The Economist Podcasts

By The Economist

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Subscribers: 11364
Reviews: 35

James
 Oct 14, 2022
Very informative.


 Sep 22, 2022


 Apr 26, 2022

andrewbetts
 Dec 6, 2021
Excellent news source in digestable chunks


 Nov 18, 2021

Description

Every weekday our global network of correspondents makes sense of the stories beneath the headlines. We bring you surprising trends and tales from around the world, current affairs, business and finance—as well as science and technology.

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Episode Date
Checks and Balance: An academic question
39:35

More and more universities across America now require would-be professors to submit so-called diversity statements. These ask applicants to set out their commitment to, and experience of, promoting diversity, equity and inclusion. At the same time some Republican-led states, most notably Florida, are putting their own restrictions on academia.  How healthy is academic freedom in America? 


Dean of Berkeley Law Erwin Chemerinsky makes the case for diversity statements, while NYU’s Jonathan Haidt argues against them. We go back to when professors took a stand against anti-communism. And former head of Human Rights Watch Kenneth Roth recounts his own fight for academic freedom.  


John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Idrees Kahloon.


You can now find every episode of Checks and Balance in one place and sign up to our weekly newsletter. For full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod.



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Feb 03, 2023
Bold eagle: America's industrial evolution
27:58

As part of The Economist’s new series on the remaking of the country's economy, our correspondent looks at the Biden administration’s audacious industrial plans. Russia’s media outlets have been relentlessly squeezed, so many have set up newsrooms in exile; we examine the rise of “offshore journalism”. And reflecting on the life of Gina Lollobrigida, a remarkable, irrepressible, impenitent Italian actress.


For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer



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Feb 03, 2023
Money Talks: Goldman Sags
38:16

Goldman once dominated Wall Street. In 2009, after the financial crisis, when most financial institutions were left reeling, Goldman had its best year ever. It appeared an apex-predator, one that could outsmart its rivals in even the toughest environments. But the last decade has been humbling for Goldman.


On this week’s podcast, hosts Alice Fulwood, Tom Lee-Devlin and Mike Bird ask what is going wrong with Goldman Sachs. We hear how the bank grew from a basement office selling promissory notes in downtown Manhattan to become the most revered name on Wall Street. Analyst Steven Chubak tells us when things changed for Goldman, and how it is trying to adapt. And The Economist's Patrick Foulis says the bank’s mystique is at odds with its “mediocre, pedestrian and humdrum” valuation.


Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks 

For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer



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Feb 02, 2023
Poll fishing: Peru’s persistent protests
27:08

The country remains riven by unrest since the “self-coup” and subsequent arrest of its president in December; only an early election might bring a return to calm. Our correspondent goes shopping to discover the spending habits of Generation Z and millennials. And examining the work of Tom Lehrer, a mathematician who was an unlikely midwife at the birth of modern satire.


For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer




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Feb 02, 2023
Babbage: Alternatives to alcohol
43:39

Alcohol is the most widely used drug in the world, but it is also the cause of three million deaths each year and has been linked to many other long-term illnesses. In addition, the loss of productivity due to hangovers has an outsized impact on some economies. People still want to have a good time, though, and innovators are dreaming up ways to enjoy the effects of alcohol, without the costs.


Jason Hosken, our producer, visits Brixton Brewery to speak to co-founders Jez Galaun and Xochitl Benjamin about the rise of alcohol-free beer. Natasha Loder, The Economist’s health editor, investigates the herbal drinks that claim to mimic the effects of alcohol. Plus, David Nutt, a professor at Imperial College London explains how alcohol affects the brain and why his synthetic alcohol could reduce excessive drinking and end hangovers forever. 


For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.



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Feb 01, 2023
Troubled shares, troubles shared: Adani and India Inc
24:31

The Adani Group, one of India’s biggest conglomerates, has come under fire from a tiny American research firm. A successful secondary share sale amid a rout in the markets leaves many questions—and proves revealing about India Inc. Our correspondent explains why Mexico is so well-placed to navigate the electric-vehicle transition. And the unlikely rise of MAGA rap artists.


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Feb 01, 2023
Drum Tower: Autocrats' pact
35:05

It’s been a year since Xi Jinping and Vladimir Putin announced the “no-limits” friendship between China and Russia. What drives the relationship and which side benefits from it more?


In the first episode of a two-part series, The Economist’s Beijing bureau chief, David Rennie, and senior China correspondent, Alice Su, assess how the relationship between Mr Xi and Mr Putin has evolved over the past year and ask whether the friendship has any boundaries.


They also speak to Wang Yiwei, director of the Institute of International Affairs at Renmin University, about how China sees Russia’s invasion of Ukraine and whether that view has changed over the course of this year.


Sign up to our weekly newsletter here and for full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/drumoffer.




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Jan 31, 2023
Not shy about retiring: strikes in France
20:56

Fixing the complex, creaking pension system remains central to President Emmanuel Macron’s agenda of reforms. But leaving it alone is central to French identity—so workers are striking, again, in huge numbers. Our correspondent lays out why 2023’s first earnings season is so gloomy. And America is providing more legal protections for polyamorous “throuples”.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer



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Jan 31, 2023
Editor’s Picks: January 30th 2023
26:38

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the humbling of Goldman Sachs, a crisis of confidence in Egypt (9:20) and how to conduct a sex survey in Britain (19:05).


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

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Jan 30, 2023
Didn’t protect or serve: Tyre Nichols’s killing
27:40

The response to the death of the 29-year-old has differed from that of previous cases of police killings; we ask what the tragedy indicates about how America deals with police violence. Our correspondent says a lawmaker’s murder in Afghanistan highlights the misery of women under the Taliban. And why a decades-old model of animal and human learning is under fire

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer



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Jan 30, 2023
Checks and Balance: Hunting ground
44:13

House Republicans hope that by delving into Hunter Biden’s business dealings they’ll find a trail of wrongdoing leading back to the president. Is this just the usual partisan mudslinging? Or will the Hunter Biden saga spell trouble for Joe Biden?


Andrew Rice from New York magazine tells us what is on Hunter Biden’s laptop. The Economist’s James Bennet remembers the time a president’s brother caused trouble. And Republican congresswoman Anna Paulina Luna explains why she wants to investigate the Biden family.  


John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Idrees Kahloon. 


You can read the New York magazine piece we mention, by Andrew Rice and Olivia Nuzzi, here


You can now find every episode of Checks and Balance in one place and sign up to our weekly newsletter. For full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod.



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Jan 27, 2023
Tunnel, no lights: South Africa’s crumbling infrastructure
23:21

South Africa’s infrastructure—its ports, railways and power grid—are struggling and poorly managed. Ordinary South Africans are increasingly fed up. We profile Russia’s new military commander in Ukraine. And our obituaries editor remembers one of Britain’s finest rural writers.


For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer



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Jan 27, 2023
Money Talks: Can Disney rekindle the magic?
41:26

The Walt Disney Company turns 100 years old this week. But the silver screen success that helped it become the world’s biggest entertainment company will not be enough to keep it on top for another century. As households swap cable packages for streaming, and kids turn to gaming, rather than movies, Disney needs reanimating.

On this week’s podcast, hosts Tom Lee-Devlin, Alice Fulwood and Mike Bird ask whether Disney has lost its touch. The Economist’s Tom Wainwright takes us on a tour of the Magic Kingdom, to assess its sprawling empire. Analyst Rich Greenfield explains why the company is losing billions on streaming. And Matthew Ball, former head of strategy for Amazon Studios, tells us about the big bet Disney needs to make if it wants to retain its crown.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer



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Jan 26, 2023
Bibi’s gambit: Israel’s government v its judiciary
26:22

Israel’s right-wing coalition government has the country’s supreme court in its sights. Their proposal to effectively subjugate its independence to the legislature has sparked protests and stirred concern for the country’s democracy. Our correspondent reports from a newly reopened Shanghai. And how gas stoves became the latest battleground in America’s endless culture wars.


For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer




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Jan 26, 2023
Babbage: The private Moon race
41:26

Three firms are racing to become the first private company to land on the Moon. The potential commercial opportunities range from mining lunar resources to establishing a human base with communications infrastructure. But the commercialisation of the Moon raises tricky questions about who owns Earth’s closest neighbour.


Steve Altemus, CEO of Intuitive Machines, explains what he hopes his company’s missions will achieve, while Ian Jones of Goonhilly Earth Station describes how the blossoming private space sector is boosting the economy. And Dhara Patel, an expert at Britain’s National Space Centre, explores how the international community has attempted to govern space. Alok Jha hosts with Tom Standage, The Economist’s deputy editor.


For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.



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Jan 25, 2023
Tanks, a lot: arming Ukraine
24:33

After months of foot-dragging, Germany is sending tanks to Ukraine, with America poised to follow suit. We examine how that could reshape the battlefield. Why Sudan’s democratic transition has stalled and its economy is struggling. And we reveal the secret to perfectly cooked chips.


For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer



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Jan 25, 2023
Drum Tower: Slow train home
41:01

China is celebrating the lunar new year. The Ministry of Transport predicts that by February 15th over 2bn journeys will be made by Chinese heading to their home towns–and for some migrant workers, it'll be the first time they've returned since the start of the covid-19 pandemic three years ago. The Economist's Beijing bureau chief, David Rennie, has a standing ticket for a train ride that’s part of the biggest annual human migration on the planet. He asks passengers on a two-day train from Guangzhou to Urumqi about the economic and emotional challenges involved in going home. He and Alice Su, our senior China correspondent, also hear from Han Dongfang, founder of the China Labour Bulletin, about a pay problem that's gripping the country's most vulnerable workers.


Sign up to our weekly newsletter here and for full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/drumoffer.




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Jan 24, 2023
Marshalling resources: rebuilding Ukraine
26:01
Around one-fifth of Ukraine’s population has fled. The country’s GDP has plummeted and foreign investors are staying away. Even as the fighting rages, the world has already begun thinking about how to rebuild the country. How a 36-year-old treaty helped heal the ozone layer. And why the pandemic did not lead to a wave of job-killing automation.

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Jan 24, 2023
The World Ahead 2023: The art of forecasting
23:33

We turn the spotlight on forecasting itself, and look back on the predictions we made for 2022. How accurate were we? How do “superforecasters” look into the future? And how can forecasters account for irrational world leaders when predicting major events? Charlotte Howard, The Economist’s executive editor, talks to Tom Standage, editor of The World Ahead, and Warren Hatch, the CEO of Good Judgement, a “superforecasting” platform and partner of The Economist.


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

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Jan 23, 2023
Feeling un-Wellington
26:09

Jacinda Ardern resigned as New Zealand’s prime minister last week. As Chris Hipkins prepares to take over, we reflect on Ms Ardern’s legacy, and look at the challenges her successor inherits. What the world’s plethora of grandparents means for families. And which issues currently motivate America’s far-right.


For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer



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Jan 23, 2023
Editor’s Picks: January 23rd 2023
28:54

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Disney’s second century, Turkey’s looming dictatorship (10:25) and how young people spend their money (17:35). 


Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions:

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Jan 23, 2023
Checks and Balance: Incoming alerts
39:58

Reports of the slow death of American incomes have been exaggerated.  Since the turn of the millennium, hourly earnings have grown steadily in real terms.  While those at the top have taken most of the gains, in the past few years, the poorest have done well too.  Where does that leave those in the middle?  What’s behind the two decades of growing incomes?  And why hasn’t a richer population brought a more contented politics?


The Economist’s Simon Rabinovitch explains the latest data on incomes–and why it can be tricky to calculate.  We go back to another time where economic perceptions and reality were far apart.  And Betsey Stevenson, of the University of Michigan, discusses what all this means for income inequality.


John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Idrees Kahloon.


You can now find every episode of Checks and Balance in one place and sign up to our weekly newsletter. For full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod




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Jan 20, 2023
A rarefied air: a dispatch from Davos
27:03

The global elite’s annual Alpine jamboree may have lost some of its convening power, our editor-in-chief says, but the many encounters it enables still have enormous value. Our correspondent considers what the closing of Noma, a legendary Danish restaurant, means for the world of fine dining. And remembering Adolfo Kaminsky, whose expertly forged documents saved thousands of Jews’ lives. 


For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer



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Jan 20, 2023
Money Talks: How globalisation gave way
41:12

America has changed the way it views the rest of the world. Rather than pushing for a more globalised economy with fewer trade barriers, the US is now seeking a more protected system of international trade. President Biden’s Inflation Reduction Act promises nearly $400bn to boost clean energy and reduce dependence on China for things like batteries for electric cars. The Chips Act, meanwhile, provides incentives worth $52bn to boost America’s semiconductor industry.


On this week’s podcast, hosts Mike Bird and Alice Fulwood examine what this new zero-sum era means for the global economy. Chad Bown from the Peterson Institute for International Economics tells them the age of globalisation isn’t returning any time soon. Henry Gao from Singapore Management University blames America’s attempt to “out-China China by becoming more like China”.


Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks 

For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer



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Jan 19, 2023
Turkey stuffed? A democracy’s last stand
23:50

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has dismantled the country’s institutions. As an election looms we ask what democratic guardrails remain, and examine the wider risks if those go, too. “Non-compete” clauses designed to protect trade secrets when employees depart are being abused—and trustbusters are going after them. And Ryuichi Sakamoto, a famed Japanese composer, reckons with mortality in his latest release.


Music from “12” courtesy of Milan Records.


For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer



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Jan 19, 2023
Babbage: How to detect a deepfake
41:06

Digital fakery, from the latest generation of deepfakes to lower-tech trickery, threatens to erode trust in societies and can prevent justice from being served. But how can technology be used to both detect deepfakes and authenticate real images?


Patrick Traynor, a professor at the University of Florida, explains a novel method to expose audio generated by artificial intelligence. Ilke Demir of Intel Labs demonstrates how to spot visual fakery by analysing colour changes in the face. Plus, The Economist’s Benjamin Sutherland investigates the flipside of deepfakes: how to prove that footage is real. And Wendy Betts of eyeWitness to Atrocities explains how her technology is being used as evidence for war crimes. Alok Jha hosts.


For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.



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Jan 18, 2023
Tanks-giving parade? Arming Ukraine
25:18

For nearly 11 months Western powers have resisted providing tanks to Ukraine, fearing an unpredictable Russian escalation. What happens now that red line has rightly been crossed? Bankruptcy proceedings simply are not built to untangle the mess left behind by the implosion of FTX, a spectacularly failed crypto firm. And what California’s deadly floods reveal about its climate future.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer





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Jan 18, 2023
Drum Tower: A tale of two Chinas
37:20

The recent surge in covid-19 cases has exposed the gulf between China's urban and rural healthcare system. How vast is the gap and what is being done to bridge it? 


The Economist’s Beijing bureau chief, David Rennie, and senior China correspondent, Alice Su, hear how doctors in cities and villages are coping with the rise in covid infections. Winnie Yip, professor of the practice of global health policy and economics at Harvard School of Public Health, assesses the Chinese government’s plans to revitalise healthcare. 


Sign up to our weekly newsletter here and for full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/drumoffer.





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Jan 17, 2023
Get down to Syria’s business: coming talks with Turkey
25:16

Through years of Syria’s messy civil war, Turkey has been a foe. As the conflict slowly fades, the countries have a mutual interest in rapprochement. Can they find common ground? Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva’s return as Brazil’s president renews a mission close to his heart: ameliorating the country’s widespread hunger. And why atheism is still taboo for America’s lawmakers.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer



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Jan 17, 2023
The World Ahead 2023: Watch the mega-states
25:12

Where is American politics heading in 2023? Alexandra Suich Bass, The Economist's senior correspondent for politics, technology and society, and our Lexington columnist, James Bennet, look outside Washington, DC, to the four mega-states to take the political temperature. Will divided government and razor-thin majorities cause politics to grind to a halt in the coming year? And will the presidential election of 2024 be a re-run of 2020? Tom Standage hosts.


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Jan 16, 2023
What did the president stow and when did he stow it? Biden‘s mess
23:49

A drip-feed of discoveries of classified material in Joe Biden’s home and offices—and the president’s botched messaging around them—are a gift to Republicans and to Donald Trump, who is under investigation for similar infractions. Our correspondent learns that many Ukrainian soldiers are freezing their sperm before heading to battle. And the fight about hunting in France is no small-boar matter.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer





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Jan 16, 2023
Editor’s Picks: January 16th 2023
21:16

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the destructive new logic that threatens globalisation, how Brazil should deal with the bolsonarista insurrection (11:55) and our review of Prince Harry’s autobiography (16:45). 

 

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Jan 16, 2023
Checks and Balance: Electric dreams
42:51

2023 ought to be a big year in America’s transition towards electric vehicles.  The federal government has set aside billions to encourage consumers and manufacturers to hitch a ride, and to ramp up the nation’s charging infrastructure. What do electric vehicles tell us about the future of American industry?


On a road trip across the Midwest we look at whether America's industrial and environmental goals are compatible.  We visit a factory making a battery-powered version of a popular truck.  Ethan Karp from MAGNET talks about the prospects for a manufacturing renaissance in what some rudely call the rustbelt.  And Chuck Browning from UAW considers what the transition means for union workers. 


John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Jon Fasman.  


You can now find every episode of Checks and Balance in one place and sign up to our weekly newsletter. For full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod.



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Jan 13, 2023
Zero-sum: the imperilled global economic order
25:25

Countries across the world are turning inward, embracing protectionism, subsidies and export controls. This threatens the global order that has lifted hundreds of millions out of poverty, and risks economic conflict. Ethiopia’s newfound peace looks fragile and uncertain. And Mexico’s ballads that critics claim glorify criminality, but fans argue celebrate loyalty, ingenuity and hard work.


For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer



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Jan 13, 2023
Money Talks: The new power in the North Sea
35:02

For decades, the North Sea’s fierce gales have created a challenge for those extracting the oil and gas buried beneath its swells. But the region’s poor weather is also the key to its future: offshore wind. And the plans are surprisingly ambitious.


On this week’s podcast, hosts Tom Lee-Devlin, Alice Fulwood and Mike Bird ask whether the North Sea can turn green. The Economist’s Matthieu Favas says wind farms in the North Sea could power Europe’s 200m homes. Jesper Frost Rasmussen, mayor of Esbjerg, explains how the offshore wind industry has changed life in the Danish port town. Ulrik Stridbæk of Orsted, the world’s largest offshore wind developer, says that some sites are already generating the same amount of power as a large nuclear power station. Plus, we speak to Thomas Dalsgaard about why his firm, Copenhagen Infrastructure Partners, wants to build a physical island 100 kilometres off the coast of Denmark. 


Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks 


For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer



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Jan 12, 2023
Unveiled threats: Iran's patient protesters
24:46

Iran’s protests may have gone quiet for the moment, but that does not mean they’ve been defeated. Beneath a calmer surface, Iranians are seething and biding their time. India’s pharma sector is huge, but has long been dogged by concerns about quality control. And we reveal last year’s most newsworthy subject.

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Jan 12, 2023
Babbage: How Elon Musk’s satellites could change warfare forever
41:39

SpaceX’s Starlink was designed to provide off-grid high-bandwidth internet access to civilians. But the mega-constellation of satellites has become more famous for its role in Ukraine. In 2022, it became vital to the country’s war effort, revealing the military potential of near-ubiquitous communications. Now, with more companies and countries piling in to build their own mega-constellations, a new space race is on.


Shashank Joshi,The Economist’s defence editor, and Tim Cross, our technology and society editor, examine how the satellites have saved Ukraine and changed warfare. Aaron Bateman of George Washington University explores the military history of satellite communications. And Herming Chiueh, Taiwan’s deputy minister for digital affairs, explains why the threat from China has led the island to pursue its own Starlink-like satellite system. Alok Jha hosts.


For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.



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Jan 11, 2023
Doctors’ disorders: Britain’s overwhelmed health service
32:20

Britain’s National Health Service is in crisis. Wait times are rising, nurses and paramedics are striking, and doctors are overworked—leading to hundreds of excess deaths each week. We visit the front line: a stretched GP’s surgery in Wales. We ask why Germany and Poland love to hate each other. And what America’s army is doing to slim down its overweight recruits.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer




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Jan 11, 2023
Drum Tower: The new wave
34:33

Since the zero-covid policy was scrapped, the virus has spread across China at a blistering pace. The medical system and crematoria are overwhelmed, but official data on infections and deaths is hazy. With so little transparency, is it possible to discover the true scale of the crisis? And, could this latest wave have been prevented?


The Economist’s Beijing bureau, David Rennie, and senior China correspondent, Alice Su, speak to our China correspondent, Gabriel Crossley, who’s visited a hospital struggling to cope with the influx of patients. Yanzhong Huang, senior fellow for global health at the Council on Foreign Relations, discusses why Chinese authorities continue to put politics above science.


Sign up to our weekly newsletter here.


For full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/drumoffer.



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Jan 10, 2023
Unquiet on the eastern front: fighting in the Donbas
25:47
Russian troops have turned Bakhmut, in eastern Ukraine, into a charnel house—and a proving ground for its mercenary army. The booming North Sea region could reshape Europe’s economy. And how women across the Middle East are taking their sexuality into their own hands. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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Jan 10, 2023
The World Ahead 2023: Bigger elephant, leaner dragon
19:26

When it comes to demographic shifts, 2023 is going to be a big year. India will overtake China to become the world’s most populous country in 2023—and China’s population will start to shrink. What are the pros and cons of growing and shrinking populations, and what can governments do in response? Tom Standage asks Brooke Unger, The Economist’s international correspondent, and Lena Schipper, South Asia bureau chief


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Jan 09, 2023
Cloud coup-coup land: riots in Brazil
21:43
In a scene reminiscent of the US Capitol riot two years ago, supporters of Brazil’s defeated president rampaged through government buildings yesterday. Our Brazil correspondent surveys the damage. We explain why Tesla’s share price has plummeted, and why an Italian film has been remade in more than 20 countries in the past six years. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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Jan 09, 2023
Editor’s Picks: January 9th 2023
29:52

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how China’s reopening will disrupt the world economy, a realistic path to a better relationship between Britain and the EU (8:54) and reinventing the Indo-Pacific (17:35).

 

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Jan 09, 2023
Checks and Balance: Speaker out of turn
43:46

The 118th Congress is, so far, a shambles.  A contingent of hardline Republicans have banded together to deny Kevin McCarthy the 218 votes he needs to obtain the speakership. The House can’t start the small matter of governing the country until the debacle is resolved. Can this Congress get over its chaotic start? 


Molly Reynolds from Brookings explains how House procedure has led to the mess.  We go back 100 years to the last time it took multiple ballots to elect a speaker.  And The Economist’s James Bennet considers the prospects for the year in Washington. 


John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Idrees Kahloon


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Jan 06, 2023
Bibi’s got backup: Israel’s right-wing government
27:17

Israel’s new government is its most right-wing ever—but, in a break from the past, that may not derail deepening relations with neighbouring Arab countries. Thousands of Africans are killed each year after being accused of witchcraft—in many cases for more nefarious reasons than mere superstition. And the “cicerones” helping Americans navigate a vast and growing craft-beer scene.

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Jan 06, 2023
Money Talks: The economics of thinness
34:02

Across the rich world there is a negative relationship between incomes and weight, as measured by body mass index. The richer people are, the thinner they tend to be. But separate the data by gender and a startling gap appears. Rich women are much thinner than poorer ones; but rich men and poor men are just as likely to be overweight or obese.


On this week’s podcast, hosts Alice Fulwood and Thomas Lee-Devlin examine why it may be rational, in economic terms, for ambitious women to pursue thinness. John Cawley of Cornell University explains his research that suggests overweight women have lower salaries than their thinner peers. We examine the legacy of Helen Gurley Brown, the outspoken former editor-in-chief of Cosmopolitan magazine, who championed dieting to get ahead. And Jennifer Shinall, a law professor at Vanderbilt University, considers potential solutions to weight-based discrimination.


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Jan 05, 2023
Silva’s mettle: Brazil’s newish president
25:42
Our Brazil correspondent surveys the state of the country, as Lula assumes the presidency precisely 20 years after his first inauguration. We ask why America’s armed forces are facing recruitment struggles not seen since the Vietnam War. And as Benedict XVI’s funeral begins, our obituaries editor reflects on his papacy. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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Jan 05, 2023
Babbage: BioNTech's founder on the future of mRNA technology
37:14

Since covid-19 emerged three years ago, mRNA vaccines have taken the world by storm. How will they keep up with new variants of the coronavirus, and where does the mRNA revolution go from here?


Natasha Loder, The Economist’s health policy editor, talks to Ugur Sahin, the co-founder of BioNTech, whose covid vaccine changed the course of the pandemic. They consider the development of a universal coronavirus vaccine, and the other infectious diseases that will be targeted by mRNA jabs. Plus, the immunologist explains how mRNA technology can treat illnesses such as cancer, and his expectations for the technology in 2023. Alok Jha hosts.


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Jan 04, 2023
We need to balk about Kevin: Congress opens in chaos
26:31
Republican control of America’s House of Representatives began in chaos: they failed to elect a speaker, the first time in a century that’s happened. China’s fishing fleet is the world’s largest—and a look at the thinning bounty from West Africa’s waters reveals its effects. And why the theft of catalytic converters is soaring in America. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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Jan 04, 2023
Ill news, spreads apace: covid in China
23:39

The sudden rescinding of zero-covid strictures has, as expected, led to a spike in cases. Our correspondent visits overstretched hospitals and crematoria, and considers what will happen next. Aerial drones have in part shaped the war in Ukraine; now the naval kind are starting to play a role. And French-language purity goes out the window when it comes to startups. 

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Jan 03, 2023
The World Ahead 2023: China's challenges
26:31

As president Xi Jinping begins his third five-year term, China’s path forward is uncertain. Covid-19 is tearing through the country after it relaxed its strict “zero-covid” policies. China also faces slowing economic growth and rising geopolitical tensions with America. Are China’s days of rapid catch-up growth behind it? And how might the war in Ukraine change China’s calculus on Taiwan? The Economist's China Editor, Roger McShane, senior China correspondent, Alice Su, and senior Asia correspondent, Dominic Ziegler, give their views.


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Jan 02, 2023
The dragon chasing: China and a new nuclear order
26:11
China’s arsenal of nuclear weapons has swiftly expanded; it is now roughly the size of Russia’s and America’s. That will make for a different—and far trickier—landscape of three-way deterrence. We ask what to expect as a mountain of Hollywood’s intellectual property heads for the public domain. And our correspondent checks in on America’s friendliest and most bearded sport. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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Jan 02, 2023
Checks and Balance: Alaska, part two—thin ice
31:50

Alaska has an obvious imperative to develop its oil. But climate change is already underway, and the Arctic is warming at nearly four times the global rate. What does our thirst for oil mean for Alaska’s ice?


In the second episode of a special two-part series, Charlotte Howard reports from Alaska. John Walsh from the University of Alaska, who tracks melting sea ice, shares his findings.  Climate researcher Sue Natali tells us why thawing permafrost is a particular problem.  Alaska’s Governor Mike Dunleavy explains why he sees some silver linings to climate change. And Peter Winsor from the Alaska Wilderness League makes the case against drilling in the Arctic.


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Dec 30, 2022
In passing: the notable lives lost in 2022
34:26

From Pelé, the “king of football”, to Britain’s longest-reigning queen, our editors and correspondents reflected on the accomplishments of many notable figures who died this year. But our obituaries editor shone a light also on the lives and legacies of lesser-known figures.

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Dec 30, 2022
The Economist Asks: Can we learn to disagree better? An episode from our archive
34:15

In a polarised world, the opportunities to disagree are plentiful – and frequently destructive. In one of our favourite episodes of 2022, host Anne McElvoy asks Adam Grant, an organisational psychologist and the author of “Think Again”, why he thinks the key to arguing well is to be open-minded. They discuss whether social media erode reasoned argument, and the new breed of powerful political communicators. Plus, how does the psychology of resilience help those who are “languishing”?


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Dec 29, 2022
Best-of three: our country, books and games of the year
21:02
It is that best-of time of year. We outline the case for our country of the year, after an uncharacteristically easy nomination process. Our correspondents explain their picks for the best books of 2022. And the shortlist of the year’s best games: there are cats, Norse gods and trombones. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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Dec 29, 2022
Money Talks: TikTok’s ticking time bomb—an episode from our archive
38:05

It’s the fastest growing app in the world, filled with dance trends, cats misbehaving, and questionable financial advice. Teenagers love it; Western politicians are less convinced. Could TikTok’s popularity be its downfall?


In one of our favourite episodes of 2022, hosts Mike Bird, Alice Fulwood and Soumaya Keynes investigate just who is afraid of TikTok’s growing influence. First, our media editor Tom Wainwright unpacks the relationship between TikTok, its parent company ByteDance, and its Chinese twin, Douyin. Then, AB Bernstein’s Robin Zhu outlines just how big a threat the app poses to the likes of Facebook, Snapchat, and YouTube. Plus, Federal Communications Commissioner Brendan Carr outlines his concerns about TikTok’s ability to harvest user data. And we ask: how long before this ticking geopolitical time-bomb blows up? 


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Dec 28, 2022
Debasement all around: lessons from 16th-century inflation
28:34
In 2022 global inflation spiked at a rate not seen in decades. A look at the world’s very first such bout reveals eerie echoes of today’s woes—and lessons for tackling them. Our correspondent meets Indonesia’s Baduy people, for whom modernity is encroaching on strict religious and ascetic ways. And our data team finds that favourite dog breeds vary by country. Additional music courtesy of Wim van Zanten. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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Dec 28, 2022
Babbage: The tech behind ChatGPT—an episode from our archive
44:52

ChatGPT is just one example of a new type of artificial intelligence, which could become the next major general-purpose technology. This week, we revisit one of our favourite episodes of 2022, which explains why "foundational AI" promises to be so transformative.


The Economist’s Ludwig Siegele explains why ChatGPT has been taking the world by storm, and why foundation models, or generative AI, could end up having an economic impact similar to that of electricity. Jack Clark of Anthropic AI tells us about the new AI ecosystem that is emerging. Reeps One, a beatboxer, explains how he uses machine learning to compose music. And Kate Crawford, the author of “Atlas of AI”, considers why the technology is proving so controversial. Alok Jha hosts.


Babbage will be published every Wednesday from January 4th 2023.


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Dec 27, 2022
Cattle lines are drawn: cows in India
29:37

Cows are venerated in India, but precisely how intensely often depends on politics. And being venerated does not necessarily yield a pleasant life for the creatures. Economists rarely consider how policies will affect birth rates and the yet-to-be-born; we examine the thorny topic of “population ethics”. And foreign-language phrasebooks may be in decline but they maintain huge historical value.

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Dec 27, 2022
Editor’s Picks: December 26th 2022
42:09

A taste of the special Christmas double issue of The Economist. This week, the economics of thinness, heat and the haj (22:28) and the decline of the city grid (30:58) 

 

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Dec 26, 2022
Land, sea and air: let us move you
28:24

In a special episode, our Paris bureau chief witnesses the political divides that become apparent as she switches from France’s famed high-speed railways to forgotten lines. Our culture editor considers the improbably prophetic nature of the film “Titanic”. And, as the last 747 rolls off the line, our correspondent reflects on how the jet reshaped the airline industry

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Dec 26, 2022
Checks and Balance: Alaska, part one—oil and trouble
25:31

Alaska sits at the heart of two big, tangled global questions: how to slow climate change, and where, or whether, to develop oil. 


Alaska uses the income from oil to fund basic services. But oil production in the state is in long-term decline. Oil companies and their many allies are pushing for a crude revival. Can Alaska reconcile the desire to drill, with the need to limit climate change?


In the first episode of a special two-part series, Charlotte Howard reports from Alaska.  Iñupiat elder Bobby Schaeffer explains how warming temperatures are affecting his community.  Alaska’s Governor Mike Dunleavy pushes for a resurgence in American drilling.  And Kara Moriarty from the Alaska Oil and Gas Association explains why she thinks the state needs to rejuvenate its oil industry.  


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Dec 23, 2022
An oily sheen: Nicolás Maduro in from the cold
31:42
Waves of protest after a stolen election in 2019 came to nothing. Now, thanks to the luck of geopolitics and petro-economics, President Nicolás Maduro is increasingly back in favour. “Peanuts” blazed a trail for comic strips, but beneath the family-friendly messages were a probing examination of the human condition. And a listen to the soundtracks of the franchise’s small-screen adaptations. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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Dec 23, 2022
The Economist Asks: What's the secret of happiness?
24:50

The pursuit of happiness continues to puzzle everyone from philosophers to politicians. But how can science help the search? Host Anne McElvoy asks Tal Ben-Shahar, an expert in positive psychology and the author of “Happier: No Matter What”, how evidence-based research can improve well-being. Plus, what’s the best way to make new year’s resolutions stick? 


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Dec 22, 2022
A figure of speeches: Volodymyr Zelensky in his own words
35:30

At the beginning of the war, editors from The Economist went to Kyiv, the first Western journalists to interview Ukraine’s president. Our Russia editor has now returned, finding a brighter capital—and a wearier leader still capable of flashes of humour. We consider the power the president has wielded through hundreds of speeches, and share his Christmas message to our listeners.

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Dec 22, 2022
Money Talks: Is Christmas becoming more efficient?
39:28

Economists are a gloomy lot, and no less so at Christmas. Whereas most people see gift-giving as a source of joy, economists fret about the potential for misallocated resources. One Scrooge-ish study found that, on average, $100 spent on gifts was worth the same as around $85 of cash spent directly by the recipient. But are there reasons to believe that over time, Christmas is becoming more efficient?


On this week’s podcast, hosts Soumaya Keynes, Mike Bird and Alice Fulwood hear from the father of Scroogenomics, Joel Waldfogel, about why Christmas may be improving for economists—even if it means fewer presents. And they speak to The Economist’s Ore Ogunbiyi about the nightmare after Christmas for retailers.


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Dec 21, 2022
Needs Musk? Tumult at Twitter
25:25

Elon Musk may be stepping down as chief executive, but he has already changed the firm’s fortunes—and shown that social media’s free-speech struggle is far from over. A bit of fried dough in Kenya reveals how cost-of-living concerns in Africa manifest as shrinkflation. And why members of South Korea’s pop behemoth BTS are headed into the armed forces

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Dec 21, 2022
Babbage: Untangling quantum mechanics with Nobel laureate Anton Zeilinger
35:37

In 2022, the Nobel prize for physics was awarded to a trio of scientists for their work on the fundamentals of quantum mechanics. This week, host Alok Jha asks one of the laureates, Anton Zeilinger, how he proved Einstein wrong and how his research into a phenomenon called quantum entanglement can help make sense of the universe. Plus, can “quantum teleportation” usher in a new era of technology? 


Anton Zeilinger is a physicist at the Austrian Academy of Sciences and professor emeritus at the University of Vienna.


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Dec 20, 2022
Trump card marked: the January 6th investigation
29:00

The Congressional committee probing the riot at America’s Capitol recommended that the Justice Department bring four charges against Donald Trump. But the road to indictment and prosecution of the former president is long and winding. The UN’s biodiversity summit ended with a historic but still unsatisfying agreement. And our language columnist presents his choice for word of the year.

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Dec 20, 2022
Drum Tower: Startle the heart
38:17

“Spring Landscape”, a poem written over 1,000 years ago, remains one of China’s most celebrated literary works. Composed by the 8th Century Tang dynasty poet Du Fu, it is still memorised by every schoolchild in the country. Why is the poem still so resonant today? 


The Economist’s Beijing bureau chief, David Rennie, and senior China correspondent, Alice Su, consider whether the ambiguity of classical Chinese makes it ideal for poetry. Our deputy editor Edward Carr explores how close he can get to the poem in translation. Nicolas Chapuis, a former ambassador to China who is translating Du Fu’s complete works into French, examines the meaning of one particular couplet of the poem. And Eileen Chengyin Chow of Duke University takes us outside China’s poetry canon. 


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Dec 19, 2022
The World Ahead 2023: Understand this
23:25

We analyse the new buzzwords and jargon that could be making their way into the collective consciousness over the next 12 months. Host Tom Standage, Lane Greene, The Economist's language columnist, and Aryn Braun, West Coast correspondent, quiz each other on the meaning of deadpool, cool pavement, aridification, TWaT city, Yimby, battery belt, passkeys, horizontal escalation and the doughnut effect.



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Dec 19, 2022
Under the missile flow: North Korea
26:11

The country has been slinging missiles skyward at an alarming pace, and with ever-greater technological advancement. We ask why things are heating up, and how the West might at last cool them down. Reforms to Indonesia’s criminal code that sparked mass protests in 2019 are back; restrictions including an extramarital-sex ban look set to pass. And Wales’s booming leech-and-maggot business

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Dec 19, 2022
Editor’s Picks: December 18th 2022
30:09

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, a looming Russian offensive, why the rich world’s politicians are giving up on growth (10:00) and can the French nuclear industry avoid meltdown? (16:25) 

 

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Dec 18, 2022
Checks and Balance: Broad stripes, bright stars
44:34

Less than a fifth of Americans are satisfied with the way things are going in the country. Poverty rates are rising and life expectancy is falling.  A majority think the economy is getting worse and that the world sees America unfavourably.  But amid the bleak metrics, there have been some bright spots this year: employment remains strong, support for Ukraine has been a notable foreign-policy success and the midterm results laid the groundwork for a stronger democracy.  What in America is working?  And will those things continue into next year?


The American Enterprise Institute’s Kori Schake explains why the Ukraine policy has gone so well.  Political scientist Lee Drutman looks beyond the doom and gloom of the two-party system. And The Economist’s Simon Rabinovitch assesses the implications of a strong jobs market. John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Idrees Kahloon, who round off the year with a festive quiz.


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Dec 16, 2022
More generals, less pacific: Japan’s new defence policy
26:25

A strategy approved today peels back some of the country’s constitutional pacifism; in large part that is because of its tense relationship with a hawkish China. Despite some promising reforms, violence against women remains rampant in India. And our obituaries editor looks back on the life of Britain’s last surviving Dambuster.

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Dec 16, 2022
The Economist Asks: Why is history a family affair?
26:30

Host Anne McElvoy asks the historian and writer Simon Sebag Montefiore why he believes the story of human history has been shaped by the family unit. The author of "The World: A Family History" considers what all dynasties have in common and what the future holds for monarchies in Britain and beyond. Plus, do men and women hold onto power differently?


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Dec 15, 2022
No rest for the weary: meeting Ukraine’s high command
27:53
Our correspondent sits down with President Volodymyr Zelensky and two top military commanders—concluding that the next few months will determine the future of Ukraine. Morocco’s inspired run in the World Cup sparked much debate about its identity as an Arab country. And our co-host investigates the vanishing pleasures of American Jewish delis—over lunch, of course. Help us make the show better: take our listener survey at http://economist.com/intelligencesurvey For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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Dec 15, 2022
Money Talks: The changing ideology of Silicon Valley
40:45

Startup founders in Silicon Valley are often motivated by an almost religious idealism: young tech workers, looking to move fast and break things, want to use technology to make the world a better place. But 2022 has brought about a reckoning: the business models of once-star firms, such as Uber and Meta, are under threat; the allure of the dishevelled whizz-kid has been undermined by the downfall of Sam Bankman-Fried; and the expense of Palo Alto has pushed plucky startups out. The Bay Area has often been populated by liberals, but many of tech’s heroes, like Elon Musk and Marc Andreessen, have shifted to the right. 


On this week’s podcast, hosts Mike Bird, Soumaya Keynes and Alice Fulwood ask whether Silicon Valley has lost its religion. Margaret O’Mara, professor of history at the University of Washington, reveals the Valley’s past. And Adrian Daub, the author of “What Tech Calls Thinking”, tells us that the secret of the successful founder is to bamboozle regulators while they make a bit more money.


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Dec 14, 2022
Precious joules: a fusion-energy result
29:20

Scientists have reported a long-awaited nuclear-fusion breakthrough, using lasers to ignite hydrogen-isotope fuel in a self-sustaining burn. But that marks just one step on a long, uncertain road to clean fusion energy. Same-sex marriage in America is now protected by legislation, in a compromise that could provide a template for future culture-war clashes. And the uncertain future of Darjeeling teas.

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Dec 14, 2022
Babbage: What causes long covid?
38:46

Soon after the pandemic began, another health crisis started to emerge. Long covid now affects millions of people around the world. But finding the causes of the condition—and how to treat it—has been a challenge. Three years after the SARS-CoV-2 virus was first detected, are scientists any closer to understanding long covid?

 

Natasha Loder, The Economist’s health policy editor, explores the latest research into the condition, and catches up with Tom Stayte, a patient we met in 2020. Jason Hosken, our producer, visits Britain’s first long-covid clinic at University College London Hospital. Melissa Heightman, the team’s clinical lead, explains how to treat symptoms. Plus, we ask whether the hunt to solve this medical mystery could have implications for other chronic conditions. Alok Jha hosts.

 

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Dec 13, 2022
Continental drift: Europe’s challenges
27:08

A pair of crises will bedevil Europe, starting with crippling energy prices in the short term. And American protectionism threatens a longer-term dent in the continent’s green-industry ambitions. A visit to Ivory Coast’s cocoa operations reveals why balancing farmers’ welfare and market forces is so tricky. And what Britain’s street names reveal about its history and its ideals.

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Dec 13, 2022
Drum Tower: The red and the green
30:10

China’s energy security concerns are undermining its ambitious climate pledges. We try to understand the contradiction from the perspective of China’s leaders. And, in a country where activism can be dangerous, we find out how environmentalists are working within the system. Is China serious about climate change? 


The Economist’s Beijing bureau chief, David Rennie, and senior China correspondent, Alice Su, talk to Ma Jun from the Institute of Public and Environmental Affairs, an NGO. Our environment editor Catherine Brahic talks to Li Shuo of Greenpeace East Asia.


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Dec 12, 2022
The World Ahead 2023: Fuelling the future
24:18

Europe faces a painful energy crunch this winter, as it tries to make do with less Russian gas. Will this crisis “accelerate the green-energy transition”—and what role can companies and consumers play in reducing consumption? Host Tom Standage asks The Economist's environment editor, Catherine Brahic and global energy and climate innovation editor, Vijay Vaitheeswaran. Also, hydrogen hype is rising again—will this time be different?


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Dec 12, 2022
Zero to sickly? China’s covid climbdown
27:25
With astonishing speed, the machinery of testing, tracing and lockdowns is being dismantled. We examine the risks that will pose to a country that is not prepared for big outbreaks. A winemaker’s lawsuit in Napa Valley reveals why many Californians believe regulators are unfriendly to business. And a clever solution to spare sharks from becoming unwanted “bycatch”. Help us make the show better: take our listener survey at http://economist.com/intelligencesurvey For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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Dec 12, 2022
Editor’s Picks: December 11th 2022
33:35

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Xi Jinping’s zero-covid policy, why trustbusters should let Microsoft buy Activision Blizzard (11:44) and why emigration is in the air for Britons (16:38).


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Dec 11, 2022
Checks and Balance: Justice deserts
42:03

The Supreme Court considered a case this week that could upend the way America conducts elections. Moore v Harper brings to the national stage a once-fringe legal theory that state lawmakers enjoy near-absolute authority over federal elections. What impact could the case have? And, with the final race in the midterms now complete, how healthy does democracy in America look?


The Economist’s Supreme Court correspondent Steve Mazie recaps the arguments before the court. The Economist’s Ann Wroe remembers the time the Supreme Court decided an election. And Harvard’s Nicholas Stephanopoulos assesses the state of America’s democracy.  


John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Idrees Kahloon. 


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Dec 09, 2022
Second time as farce: Peru’s president falls
24:45
Perhaps Pedro Castillo thought he could repeat the coup staged by his predecessor, Alberto Fujimori, in 1992. He did not, and is now behind bars. We ask how his fitful presidency fell apart so suddenly. Our correspondent explains why getting policy right around e-cigarettes is so tricky. And what the funerals of Kenya’s motorbike-taxi drivers reveal about the country. Help us make the show better: take our listener survey at http://economist.com/intelligencesurvey For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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Dec 09, 2022
The Economist Asks: How is Ukraine coping with the trauma of war?
29:19

After her brother died fighting in Luhansk in 2017, the historian and author Olesya Khromeychuk channelled her grief by writing “The Death of a Soldier Told by His Sister”. Host Anne McElvoy asks her how war and resistance has shaped the identity of Ukraine and Ukrainians and what the country could look like once the conflict ends.


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Dec 08, 2022
Like biding a Reich: Germany’s alleged coup plot
25:21

Raids across the country netted 25 far-right extremists suspected of trying to overthrow the government. We look into what is known about a hare-brained plan to dissolve the republic and restore a king. Spates of spontaneous violence in Chicago reveal the unintended consequences of America’s organised-crime crackdown. And why Indonesia’s clerics are taking up environmentalist causes.

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Dec 08, 2022
Money Talks: China reopens
35:59

China’s draconian zero-covid policies have required repeated and lengthy lockdowns, enormous make-shift quarantine facilities, and endless testing for the population. They have also done real damage to its economy. After rare outbreaks of protest against the policy in several cities, the strict rules that have smothered normal life around the country are being relaxed, after almost three years in place.


On this week’s podcast, hosts Mike Bird, Soumaya Keynes and Alice Fulwood ask what this means for the Chinese economy—and the world. One of China’s best-known investors, Fred Hu, tells us the policy has been driving China’s economy “to the ground” and Goldman Sachs’ Andrew Tilton says that restrictions have shaved up to 5% off GDP growth. But what will happen as China opens up?


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Dec 07, 2022
Pastor present: Georgia’s Senate runoff
28:12
Democrats will have a bit more breathing room in the Senate, with an outright majority provided by Reverend Raphael Warnock’s win. We ask what the state-level victory reveals about national politics. Algeria’s leadership has benefited from an oil-and-gas boom; lamentably, its long-suffering citizenry has not. And why an artificial intelligence success at the game Diplomacy is significant. Help us make the show better: take our listener survey at http://economist.com/intelligencesurvey For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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Dec 07, 2022
Babbage: The surprising ineffectiveness of Russia’s cyber-war
36:46

When Russia invaded Ukraine, for the first time ever, two mature cyber-powers began to fight over computer networks in wartime. But while Russia’s cyber-war may have been intense, its impact has been modest. Has the country’s cyber prowess been overrated?

 

The Economist’s Benjamin Sutherland describes the cybercriminals joining the war effort in Ukraine. Paul Chichester, operations director at the UK’s National Cyber Security Centre, analyses why Russia hasn’t had more success in the cyber domain. And Shashank Joshi, our defence editor, finds lessons from Ukraine on cyber warfare more broadly. Alok Jha hosts.

 

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Dec 06, 2022
Suspension of this belief? Iran’s morality police
24:36
The enforcers of the hardliners’ mores may have been disbanded; it is hard to know if the regime is bending to protesters or sowing confusion. Either way the disquiet looks set to continue. We take a look at China’s widely watched nightly news and the narrative it hopes to promulgate. And why women are suddenly flooding into America’s funeral-services industry. Help us make the show better: take our listener survey at http://economist.com/intelligencesurvey For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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Dec 06, 2022
Drum Tower: Zero no more
41:10

The zero-covid policy, a source of pride for Xi Jinping, has sparked protests across China. Public frustration is growing, covid cases are rising, and confusion reigns. How did zero-covid turn into a trap? How can China escape it? 

 

The Economist’s Beijing bureau chief, David Rennie, and senior China correspondent, Alice Su, talk to Ben Cowling, an epidemiologist at Hong Kong University, about the lessons from the omicron wave there.


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Dec 05, 2022
The World Ahead 2023: The coming recession
19:29

What are the prospects for the world economy in 2023? Economies face volatile energy prices and inflation at its highest level in decades. The Economist's economics editor, Henry Curr, and deputy business affairs editor, Rachana Shanbhogue, explain the dilemma facing central bankers around the world. Also, what are the global effects of a strong dollar and high American interest rates?


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Dec 05, 2022
The for-sixty-dollar question: a cap on Russian oil
22:44

Shippers and insurers of Russian crude are now subject to a $60-per-barrel price cap. That may spark Russian production cuts—or an oil-market realignment that undercuts the cap. Senegal might be out of the World Cup, but a visit to its football-academy machinery reveals why it will continue to create star players. And why it’s harder to get deodorant in Manhattan.

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Dec 05, 2022
Editor’s Picks: December 4th 2022
25:12

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Xi Jinping’s zero-covid policy, why trustbusters should let Microsoft buy Activision Blizzard (11:44) and why emigration is in the air for Britons (16:38).


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Dec 04, 2022
Checks and Balance: Sitting ducks
39:37

Politicians have returned to Washington following the Thanksgiving break, for what Democrats hope will be a legislative flurry. Once Republicans take over the House in January, passing bills will get a lot harder. What can, and should, the lame-duck session of the 117th Congress accomplish?  

 

Senator Angus King tells us why reforming a law from 1887 is at the top of his to-do list. We go back to a particularly productive lame-duck session. And The Economist’s James Bennet makes the case that Congress should act to protect those who grew up undocumented in America.


John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Idrees Kahloon. 


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Dec 02, 2022
In sofa as I can recall: troubles for Cyril Ramaphosa
27:23

South Africa’s leader says a pile of cash stashed in a sofa represents no wrongdoing. The outcome of an investigation could be the undoing of his presidency and his party. We examine Britain’s hydrogen-economy plans as representing the tradeoffs that many countries will face. And remembering Jay Pasachoff, the world’s foremost expert on and exponent of eclipses.

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Dec 02, 2022
The Economist Asks: Will Germany succeed in transforming its foreign policy?
22:37

Days after Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, Olaf Scholz, the German chancellor, announced a radical shift in the country’s foreign and security policy. Host Anne McElvoy asks Christoph Heusgen, a former advisor to Angela Merkel, whether the Zeitenwende (“turning point”) will be delivered or derailed. The veteran diplomat, who now chairs the Munich Security Conference, also assesses Germany’s China policy and how to mend fences with European allies.


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Dec 01, 2022
Square dealing: Jiang Zemin dies
25:37

The Chinese leader who took over a squabbling party following the Tiananmen Square massacre surprised the world by stifling dissent, overseeing a staggering economic awakening—and occasionally breaking into song. We examine the lessons to be drawn from his legacy. After scores of failures, a new Alzheimer’s treatment shows real promise. And our annual ranking of the world’s most expensive cities.

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Dec 01, 2022
Money Talks: The new rules of investment
39:03

High inflation, amid warnings of a global recession, is forcing investors to tear up the rule book. Since the financial crisis, bonds have been seen as a safe bet—even if they did not promise much of a return. Equity markets, led by soaring tech stocks, were where fortunes were made. Both have plunged this year. 


In a world where rising interest rates have left governments worrying about how to afford their debts, and companies will struggle to raise cash, investors need new strategies.


On this week’s podcast, hosts Alice Fulwood, Soumaya Keynes and Mike Bird ask what those new rules of investing look like. Wei Li, global chief investment strategist for the world’s biggest investor, BlackRock, argues this new macroeconomic era is here to stay. And Mohamed El-Erian, chief economic adviser to Allianz, says investors need to focus on picking winners within stocks and bonds.


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Nov 30, 2022
On the Horn’s dilemma: meeting Somalia’s president
28:10

The Horn of Africa’s resurgent jihadists of al-Shabab pose the biggest problem to Hassan Sheikh Mohamud. He tells us his plans—political, economic and principally ideological—to calm tensions. Western pilots have been training their Chinese counterparts, to widespread consternation. And looking back on the best footballers never to have appeared in a World Cup.

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Nov 30, 2022
Babbage: How to cure type-1 diabetes
41:39

A new drug for type-1 diabetes has been licensed in America. Teplizumab is the first treatment for the condition since insulin began being used a century ago. It targets one of the root causes of this type of diabetes and can slow the onset of the disease. Better still, the drug could be the herald of a new era in treating the condition.


Colin Dayan, a professor of clinical diabetes and metabolism at Cardiff University, tells “Babbage” producer Jason Hosken why immunotherapy could be a game-changing innovation for diabetes. Beth Baldwin and Harj Singh share personal stories of how the condition has affected their families. And Sanjoy Dutta, chief scientific officer of diabetes research charity JDRF, explains the potential pathways to finding a cure. Alok Jha hosts.


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Nov 29, 2022
The French connection: Macron’s state visit to America
23:47

Behind the pageantry, Presidents Joe Biden and Emmanuel Macron will have much to chew over, from a unified response in Ukraine to tricky trade negotiations. Our modelling suggests that Russia’s weaponisation of energy might ultimately kill more people than its efforts on the battlefield will. And a Ghanaian brewer’s struggles reveal the difficulty of business-building in sub-Saharan Africa.

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Nov 29, 2022
Drum Tower: Control pique
37:33

Protests in cities across China show there is real anger over the zero-covid policy and the party's intrusion into every corner of people's lives. A neighbourhood surveillance system is mobilising people to police one another. Could public unrest threaten Xi Jinping’s plans for total control?


The Economist’s Beijing bureau chief, David Rennie, and senior China correspondent, Alice Su, hear from somebody who has lived through street-level surveillance in China's most tightly policed region of Xinjiang. 


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Nov 28, 2022
The World Ahead 2023: Conflicting possibilities
21:57

How will the war in Ukraine play out in 2023? The Economist’s foreign and defence editors discuss the possible scenarios for the conflict with Russia. The best one for Ukraine is also the most dangerous. Tom Standage hosts


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Nov 28, 2022
Patience zero: China’s remarkable unrest
25:24

Protests have become as bold as they are widespread—mostly against the country’s unsustainable zero-covid policies, but increasingly against the ruling regime itself. California’s wildfires have been growing more intense, and a new analysis shows just how much those blazes undo the good work of the state’s green policies. And a look at the evolution of the Great British Lad.

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Nov 28, 2022
Editor’s Picks: November 27th 2022
25:06

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Europe’s crisis of energy and geopolitics, how crypto goes to zero (10:19) and the consequences of America’s success against organised crime (16:32) 

 

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Nov 27, 2022
Checks and Balance: From our archive—beef encounter
40:12

At Thanksgiving Americans express gratitude for family, the harvest… and a big, juicy turkey.  Americans consume the most meat per person, but that's not good for the planet. In an episode first released in November 2021, we ask: could they cut back?

 

The Economist’s Jon Fasman and his sons prepare the Thanksgiving turkey. We go back to a nationwide contest to find the perfect chicken. And Caroline Bushnell from The Good Food Institute discusses how to wean Americans off meat.  

 

John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard.


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Nov 25, 2022
Forgoing a song: protest inside and beyond Iran
28:30

Players’ refusal to sing their national anthem at the World Cup has brought their country’s protests onto the global stage. We ask whether the discontent back home threatens the regime. A sober look at global economic data reveals a probable global recession—one that may not even tame raging inflation. And remembering Hebe de Bonafini, Argentina’s icon of resistance.

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Nov 25, 2022
The Economist Asks: How could Ukraine win the war?
28:53

Ben Hodges, a former commanding general of US Army Europe, believes that Ukraine has achieved “an irreversible momentum” since the liberation of Kherson. He predicts the country could declare victory against Russia by the summer. Host Anne McElvoy asks him how Ukraine could pull it off. He assesses whether Western countries will hold their nerve as the conflict drags on and what could happen if Vladimir Putin loses on the battlefield.


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Nov 24, 2022
Scar from the madding crowd: Korea probes a tragedy
26:18

Grief about the deaths of more than 150 people in a crush has turned to anger, and the investigation into what actions were taken—or not taken—has turned political. Our correspondent looks into the vast effort to remake the car industry as automobiles turn into software platforms on wheels. And how Britain’s twee National Trust has waded into the culture wars. 

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Nov 24, 2022
Money Talks: Why it’s time to talk about Indonesia
38:36

Indonesia is the world’s third-largest producer of coal. Not only does it power the country, it powers the economy. But the country’s president, Joko Widodo, wants to change that. Indonesia is garnering global attention due to its stock of nickel and cobalt, core elements in the batteries needed for the booming electric vehicle industry. Can the government swap the fossil-fuel-powered economy to one that runs on batteries instead?


On this week’s podcast, hosts Soumaya Keynes, Mike Bird and Alice Fulwood ask whether Indonesia can really go green. Zanny Minton Beddoes, The Economist’s editor-in-chief, sits down with Joko Widodo to find out if he is the man to wean the country off coal. Finance minister Sri Mulyani Indrawati and education minister Nadiem Makarim tell us how to train a generation of battery-makers. And Patrick Foulis, our business-affairs editor, warns of a red flag.


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Nov 23, 2022
A whole other kettle of fission: Ukraine’s imperilled nuclear plant
23:53

The power station in Zaporizhia has served as an impromptu military base for Russian forces—but danger is mounting and there are signs that troops may soon give it up. The sportswear-industry boom that has much of the world wearing high-performance kit may soon come to an end. And why teenage angst is such a good fit for horror films. 

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Nov 23, 2022
Babbage at COP27: Part four—“Africa’s COP” concludes
37:52

COP27 was an arduous summit, with mixed results. A landmark agreement to create a new “loss and damage” fund was a historic achievement. But many delegates were disappointed by the lack of progress on decarbonising energy systems. In the final episode of our series, we explore what the final deal means for the future of climate action. Plus, we examine AFR100, a project that aims to pair climate action with economic growth in Africa.


The Economist’s Rachel Dobbs reports on the gruelling final hours of negotiations at COP27. Ani Dasgupta of the World Resources Institute explains how the AFR100 project combines agriculture, technology and clever financing to capture carbon in Africa. And Mamadou Diakhite of the African Union Development Agency describes the impact the initiative is having on communities.


Alok Jha hosts with Catherine Brahic, The Economist’s environment editor, and Vijay Vaitheeswaran, our global energy and climate innovation editor.


Listen to our mini-series at economist.com/COP27pod and follow all of The Economist’s climate coverage at economist.com/climate-change.


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Nov 22, 2022
Ploy story: a defenestration at Disney
22:41

Executives have squeezed out Bob Chapek and re-anointed Bob Iger as boss. But the firm’s woes are less about leadership and more about the new economics of Hollywood. We ask why Zimbabwe’s teen mothers find it so hard to stay in school, and what can be done about it. And pigs prove their intelligence, again, by making up after confrontations.

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Runtime: 22 min





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Nov 22, 2022
Drum Tower: Better than a punch in the face
36:10

Xi Jinping and Joe Biden met face-to-face for their first time as national leaders. Both men spoke about feeling the eyes of the world on them. What does the world need from this relationship


The Economist’s Beijing bureau chief, David Rennie, and senior China correspondent, Alice Su, talk to Wang Yong of Peking University and Daniel Russell, a former adviser to President Obama who has been in the room with Mr Xi and Mr Biden. The Economist’s Banyan columnist Dominic Zeigler analyses how their relationship impacts South-East Asia.


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Nov 21, 2022
Damage collateral: a tide turns at COP27
28:13

An issue ignored for three decades came to dominate the summit’s agenda: reparations to poor countries for climate-driven “loss and damage”. Alas, halting those coming losses did not feature much. Our correspondent speaks with a Ukrainian fighter pilot about defending the country’s airspace using mostly Soviet-era kit. And why some words sound the same across many languages.

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Nov 21, 2022
Editor’s Picks: November 20th 2022
26:38

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, is this the end of crypto? Also, why Indonesia matters (11:00) and Glenn Youngkin’s unique approach to Trumpism (19:40)

 

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Nov 20, 2022
Checks and Balance: Trump's back
42:01

As Donald Trump launches a third White House run, we report on the view from Mar-a-Lago and the rise of Ron DeSantis. Are attempted presidential comebacks ever a good idea? And how will a fractured Republican Party navigate the long road to 2024?


The Economist’s Alexandra Suich Bass dissects Mr Trump’s announcement speech. We revisit Herbert Hoover’s hopes for a return to Pennsylvania Avenue. And Russell Vought of the Center for Renewing America explains why he’s backing Mr Trump. 

 

John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Idrees Kahloon. 


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Nov 18, 2022
In come taxes: Britain’s austere economic plan
22:12
The “Autumn statement” was filled with belt-tightening, from stealthy tax rises to public-service cuts. But perhaps the bitterest part of the pill has been left for the next government to swallow. As the World Cup begins in Qatar, controversies over preparedness and human rights threaten to overshadow what happens on the pitch. And New York City declares war on rats. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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Nov 18, 2022
The Economist Asks: Will the clean-energy transition be fast enough?
26:58

As the end of COP27 nears, US energy secretary Jennifer Granholm talks to Anne McElvoy from the climate summit in Egypt. They discuss the impact the global energy crisis is having on Joe Biden’s green agenda, whether the hype around hydrogen will endure and if the president is willing to put aside a tussle with China for the sake of climate cooperation. Plus, Vijay Vaitheesawaran, The Economist’s global energy and climate innovation editor, measures the ambitions declared at COP27 against what is achievable.


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Nov 17, 2022
Musketeers heading for the exits: chaos at Twitter
25:48

Elon Musk gave Twitter’s remaining staff an ultimatum: commit to “working long hours at high intensity” for “hardcore” Twitter, or leave. We evaluate his reign so far. Under President Daniel Ortega, Nicaragua has become a one-party state. And remembering the long life of Anne Frank’s best friend. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer





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Nov 17, 2022
Money Talks: The cryptocalypse
44:01

Until last week, Sam Bankman-Fried - or SBF as he’s become known - was crypto’s poster-child. He was a regular in Washington, DC where he schmoozed journalists, regulators and lawmakers alike. He funded political campaigns and sponsored sports teams ranging from basketball to Formula One. For many, the floppy-haired, 30-year-old once-billionaire wasn’t just the face of his crypto trading firm FTX, he was the face of crypto. But last week, SBJ’s business, which was valued at $32bn at the start of the year, collapsed into bankruptcy and now he is being investigated by regulators and law-enforcement agencies.


On this week’s “Money Talks’, hosts Alice Fulwood and Soumaya Keynes ask whether the crypto phenomenon can survive the loss of a figurehead. They speak with Alesia Haas, the CFO of the second-largest exchange Coinbase. And hear from some of the recipients of SBF’s contributions to the effective altruism movement about what’s next.


Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks 

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Nov 16, 2022
Strike price: missiles fall in Poland
24:15
How did apparently Russian-made munitions kill two people on NATO soil? An accident in the fog of war seems likely, but listen closely: the immediate international response has been telling. Donald Trump has announced he will run for the American presidency again; we ask about his chances and his motivations. And we take you inside India’s tangled hair industry. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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Nov 16, 2022
Babbage at COP27: Part three—the energy crisis
40:40

COP27 takes place amid war in Ukraine and an energy crisis. In the third episode of our series covering the summit, we explore how energy-security concerns are affecting efforts to decarbonise.


Niklas Höhne of the NewClimate Institute says the energy crisis could deepen Europe’s dependence on fossil fuels. But Francesco La Camera, who leads the International Renewable Energy Agency, sees it as an opportunity to accelerate the green agenda. Plus, award-winning author Daniel Yergin explains the implications for Russia, and Jason Bordoff of Columbia University assesses the geopolitics of the transition to clean energy.


Alok Jha hosts with Catherine Brahic, The Economist’s environment editor, and Vijay Vaitheeswaran, our global energy and climate innovation editor.


Listen to our mini-series at economist.com/COP27pod and follow all of The Economist’s climate coverage at economist.com/climate-change.


For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions, subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.



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Nov 15, 2022
Get the Bali rolling: the G20 meet begins
22:45
The G20 Summit gets under way in Bali today at a time of tensions over Ukraine and Taiwan, and worries about high food and energy prices. We look at what progress, if any, is likely to result from the high-level meeting. An unusually warm autumn has kept gas prices low in Europe. And what a Nobel-prize winner’s work suggests about Neanderthal family life. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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Nov 15, 2022
Drum Tower: Back to the future
32:17

As China re-shapes the existing world order, its officials argue that the values behind it are Western and not universal. Western leaders worry that China is merely trying to make the world safe for dictatorships. Do universal values exist?


The Economist’s Beijing bureau chief, David Rennie, and senior China correspondent, Alice Su, talk to Zhou Bo, a former senior Chinese army colonel, and to Zha Jianying, a Chinese writer in New York. 


Sign up to our weekly newsletter here and for full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/drumoffer.



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Nov 14, 2022
Bolt from the blue: Democrats hold the Senate
28:34
America’s upper legislative chamber remains in Democrats’ hands; they may even expand their majority. We explain what that means for the Biden administration, and why Democrats outperformed expectations. President Biden’s biggest foreign-policy headaches involve China; we ask what to expect from his first in-person meeting with President Xi Jinping. And we introduce our new China-focused podcast, “Drum Tower.” For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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Nov 14, 2022
Editor’s Picks: November 13th 2022
24:37

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the Trump effect, (10:30) imagining peace in Ukraine and (18:00) should fans watch the World Cup in Qatar?

 

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Nov 13, 2022
Checks and Balance: Red faces
45:00

Republicans should have done better. With high inflation and an unpopular president, the stage was set for them to easily take back both chambers of Congress. Instead they look on track to barely capture the House, and the Senate is most likely to stay blue. It was a bad result for Donald Trump, whose handpicked election-denying candidates underperformed horribly. What do the midterm election results mean for America


The Economist’s Elliott Morris assesses how our election model did. We check in, one last time, on the races in Pennsylvania. And The Economist’s James Bennet explains why he thinks Joe Biden shouldn’t seek another term.


John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Idrees Kahloon.


You can now find every episode of Checks and Balance in one place and sign up to our weekly newsletter. For full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod.



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Nov 11, 2022
Tales from the crypto: An exchange implodes
28:46
At the start of this week, FTX was the world’s third-largest crypto exchange. After rumours of illiquidity swirled, customers pulled $6bn in assets. It now reportedly faces an $8bn shortfall, and the contagion is spreading. The Sama-Bajau have fished the same waters for centuries, but are citizens of nowhere, which makes their hard lives harder. And what Rishi Sunak can learn from his fictional predecessors. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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Nov 11, 2022
The Economist Asks: What does Binyamin Netanyahu’s comeback mean for Israel and the world?
25:00

Binyamin Netanyahu is set to return to power in Israel, after winning a majority in last week’s general election. His coalition is likely to include Religious Zionism, a far-right bloc. Host Anne McElvoy asks Anshel Pfeffer, The Economist’s Israel correspondent and a biographer of Mr Netanyahu, what the partnership could mean for Israel’s democracy. And David Makovsky of the Washington Institute assesses how the change in government could affect Israel’s alliance with America and burgeoning relationships in the Middle East.


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Nov 10, 2022
Beaten, a retreat: cautious hope in Kherson
25:17

Russia says it will withdraw from the only captured Ukrainian provincial capital. We ask how the drawdown might go and what it means for the wider war. Britain is set for the largest wave of industrial action in decades; the strikes could throw the country into chaos. And the long life of Shyam Saran Negi, India’s first-ever voter.

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Nov 10, 2022
Money Talks: Is pay transparency good?
34:15

On November 1st, New York City’s workers woke up to a new reality: every job listing for work that could be done in one of the five boroughs now had a stated salary band. Gossips rejoiced. But who does the law really benefit?


On this week’s podcast, hosts Soumaya Keynes, Mike Bird and Alice Fulwood look at the pros and cons of pay transparency. First, they hear from Harvard Business School’s Zoe Cullen who says wages fell by 2% on average when firms opened up about pay. Then, they speak to Joel Gascoigne, the founder of online marketing firm Buffer, who went further than companies in New York and published each of his employees’ salaries, by name, on the company’s website (it lists his salary as $298,958). And then they go to Norway, where incomes have always been publicly available - and hear about the unexpected consequences on happiness when you can easily see what your friends, neighbours and enemies earn. 


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Nov 09, 2022
Red ripple: America’s midterm elections
26:19
America’s midterm elections have finished. While the full results may not be known for some time, Democrats appear to have outperformed expectations: Republicans will probably narrowly win the House, while the Senate remains too close to call. Argentina’s slum policy is a rare bright spot in the country’s politics. And why the war in Ukraine may put paid to ground-attack aircraft. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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Nov 09, 2022
Babbage at COP27: Part two—adapting to a changing climate
39:16

COP27 has kicked off in Egypt, and adaptation is high on the agenda. In the second episode of our series covering the conference, we explore how to step up global efforts to adapt to a changing climate.


Edward McBride, The Economist’s briefings editor, travels to Iraq to investigate how a hotter world is affecting the way people live. Adeline Stuart-Watt, an adaptation policy fellow at the London School of Economics and Political Science, explains how to implement and finance climate-resilient projects.


Alok Jha hosts with Catherine Brahic, The Economist’s environment editor, and Vijay Vaitheeswaran, our global energy and climate innovation editor.


Listen to our mini-series at economist.com/COP27pod and follow all of The Economist’s climate coverage at economist.com/climate-change.


For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions, subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.



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Nov 08, 2022
Who counts wins: Election-administration fears
28:31
In the final episode of our midterms series, we examine how the Republican party’s anti-democratic turn is putting pressure on election administrators. When he briefly reneged on a deal to allow Ukrainian grain exports, Vladimir Putin held the world’s grain supply hostage  – a tactic beloved of strongmen the world over. And HBO turns 50 this year: we assess its legacy. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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Nov 08, 2022
Introducing Drum Tower
2:18

Two of The Economist's China correspondents, Alice Su and David Rennie, analyse the stories at the heart of this vast country and examine its influence beyond its borders.


They’ll be joined by our global network of correspondents and expert guests to examine how everything from party politics to business, technology and culture is reshaping China and the world.


For almost seven centuries the beats of China’s most famous drum tower, or gulou, kept people in Beijing to time. The Economist’s latest podcast keeps you up to date every Monday.


Sign up to our weekly newsletter here and for full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/drumoffer.



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Nov 07, 2022
Degrees of risk: COP27 and the 1.5C myth
26:19
As the UN’s annual climate jamboree begins, our correspondent calls for a strong dose of realism: limiting warming to 1.5C is just no longer feasible. On average the rule of law is losing ground globally, yet one place it appears to be strengthening is on Russia’s doorstep. And a look at the sports teams everyone loves to hate. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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Nov 07, 2022
Editor’s Picks: November 6th 2022
22:53

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, climate policy is off target, (10:40) Qatar’s World Cup isn’t quite over the goal line and (18:35) why do people who worry about exams do worse

 

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Nov 06, 2022
Red fights and blue: America’s midterm elections
1:30:02

America’s midterm elections, which will determine control of both chambers of Congress, end on Tuesday. For the past three months our correspondents have been travelling across the country, reporting on the trends and concerns shaping the race. This compilation episode highlights the best of their work. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer






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Nov 05, 2022
Checks and Balance: End of midterm
43:02

The big guns are out.  Donald Trump has three rallies planned before election day.  Barack Obama has popped up in several battleground states. The former presidents will, separately, converge on Pennsylvania at the weekend, where Obama will be joined by a lesser-spotted figure on the trail: President Biden. What’s at stake in these midterm elections?


The Economist’s Elliott Morris assesses what pundits have got wrong about the campaign.  We consider why Democratic warnings about the future of democracy aren’t cutting through.  And the Republican Governor of Virginia Glenn Youngkin summarises his party’s closing arguments.  


John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Idrees Kahloon. 


On Thursday November 10th subscribers can join the Checks and Balance team for a live Q&A discussion about the midterm results. Sign up now at economist.com/checksevent.  


You can now find every episode of Checks and Balance in one place and sign up to our weekly newsletter. For full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod.



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Nov 04, 2022
Peace meal: Ethiopia’s civil war
25:26

A surprise peace agreement should permit desperately needed humanitarian relief for millions in the region of Tigray—but there are reasons to doubt the grinding conflict is at an end. Britain has a problem that other rich countries do not: its over-50s are flooding out of the labour market. And our correspondent attends an unexpectedly tame “crypto rave”.

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Nov 04, 2022
The Economist Asks: Can New York solve its housing crisis?
21:52

Eric Adams, the mayor of New York, grew up on the verge of homelessness. Now he’s in charge of fixing the city’s housing crisis. Host Anne McElvoy asks him how he plans to do it. They discuss how an influx of 20,000 migrants, many from the southern border, adds to the problem. Mr Adams, a former police captain, defends his record tackling violence and relays his concerns about the Democrats’ pitch ahead of the midterms.


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Nov 03, 2022
The elephant in the chamber? America’s midterms
29:55

Our election model suggests that at least one legislative chamber will revert to Republican control; we ask what sort of government would result. The breach of the Nord Stream pipelines is a reminder of how much infrastructure is at risk of subsea sabotage. And what the trendy term “ikigai” actually means in Japan, its ostensible country of origin.

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Nov 03, 2022
Money Talks: The tech reckoning
35:28

Most of America’s biggest technology firms are having a bad time - and not just the ones who have been recently acquired by a mercurial billionaire. More than $1tn has been wiped from their market value in recent weeks. Is the sell-off just investor jitters? Or is it a symptom of something more fundamental about the future of the sector? 


On this week’s podcast, hosts Soumaya Keynes, Mike Bird and Alice Fulwood are joined by our technology editor Tom Wainwright and global business correspondent Thomas Lee-Devlin to diagnose the common problem facing the movers (like Uber), the streamers (like Netflix) and the creepers (like Facebook owner, Meta). And we ask what they can learn from China, where tech behemoth Alibaba has seen its share price plunge by 77% from a 2020 peak. Plus, we ask if this is a turning point - what does that mean for the future of the formerly most profitable sector in America?


Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks 

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Nov 02, 2022
The curious case of Binyamin’s butt-in: Israel’s election
27:32

After a 16-month absence from leadership, Binyamin Netanyahu is back at the centre of the country’s messy politics. We ask how his divisive ways will play out this time. Apple is slowly weaning itself off China as a place both to make and to sell its gizmos. And how the “palaeo” diet bears little resemblance to the real thing.

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Nov 02, 2022
Babbage at COP27: Part one—the new climate realism
39:13

This week, the COP27 climate summit will begin in Egypt. In the first of four episodes, we consider the themes set to dominate the conference. After a year lacking in climate action, do lofty targets need a dose of realism? Plus, “loss and damage” financing is expected to be high on the agenda at the summit. We explore its patchy history, and explain why we think rich countries are unlikely to pay compensation to vulnerable ones for historic emissions.


Gavin Jackson, The Economist’s economics and finance correspondent, scrutinises debates on climate reparations. Fredi Otto, a climate scientist at Imperial College London, explains how carbon emissions can be attributed to climate disasters.


Alok Jha hosts with Catherine Brahic, The Economist’s environment editor, and Vijay Vaitheeswaran, our global energy and climate innovation editor.


Follow all of The Economist’s climate coverage at economist.com/climate-change.


For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions, subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.



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Nov 01, 2022
Falling tsar? Russians eye life after Putin
23:17

As President Vladimir Putin’s war in Ukraine continues to falter, Russian elites are now daring to consider the once unthinkable: a life after his leadership. Haiti is in grave disarray, but calling in foreign help to sort things out is proving tricky. And the diamond in Britain’s crown jewels that India wants back.

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Nov 01, 2022
The Prince bonus 2: The 20th party congress
29:51

Host Sue-Lin Wong dissects the unexpected and the foreseen from the Chinese Communist Party’s five-yearly meeting, with The Economist’s Beijing bureau chief David Rennie, who was there. How did Xi Jinping use the event to tighten his grip on power? 


Listen to The Economist’s new weekly China podcast Drum Tower here


Subscribe to The Economist with the best offer at economist.com/chinapod.



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Oct 31, 2022
Once and future: Brazil’s Lula wins again
26:00
Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, a leftist former president, has won again. Even if President Jair Bolsonaro gracefully concedes, his followers and fellow party members will make Lula’s hard job harder. We ask why California’s green-tinged Democratic governor is against a progressive ballot initiative on electric vehicles. And our say on the bread of the day of the dead. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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Oct 31, 2022
Editor’s Picks: October 31st 2022
25:47

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Rishi Sunak’s promise of stability is a low bar for Britain, (10:35) the risks of Bidenomics and (18:20) will Iran’s women win?

 

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Oct 31, 2022
Checks and Balance: Donkey years
41:13

For two years Democrats have held the Holy Grail – control of the presidency and both chambers of Congress. The midterms will, most likely, put an end to that. Divided government is going to make Joe Biden’s agenda much harder to pass: what will the legacy of his first two years in power be?  


The Economist’s Henry Curr takes us through “Bidenomics”. We go back to the last time Democrats had a government trifecta. And The Economist’s Stevie Hertz speaks to voters who have been helped by the Biden administration, but may not realise it. 


Charlotte Howard hosts with Idrees Kahloon and Jon Fasman.


You can now find every episode of Checks and Balance in one place and sign up to our weekly newsletter. For full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod





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Oct 28, 2022
Elon-gate: the Musk-Twitter story
26:01
After months of wrangling, Elon Musk completed his deal to buy Twitter, and immediately sacked several top executives. We ask what’s next for the platform and its users. Organised crime is damaging South Africa’s economy. And our obituaries editor looks back at one of the 20th century’s most daring heists. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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Oct 28, 2022
The Economist Asks: How will Rishi Sunak lead Britain?
32:56

On Tuesday, Rishi Sunak became Britain’s new prime minister–its third in two months. Host Anne McElvoy speaks to Matthew Holehouse, The Economist’s British political correspondent, about the new leader’s first few days in office and the shape his premiership could take. Mr Sunak inherits a fractured Conservative Party that’s taken a pummelling in the polls. Anne asks Matt Goodwin, a pollster and professor of politics at the University of Kent, if the Tories can restore their image in time for the next general election.


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Oct 27, 2022
Power play: electricity in Ukraine
28:03

Russia has been targeting Ukraine’s energy infrastructure with missiles and drones. Ukraine’s air defences are struggling to keep up, and many households are without power as winter approaches. Bill Gates has a plan to boost African crop yields. And as the BBC turns 100, we reflect on its legacy, and look at challenges ahead. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer






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Oct 27, 2022
Money Talks: Wall Street's top cop
37:00

Gary Gensler has spent just a little over a year and a half as the head of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), America’s top markets regulator. In that time, he’s proposed 40 separate filings for rules, given 60 speeches, and intervened, in sometimes controversial ways, in everything from crypto to SPACs to environmental regulations. In other words: he is getting a lot done and making a lot of people angry. 


On this week’s episode, hosts Alice Fulwood, Mike Bird and Soumaya Keynes sit down with Mr Gensler to try and figure out what he wants to accomplish and how he plans on getting it all done. They discuss everything from the functioning of the Treasury market, to efforts to prioritise retail investors in the wake of the meme-stock craze, to why he thought it was important that the SEC fine the reality television star Kim Kardashian.


Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks 

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Oct 26, 2022
Tough Roe to go: abortion and the midterms
29:08
When America’s Supreme Court overturned Roe v Wade, the conventional wisdom was that it would help Democrats by galvanising them for the midterm elections. Two weeks away from Election Day, the picture isn’t quite so clear. We meet Russia’s ruthless new battlefield commander. And what scientists can learn from training nerve cells to play Pong. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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Oct 26, 2022
Babbage: How to use the pandemic to tackle TB
38:31

The pandemic shattered global efforts to control tuberculosis, which was the most lethal infectious disease in the world until covid-19 took its crown. Now, with deaths rising, TB is set to reclaim that dubious honour. But the covid era also holds important lessons for the fight against TB. Can innovations such as genomic sequencing facilities and new vaccine technologies be applied to TB care, too?


Avantika Chilkoti, The Economist’s international correspondent, travels to Rio de Janeiro in Brazil to find out why TB is a disease of the poor. Mel Spigelman of the TB Alliance and Lucica Ditiu of the Stop TB Partnership say tackling the disease is a question of political will. Josefina Campos of ANLIS in Argentina explains how genomic sequencing helps monitor TB drug resistance. Author Vidya Krishnan talks about TB’s influence on art and culture. Plus, we examine why doctors are worried about the prospect of a new, highly contagious form of TB that doesn’t respond to existing drugs. Alok Jha hosts.


For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.



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Oct 25, 2022
Third time’s the charm? Britain’s new prime minister
23:09
Rishi Sunak becomes Britain’s prime minister today, making him the third in the past seven weeks. Our correspondent explains who he is, and analyses his road ahead. In Mexico there are growing concerns over the army’s increasing wealth and power. And why “The Stepford Wives,” a novel published 50 years ago, remains relevant and influential today.

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Oct 25, 2022
Number three for Xi: power in China
28:23
Xi Jinping won a third term as general secretary of the Chinese Communist Party. Our correspondent explains how the recent party congress solidified Xi’s grip on power. With record numbers of people showing up, America’s southern border is a political and actual problem for the Biden administration. And why FIFA and EA Sports have parted ways after 30 years.

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Oct 24, 2022
Editor’s Picks: October 24th 2022
24:30

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the coming house-price slump, why Xi Jinping has no interest in succession planning (10:10) and how to make better use of antidepressants (19:29).

 

Please subscribe to The Economist for full access to print, digital and audio editions: www.economist.com/podcastoffer.



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Oct 23, 2022
Checks and Balance: Bordering on chaos
43:30

So far this year officials at the southern border have encountered over two million people trying to enter America. The actual number crossing is likely to be much higher. Two thousand miles north, New York’s mayor has declared a state of emergency. 20,000 migrants have arrived in the city, bused there by politicians further south. Is there a solution to this intractable problem? And will immigration lose Democrats votes in the midterms?


The Economist’s Alexandra Suich Bass assesses the problems at the border.  We go back to a surprisingly pro-immigration president. And The Economist’s Jon Fasman speaks to asylum-seekers in New York.


John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Idrees Kahloon.


On Thursday October 27th subscribers can join the Checks and Balance team for a live Q&A discussion about the midterms. We’ll be exploring the most heated races, considering what their outcomes might mean for America and answering your questions. Sign up now at economist.com/checkswebinar.  


You can now find every episode of Checks and Balance in one place and sign up to our weekly newsletter. For full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod.



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Oct 21, 2022
No wilt to go on: let us bid Truss goodbye
27:23

The Economist’s comparison of Liz Truss’s staying power to that of a lettuce captured global imaginations. Will the next prime minister have a longer shelf-life? We ask why it has proven so tricky to get the Middle East’s considerable natural-gas resources to market. And the murder of Yurii Kerpatenko, a conductor from Kherson who refused to bow to Russian orders.

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Oct 21, 2022
The Economist Asks: How can America’s voting system be made more fair?
28:32

The Supreme Court could be on the verge of gutting the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Eric Holder, a former attorney-general, was in office the first time the court hollowed out the VRA. Host Anne McElvoy asks him what’s at stake as the midterm elections approach. Mr Holder, who now leads the National Democratic Redistricting Committee, explains why he believes American democracy is in decline. And, they explore whether a bipartisan effort is likely to bear fruit.


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Oct 20, 2022
Redrawing the lines: cocaine policy in Latin America
27:48
Regional leaders recognise the abject failure of the war on drugs. We speak with Colombia’s president about some bold new ideas to tackle the problem. Meta, the company formerly known as Facebook, is a big gamble on the metaverse—but the real risk is that the company still known as Facebook is waning. And a zippy ride through England’s electric-scooter trial. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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Oct 20, 2022
Money Talks: How to rebuild Ukraine
39:29

Ukraine’s economy is both hurting and defying expectations. The International Monetary Fund (IMF) estimates that GDP will shrink by 35% this year and inflation is running at 24%. Yet slowly and grimly the country’s economy has adapted to war—and seems to be growing again. What can and should the long march back to normalcy look like?


On this week’s podcast, hosts Mike Bird, Soumaya Keynes and Alice Fulwood are joined by our European economics editor Christian Odendahl and our Europe correspondent Matt Steinglass, who is in Ukraine, to discuss the country’s economic future. They hear from Yuriy Ryzhenkov, the boss of Metinvest, Ukraine’s largest steel company and the owner of the factory that became the site of a deadly siege in Mariupol, about how the firm is adapting. And Vladyslav Rashkovan, the alternate executive director at the IMF responsible for Ukraine, outlines the key areas Western powers should be thinking about in terms of their plans to offer reconstruction aid to the country.


Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks 

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Oct 19, 2022
Variety in the price of life: inflation and the midterms
28:26
In the next instalment of our American midterms series we visit Rhode Island to see how inflation—at its highest since the early Reagan era—is affecting people’s lives, and their voting intentions. Denmark’s refugee policies are surprisingly hostile, and surprisingly popular. And our correspondent assesses the latest album and the legacy of Keith Jarrett, one of the world’s greatest living pianists. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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Oct 19, 2022
Babbage: What are tactical nuclear weapons?
36:50

The war in Ukraine has raised the nuclear threat to its highest level since the Cuban missile crisis. What types of nuclear weapons could be used in Ukraine, and how much damage could they do? 


Cheryl Rofer, a former nuclear scientist at America’s Los Alamos National Laboratory, describes the “tactical” nukes in Russia’s arsenal. Patricia Lewis, research director for international security at Chatham House, explains the destruction that would be wrought if the war turned nuclear. Plus, Shashank Joshi, The Economist’s defence editor, analyses whether Russia’s recent military setbacks increase the risk of nuclear conflict. Alok Jha hosts.


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Oct 18, 2022
Hell hath no fury: a look inside Iran’s protests
26:38

Unrest is only spreading and the authorities trying to quell it are looking increasingly desperate. We hear from one protester among many who are racked by fear but motivated by hope. The leader of the shadowy Wagner Group of mercenaries has revealed himself; we ask why. And a look at how few workers call in sick these days. 

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Oct 18, 2022
The Prince bonus episode: Behind the propaganda
28:16

Host Sue-Lin Wong talks to The Economist’s China correspondent Alice Su about the challenges of making The Prince and answers listeners’ questions.


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Oct 17, 2022
Helmsman’s high water: China’s Communist Party Congress
22:04

State media have taken to calling President Xi Jinping “the helmsman”; at the five-yearly meeting he defended his means of steering the country. We ask how to read between his tightly prepared lines. Many of America’s firms will soon deliver disappointing profits—and there is more to blame than simple business cycles. And research suggests that parenthood causes fathers’ brains to shrink.

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Oct 17, 2022
Editor’s Picks: October 17th 2022
21:12

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, China’s next chapter, why emerging markets look unusually resilient (10:05) and why it is time to legalise cocaine (15:40).

 

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Oct 16, 2022
The Prince episode 8: The great helmsman
41:32

Ten years on, Xi’s tight grip on power risks another crisis—this one of his own making.


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Oct 16, 2022
The Prince episode 7: Wolf warriors
41:02

A young Xi Jinping visits Iowa and tries popcorn for the first time. But reconnecting with "old friends" in the Midwest years later fails to prevent relations with America from souring.


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Oct 15, 2022
Checks and Balance: Quality control
42:11

A celebrity doctor who recently lived out of state.  An ex-football player beset by controversy.  When Mitch McConnell said that “candidate quality”  might handicap Republicans’ chances of taking the Senate, it’s likely he was referring to Mehmet Oz and Herschel Walker.  Democrats have some flawed candidates too, but the Republican bad batch is getting more attention. Why is that?   


Georgia journalist Stephen Fowler explains how voters in the state are reacting to the accusations against Walker.  We rank some of the all-time worst Senate candidates. And we revisit the Pennsylvania Senate race, where both candidates have some pretty striking weaknesses.  


John Prideaux hosts with Idrees Kahloon and Jon Fasman.


Join the Checks and Balance team for a live Q&A discussion about the upcoming midterm elections. We will explore the most heated races and what their outcome means for America. That's all in a one-off live webinar for subscribers at 9pm UK time, 4pm on America's East Coast, on Thursday October 27th. You can sign up now at economist.com/checkswebinar 


You can now find every episode of Checks and Balance in one place and sign up to our weekly newsletter. For full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod.



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Oct 14, 2022
Witness self-protection programme? Trump and the Capitol riot inquiry
27:45
The former president may well ignore the January 6th committee’s summons; the whole affair may be unceremoniously shut down next year. But that is not to say the process has been in vain. Russia’s intelligence failures during the war in Ukraine have taken the shine off the security services’ fearsome reputations. And remembering Loretta Lynn, country music’s most-successful-ever female star. Additional audio courtesy of Honor Your Hometown. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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Oct 14, 2022
The Economist Asks: Where will Xi Jinping take China next?
22:56

During his decade-long reign in China, Xi Jinping has amassed more power and wielded it more ruthlessly than any leader since Mao Zedong. At the upcoming Chinese Communist Party congress, Xi is expected to secure an unprecedented third term as leader. Host Anne McElvoy asks Kevin Rudd, president of the Asia Society Policy Institute and a former prime minister of Australia, what to expect from the next era of Xi’s rule and the implications that could have for China and the world. 


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Oct 13, 2022
Gilt trip: Liz Truss’s hobbled leadership
26:00

Paroxysms in the market for gilts—British-government bonds that were once safe-haven assets—reveal just how wounded the new government’s plans have left it. Cuba is experiencing the worst economic crisis in decades, and those who are not protesting are heading for the door. And making the case to let your lawn go wild.

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Oct 13, 2022
Money Talks: Panic economics
38:34

This year’s Nobel prize in economics was awarded to Ben Bernanke, Philip Dybvig, and Douglas Diamond for their pioneering research into the role that banks play in financial crises. On this week’s episode, hosts Soumaya Keynes, Mike Bird and Alice Fulwood speak with Professors Dybvig and Diamond about their eponymous model of financial panics - one economics’ most cited papers - and ask whether policymakers have truly absorbed their insights.


Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks 

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Oct 12, 2022
Don kingmaker: Trump and the midterms
28:53
The latest instalment of our series asks how much difference Donald Trump’s imprimatur has made to candidates—and whether that influence will carry over to a general election. A look at South African rugby reveals positive change in the top ranks but dispiriting decline in the local game. And what the cultural intertwining of James Bond and the Beatles says about Britishness. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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Oct 12, 2022
Babbage: The gene-therapy revolution
39:12

Gene therapies border on the miraculous, transforming lives in a single shot. The treatments offer hope to millions around the world who live with genetic diseases, and could also help the fight against cancer and HIV. This year, four new gene therapies were approved—and there are thousands more clinical trials under way. But the path from miracles of science to miracles of medicine will not be easy. The Economist’s Natasha Loder explains the safety concerns and market challenges that must be overcome to make the genetic revolution possible. Alok Jha hosts.


For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.



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Oct 11, 2022
Help them, Obi: one hopeful candidate in Nigeria
25:30

Our correspondent meets with Peter Obi, who has a handsome poll lead and an appeal that spans the country’s religions and ethnicities. But his presidential bid still faces obstacles. Myanmar’s ruling junta is doing more than suppressing the country’s people: it is battering the economy equally efficiently. And remembering Brother Andrew, who made daring deliveries behind the Iron Curtain.

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Oct 11, 2022
The Prince episode 6: Seeds of a pomegranate
39:03

A Uyghur language teacher is accused of spying for the CIA. An NBA player discovers the cost of criticising China. And Xi Jinping’s obsession with control reaches new and brutal extremes.


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Oct 10, 2022
Crimea and punishment: Russia’s reprisals
23:51

An attack on the Kerch bridge—a pet project of President Vladimir Putin that links Russia with annexed Crimea—has prompted a swift and brutal response. We ask what is likely to happen next. We examine the multipolar nature of popular culture: fears of a globalised monoculture of cool have proved misplaced. And why buying booze in Delhi has again become so unpleasant. 

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Oct 10, 2022
Editor’s Picks: October 10th 2022
23:08

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the outlook for the world economy, how worried you should be about Elon Musk’s superpowers (12:50), and a study allays fears that covid vaccines harm menstrual cycles (16:50).

 

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Oct 09, 2022
The Prince episode 5: He who must not be named
38:03

A censor at a Chinese social media company can't take it anymore after Xi Jinping’s rule brings harsh new restrictions. The Chinese internet becomes an alternate reality.


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Oct 09, 2022
The Prince episode 4: Man enough
36:06

On taking power, Xi Jinping launches a ruthless series of purges and an unexpected ideological revival to cement his control—and mobilise the Chinese Communist Party behind him.


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Oct 08, 2022
Checks and Balance: On the money
43:27

The most important issue for Americans is the economy. When asked, in a poll by YouGov for The Economist, to pick from a list of a dozen problems facing the nation, over a third of people said that the state of the economy or inflation is their top concern. Republicans have a clear lead on the issue and so they ought to do well in the midterms. Except it's more complicated than that: most people don't have an accurate picture of how the economy is doing, and partisanship fills the gap.


The Economist’s Simon Rabinovitch takes the temperature of the US economy. We go back to a time when a state bucked the national economic trend. And The Economist’s Elliott Morris explains how politics influences Americans’ assessment of their financial health. 



John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Idrees Kahloon. 


You can now find every episode of Checks and Balance in one place and sign up to our weekly newsletter. For full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod.



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Oct 07, 2022
The gains in Ukraine: stalled Russia plainly wanes
24:57

Ukraine’s army has pushed Russian forces back in the south and east. We ask how they’ve managed to make such impressive gains so quickly, whether more could follow and what Russia’s reaction might be. Why Britain has such troubles building homes, power stations and really much of anything. And how Maine’s lobstermen are responding to the latest threat to their industry.

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Oct 07, 2022
The Economist Asks: How can covid learning loss be overcome?
23:12

The covid-19 pandemic starved young brains. Estimates suggest that globally schoolchildren may be eight months behind where they’d normally be. Host Anne McElvoy asks Jaime Saavedra, global director of education at the World Bank, how kids can catch up after “the worst educational crisis for a century”. They discuss the education policies that could make a difference, and why political will is the key to implementing them.


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Oct 06, 2022
Bloody and forgotten: Conflict in eastern Congo
27:57
Our correspondent reports from eastern Congo, where a three-decade-long conflict has killed thousands, and forced more than five million people from their homes--with no end in sight. Researchers are searching for better analgesics: ones that reduce pain without the risk of addiction or corollary physiological damage. And a contest in southern Alaska to select the internet’s favourite fat bear.

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Oct 06, 2022
Money Talks: Managing the consultants
32:44

The image of management consultants has taken a pounding in recent years, giving the industry a reputation for unscrupulousness on par with investment bankers. And a recent difficulties and controversies at the three most prestigious firms - McKinsey, Bain and Boston Consulting Group (BCG), known collectively as MBB - hasn’t exactly helped the perception that they serve mostly to bamboozle CEOs while collecting fat fees. Can the industry be reformed?


On this week’s episode, hosts Mike Bird, Alice Fulwood and Soumaya Keynes are joined by our global business correspondent Thomas Lee Devlin to find out more about the booming business for advice, and the problems that bedevilling the industrry. They also speak with New York Times journalists Michael Forsythe and Walt Bogdanich about their newly-published book, “When McKinsey Comes to Town”, looking at failures at the most prestigious consultancy, McKinsey - failures that McKinsey says misrepresent its business. 


Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks 

For full access to print, digital and audio editions, subscribe to The Economist at www.economist.com/podcastoffer



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Oct 05, 2022
It does mean a thing: America’s swing voters
27:08

In the next instalment of our midterms series, we head to the suburbs of Atlanta in search of that rarest of political creatures: the swing voter. There aren’t many of them, but they may well determine which party controls the Senate. Luxury brands are changing their outlooks and offerings as they seek new markets and younger consumers. And our culture correspondent visits a retrospective of William Kentridge’s works.

For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer



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Oct 05, 2022
Babbage: How snooping on sewage could save lives
42:34

During the pandemic, wastewater monitoring became a valuable tool in spotting covid-19 infection waves and the arrival of new variants. But sewage surveillance can help track the spread of all kinds of diseases—and measure a population’s consumption of everything from vegetables to cocaine. The Economist’s Gilead Amit examines how spying on sewage could offer health agencies an unprecedented insight into the lives of local populations, and considers the privacy concerns that could arise. Plus, we speak to the founder of a company that monitors wastewater to track the opioid crisis in America. Alok Jha hosts.


For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions, subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.



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Oct 04, 2022
Misplaced Truss? Britain’s ruling party meets
25:32

Prime Minister Liz Truss has had a bruising first few weeks in office. Amid policy U-turns and plummeting poll numbers, her Tory party’s annual shindig is a venue for much soul-searching. Russia’s “partial mobilisation” is unlikely to help much on the battlefield—and is proving exceedingly unpopular at home. And the dangers of naming species after people who become notorious.

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Oct 04, 2022
The Prince episode 3: Patriot number one
32:51

A villager’s campaign against corruption highlights the Chinese Communist Party’s weakening grip. As Xi Jinping stands on the brink of power, the emergence of a flamboyant rival deepens the crisis.


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Oct 03, 2022
Poll vaulter: Brazil’s surprise election result
23:55

Jair Bolsonaro, the incumbent president, did unexpectedly well—giving his campaign a boost and foreshadowing a tough run-up to the second round. Malawi’s incipient democracy stands as a shining regional example, but remaking its economy has proved even harder than ousting its undemocratic leader. And why one tank is a particularly handsome prize amid Ukraine’s growing pile of captured Russian kit.

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Oct 03, 2022
Editor’s Picks: October 3rd 2022
22:29

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Britain in crisis: how not to run a country. Also, how to make sense of China’s president (10:00), and why becoming a father shrinks your cerebrum (18:05).

 

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Oct 02, 2022
The Prince episode 2: Hide and bide
36:55

As a modest provincial official in Fujian, Xi Jinping is outshone by his celebrity wife, while colleagues are caught up in a lurid corruption scandal. How does Xi survive? 


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Oct 02, 2022
The Prince episode 1: Redder than red
36:33

Xi Jinping is born into the top rung of China's elite. But his family is torn apart while he is still a child. The Economist's Sue-Lin Wong finds out why Xi kept faith in the Communist revolution.


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Oct 01, 2022
Checks and Balance: House party
41:16

House Republicans have launched their legislative agenda for the next Congress. The “Commitment to America” is fairly brief, pretty unspecific, and filled with standard Republican platitudes around tax cuts and curbing wasteful spending. Kevin McCarthy, who will probably be Speaker if his party wins, calls it “a new direction” for America.  What would Republicans do with control of the House? 


We dissect what’s in the “Commitment to America”, and look at its famous predecessor.  Representative James Comer, who will likely chair the House Oversight Committee if Republicans win, explains what he plans to do in the role.


John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Idrees Kahloon.  


You can now find every episode of Checks and Balance in one place and sign up to our weekly newsletter. For full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod.  





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Sep 30, 2022
Form-annex trick: Russia’s Ukraine-seizure bid
23:12

After a series of sham referendums, President Vladimir Putin is expected to annex four partly occupied regions of Ukraine. We ask what risks that move would pose. What has driven China’s president to amass such tremendous personal power? We introduce our new, long-form podcast “The Prince”, which dives deep into his life. And video-game music is rapidly growing in prestige.

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Sep 30, 2022
The Economist Asks: In times of economic turmoil, can global trade help?
27:11

The World Trade Organisation was set up in 1995 to enable the multilateral trading system. But in the past decade, it’s come under pressure. Now, the global economy looks set to enter an unstable new phase. Host Anne McElvoy and Henry Curr, The Economist’s economics editor, travel to the WTO’s headquarters in Geneva to ask Dr Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, the director-general, how trade can mitigate the pain. They discuss how supply chains need to change and assess the trade-off between efficiency and equality. Dr Okonjo-Iweala examines the rift between China and America and how the WTO needs to reform.


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Sep 29, 2022
Lula loop: meeting Brazil’s presidential front-runner
27:21

Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, a leftist former president, looks well-placed to win a third term. But which Lula would Brazil get—the fiscal conservative or the populist spendthrift? Germany has an earned reputation as an industrial powerhouse, but its dependence on Russian gas and Chinese demand are hobbling it. And why the propaganda-spewing loudspeakers in Vietnam’s capital are firing up again.

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Sep 29, 2022
Money Talks: The rate shock
33:51

The world’s financial markets are going through their most painful adjustment since the global financial crisis. Global stock markets have sold off sharply and bond markets are on course for their worst year since 1949. The British pound briefly fell to its lowest level ever against the dollar. And the Japanese government has intervened to prop up the value of the yen for the first time since 1998. What’s underlying this shift?


On this week’s episode, hosts Alice Fulwood, Mike Bird and Soumaya Keynes are joined by our business affairs editor Patrick Foulis to parse the fallout from this month’s synchronous decision by the majority of the world’s central banks to raise interest rates. They’ll look at the idiosyncrasies of two outliers: Britain, where the government’s tax cuts are at odds with the Bank of England’s desire to reign in prices, and Japan, where the central bank recently decided to keep rates negative. Plus, Blue Bay Asset Management’s chief investment officer Mark Dowding explains why he’s decided to bet against sterling. And former Bank of Japan policy committee member Goushi Kataoka outlines why he thinks a weak yen could spell opportunity for Japan’s ailing economy.


Sign up for our new weekly newsletter dissecting the big themes in markets, business and the economy at www.economist.com/moneytalks 

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Sep 28, 2022
Off the top of their heads: Iran’s widespread protests
25:12
Women are burning their hijabs on bonfires and hacking off their hair—but the unrest has come to be about far more than the heavy hands of the morality police. The murder of Abe Shinzo, a former Japanese prime minister, exposed troubling government links to a cult-like sect; the fallout could unseat his successor. And using flying robots as 3D printers. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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Sep 28, 2022
Babbage: How psychedelics could fix the brain
44:25

Psychedelic drugs—such as LSD and psilocybin, the psychoactive compound found in magic mushrooms—may be coming to the medicine cabinet. Research into their use to treat mental-health conditions was long blocked by law and stigma. But in recent years, there has been a revival of interest in the drugs, which are now being trialled to treat conditions such as depression. The Economist’s Ainslie Johnstone visits one of Britain's most high-profile psilocybin research facilities, and investigates how the drug could help scientists better understand autism. And, as investors pile in, Natasha Loder, our health policy editor, separates the hope from the hype. Plus, we ask whether the drugs’ hallucinatory effects are necessary for their health benefits, and meet a researcher who hopes to develop psychedelics without the trip. Alok Jha hosts.


Listen to our other episodes on psychedelics in health care at economist.com/psychedelics-pod.


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Sep 27, 2022
In for a penny, in for a pounding: Britain’s economic gyrations
23:25

The markets are so far entirely unconvinced that the new administration’s Reagan-esque economic plans will work to spur growth—just look at sterling's tumble. In Tibet, China’s mass collection of DNA samples has one unabashed motive: social control. And the curious wave of “unretirees” returning to work after the pandemic.

Additional audio courtesy of the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library.

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Sep 27, 2022
Editor’s Picks: September 26th 2022
24:27

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, a new-look Gulf, Vladimir Putin's partial mobilisation (10:45), and the Google-Meta advertising duopoly (15:00).

 

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Sep 26, 2022
Giorgia on my mind: Italy’s far-right government
24:01

Italians have voted decisively for a coalition of right-wing parties, with Giorgia Meloni, leader of the Brothers of Italy, the likely next prime minister. What this means for Italy, Europe and the war in Ukraine remains unclear. Latin American prisons are awful and getting worse. And a surprising hit film makes Chinese authorities nervous.


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Sep 26, 2022
Checks and Balance: Ukraine relief
44:36

“The world should see the outrageous acts for what they are," Joe Biden told the United Nations General Assembly this week, condemning Russia's invasion of Ukraine. So far, America has led efforts to support Ukraine’s fight back against the aggressor next door. But with food and energy prices high, Vladimir Putin announcing a partial mobilisation (whatever that is) and once again threatening to use nuclear weapons, how long-lasting will support from the West be? 


Jeremy Shapiro of the European Council on Foreign Relations explains how America’s approach to Ukraine has been a success so far—and the risks it now faces. We go back to another time the United States supported an ally without putting boots on the ground. And the American Enterprise Institute’s Danielle Pletka discusses how Republicans might respond to the war in Ukraine in the future. 


John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Idrees Kahloon.


You can now find every episode of Checks and Balance in one place and sign up to our weekly newsletter. For full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod.



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Sep 23, 2022
Empire State v real-estate empire: Donald Trump’s legal woes
25:58
Letitia James, New York’s attorney general, announced a sweeping lawsuit against Donald Trump, his businesses and three of his children. He’s also being investigated over allegations of election interference in Georgia and storing classified documents at his Florida resort. The battle to be the top provider of cloud-computing services is heating up. And reflecting on the legacy of “The Joy of Sex,” published 50 years ago. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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Sep 23, 2022
The Economist Asks: Why is progress on gender equality slowing?
21:27

The covid-19 pandemic played havoc with the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals. Progress to achieve gender equality by 2030 has not only stalled, it’s reversed. Host Anne McElvoy asks Melinda French Gates, a philanthropist, if the target still makes sense. The co-chair of the Gates Foundation also discusses the overturning of Roe v Wade in America


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Sep 22, 2022
Inflation nation: The Fed raises rates, again
23:39
America’s Federal Reserve made its third straight 0.75% interest-rate hike, with Jerome Powell, the Fed’s chair, warning that more hikes would follow. But with inflation still high, and labour markets still tight, is the Fed doing all it can? A new report suggests that forced labour and marriage are on the rise around the world. And reflecting on one man’s long search for extraterrestrial life. For full access to print, digital and audio editions of The Economist, subscribe here www.economist.com/intelligenceoffer

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Sep 22, 2022
Money Talks: Beyond seasonable doubt
37:50

Lawsuits aimed at green-house gas emissions are a growing trend, and better science is making them more precise. As ESG comes under attack, could these suits represent a different front in pressuring companies to act on climate change?


On this week’s episode, hosts Alice Fulwood and Mike Bird speak with our environment editor Catherine Brahic about the rise in climate litigation aimed at holding companies responsible for climate change. Then, we head to Peru, to meet the farmer at the centre of a potentially seismic court case against Germany’s largest electricity firm. Finally, Sophie Marjanac of the environmental organisation ClientEarth explains why the law can be a useful way to outline the responsibilities of corporations when it comes to greenhouse gas emissions and who pays the costs of a warming planet.


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Sep 21, 2022
The 300,000 body problem: Russia mobilises and threatens
28:40

This morning Vladimir Putin announced that Russia would call up more troops to fight in Ukraine, said his goal of “liberating” eastern Ukraine remained unchanged and accused the west of “nuclear blackmail.” Our correspondent parses his speech. Our midterm series heads to Maine, to see how Democrats are fighting for rural voters. And a new discovery in Borneo rewrites the history of surgery.


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Sep 21, 2022
Babbage: How science can save the world
36:09

During the pandemic, scientists gained greater prominence in the lives of ordinary people than ever before. And while covid-19 highlighted the importance of the field to humanity, it also raised questions about the role of scientists in modern life. Host Alok Jha talks to the astronomer and cosmologist Martin Rees, one of Britain’s top scientists and a former president of the Royal Society. His new book “If Science is to Save Us” argues that scientific knowledge can solve some of the world’s biggest problems, but it can also lead to great harm. He tells us about the three looming “mega-catastrophes” that worry him most, and how to encourage innovation in scientific research.


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Sep 20, 2022
Charles in charge: the future of the Commonwealth
23:26
Elizabeth II was devoted to the Commonwealth, a club of countries that are home to one-third of the world’s population. What is its future under Charles III? Jeddah is Saudi Arabia’s most charming and cosmopolitan city, which Saudi Arabia’s de facto ruler, Prince Muhammad bin Salman, is swiftly bulldozing. And why China’s economy may struggle to overtake America’s.

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Sep 20, 2022
Editor’s Picks: September 19th 2022
23:17

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, why the British monarchy matters, Vladimir Putin’s war is failing (10:31), and China’s property crisis hasn’t gone away (17:59).

 

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Sep 19, 2022
The first draft is history: Chile’s rejected constitution
21:59

Two years in the making, the country’s new foundational document was summarily swatted down in a referendum. We ask how it went so wrong, and what comes next. Data show a long-held view on fertility and prosperity is not as straightforward as thought; we examine the policy implications. And learning about HARM—the missiles causing so much harm to Russian forces.

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Sep 19, 2022
Checks and Balance: Roe your own way
44:02

The most significant moment in the midterms campaigns may have come in June. That was when the Supreme Court decided to overturn Roe v Wade, taking away the federal right to an abortion and sending the decision back to the states. This fired up Democratic candidates and voters. The party has been doing well in special elections and referendums, and making gains in the polls. How much is this to do with the fight for abortion rights? 


The Economist’s Stevie Hertz travels to Michigan to hear how abortion is influencing voters in that state. We go back to a milestone election for female voters. And US representative Abigail Spanberger explains how the issue is shaping her race for reelection.  


John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Idrees Kahloon.


You can now find every episode of Checks and Balance in one place and sign up to our weekly newsletter. For full access to print, digital and audio editions, as well as exclusive live events, subscribe to The Economist at economist.com/uspod.



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Sep 16, 2022
Minority report: the Rohingya, five years on
24:45

Five years after a brutal campaign that drove nearly 750,000 out of Myanmar and into Bangladesh, conditions for the Muslim minority remain appalling on both sides of the border. Central Asian countries are laying plans for railways that would fill their coffers, distance Russia and empower China. And the economics lessons in London’s queue to see Queen Elizabeth II.

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Sep 16, 2022
The Economist Asks: Could Vladimir Putin lose the war in Ukraine?
37:54

Ukraine has made a remarkable turnaround. In a few days, its army liberated 6,000 square kilometres of territory–more than Russia had seized in the previous five months. Host Anne McElvoy asks Wesley Clark, a retired four-star US general, if Ukraine’s surprise counter-offensive marks a new phase in the war and what to expect if Russia retaliates. And Alexander Gabuev, a senior fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, analyses whether the cracks in Vladimir Putin’s aura of invincibility will damage his standing at home. 


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Sep 15, 2022
Xi sells sanctuary: a telling Putin meeting
25:42

As the presidents of China and Russia meet in Uzbekistan, we examine their friendship. They have much in common—but Russia’s prosecution of the war in Ukraine may strain relations. Islamic State and al-Qaeda may be less in the news but their foothold in Africa only keeps growing. And why so many young Korean city-slickers are becoming farmers in the countryside.

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Sep 15, 2022
Money talks: India's moment
36:50

India’s economy recently overtook Britain’s to be the world’s fifth largest, and it’s on track to be the fastest growing big economy this year. Part of what’s powering that growth is renewed domestic investment by the country’s big conglomerates. Could this be the year that India’s promise is realised?


On this week’s episode, hosts Mike Bird, Soumaya Keynes and Alice Fulwood examine what’s powering India’s growth. First, Natarajan Chandrasekaran, the chairman of India’s biggest conglomerate, Tata Sons, explains why the company is investing $90bn domestically. Then, our global energy and climate innovation editor Vijay Vaitheeswaran heads to Pune, where he finds that India’s green energy transition is well underway. Finally, our Mumbai bureau chief Tom Easton takes a tour of Tamil Nadu, where he sees factories rapidly being built to help power India’s domestic manufacturing transition. 


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Sep 14, 2022
Cautiousness in the Caucasus: Azerbaijan and Armenia clash
25:00

A conflict smouldering since a war in 2020 has again caught alight; Azerbaijan may feel emboldened by a distracted Russia and its own energy prospects. Gulf countries are swimming in piles of unexpected, oil-derived cash: we ask whether they will sock it away or splurge on citizens and pet projects. And why many Lebanese couples are choosing to wed online.

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Sep 14, 2022
Babbage: Will Ethereum’s merge transform crypto?
42:49

A monumental shift is about to take place in the crypto world. One of the most important blockchain projects, Ethereum, is set to change the way it secures its network—from the energy-intensive “proof-of-work” system to the greener “proof-of-stake” method. Known as “the merge”, the switch could slash Ethereum’s energy consumption by over 99 percent. The Economist’s Stevie Hertz investigates why the “proof-of-work” system of mining currencies like bitcoin is so bad for the environment, and Alice Fulwood and Ludwig Siegele analyse how Ethereum’s merge will change the wider cryptoverse. Alok Jha hosts.


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Sep 13, 2022
Joule of denial: Russia’s energy games
25:01

Vladimir Putin hopes the threat of cutting off fuel supplies this winter will weaken Europe’s support for Ukraine. European leaders are trying to cobble together a collective response to prevent such fracturing. Before Russia invaded, Ukraine’s surrogacy industry was booming. It has since been disrupted, but not ended. And Britain’s bird populations are changing: we ask why.

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Sep 13, 2022
Editor’s Picks: September 12th 2022
27:14

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the death of Elizabeth II marks the end of an era. Also, why Jair Bolsonaro poses a threat to Brazilian democracy (11:15), and Europe’s energy market in crisis (19:12).

 

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Sep 12, 2022
Russian rush-out: Ukraine’s stunning gains
27:25

Russia has lost in a week what cost it months to gain in eastern Ukraine. We ask what the lightning counter-offensive means for the war. What is more surprising than Mississippi’s capital lacking access to clean drinking water is that millions of other Americans face the same struggle. And the quasi-astrological methods some investors use to predict market movements.

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Sep 12, 2022
Checks and Balance: The elephant in the boardroom
42:53

The close relationship between the Republican Party and the corporate world has shaped American capitalism for decades. Businesses are used to disdain from Democrats, but vitriol from the right is newer. This has been on display in public brawls between lawmakers and companies, and shifting orthodoxies in the Republicans’ economic philosophy. What will be the impact of the party’s growing suspicion of America Inc?  


West Virginia State Treasurer Riley Moore tells us why he’s targeting firms that won’t invest in fossil fuels. We go back to a high point in the party’s love-in with big business. And political adviser Oren Cass explains the theory behind the Republicans’ new approach. 


John Prideaux hosts with Charlotte Howard and Alexandra Suich Bass. 


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Sep 09, 2022
Beyond the call of duty: Britain’s queen dies
20:04

The death of Queen Elizabeth II marks the end of an era. We explore her long, dutiful reign and how it shaped the modern monarchy. The country has changed substantially during her time, but one parallel remains: her successor, King Charles III, will also take over at a time of uncertainty for the country and for the monarchy itself.

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Sep 09, 2022
The Economist Asks: Can Britain’s new prime minister solve an economic crisis?
36:55
The new leader of the Conservative Party, Liz Truss, faces an enormous task. Britain is contending with soaring energy bills, double-digit inflation and the unresolved backwash of Brexit. Host Anne McElvoy asks Lord Razzall and former Tory leader Iain Duncan Smith about her path to power. And, The Economist’s Soumaya Keynes and Matthew Holehouse analyse her chances of success.

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Sep 08, 2022
Playing his Trump card: Bolsonaro and the election
27:33

In Brazil, fears are growing that if Jair Bolsonaro loses in October, as polls suggest is likely, he may try to stage a coup or foment violence. He’s been sowing distrust in the country’s electoral system, and many of his supporters are well-armed. Should school lunches be free? And why the gap between the number of boys and girls born in India is narrowing.


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Sep 08, 2022
Introducing The Prince
3:28

Xi Jinping is the most powerful person in the world. But the real story of China’s leader remains a mystery. The Economist’s Sue-Lin Wong finds out how he rose to the top in a new podcast series launching on September 28th. 


Subscribe to The Economist with the best offer at economist.com/chinapod and join our editors to discuss the implications of Xi Jinping's rule at a subscriber event on September 15th here.



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Sep 07, 2022
Money Talks: Running on empty
37:41

Europe is facing a catastrophic energy crisis. Prices for the natural gas needed to power many of its electricity plants have increased ten-fold since last summer. Most recently, Russia has choked off gas supplies to the Nord Stream 1 pipeline in retaliation against the G-7’s decision to put a cap on Russian oil prices. What needs to be done to keep homes warm this winter?


On this week’s episode, hosts Soumaya Keynes, Alice Fulwood and Mike Bird investigate the options facing European governments as they scramble to tackle soaring consumer energy bills. First, our Europe economics editor Christian Odendahl explains the extent of the problem and the structural factors that underpin it. Then, the IMF’s Assistant Director for Europe Oya Celasun describes how direct cash support can protect the poor from surging energy prices. Finally, Scottish Power chief executive Keith Anderson outlines his plan for a state-supported price freeze and structural reform of the UK’s energy market.


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Sep 07, 2022
America’s next top model: predicting the midterm results
26:43

Our model, built to predict the outcome of this year’s midterm elections, tips Republicans to take the House and Democrats to retain control of the Senate. The model’s architect discusses how and why he built it, and our polling guru explains why polls matter. Why there’s no nuclear-arms race in Asia—yet. And Egypt wants the Rosetta Stone back, but it’s not that simple.

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Sep 07, 2022
Babbage: From our archive—the James Webb Space Telescope
41:10

In recent months, the world has been astounded by cosmic images taken by the James Webb Space Telescope. By gazing deep into space, it can see billions of years back in time, and promises to transform human understanding of the universe. In this episode, first released in December 2021, host Alok Jha explores the telescope’s promise. And, science correspondent Gilead Amit asks NASA’s head of science Thomas Zurbuchen about the mission’s impact on the agency.


For full access to The Economist’s print, digital and audio editions subscribe at economist.com/podcastoffer and sign up for our weekly science newsletter at economist.com/simplyscience.


With thanks to Don Giller for supplying additional audio.



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Sep 06, 2022
Deed of Truss: Britain’s new leader
22:07

As Liz Truss becomes prime minister, we ask whether her meat-and-potatoes tax-slashing agenda will work for a crisis-stricken Britain. Japan’s prison population is ageing just as its wider society is—and that is at last prompting reforms to its punitive penal system. And why Ukraine’s short supply of anti-tank missiles is not as worrying as it would once have been. 

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Sep 06, 2022
Editor’s Picks: September 5th 2022
24:33

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the disunited states of America, why Britain can't build (9:15) and Pakistan’s worst floods in recent memory (17:05). 

 

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Sep 05, 2022
Cereal numbers: the fall in food prices
24:37

The worst predictions for costs have not come to pass, partly because Russia is selling plenty of wheat. But plenty of food-price woe may still await. We examine the curious re-appearance of the polio virus in the West. And the trials of “Pink Sauce” reveal the perils of being a cottage-food producer—or consumer—in the social-media age.

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Sep 05, 2022
Checks and Balance: A house divided
46:06

Red and blue states have always been different. Each state’s ability to experiment, iterate and differentiate has been a source of strength. But as federal politics has become more partisan, so have the states. On everything from abortion to climate, American policy is now dividing into two distinct blocs. How is this new, fractious federalism changing the union?


We hear from the governors of America’s most conservative state, Tate Reeves of Mississippi, and its most progressive, Gavin Newsom of California, whose visions of America’s future are almost polar opposites. We go back to the unlikely origin of the idea that states should be the “laboratories of democracy”. And Chris Warshaw, a political scientist at George Washington University, explores how far apart states can drift and at what cost. John Prideaux hosts with Alexandra Suich Bass and Idrees Kahloon. 


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Sep 02, 2022
No quiet on any front: Ethiopia’s clash of conflicts
24:10

After a five-month hiatus, violence has returned to the northern region of Tigray—but that is just one of the conflicts threatening to pull the country to pieces. China’s Belt and Road Initiative has made it a prominent developing-world lender. How will it deal with so many of its loans souring? And our obituaries editor reflects on Issey Miyake’s fashion-for-the-masses philosophy.

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Sep 02, 2022
The Economist Asks: How can mental health-care crises be solved?
28:01

During the 13 years Thomas Insel led America’s National Institute of Mental Health, medicines and treatments for those with serious mental health disorders improved, but outcomes did not. Host Anne McElvoy asks him what has gone wrong–and how it might be fixed. The psychiatrist and author of “Healing” also discusses how technology might help.


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Sep 01, 2022
Ready, steady, slow: Ukraine’s bid for Kherson
24:53

The long-trailed counter-offensive to retake the Russian-occupied regional powerhouse and symbolically powerful provincial capital has begun. But Ukraine’s forces are in no hurry. Visa and Mastercard are two of the world’s most profitable companies; we look at efforts to break their iron grip on the payments market. And the blue-blooded horseshoe crabs that are needlessly bled in their millions.

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Sep 01, 2022
Money Talks: Will the electric vehicle boom go bust?
37:47

This month, California banned the sale of petrol cars by 2035. It could prompt a third of American states to embrace electric vehicles more quickly. But America is a laggard when it comes to the EV revolution. The European Parliament voted in June for a ban on sales of petrol and diesel cars by 2035. Japan and others are also aiming for a ban by 2035. But government efforts to encourage consumers to switch to buying electric cars could run into the reality that there isn’t yet enough capacity to manufacture the batteries necessary to power all those cars. 


On this week’s episode, hosts Alice Fulwood, Soumaya Keynes and Mike Bird look at whether the EV boom