in Washington DC this week, we ask war historian Margaret MacMillan if violence is an inevitable part of civilisation. Professor MacMillan, author of 'War: How conflict shaped us', reflects on whether the invasion of the Capitol qualifies as a coup. And she unravels the mystery of why we fight, from ancient times to the 21st century. 


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 07, 2021
Riot act: Biden confirmed amid chaos
00:20:50

After previously unthinkable scenes played out in Washington’s legislature, we ask what the violence will mean for the president, Republican lawmakers and American democracy. Argentina’s move to liberalise its abortion laws reflects slowly changing attitudes across Latin America, and may spur wider change. And examining the history of Ethio-jazz, a unique musical melting pot. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 07, 2021
Babbage: Viral defences
00:27:30

A new strain of covid-19 is surging in Britain, America and Europe—vaccines can curb the effects, but can governments speed up the roll-out? Also, in 2020 some regions acted rapidly enough to avoid severe waves of infection. Host Kenneth Cukier speaks to the public health leaders who initiated “elimination” strategies.


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 06, 2021
Run-off, their feat: Georgia’s Senate races
00:22:34

Democrats look set to win both the run-off elections that will determine control of the Senate—and how President-elect Joe Biden will be able to govern. Quantum computing is still nascent, its power yet to be truly tapped. But the finance sector is already looking to squeeze it for analytical advantage. And how Confucianism still influences society in South Korea.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 06, 2021
Money Talks: Once bitcoin, thrice as high
00:23:38

Having tripled in value in the past quarter, the cryptocurrency continues its rollercoaster ride, as the financial establishment begins to jump aboard. Also, why a new EU-China investment deal fails to balance competition, cooperation and confrontation. And, what can companies do to bridge the gap between the workforce of today and the jobs of tomorrow? Rachana Shanbhogue hosts 


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 05, 2021
Stresses of strains: emerging coronavirus variants
00:18:44

It is no surprise that more-transmissible coronavirus variants are cropping up. We ask how worrisome the strains found in Britain and South Africa are. American authorities have lodged a landmark case against Walmart for its role in the country’s worsening opioid crisis—a problem with clearly more than one cause. And dealing with the pile of unused vacation days from 2020.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 05, 2021
Arms within reach: Israel's vaccination lead
00:23:15

Aggressive purchasing, solid logistics and a competitive health-care system have led to a world-beating rate of immunisation—but, as ever, politics is playing a role, too. Big oil had a terrible 2020, but the sector’s troubles pre-date the pandemic; we look at the supermajors’ varying approaches to an uncertain future. And how covid-19 is reshaping China’s clubbing scene.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 04, 2021
Editor’s Picks: January 4th 2021
00:21:46

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: Britain’s place in the world, the future of global e-commerce (9:25), and using urine to heat homes (16:30).

 

Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 04, 2021
Checks and Balance: Leaving today
00:43:53

New York became the epicentre of the pandemic when it first hit America. More than 25,000 New Yorkers have died of covid-19. An estimated 300,000 have left the city as its health infrastructure stretched beyond capacity, schools closed, and crime spiked. The loss of commuters and tourists leaves a huge hole in the city's finances. But the city has bounced back from bankruptcy, and worse, before. Can it recover in 2021?


We speak to funeral director Sal Farenga and Kelley Cabrera, a nurse in The Bronx. Kathryn Wylde of The Partnership for New York City tells us recovery is not guaranteed.


John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, US digital editor.


For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/2020electionpod 

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 01, 2021
Babbage: Baby it’s cold outside
00:25:51

In a special holiday episode, we travel to the Russian Arctic to meet the "prophet of the permafrost", take an extraterrestrial hike in the tracks of NASA’s Curiosity rover on Mars and meet the researchers cataloguing culture. Kenneth Cukier hosts 


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 30, 2020
Isle talk to EU later: a vote on a scant Brexit deal
00:20:36

Britain’s parliament will vote today on its last-gasp agreement with the European Union. But that will only mark the start of more negotiations for years to come. And we examine the shortlist from The Economist’s annual “country of the year” debate—New Zealand, Malawi and Taiwan—and unveil the winner. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 30, 2020
Money Talks: The Alexander technique
00:24:26

A hundred years ago, Sadie Alexander became the first African American to receive a PhD in economics and then spent a career fighting racial discrimination. In this episode, The Economist’s trade and globalisation editor Soumaya Keynes speaks to Nina Banks of Bucknell University about rediscovering Alexander's economics and why her insights are still relevant today. 

 

Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 29, 2020
Cheques, imbalances: America’s fraught stimulus
00:22:20

After months of deadlock, a covid-19 relief package has passed, but the battles continue. We ask how things got so dire and what President-elect Joe Biden will inherit. A deadly shootout in London more than a century ago still resonates today; we examine one of the world’s first breaking-news stories. And the colour black reaches new depths in art. 

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 29, 2020
The World Ahead: Joe Biden’s in-tray
00:23:42

Looking ahead to 2021, we consider Joe Biden’s domestic-policy agenda: faced with a pandemic and an economic crisis, where will he start? To what extent will the new president be able to heal America’s deep cultural divides and how will state-level politics influence his policies? Also, how will the Republican party evolve in 2021? Tom Standage hosts.

 

Subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 28, 2020
Going around the bloc: Europe’s vaccination push
00:22:00

The first inoculations are happening across the continent as part of a co-ordinated push—but levels of both supply and uptake remain uncertain. Our correspondent explores South Korea’s obsession with hiking and why it means different things to different climbers. And looking back on a troubling year for Britain’s royals.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 28, 2020
Editor’s Picks: December 28th 2020
00:55:56

A selection of three articles read aloud from the holiday issue of The Economist. This week: a history of Christmas newsletters, the life of Desiderius Erasmus (18:20) and the lure of pebbles (37:45).


 

Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 28, 2020
The Economist Asks: Misty Copeland
00:27:08

Was the first black principal dancer at the American Ballet Theatre earlier denied roles because of her skin colour? She tells host, Anne McElvoy, how dance saved her from a difficult childhood and about her first performance in a classic Christmas production. And, which ballets would she remove from the repertoire?


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer




 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 24, 2020
Babbage: The parasites and the pandemic
00:30:55

While the world has been preoccupied with tackling covid-19, deadly malaria epidemics are continuing around the world. Robert Guest, The Economist’s foreign editor, investigates how covid-19 has affected the fight against malaria and talks to scientists in Senegal working to eliminate the disease. Also, historian Timothy Winegard explains how malaria has shaped life on Earth.


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 23, 2020
Old acquaintance not forgot: the notable deaths of 2020
00:22:26

In a year marked by more than a million and a half deaths, mortality has rarely been so front of mind. Our obituary editor looks back through the notable figures she has memorialised, from George Floyd to Vera Lynn. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 23, 2020
Merry Talks: The year that was
00:30:50

Tins of tuna and bedroom slippers, triple-digit growth and IPO implosion—what could it all mean? Host Henry Tricks leads an international band of “Money Talks” regulars on a whistlestop tour through a year like no other. The team choose their stories of the year, face baffling clues to mystery items, and share their predictions—and their hopes—for 2021.


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 22, 2020
Bubbles in the market: Mexico’s Coca-Cola obsession
00:21:01

For decades, the country has been an almighty consumer of the fizzy drink. But amid a woeful covid-19 situation politicians are highlighting the health concerns it brings. In getting to know a sleepy French village, our correspondent finds a nuanced view of isolation in the pandemic age. And the lavish books providing a never-before-seen perspective on the Sistine Chapel’s frescoes.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 22, 2020
Get the lead out: Zambia’s toxic mine
00:22:36

A site that closed more than a quarter-century ago is still slowly poisoning the residents of Kabwe with lead; a class-action lawsuit is at last seeking redress. Our correspondent visits the ancient monastery behind the international Shaolin brand, learning the subtle story of its abbot and chief executive. And flicking through The Economist’s staff picks for books of the year.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 21, 2020
Editor’s Picks: December 21st 2020
00:20:50

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: reflecting on the plague year, ten years after the Arab spring (9:50), and what if CEOs’ memos were clear and honest? (15:30).

 

 

Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 21, 2020
Checks and Balance: The unfinished revolution
00:37:05

After the defeat of the Confederacy and the end of slavery in 1865, the period known as Reconstruction was a chance to create a multiracial democracy and for America to live up to the promise made at its founding. It ended in failure. But in establishing the idea that the federal government should act as a guarantor of individual liberties it planted the seeds of that democracy. America’s second revolution remains unfinished.


Our end-of-year special episode asks what the history of Reconstruction reveals about 2020’s reckoning on race. 


We talk to Eric Foner, the leading historian of Reconstruction, Kimberlé Crenshaw of the African American Policy Forum, and Aderson Francois, a Georgetown law professor.


John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, Washington correspondent.


For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/2020electionpod

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 18, 2020
Rehousing project: Bangladesh’s Rohingya
00:21:26

The country’s refugee camps are packed and squalid, so the government is moving perhaps 100,000 Rohingya Muslims to a tiny island. Will life for them improve? Military tactics can be misleading; sometimes they are outright trickery. Our defence editor looks at the past and future of military deception. And why Christmas dinner involves such different fare around the world.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 18, 2020
The Economist Asks: What next for Germany after Merkel?
00:26:19

Anne McElvoy asks the former German ambassador to the US, Wolfgang Ischinger, if America can still be relied upon as a “protective uncle” and how it should deal with China. And, who will succeed Chancellor Merkel in 2021? Anne talks to German cabinet minister Jens Spahn, one of a proposed 'dream team' of candidates in the upcoming party leadership contest. 


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 17, 2020
And then, winter: ten years after the Arab Spring
00:23:30

A revolutionary conflagration a decade ago has almost entirely flickered out. We ask what happened to all the optimism and why real change has been so hard to achieve. A widely watched lawsuit reveals the slow march of feminism in China, one case at a time. And a look back at Ludwig van Beethoven’s life and work, 250 years on. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 17, 2020
Babbage: Taming the tech titans
00:26:36

This week the EU unveiled its plan to rein in big tech—the draft laws target the American giants, but European firms may not benefit much. Also, how a failed study has revealed a promising new gene-therapy treatment for blindness. And, which science stories were overlooked in a year dominated by covid-19? Kenneth Cukier hosts 


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 16, 2020
This market went a little piggy: a capital-raising frenzy
00:22:39

Astonishingly, companies have raised more capital this year than ever before. We ask how capital markets shook free amid the pandemic—and what will happen with all that cash now. Our correspondent finds just how dependent the world’s waste-management industry is on informal workers, whose hard jobs have been made far harder this year. And the technology making megaphones much more mega.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 16, 2020
Money Talks: The madness of crowds
00:28:27

A volatile world begets volatile financial markets. Does this explain investor enthusiasm for tech stocks and IPOs—or is something else afoot? Also, Michael O’Leary, the boss of Europe’s largest airline Ryanair, reads the skies ahead. And, the little-known history of working from home: even in the 18th and 19th centuries it had its advantages. Patrick Lane hosts 


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 15, 2020
Joe, College: Biden’s victory affirmed
00:21:46

America’s by-the-book electoral-college vote calmed concerns about another Trump-camp bid to overturn the election—but that is not to say the ructions are over. On an unannounced visit to a suspected forced-labour camp in China’s Xinjiang province, our correspondent runs into trouble when witnessing evidence of a far wider social-engineering effort. And Cuba’s beloved sweet, milky treat gets a freshen-up. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 15, 2020
So long, and we’re keeping all the fish: Brexit
00:18:49

Britain’s divorce from the European Union still hinges on sticky matters of fishing rights and the enforcement of fair competition, and time is rapidly running out to strike a deal. India’s fantastical “love jihadconspiracy theory is just another Muslim-marginalisation move—one that the government seemingly approves of. And a hermit-crab housing shortage in Thailand.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 14, 2020
Editor’s Picks: December 14th 2020
00:20:52

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: after the pandemic, will inflation return? Religious discrimination in a New York village (09:35). And, the global repercussions of an English ruling on transgender teens (13:45)

 

 

Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 14, 2020
Checks and Balance: On my mind
00:38:37

As 2020 draws to a close, the partisan feud is focused on Georgia. Joe Biden was the first Democrat in 28 years to win the state on the way to the White House. Run-off elections on January 5th will decide who controls the Senate - and Biden’s agenda. They will also test Donald Trump’s hold on his party as he refuses to admit defeat. Will Georgia tip the balance of American politics?


Pablo Montagnes of Emory University lays out Georgia’s political geography, Congresswoman-elect Nikema Williams and State Senator Jen Jordan account for the Democrats’ success, and Congressman Tom Graves assesses Republican fortunes. 


John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, Washington correspondent.


For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/2020electionpod

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 11, 2020
Taking the temperature: a climate chat with the UN chief
00:20:33

Ahead of a weekend meeting to assess and bolster the Paris Agreement, our correspondent speaks with Antonio Guterres about his reasons for cautious optimism. The founder of an upstart far-right Dutch party has been consumed by scandals; we discuss a disastrous downfall. And following AirBnB’s stonking stockmarket debut, we examine the revealed preferences of pandemic-era bookers. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 11, 2020
The Economist Asks: Joseph Henrich
00:28:27

How stable is the West? Professor Joseph Henrich, chair of Human Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University, says that even successful societies can implode. He tells Anne McElvoy that the economically dominant Western identity, evolving from the “psychologically peculiar” minds of the population, could look very different in the future. 


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 10, 2020
If you already joined ‘em, beat ‘em: Facebook gets sued
00:21:01

American regulators have put mergers that they approved years ago at the heart of antitrust lawsuits—a tricky bid to curb the social-media giant’s market power. We examine the surge of an artist-led protest movement in Cuba, where dissent on any scale is a dangerous proposition. And what a cross-border, ski-slope spat reveals about European co-operation. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 10, 2020
Babbage: Lighter than air
00:23:50

The aviation industry is under pressure to curb carbon-dioxide emissions—hydrogen fuel could offer a greener way to fly. Also, host Kenneth Cukier unravels the inner workings of the human mind with psychologist Howard Gardner and neuroscientist David Eagleman. If there are multiple intelligences, what happens when they work together? And, how technology can tap into the abilities of the ever-changing brain.


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 09, 2020
Laïcité, égalité, fraternité? France’s secularism bill
00:19:40

President Emmanuel Macron’s draft bill walks a fine line balancing the country’s foundational secularism and worries about Islamist terrorism. Amid slumping economies everywhere, Taiwan’s looks surprisingly buoyant; we ask how that might continue after the pandemic. And how managers can best navigate the holiday-party season in a cheerless year.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 09, 2020
Money Talks: Will inflation bounce back?
00:24:20

Worrying about inflation has gone out of style. But a small band of economists and investors argue the pandemic could usher in a new era of rising prices. Also, how one of the world’s biggest pension funds is navigating this and other pandemic-related risks. And, the remarkable resilience of America’s chain restaurants. Simon Long hosts


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 08, 2020
Granting immunity: America weighs vaccine approval
00:21:32

As Britons receive the first doses of Pfizer’s coronavirus vaccine, authorities in America are meeting this week to authorise its emergency use. We examine the approaches on both sides of the pond. Despite pandemic prescriptions of social distancing, multigenerational living is on the rise. And how Advent calendars became so very extra.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 08, 2020
Fairly unusual: Ghana’s elections
00:22:24

In a region racked by dodgy polls, the country looks to continue a trend of uncontested handovers of power. That is not to say, however, that there aren’t sticking points. As tortuous Brexit negotiations drag on, we look at how British farming can and should change under a new regulatory regime. And the starving deer of a Japanese tourist hotspot.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 07, 2020
Editor’s Picks: December 7th 2020
00:24:00

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week: killing coal, Joe Biden and Iran (10:30), and how Taiwan’s economy remains resilient (16:20) 

 

 

Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer 


 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 07, 2020
Checks and Balance: Using my religion
00:41:51

A ruling lifting covid restrictions on places of worship suggests the Supreme Court will favour religious rights even as faithlessness is rising. The court’s realignment may be Donald Trump’s most enduring legacy. How is the balance between religion and politics shifting in America?


David French of The Dispatch explains how secularisation lays a religious rift onto the political one, we find out why the French president is carping at America over secularism, and how Joe Biden will navigate this tricky territory.


John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, Washington correspondent.


For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/2020electionpod

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 04, 2020
Intensive scare: covid-19 ravages America
00:23:19

Numbers of cases, hospitalisations and deaths are rocketing across the country. We examine the situation in the Midwest, as a microcosm of a wider unfolding tragedy. Venezuela’s ruling party will take over the National Assembly after Sunday’s vote, sidelining the self-proclaimed legitimate leader Juan Guaidó and cementing Nicolás Maduro’s dictatorship. And the fruitful life and ignominious death of the Arecibo telescope.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 04, 2020
The Economist Asks: Viggo Mortensen
00:26:55

The actor, best known for playing Aragorn in the Lord of the Rings trilogy, talks about directing his first feature film on caring for his parents who suffered from dementia. Anne McElvoy asks him why he prefers cinema to home-streaming and whether he believes people will return to the big screen after the pandemic. And, how controversy around Hollywood director Woody Allen doesn’t stop Mortensen from enjoying his films. 

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 03, 2020
Your planet, or mines? Kicking the coal habit
00:21:37

In the West market forces are squeezing coal—even as its use rises in Asia. We examine how the world can wean itself off the dirtiest fossil fuel. Svetlana Tikhanovskaya, Belarus’s probable presidential-election winner, never expected to run for office. Our correspondent visits her in exile, asking about the country’s prospects for democracy. And how candy-floss machines may help make better face masks.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 03, 2020
Babbage: Testing testing
00:30:32

Britain has become the first country to license a fully tested covid-19 vaccine—the Economist’s health policy editor explains why this a historic milestone. Until vaccines become widespread, mass testing can be used to curb contagion. And, is it possible to detect covid-19 from the sound of a cough? Kenneth Cukier hosts 


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 02, 2020
Trans formative: a landmark children’s-rights ruling
00:21:46

Britain’s High Court has ruled that puberty blockers for children with gender dysphoria have been dispensed too readily, fuelling a debate that will be keenly watched abroad. A vote today on a law tightening accounting rules on American-listed Chinese companies has a political dimension—and implications for investors. And Poland’s populist leaders seize on the resurgence of “disco polo” music.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 02, 2020
Money Talks: Joe’s dream team
00:24:33

Mr Biden’s latest nominations for his economic team send a clear message about his gameplan. Plus, deal season returns. Salesforce will buy Slack—united, could the pair take on Microsoft? And, the publishing giant building a behemoth of books. Rachana Shanbhogue hosts.


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 01, 2020
Nuclear-war head: assassination in Iran
00:19:13

The killing of the country’s top nuclear scientist comes at a tricky time: violent retribution may threaten hoped-for diplomacy with the incoming American administration. An artificial-intelligence breakthrough may transform protein science, with implications for everything from industrial processes to tackling disease. And why Europe’s lighter-touch, second round of lockdowns have been so effective.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 01, 2020
The World Ahead: Post-coronanomics
00:22:52

What is the outlook for the world economy in 2021, and how much lasting damage has been done in 2020? Carmen Reinhart, chief economist at the World Bank, explains how this crisis compares with previous ones. We find out how China’s rapid rebound is taking it back to the future. And, we predict the impact of Joe Biden’s policies on US-China trade relations. Tom Standage hosts.

 

 

Subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer 

 

Music by Chris Zabriskie "Candlepower" (CC by 4.0)

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 30, 2020
No show of force: France’s controversial police-protection bill
00:21:42

Protesters are raging against a proposed bill that would outlaw posting videos of alleged police brutality—just as two videos expose more such violence. High-stakes exams for students have been delayed, modified, even cancelled during the pandemic; we look at how all those varying results stack up. And, South Africa’s growing trend of livestock theft—and rebranding.  

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 30, 2020
Editor’s Picks: November 30th 2020
00:23:18

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how resilient is democracy? Nordic politics (11:00) and remembering Diego Maradona (19:34)

 

 

Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 30, 2020
Checks and Balance: Sedate expectations
00:44:47

Policymaker, father figure and stand-in king - the Olympian job description sets an impossible standard for any new president. But expectations of Joe Biden are more modest than for most. Solid picks for the top spots in his administration only confirm his ordinariness. What makes an ideal president and how might Biden match up?


James Astill, The Economist’s Washington bureau chief, assesses how Barack Obama dealt with high expectations, columnist Lane Greene argues Biden’s plain speech is his secret weapon, and writer and producer Michael Oates Palmer tells us what makes a great president on screen.


John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, Washington correspondent.


1843 Magazine profiles ex-presidents


For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/2020electionpod

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 27, 2020
One party to rule them all? India’s fraying democracy
00:20:03

Many of the country’s institutions are being slowly hobbled by Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s government; we ask whether the world’s largest democracy is in peril. Sweden has a surprisingly entrenched problem with gang violence, revealing the social costs of its segregated populations. And how Black Friday is playing out in the pandemic era. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 27, 2020
The Economist Asks: Nigella Lawson
00:29:50

The British chef, author and host of television show “Cook, Eat, Repeat”, tells Anne McElvoy how to become a better cook. They talk about how our relationship with food is changing in the pandemic. Nigella explains the therapeutic nature of cooking and her culinary relationship with her mother. Also, what would she prepare for the new President Biden and her best Thanksgiving recipes—"apple pie without cheese, is like a kiss without a squeeze".


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 26, 2020
At his majesty, displeasure: Thailand’s anti-monarchy push
00:23:04

A long string of pro-democracy protests are railing more and more against the king himself—and the protesters are younger and more fearless than ever before. The arrest of Bobi Wine, Uganda’s popular singer-turned-opposition-hero, has sparked deadly violence. He won’t win January’s election, but his movement isn’t going away. And a Thanksgiving Day look at the globe-trotting history of the turkey

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 26, 2020
Babbage: Another dose of good news
00:30:02

Following promising results from Pfizer and Moderna, why is a third vaccine, from Oxford University and AstraZeneca, so important in the fight against covid-19? Host Kenneth Cukier and The Economist’s health policy editor Natasha Loder investigate the different approaches to this immense challenge. And Nicholas Christakis, a doctor and network scientist at Yale University, explains how despite a vaccine the pandemic could change humanity for good.


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer


 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 25, 2020
Tigray area: Ethiopia’s deadly standoff
00:21:46

The northern region’s surrounded forces are ignoring Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed’s deadline to disarm. More regions are being drawn in—and a conflagration across the Horn of Africa looms. Artificial-intelligence pilots have shown serious dogfighting skills, but for reasons both technical and ethical humans are still needed in the cockpit. And the rise of mixed martial arts on both sides of the Atlantic.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 25, 2020
Money Talks: The money doctors
00:31:16

A quiet revolution is happening in asset management. Host Patrick Lane and John O’Sullivan, The Economist’s markets columnist, speak to industry insiders about a centuries-old model under strain. They ask about the cost of the race to zero fees, if value investing has had its day and whether the quest for higher returns will lead to China.


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 24, 2020
What funds we’ll have: green venture capital
00:22:05

The boom-and-bust of environmental-technology investing has settled out, and money is flooding in—both individual and institutional. We examine the green fields that lie ahead. Many Arab countries have long been suffering an exodus of medical professionals—a problem only magnified by the pandemic. And a reflection on the life of Jonathan Sacks, a tirelessly unifying British rabbi. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer


 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 24, 2020
Playing his Trump cards: Biden’s China policy
00:22:18

The tone of America’s president-elect on China changed markedly through the campaign; his policies, at least at the outset, may differ little from those of his predecessor. We examine the stark racial disparities in covid-19 outcomes around the world. And the clever use of a waste product to make a better takeaway coffee cup.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 23, 2020
Editor’s Picks: November 23rd 2020
00:20:04

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, remaking the British state, the China strategy America needs (08:27) and consultants of swing (14:56)



Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer 



 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 23, 2020
Checks and Balance: Not going gentle
00:40:47

Donald Trump’s long-held aversion to admitting defeat leaves America with an unprecedented scenario: an incumbent president thwarting the transition to a new administration. How harmful is Donald Trump’s refusal to concede?


In this episode we find out how a presidential transition is meant to work, how the current upheaval falls short, and how Richard Nixon dealt with a disputed election. 


John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, Washington correspondent.


For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/2020electionpod

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 20, 2020
Undercut a deal: the threat to Afghan peace
00:20:05

Peace talks continue in Doha but on the ground the Taliban are consolidating control. America’s rush to withdraw its forces could undo the good work of getting them to the negotiating table. As DoorDash heads to a public listing, we look at the rapidly shifting fortunes of the food-delivery business. And why golf has a long-shot problem.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 20, 2020
The Economist Asks: Sonia Friedman
00:27:48

The West End and Broadway producer says visiting closed theatres during the lockdown brought her to tears. Now that an effective vaccine is on the horizon, Anne McElvoy asks Friedman what it will take for theatre curtains to rise again. And, after the pandemic how much does it cost to restart a hit show like Harry Potter and the Cursed Child? 


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 19, 2020
Quit it cold, Turkey: policy tightens at last
00:21:15

Now that the economic reins have been taken back from the president’s son-in-law, the country is making the right policy noises—and just in time. China’s anti-poverty drive is not disinterested charity; it is about transforming citizens’ thoughts. And chronicling Pepe the Frog’s descent into alt-right memedom.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 19, 2020
Babbage: A grand bargain for tech
00:22:56

Is it time for a new, global politics of technology? Democratic countries need to establish a robust alternative to China’s autocratic technosphere. The news about potential covid-19 vaccines keeps getting better; we assess how the leading candidates differ. And, is there really phosphine on Venus? Kenneth Cukier hosts 


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 18, 2020
Concession stand: Trump’s intransigence
00:21:13

America’s outgoing president is sticking with an insidious fiction, lashing out at those who deny it. That frustrates a stable handover of power—and will cost lives. Egypt has a long-standing problem with sexual harassment and abuse. A reckoning has begun this year, revealing some deeply conservative views among both men and women. And why streaming-era television programmes have got so long.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 18, 2020
Money Talks: Lukewarm RCEPtion
00:25:50

China is in, America and India are out; is the world’s biggest trade agreement a triumph for rules-based trade or a step towards a new world order? Donald Trump’s last nominations to the Federal Reserve could help secure his legacy—and limit Mr Biden’s ability to fix the country’s economic problems. And, the candy-pink Swedish unicorn hoping to work its magic in America. Patrick Lane hosts 


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 17, 2020
Out on a LegCo: Hong Kong under pressure
00:22:00

Following a purge based on a harsh new security law, the territory’s Legislative Council lacks a single opposition voice. That will make the work of pro-Beijing lawmakers easier. As promising vaccines start to emerge, we examine the role of so-called T-cells in granting long-lasting immunity to the coronavirus. And why employers are relying more and more on psychometric tests.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 17, 2020
Disrupter, disrupted: Britain’s government
00:21:24

The chief aide to the prime minister had been a driving force in policy but a dividing force in government. What will happen now that he has stood down? We examine how Canada’s response to the pandemic has shielded its economy—so far. And lockdowns bring the market for pasta to a rolling boil. 

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 16, 2020
Editor’s Picks: November 16th 2020
00:21:20

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Suddenly, hope: covid-19 vaccines, The world and Joe Biden: Great Expectations (09:25) And, how Princess Diana shaped British politics (14:05).

 

 

Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 16, 2020
Checks and Balance: Opening shot
00:38:41

Joe Biden’s first move as president-elect was to unveil a pandemic advisory panel staffed by the public-health experts the incumbent likes to mock. News of an effective covid-19 vaccine came the day America passed 10m recorded cases. What difference will the Biden administration make?


In this episode we hear from Kavita Patel, a doctor who advised Vice President-Elect Kamala Harris, and find out how making a miracle vaccine went wrong once before. 


John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, Washington correspondent.


The Economist charts White House pets 


For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/2020electionpod

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 13, 2020
Going to cede: Armenia and Azerbaijan
00:22:25

The longest-running conflict in the Caucasus could well be over. We examine a peace deal that benefits outside powers and chips away at regional identities. The hipster aesthetic long ago permeated rich countries; our correspondent finds it creeping even into impoverished and war-torn corners of the world. And reflecting on the life of James Randi, a tireless debunker of charlatans.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 13, 2020
The Economist Asks: Jim Clyburn
00:29:01

Nicknamed “the kingmaker”, the South Carolina congressman and civil-rights activist set Joe Biden on his path to the White House. But the narrowness of Mr Biden's victory shook Democratic confidence. Anne McElvoy asks one of the most senior Democrats in Congress whether the president-elect can heal America. Did slogans like “defund the police” cost the party at the polls? And, are politicians getting too old?


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 12, 2020
Sahel of a mess: France’s impossible peacekeeping mission
00:23:01

Jihadism is growing in a continent-wide strip of Africa, and the riskiest operations to contain it fall to French troops. Our correspondent witnesses a fraught and seemingly endless mission. Peru has ousted yet another president, at a woeful time: the pandemic is raging, the economy cratering and politics fracturing. And the movement to water down Sweden’s state monopoly on booze. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 12, 2020
Babbage: In it for the long-haulers
00:29:33

The arrival of vaccines to tame covid-19 now seems within reach, but the disease will continue to shape lives long after the pandemic. The Economist’s health policy editor Natasha Loder speaks to patients, doctors and researchers about the symptoms that make up “long covid”, the latest findings about its causes—and how to treat it.


Subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 11, 2020
We’ll again have Paris: Biden’s ambitious climate plans
00:21:42

President-elect Joe Biden’s campaign had the environment front and centre. We analyse his pledges—and his prospects for implementing them. As the video-gaming industry releases its next round of consoles, it is eyeing a far larger prize: high-end gaming with no console at all. And the red poppy of Remembrance Day turns into something of an armistice race in Britain. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 11, 2020
Money Talks: The inheritance of Joe
00:23:37

Coaxing the American economy back to health will be an unenviable challenge for the 46th president. From taxes to tariffs, we assess the task. And, as Ant agonises, what does the fate of the world’s biggest suspended IPO reveal about the future of private enterprise in China? Simon Long hosts 


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 10, 2020
Nine out of ten, doctors say: a promising coronavirus vaccine
00:20:27

A vaccine claimed to be 90% effective represents an enormous achievement. We discuss what questions remain and the regulatory and distribution challenges ahead. A string of recent African elections reveals strongmen bending democracy to stay in office; will upcoming polls break it altogether? And a moral crusade in India doesn’t fit the country’s chill relationship with weed. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 10, 2020
Brought to heal: Biden’s chance to unite America
00:22:37

President Donald Trump will go, but Trumpism will remain. Our editor-in-chief considers how President-elect Biden can repair the divided country he will inherit. Denmark aims to cull 17m mink that could represent a reservoir of a mutated coronavirus—why didn’t it do so when other countries did? And the old-timey Korean music that might just challenge K-pop.  

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 09, 2020
Editor’s Picks: November 9th 2020
00:26:23

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, what the 2020 results say about America’s future, is there an alternative to Huawei’s 5g technology? (09:25) And, global hipster culture is spreading to even the world’s poorest countries (14:15). 

 

 

Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 09, 2020
Checks and Balance: When I’m 46
00:45:44

Joe Biden is set to score a rare victory against an incumbent to become America’s 46th president. A Biden White House will set a new tone for the country. Yet the unexpected closeness of the vote - and the president’s refusal to go quietly - means the Trump brand of populism will live on. 


In this episode we decode the message the voters sent and what it means for America with The Economist’s data journalist Elliott Morris and Beijing bureau chief David Rennie.


John Prideaux, The Economist's US editor, hosts with New York bureau chief Charlotte Howard, and Jon Fasman, Washington correspondent.


For access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe: economist.com/2020electionpod

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 06, 2020
Abiy damned: Ethiopia’s looming civil war
00:21:34

Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed has taken drastic steps to quieten a state stacked with trained militias. The conflict could draw in more states—or the whole of the Horn of Africa. China’s increasing push for self-reliance in a globalised economy has its complications—made clear by a vast influx of precision-bred super-chickens. And the macabre tale of books bound with human skin.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 06, 2020
The Economist Asks: The Lincoln Project
00:32:38

President Trump is on course to lose his re-election bid albeit with the second-highest number of votes ever recorded. Anne McElvoy asks Jennifer Horn, founder of the Lincoln Project, a conservative coalition that campaigned against the president, why Trumpism proved so attractive to swathes of America. Beyond the presidency, which forces are the winners and losers of this election? And, The Economist's deputy editor Edward Carr on what record turnout but contested results say about American democracy.


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 05, 2020
The lawyers of diminishing returns: America’s election
00:20:00

As President Donald Trump’s re-election path slims, his pledges to fight the results in court are multiplying. We look at the cases that may eventually decide the election. Global crises tend to affect birth rates, and covid-19 is no different—but the effects are not evenly spread. And a suite alternative for business types tired of working from home. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 05, 2020
Babbage: Signal and noise
00:25:11

Social media platforms face one of the most testing weeks in their history as they try to filter the real election news from the fake—host Kenneth Cukier asks whether they are up to the task. In the data economy, does privacy equal power? And, how to harness the sound of the deep sea to power underwater devices.


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 04, 2020
Tally forth: America’s elections
00:21:31

The outcome remains unclear as vote-counting continues. We look at some of the surprise results, ask what happens next and examine how The Economist’s election forecast has held up. And we tag along with our American correspondents for the thrill of election-night reporting.The latest results are here www.economist.com/us2020results; for full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 04, 2020
Money Talks: Buried in treasuries
00:24:21

On election day in the United States, host Patrick Lane looks at perhaps the world’s most important asset market: American government bonds. As it grows, this supposed safe haven is malfunctioning. If Joe Biden wins the presidency, his choice of treasury secretary will reveal much about his priorities—we size up the frontrunners. And, how to count the cost of partisanship to America Inc.


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 03, 2020
Poles’ position: an abortion-law backlash
00:21:54

Poland already had some of the strictest laws on terminations, but the ruling party’s bid to tighten them further has sparked national outrage. We lay out what to expect on election night in America—the denouement will not be simple, and is unlikely to be quick. And a historical look at the films screened in the White House’s private cinema. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, su