The Medicine Mentors Podcast

By Mentors in Medicine

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Interviewing physician leaders to tap into their wisdom

Episode Date
Delivering World Class Results with Dr. Luis Diaz
12:33

Luis Diaz, MD, is the Head of the Division of Solid Tumor Oncology and holds the Grayer Family Chair at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Dr. Diaz is an internationally recognized physician-scientist, accomplished physician, researcher, and leader in the field of clinical oncology. He has pioneered several diagnostic and therapeutic genomic approaches to cancer and has developed the basis for a molecular pap smear, a promising way to detect early-stage ovarian and endometrial cancers based on genetic markers. He is one of the seven distinguished members of the National Cancer Advisory Board at The White House and was recently inducted into the prestigious Giants of Cancer Care.

“Trust amongst a team enables ideas to emerge that can change a project from one that is mundane or incremental, into one that can deliver a world class result. Try to assimilate yourself in teams which not only have passion, resources, and talent, but that also give you the opportunity to speak freely; so that when moments come, ideas can flow that make a world class difference.”

Pearls of Wisdom:
 
1. Trust is the key component of successful teams, and it is what will create an environment where creative ideas are unleashed and take incremental success to world-class success.
2. Leadership is about being nervous that sets the stage for equanimity and having comfort and clarity that allows you to navigate the situation.
3. We have to be better every day and the mindset of continuous development is the key to making the difference between great and master clinicians.
Aug 23, 2022
Let The Game Come to You with Dr. Talmadge King
14:06

Talmadge E. King Jr., MD, is the Dean of the School of Medicine and Vice Chancellor for Medical Affairs at the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. King is also a Master of the American College of Physicians and Fellow of the American College of Chest Physicians. He holds the UCSF Julius R. Krevans Distinguished Professorship in Internal Medicine, and is a recipient of the 2007 Trudeau Medal, the highest honor of the American Lung Association & American Thoracic Society. His research has led to pioneering treatments for interstitial pneumonias, and his bibliography comprises more than three hundred publications, as well as the co-authorship of eleven books.

“Keep working to become the best and don’t worry about what opportunities are out there. If they want you now, they’re going to want you even more later because you're going to be better.” This was a piece of advice the young Dr. Talmadge King received from one of his mentors. Tune in as we listen to the now Dean at UCSF share impactful anecdotes from his life reinforcing fundamental values of trust, kindness and continuous self-development to find joy in medicine.

Pearls of Wisdom:
 
1. Start with trust, assuming that most people are decent and have good intent. You should give them the benefit of the doubt.
2. Early in your career, embrace a growth mindset, seek help, and develop the areas where you’re weak. Later on, become more and more expert so that your work becomes your joy.
3. Let the game come to you—engage in continuous self-development so that you’re better today than you were yesterday. If they want you now, they’re going to want you even more later, because you’ll be better.
Jul 06, 2022
The Unhurried Patient Visit with Dr. Vincent Rajkumar
13:06

S. Vincent Rajkumar, MD, is the Edward W. and Betty Knight Scripps Professor of Medicine at the Mayo Clinic and Chair of the ECOG Myeloma Committee. He is also the Associate Editor of Mayo Clinic proceedings, as well as the Editor-In-Chief of Blood Cancer Journal. He was recently awarded the Giants of Cancer Care Award in 2019 and the Waldenström Award for lifetime achievement in myeloma.

When Dr. Vincent Rajkumar first joined the Mayo Clinic, he was inspired by his colleagues to embrace the “unhurried patient visit” with a focus on "hearing the patient's whole story" however long it takes. Today, Dr. Rajkumar elaborates on why really knowing the patient is critical in truly being able to help our patients and provide care tailored to their unique circumstances. Join us as we journey from Madras to Minnesota with one of the most respected names in Myeloma to learn the tips to building relationships with patients that last a lifetime.

Pearls of Wisdom:
 
1. The secret to building clinical excellence is to use same-day, patient-oriented learning. Make it a habit to read up on patients you’ve seen that same day—rather than doing it later.
2. Patients are vulnerable and need the comfort of knowing they can access their doctor, if an emergency happens. Be proactive and share your direct contact information. Let’s be available for our patients in times of need.
3. Mentors are critical in achieving our peak potential. There’s so much to learn in medicine that we can’t become good at those things if we aren’t proactive in finding other people who are brilliant, and try to emulate them.
Jun 08, 2022
Eliminating the Grocery List Mentality with Dr. Joseph Treat
18:40

Joseph Treat, MD, is a Professor of the Department of Hematology/Oncology, Vice Chair of Education and Medical Director for Ambulatory Care at Fox Chase Cancer Center. Dr. Treat completed his medical school from Temple University and residency in Internal Medicine from Georgetown University Hospital where he stayed to pursue an Oncology fellowship at the Lombardi Cancer Center. He has dedicated his clinical practice to mesothelioma and lung cancer for the past 20 years and has published extensively on these topics, including widely read reviews on popular chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of lung cancer.

Science and Empathy being distinct opposites is a common misconception; Dr. Treat says: "Medicine is a gift that allows us to combine the scientific method with empathy. Eliminate the grocery list mentality and be empathetic." Join us as we listen to anecdotes from Dr. Treat’s life and identify the essentials of medicine and mentorship to make the leap from good to great.

Pearls of Wisdom:
 
1. Patients can understand when you are simply ticking off the grocery list of medical procedures. To become a GREAT physician, you must employ empathy in your practice.
2. Mentorship is an active process. It’s not magic. You must deliberately reach out to potential mentors by being an enthusiastic mentee.
3. Getting things done quickly is a critical quality. It’s an overt indicator for competence and determination. Always be swift in completing tasks.
May 04, 2022
Commitment over Intelligence with Dr. Stephen Rennard
19:17
Stephen Rennard MD, is the Larson Professor of Medicine in the Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. He received his medical degree from the Baylor College of Medicine. He completed Internal Medicine training at the Washington University in St Louis followed by training in pulmonary diseases at the National Institutes of Health where he conducted research in the cell biology of lung disease for the next seven years. He joined the University of Nebraska Medical Center in 1984 as Chief of Pulmonary & Critical Care, a position he retained until 1997. He maintains an active program of clinical investigation in COPD and smoking cessation and a program of basic research in the mechanisms of lung tissue repair and remodeling, including the role of stem cells in disease pathogenesis and repair. He is a recipient of UNMC’s Inaugural Scientist Laureate Award, the highest recognition given to a UNMC scientist.
 
“You’re gonna make it” said a lab tech who Dr. Rennard regarded as an early mentor. “You’re here on a Sunday morning. You’re gonna make it.” That’s when it struck: it’s not sleepless nights of studying, having textbooks for breakfast, or being an ultra-smart genius that shapes a student into an excellent physician; it is commitment. It is the commitment to the cause you believe in and having the willingness to walk the extra mile that will make you successful. Join us as we listen to Dr. Rennard’s journey at the bench, bedside and in industry, highlighting commitment as the most important criterion for success.
 
Pearls of Wisdom:
 
1. The job of being a good student is to make good teachers. Also, focus on commitment to the task and openness to improving your understanding as you go.
2. Commitment is the willingness to work hard and put ourselves in situations through which we can get the exposure we need to achieve our goals.
3. Practice your ability to reach out to whoever you need to, and ask for help. Don’t be afraid to ask because it’s flattering to whoever you’re asking! It’s nice for them to answer questions they know the answers to.
Apr 13, 2022
Mentorship: Does one size fit all? with Dr. Ariela Marshall
16:12

Ariela Marshall, MD, is the Director of the Women’s Hemostasis and Thrombosis Program and the Associate Program Director of Non-Malignant Hematology fellowship at the University of Pennsylvania. She is an international leader and innovator in practice leadership and medical education with a passion for mentoring trainees into positions at top institutions. Dr. Marshall completed her medical school from Harvard Medical School, residency in Internal Medicine from the Hospital of University of Pennsylvania and a fellowship in Hematology/Oncology from Dana- Farber Cancer Institute at Harvard.

Often, the most challenging aspect of life for a new physician is achieving some semblance of harmony between the demanding career of medicine and a fulfilling, passionate personal life. Is it realistic to expect one mentor to relate with who you are and aspire to become on a personal and professional level? Join us for this episode and learn why Dr. Ariela Marshall firmly believes that “it’s rare to find a mentor for both your work and your life” and why you should be open to bringing mentors into your life that can each help you to overcome specific challenges.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. We need to discuss one problem or area of opportunity with one person rather than getting scattered. That's fundamental; rather than taking the same question to six people, find the one person who can offer the perfect solution.
2. Open up to your mentors. It doesn't have to be with everybody, but exerting effort to search for that person is essential; we'll be amazed at the similarities we’ll discover between us. Despite feeling alone sometimes, we’re not alone.
3. People exceeding your expectations are the people that you want to exceed expectations for.

Mar 02, 2022
A Mentoring Ecosystem with Dr. Vineet Chopra
13:38

Vineet Chopra, MD, MSc, is a hospitalist and Chair of Medicine at the University of Colorado. He was previously the Inaugural Chief of Hospital Medicine at the University of Michigan. He completed his medical school at Grant Medical College in India and residency in Internal Medicine from Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York. He is an accomplished physician-scientist and health services researcher focused on patient safety, hospital-acquired complications and the art and science of mentorship. He has published over 250 peer-reviewed articles and was recently selected to serve as Deputy Editor for the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Elementary school in France, middle school in Cairo, high school in Japan, medical school in India, to become a hospitalist researcher and now Chair of Medicine in the United States; today we get a glimpse of the many experiences that have shaped Dr. Vineet Chopra’s life. Dr. Chopra recounts the impact that mentors have had in shaping this very unique path and his vision for preparing the stage for the new generation of mentors and mentees by nurturing a mentoring ecosystem. Join us today as we sit at the cross-section of medicine and mentorship with Dr. Chopra.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Mentors need to inspire passion and drive in their mentees. The future of a mentee will be molded and shaped by the character, work ethic and mindset of their mentor.
2. After establishing a professional career, the relationship between a mentor and mentee goes beyond mentorship bounds. They become close friends and colleagues.
3. There is a need to develop a culture of mentors. More experts must be encouraged to take on the role of mentorship, and it is the responsibility of institutions to create a system where they have an incentive to do so.

Jan 06, 2022
Doing Your Homework with Dr. Suresh Ramalingam
19:40

Suresh Ramalingam, MD, FACP, FASCO, is the Professor of the department of Hematology-Oncology, Roberto C. Goizueta Distinguished Chair and Assistant Dean for Cancer Research, Director of Division of Medical Oncology at Emory University School of Medicine. He is also the Deputy Director at Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University. Dr Ramalingam completed his medical school from Kilpauk Medical College University of Madras and residency in Internal Medicine from Wayne State University. He pursued a fellowship in Hematology and Medical Oncology from University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute. Dr. Ramalingam currently serves as president of the Georgia Society of Oncology. Dr. Ramalingam is nationally recognized as an investigator and a physician in the area of small cell and non-small cell lung cancer. He has been awarded the James Eckman Award for Excellence in Teaching at Emory, and the NCI Cancer Clinical Investigator Team Leadership Award.

What makes an exceptional mentor and how do you go about finding one? Dr. Suresh Ramalingam explains why enthusiasm and your ability to “do the homework before you go to someone” compel the most impactful mentors to pay it forward, investing in improving the lives of patients not only by their own efforts, but also by the future efforts of those who share in their wisdom. Listen to Dr. Ramalingam’s unique journey from Chennai to Atlanta to learn more about how identifying your strengths, knowing your gaps, and doing your homework can initiate meaningful mentorships and propel your career in medicine.
 

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. You don’t need to reinvent the wheel. You need to learn how to reach out and move it forward in a way that helps you progress in your career and life.
2. Focusing on your strengths first gives you the confidence to objectively look at your gaps and figure out who can help you fill them.
3. To approach the right mentor, invest in learning first and realizing why you need a mentor in the first place.

Nov 17, 2021
"Total Commitment": Practicing Selfless Medicine with Dr. Shlomo Melmed
19:16

Shlomo Melmed, MD, MB, ChB, FRCP, MACP, is a Distinguished Professor of Medicine, Executive Vice-President and Dean of the Medical Faculty at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center and holds the Helene A. and Philip E. Hixon Chair in Investigative Medicine. Dr. Melmed completed his medical school from University of Cape Town and Residency in Internal Medicine from Sheba Medical Center in Israel. He then trained in Endocrinology at UCLA. His research focuses on molecular pathogenesis of pituitary tumors and pituitary receptor signaling. He has received Cedars-Sinai’s ‘Pioneer in Medicine’ Award and has also been honored with the Pituitary Society’s ‘Lifetime Achievement’ Award. He is editor-in-chief of The Pituitary, editor of Williams Textbook of Endocrinology and is on the editorial board of the Journal of Clinical Investigation. Dr. Melmed has been a faculty leader at Cedars-Sinai for nearly 40 years and has been the health system’s chief academic officer since 1998.

What is the difference between a good physician and a great physician? Dr. Melmed reflects on the culmination of his career in endocrinology and healthcare leadership to explore how tenacity, focus, and amelioration of patient anxiety continue to set the best practitioners apart from the rest in the ever-evolving field of medicine.  Join us to take advantage of the unique perspective offered by Dr. Melmed’s unparalleled expertise and learn how “total commitment: physical, emotional and intellectual dedication” establishes the foundation of greatness and leadership.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. The patient’s number one concern is not the disease or illness; it is anxiety. Our first job as the caretaker is to reassure them and comfort them, to tell them that everything will be okay and we are there for them.
2. The real sign of a great physician is their dedication and commitment. This amounts to being disciplined and strict with time when attending to the patient or interacting with colleagues.
3. Leadership goes beyond I, me, and myself. It is the ability of an individual to say yes when presented with opportunities and transform the people’s mindset from ME to US.

Oct 27, 2021
Pick Your Battles and Be Fearless with Dr. Sowmya Nagaraj
18:44

Sowmya Nagaraj, MD is currently the Assistant Professor of Medicine and the Associate Program Director of the Internal Medicine residency program at the East Carolina University. Dr Nagaraj grew up in India and completed her medical school from JSS Medical College in India  before moving to  the United States.  She then pursued a residency in Internal Medicine from Hurley Medical Center of Michigan State University. After completing residency, she joined as a faculty member at Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University.

For Dr. Sowmya Nagaraj, it’s all about picking your battles: What do you want in life? How much are you willing to fight for it? Are you going to do whatever it takes? And what if what you want now isn’t the same as what you want in 10 years? Keep a timeline for goals and revisit them every few years: Is this still what you want? Do you need to make a change? Dr. Nagaraj shares her wisdom about recognizing that people and goals and aspirations change, and that’s okay. Change is necessary for growth.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Arm yourself with an ecosystem to prepare for the battles: start with being kind to yourself, then find people you trust.
2. Understand that change is inevitable and come from within. What you want now might not be what you want in five years. That’s okay. Embrace that.
3. Strive to become fearless of failure. Self-doubt is dangerous and gets in the way of success. Instead, cultivate a feeling of self-worth.

Sep 24, 2021
The Five-Minute Daily Ritual with Dr. Fred Schiffman
17:56

Fred J. Schiffman, MD, is a Hematologist/Oncologist and the Associate Physician-in-Chief at The Miriam Hospital, the Medical Director of the Lifespan Cancer Institute, the Sigal Family Professor of Humanistic Medicine and the Vice-Chairman of the Department of Medicine at the Warren Alpert School of Medicine at Brown University. Dr. Schiffman is a graduate of NYU Medical School. He completed his residency in Internal Medicine and fellowship in Hematology/Oncology from Yale New Haven Hospital. Dr. Schiffman has published extensively in hematologic malignancies and on a variety of subjects regarding the education of students and house staff. He has received numerous teaching awards, including the Charles C. J. Carpenter Award for excellence in the specialty of Internal Medicine, and the Human Dignity Award given by Home & Hospice Care of Rhode Island.

“At the end of the day, when you’re off the clock, go to the patient’s room. Ask about their day; answer their worries; reassure them of your support; give them your undivided attention; clear your mind of all distracting thoughts, and just be there for the patient.” Today we listen to Dr. Fred Schiffman share his journey, reflecting on our broader role as physicians in treating illness, not just disease. “Cure sometimes, relieve often, and comfort always” is one of Dr. Schiffman’s many mantras, encouraging us to allow our humanistic side to shine through as we care for our patients.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. The secret to dealing with learners that have difficulty is to capitalize on their strengths, and to never criticize the person, only the incorrect method or behavior.
2. Be present with the patient. Give them your undivided attention. When you are off the clock at the end of the day, spend five minutes to ask about their day.
3. As our career progresses, we often forget the compassion and love that inspired us to enter the field of medicine. To reconnect with the warmth of those ideals, simply take five minutes to reflect on what you would want if you were on the other side of the stethoscope.

Sep 08, 2021
Empty Your Backpack with Dr. Stephanie Halvorson
18:21

Stephanie Halvorson MD is the Chief, Division of Hospital Medicine and an Associate Professor of Medicine at Oregon Health & Science University. She completed her medical school at the University of Minnesota and her residency and chief residency in Internal Medicine at Oregon Health & Science University. In 2005, she joined the Division of Hospital Medicine in the Department of Medicine at OHSU and in addition to her clinical responsibilities, has served as an Associate Program Director for the Internal Medicine Residency, Director of Medicine Teaching Service and Medical Director for Clinical Integration at OHSU. She is a recipient of a number of teaching awards including Faculty Award for Excellence in palliative care, the Early Career Physician Award from ACP, and David Bristow Award from the Medical School for representing ideals of a true physician, and is a member of Society of Hospital Medicine and fellow of the American College of Physicians.

Dr. Stephanie Halvorson is efficient. If she has a list of errands, she will plan the route so she drives the least amount of miles and gets home in time. And yet, even she finds herself overextended at times. That’s why every year, she follows the advice of a mentor and “empties her backpack”. She takes everything that she’s doing out, and is very intentional about what she puts back in. Some projects go back, others might get handed off to someone else. This is an exercise in time management that removes the unnecessary to leave room for the essential.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Be yourself. Recognize who you are instead of changing yourself to fit. That will lead you to your superpower.
2. Empty your backpack. Every year, figure out your priorities: what do you keep, what needs to go? This is time management by subtracting the unnecessary.
3. Look for a mentor that will be brutally honest with you, even if you don’t want to hear it, and a mentee that will give you the comfort to be honest with them.

Aug 18, 2021
Treating Cancer Before it Spreads with Dr. Dan Theodorescu
19:26

Dan Theodorescu, MD, PhD, is the Professor of surgery, pathology and laboratory medicine, Phase-I Foundation Distinguished Chair and Director of the Samuel Oschin Comprehensive Cancer Institute and Cedars Sinai Cancer. Dr. Theodorescu completed his medical school from Queens University, Ontario and residency in Urology from University of Toronto. He then pursued a fellowship in Urologic Oncology from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Dr. Theodorescu has published over 300 articles in leading journals like Nature, Science, Cancer cell, PNAS, and JCI. He is the director for an inaugural Department of Defense Grant aimed at mentoring the careers of young faculty DOD awardees across the nation and is a member of the National Academy of Medicine.

Dr. Theodorescu has a philosophy: “Treat the cancer before it spreads.” He loves to extend this to his mentees and their problems. Dr. Theodorescu decided that the ultimate calling in his life is to help people, take care of them, and pursue a cure for their illnesses. Join in today as Dr. Theodorescu shares with us his mentorship philosophy of treating cancer (mentee problems) in the early stage and why personal chemistry between the mentor and mentee is integral to the mentorship relationship’s success.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Curiosity and mentorship are the two key ingredients to achieving success in life. Curiosity leads us to the right mentors, and what our mentors teach us stays with us for the rest of our lives.
2. Mentoring relations will vary. You need to have multiple mentors that offer you a diverse perspective and different outlooks on your challenges. Personal chemistry is crucial in sustaining that mentoring relationship.
3. A mentee’s problem is like cancer: it needs to be treated early-on. A mentee needs to actively engage with their mentors and prepare for times of crisis rather than approaching them when the crisis hits.

Aug 17, 2021
Find What Excites You with Dr. John Donnelly
18:01

Dr. John Donnelly has had a career at ChristianaCare committed to excellence in medical education. After completing medical school at Michigan State University College of Human Medicine, Dr. Donnelly did his dual training in Internal Medicine and Pediatrics at ChristianaCare and Nemours/Alfred I. DuPont Hospital for Children. Dr. Donnelly has worked with countless medical students and residents in his roles as a Core Faculty member for Internal Medicine and Pediatrics and Associate Program Director and Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency. In Dr. Donnelly’s current role as the Director of Medical Education for ChristianaCare’s Department of Medicine, he works closely with the student, resident and fellowship programs, as well as serving as the lead for faculty and faculty development.

Medical students: you do a rotation in medicine and you love it! Next month, you have a surgical rotation. You love that too! Sound familiar? How do you decide what to pursue for residency? Today, Dr. John Donnelly shares that for many medical students, and even residents considering fellowship, they worked with an inspiring mentor that drove them toward that field. That’s certainly one way to choose. When Dr. Donnelly mentors students to help them decide, he approaches each mentoring relationship with an open mind and finds what’s exciting for the student: Is it longitudinal care? Procedural skills? Acute care? Reflecting on these questions can help students decide on their best career path.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. It’s important to know what you want from a mentoring relationship. Have an agenda and take ownership of how often you meet and what you’ll discuss.
2. Build trust with patients by validating their concerns, whatever they are, and advocating for your patient. Then, empower them so they’re involved in their own care.
3. Success is about what your current goals are and you succeed by taking one step at a time towards them. Don’t make the status quo your new normal. Continue to strive towards accomplishing your goals.
4. The best trainees are those who give themselves to their patients and colleagues but also preserve themselves. And they have their own individual pursuits, so they don’t get burned out.

Aug 06, 2021
Persistence. Agility. Cancer Research with Dr. Wafik El-Deiry
18:26

Wafik El-Deiry, MD, PhD, FACP, is Associate Dean for Oncologic Sciences at the Warren Alpert Medical School, Director, Cancer Center at Brown University, practicing oncologist and ACS Professor. El-Deiry earned MD/PhD degrees at U. Miami, completed Medicine residency, Oncology fellowship at Johns Hopkins where he discovered CDK-inhibitor p21WAF1. He was HHMI Investigator, tenured Professor of Medicine, Genetics and Pharmacology, Associate Director for Physician-Scientist Training in Hem-Onc, and Radiobiology Program leader at Penn's Abramson Cancer Center. He was Chief of Hem-Onc at Penn State, and Deputy Director at Fox Chase Cancer Center. Dr. El-Deiry discovered TRAIL death receptor DR5, TRAIL-Inducing Compound #10 (TIC10), and founded Oncoceutics to bring TIC10/ONC201 to patients where it showed exceptional responses against glioblastoma. He has >400 publications, 5-edited books, H-Index of 120 with > 83,000 citations in Google Scholar. He is an ASCI, AAP member, Past President of Interurban Clinical Club (2013-2014), and Elected Member of Johns Hopkins Society of Scholars (2014). He won the Michael Brown Award (Penn), the Elizabeth and John Cox Award (Georgetown), and the International Kuwait Prize for Cancer. Dr. El-Deiry trained many students, fellows, physician-scientists, and continues to mentor scientists and faculty in basic and translational cancer research. Dr. El-Deiry is one of the original physician-scientists on social media who was recognized among the top 10 Oncologists in the world for impact on Twitter in 2021. Follow him @weldeiry

“If you try 10 things and one of them works, you'll be successful.” From naming the WAF1 gene as an oncology fellow to becoming one of the most cited researchers in oncology, Dr. El-Deiry shares with us his unique journey in the space of cancer research. Join us as he shares anecdotes from his early career, overcoming rejections and developing a persistent yet agile mindset to make his mark in medicine.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. If you limit yourself to one attempt and fail, you will think of yourself as a failure. Try your hand at ten things. If you succeed at even one of them, then you are successful.
2. There's a fine line between believing in what you do and understanding the limitations of your idea. That’s when you can decide to continue being persistent or decide to be agile and open to change.
3. Finding the right mentor is crucial. What separates a good mentee from a great mentee is their drive to keep trying different things and perpetually reaching out to their mentor to find the right answer.

Aug 04, 2021
From Playing Melodies to Curing Maladies with Dr. Matthew A. Sparks
23:00

Matthew A. Sparks, MD, is an Associate Professor of Medicine in the Department of Nephrology and the Program Director for the Nephrology Fellowship Program at the Duke University School of Medicine. He also serves as the Director of Medical Student Research, and Lead of Society for Early Education Scholars Program in the department of medicine. Dr. Sparks completed his medical school and residency in Internal Medicine from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. He then pursued a fellowship in Nephrology from Duke University School of Medicine. He serves as the co-program director of the Nephrology Social Media Collective (NSMC) and member of the board of directors of the Nephrology Journal Club (NephJC). He is also interested in finding ways to promote medical education. His focus is on leveraging social media to enhance learning in nephrology. He has been awarded the Excellence in Education Award in 2016 and the Young Physician-Scientist Award in 2017.

As medical students, residents, and interns, we always look to inspirations who always dreamt of becoming physicians from an early age and eventually achieved their goal. Bizarrely enough, it was a music mentor that inspired Dr. Matthew Sparks to switch from music and take up education in medicine. A few more influential mentors in his life and now he is a successful Nephrologist and pioneer in the field. Learn as he shares his journey, challenges, and the wisdom that he gained in his pursuit.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Our mentors need to be people who believe in us and have faith in our abilities, even when we fail to realize it ourselves.
2. The motivation and intention that we have before reaching out to potential mentors must be genuine. It’s a two-way street; the mentor and mentee both learn from each other.
3. Realizing that you are giving your best and working as hard as you can is enough. It gives you the strength to deal with failures and the challenges that are thrown your way.

Jul 23, 2021
Disabusing Disability with Dr. Oluwaferanmi Okanlami
17:13

Oluwaferanmi Okanlami MD is an Assistant Professor of Family Medicine, Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, and Urology at University of Michigan. He is also the Interim Director of Services for Students with Disabilities (SSD) and Director of Adaptive Sports & Fitness within the Division of Student Life at the University of Michigan. He is the Spokesperson for Guardian Life in their Equal & Able Partnership. Dr. Okanlami was featured on Robin Robert’s Good Morning America Series “Thriver Thursday,” and has a catch phrase, “Disabusing DisabilityⓇ.” He received Michigan Medicine’s Distinguished Early Career Alumni Award in 2020, and was given the “A Teacher’s Teacher Award” by the Academy of Medical Educators. He speaks around the country on topics related to Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion and has been featured on CBS News, Fox News, PBS NewsHour, and MSNBC’s Morning Joe.

During his orthopedic surgery residency, Dr. Oluwaferanmi Okanlami took care of patients with disabilities. He treated patients with spinal cord injuries, but didn’t know how inaccessible the world was because he had never experienced it that way. After the diving accident that left him paralyzed, Dr. Okanlami saw life from the other side of the stethoscope. He recognized that he had been unintentionally complicit in ableism that excluded an entire population. Today, Dr. Okanlami shares his message that diversity, equity, and inclusion are not just for minority populations. They are conversations that all of us need to be a part of.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Find your passion by asking what excites you. Then follow your passion and make your passion your profession. be intentional about where you hope to make an impact and really focus on that area.
2. Discussion on diversity, equity, and inclusion are not just for minorities. We all need to be concerned because any inequity will impact us all.
3. Disability is not the same as inability. Disability is ubiquitous if we identify it as that feeling of being less, feeling inadequate, and imagining how it would be to feel like that all the time.

Jul 14, 2021
Four Pillars of Success with Dr. Ruth Gotian
19:52

Ruth Gotian, EdD, MS, is the Chief Learning Officer and Assistant Professor of Education in Anesthesiology at Weill Cornell Medicine. She is the former Assistant Dean of Mentoring and Executive Director of the Mentoring Academy at Weill Cornell. She has been hailed by the journal Nature and Columbia University as an expert in mentoring and leadership development and is currently a contributor to Forbes where she writes about ‘optimizing success’. She was named to the Thinkers50 Radar list, has won numerous mentoring awards, and is currently researching the most successful people in our generation to learn about their habits and practices so we may optimize our own success.

After having interviewed a multitude of successful athletes, physicians, scientists, nobel laureates, Dr. Gotian has identified four pillars of success, common to peak performers: intrinsic motivation, work ethic, a strong foundation, and continued learning through informal means. Tune in today to learn from Dr. Ruth Gotian, one of the leading mentorship researchers on how physicians can adopt these four pillars in our practice and make the leap from good to great.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. When looking for mentors, get a diverse team of mentors from different levels: not just senior mentors, but also peers, juniors, and retirees. Retirees make great mentors because they have wisdom, time, and the desire to give back.
2. Mentorship starts with your mindset. Ask yourself: what is one thing I want to get better at? What is something I haven’t accomplished yet, and why not? Seeing yourself as a work-in-progress will allow you to move forward.
3. We often talk about the Do’s of mentorship. There is also much to learn from the Do not’s. Often, wisdom is not in what to do, but in what not to do.
4. Doctors who move from good to great don’t lose sight of their Why. Their intrinsic motivation helps them persevere.

Jul 01, 2021
Don’t Be in a Hurry; Take Your Time with Dr. Alan Wasserman
17:06

Alan Wasserman MD is the Eugene Meyer Professor of Medicine and Chair of the Department of Medicine at George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences. He is the former President of the George Washington University Medical Faculty Associates (MFA), which comprises the University’s full-time clinical faculty. Dr. Wasserman completed his medical school from Hahnemann Medical College and residency from Abington Memorial Hospital. He pursued a Fellowship in Cardiology from The George Washington University Medical Center. His Clinical and Research Interests include cardiac imaging, ischemic heart disease, and preventive cardiology. He is a former member of the National Board of the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society and has been awarded with the John F. Maher Memorial Laureate Award, which honors select Fellows and Masters of the ACP in the DC Chapter who have “shown by their lives and conduct an abiding commitment to excellence in medical care and service to the College”.

“I did something I thought was really important and really enjoyed.” That’s how Dr. Wasserman describes discovering his passions and navigating a successful career in medicine. He didn’t have massive reserves of wealth or ostentatious resources; what he did have was an inspiring father, trustworthy mentors, and a passion for what he did. When asked how he made important decisions about his career, he has one advice for all of us: “Don’t be in a hurry. Take your time. It’ll come to you.”

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Our parents and our mentors pay an important role in our lives. Let’s remember that impact with gratitude.
2. The mentor-mentee relationship shouldn’t be one-sided. There should be two active participants: it’s interactive and it’s teamwork.
3. A good internist takes care of what’s in front of them. A great internist is looking beyond: What brought the patient there? Who is your patient?

Jun 17, 2021
Reconnecting to your Why with Dr. Laxmi Suthar
20:42

Laxmi Suthar MD is the Program Director Of  UCLA-Olive View Categorical and Preliminary Internal Medicine Residency, and an Associate Professor Of Medicine at David Geffen School Of Medicine at UCLA. Dr. Suthar completed her medical school from Oregon Health Sciences University and residency in internal medicine from the University of California -- San Francisco. She also completed a teaching fellowship at UCSF during her training. Dr. Suthar’s academic areas of interest include medical education, pre-operative medicine, and women’s health. She has been awarded Attending of the Year awards at both UC Irvine and Olive View and the American College of Physicians Southern California Laureate Award in 2018 for her contribution to resident education. Dr. Suthar has been committed to the personal and professional growth of medical students and residents in a wide variety of practice settings.

When discussing the traits of the best residents she has trained, Dr. Laxmi Suthar mentions enthusiasm first: embracing the joy of medicine and what brought them into medicine. She says, ‘For me if a mentee has that joy, I can help them through anything else.” But what if they have lost that joy? “Then we have to actually work through that piece first.” Dr. Suthar does that by asking the resident why they applied to medical school in the first place. Once the resident identifies what they wanted to do in medicine, then, Dr. Suthar asks what’s stopping them from doing that? And once they know that, they can work on problem-solving and getting rid of the obstacles in order to get them back to that joy of medicine again.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. While trying to achieve balance, realize that you will have to prioritize for a particular day. You can't do it all on the same day. You will need to sacrifice some things.
2. Don’t be afraid to ask for what you need, whether in a contract negotiation, or with a mentor. And it’s important to have mentors throughout your career, not just as medical students or residents.
3. To help you build better relationships with patients, make notes of their personal details and bring them up at the start of their next visit. Also, tailor their treatment plans to suit their particular situations. This will improve compliance.
4. The three main traits of successful residents are 1, staying connected to their why, 2, flexibility of thought process, and 3, honesty with themselves and their mentor.

Jun 15, 2021
Little Acts of Kindness with Dr. Christopher Whinney
18:27

Christopher Whinney MD is the Department Chair for Hospital Medicine at the Cleveland Clinic, where he oversees 200 providers and 6 hospitals. He completed his medical school at Medical College of Pennsylvania and Hahnemann University and residency in Internal Medicine from Temple. His Clinical Interests include inpatient and perioperative medicine. He enjoys mentoring students, residents and faculty and has been awarded 2018 Master Teacher of the Year Award by ACP Ohio and the 2020 Center for Excellence in Coaching and Mentoring’s Mentor of the Year award at the Cleveland Clinic.

As physicians, we must strive for clinical expertise, but that's not where our work ends. Today, Dr. Christopher Whinney shares a personal anecdote of being in the hospital with his wife who had terminal breast cancer. He experienced more closely what it was like to be on the other side of the hospital bed. When Dr. Whinney looks back, it’s not just the clinical expertise that he remembers. It’s the compassion and the care brought to the bedside. Little acts of kindness that really made an impact: the doctor slowing down, taking a seat, asking his wife “what do you need?"

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. At the start of a rotation, ask everyone on your team for one interesting fact about them, beyond medicine, to get to know each other.
2. When you think about healthcare from the perspective of a patient, compassion is what patients remember, more than clinical expertise. Practice little random acts of kindness.
3. Mentorship is not a quick fix, it’s a journey. Think of it not as transactional, but as relational.
4. When deliberating whether to reach out to a mentor, just do it! If they say no, move on to someone else!

Jun 01, 2021
Tips for Effective Mentoring with Dr. Matthew Fitz
16:45

Dr. Matthew Fitz is a Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics at Loyola University Medical Center, Stritch School of Medicine. Dr. Fitz completed his medical school from University of Kentucky College of Medicine and residency in Internal Medicine & Pediatrics from Loyola University Medical Center. He was a Chief Resident, then the Internal Medicine Clerkship and Subinternship Director before transitioning into becoming the lead advisor for students in the Clinical Years and the Vice Chair for Faculty Development and Mentorship in the department of medicine. His areas of clinical and research interest include advocacy, advising, NBME subject exam assessment, and underserved medicine.

Finding an exceptional mentor is an integral part of any professional career, but it can be particularly invaluable for those in the early part of their careers in medicine. Today, Dr. Fitz speaks about starting and sustaining effective mentoring relationships, how the natural tension can actually work out in your favor, and what it really means to be a great follower & leader when it comes to receiving and accepting guidance.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Being a good leader means having a vision, communicating it effectively, working on and enabling a successful team, and surrounding yourself with people you can trust.
2. Natural tension is common in a mentor/mentee relationship. If it’s present, you shouldn't give up and walk away, especially since these relationships tend to be the most successful.
3. When working with a mentor, be respectful of their limited time. To show this, be readily available, specify the big picture, identify where you need help, and follow up afterwards.

May 13, 2021
Becoming Champions with Dr. Moises Auron
22:21

Moises Auron MD is an Associate Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics, Medical Director of Blood Management for the Cleveland Clinic, and Quality Improvement and Patient Safety Officer for the Department of Hospital Medicine on the Main Campus. He is also a part of the core faculty of the internal medicine residency program and the pediatrics hospital medicine fellowship program. Dr. Auron completed his medical school in National Autonomous University of Mexico and residency in Internal Medicine at National Medical Science and Nutrition Institute Salvador Zubiran and residency in Internal Medicine-Pediatrics at MetroHealth Medical Center in Cleveland, Ohio. His main areas of expertise are quality and patient safety, blood management, and medical education. He has been awarded with numerous awards from the Cleveland Clinic’s Center for Executive Coaching and Mentorship including the 2020 Susan J. Rehm Inspiration Award and the 2019 Mentor of the Year Award.

As medical students, we all do the normal: go on rounds, see patients, give presentations, and then go. Today, Dr. Moises Auron shares what champions do. They want to do the resident’s job. They’ll ask questions, provide input, and try to answer. While they may not always be right, their curiosity pushes them to go the extra mile. They’re the ones who will write up a clinical vignette and want to submit it. Dr. Auron explains that “students, residents that bring something to the table, share literature, make the whole team learn -- those are the champions.”

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Find the balance between pride and humility. Have the pride to make autonomous decisions about patient care, but also the humility to ask questions. No question is a silly question.
2. There is a fine line between imposter syndrome and growth mindset. How can you be confident and yet open to ask questions? Engage in regular self-reflection. Reflect on what you’ve achieved (confidence) and also look at your knowledge gaps (growth).
3. Be fearless in reaching out to mentors, Don’t be intimidated! In fact, reach out to those farthest away because they have the wealth of experience.
4. To make the good-to-great transition, go the extra mile. Take the initiative with excitement and enthusiasm. Go beyond with energy and motivation.

Apr 30, 2021
Good Doctors, Good Leaders with Dr. Patricia Conolly
21:06

Patricia Conolly‌ MD‌ is the former ‌Executive‌‌ Vice‌ ‌President‌ ‌of‌ ‌Information‌ ‌Technology‌ ‌& Associate‌ ‌Executive‌ ‌Director‌ ‌on‌ ‌the‌ ‌National‌ ‌Kaiser‌ ‌Permanente‌ ‌Leadership‌ ‌Team.‌ ‌She is currently practicing as an internist and teaching‌ ‌at‌ ‌UCSF‌ ‌and‌ ‌Alameda‌ ‌Health‌ ‌Systems‌ ‌in‌ ‌Oakland‌ ‌California.‌ ‌Dr.‌ ‌Conolly‌ ‌completed‌ ‌her medical‌ ‌school‌ ‌from‌ ‌UCLA‌ ‌and ‌‌residency‌ ‌from‌ ‌Kaiser‌ ‌Permanente‌ ‌Medical‌ ‌Center‌ ‌in‌ ‌Oakland.‌ ‌She‌ ‌‌previously‌ ‌served‌ ‌as‌ ‌Director‌ ‌of‌ ‌the‌ ‌Internal‌ ‌Medicine‌ ‌Residency‌ ‌Program‌ ‌&‌ ‌Chief‌ ‌of‌ ‌Medicine‌ ‌at‌ ‌Kaiser‌ ‌Oakland.‌ ‌Dr.‌‌ Conolly‌ ‌is‌ ‌a‌ ‌fellow‌ ‌of‌ ‌the‌ ‌American‌ ‌College‌ ‌of‌ ‌Physicians‌ ‌and‌ ‌has‌ ‌served‌ ‌as‌ ‌chair‌ ‌on‌ ‌the‌ ‌board‌ ‌of‌ ‌directors‌ ‌of‌ ‌the‌ ‌American‌ ‌Board‌ ‌of‌ ‌Internal‌ ‌Medicine.‌ ‌ 

Imagine working as an internist (or remember it) when the EMR was being rolled out at your hospital for the very first time. You see the potential to collect huge amounts of data through this technology, which would benefit patients, but you also recognize the myriad of challenges that it would bring. You voice your concerns and find yourself invited to help solve the problems as part of the leadership team. This was the situation Dr. Patricia Conolly found herself in. Years later as the Executive Vice President of Information Technology on the National Kaiser Permanente Leadership team, Dr. Conolly shares that “some of the same skills that help us be a good doctor are skills that help us be a good leader.” In fact, the key lies in listening, says Dr. Conolly. “As a leader, you often engage with people you disagree with. If you only try to convince them you’re right, you don’t hear what they’re right about.”

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. There are enormous opportunities available in medicine. Find where you want to fit in, where your soul lies, and where you want to make an impact, and run after it.
2. Voicing areas for improvement isn’t enough. You have to get engaged in solving the problem. That’s where we start to make a difference.
3. A lot of the skills we need as a doctor are the same skills we need as a leader: listen to people who don’t agree with you. Then, focus on the shared end goal.
4. Great mentees are intellectually curious, persistent, and creative. This is what mentors are looking for in the people they take time to invest in.

Apr 21, 2021
When Passion Fuels Curiosity with Dr. Marijane Hynes
17:39

Marijane Hynes, MD, is a Clinical Professor of Medicine at George Washington University. After completing her medical school and residency at Georgetown University, Dr. Hynes became interested in trying to help her patients lose weight as a treatment for many of their medical problems. In 2009, Dr. Hynes started The Weight Loss Clinic, which focuses on behavior changes in diabetes prevention and is partnered with many groups, such as Whole Foods to promote healthy eating. Dr. Hynes' goal is to develop a center focused on obesity prevention and treatment for which she has advocated at conferences around the country.

Here’s a secret we’re going to let you in on: It’s okay to not know exactly where you’re going. Because the truth is: You never know what opportunities are around the corner. According to Dr. Marijane Hynes, the key is finding a passion within medicine to fuel your curiosity and engagement—and seeing where it takes you. The fact that Dr. Hynes found her way into specializing in obesity was all by chance. But she attests this happy accident to an openness and enthusiasm for learning. Today, we’ll also learn about how medicine is always a team sport. That everyone is an equal part of the team. And that empathy is a powerful tool for connection and positive change.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Medicine is a team sport. Our support staff is not inferior to us. They have skills that we simply don't possess and they can add to the experience in ways that we can't.
2. Writing out goals is important. Even if these goals are 5-10 years down the road.
3. One of the most important things we can do in our encounters is to tell our patients “I can help you.”

Apr 08, 2021
Different Paths to a Successful Career with Dr. Yul Ejnes
21:52

Yul Ejnes MD is the Chair-elect of the Board of Directors of the American Board of Internal Medicine, Chair Emeritus of the ACP Board of Regents and a Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine at Brown Medical School, his alma mater where he completed his medical school and residency training. Dr. Ejnes is also the founding partner of Coastal Medical, the largest physician owned and governed primary care practice in the state of Rhode Island. Dr. Ejnes has been awarded Mastership by the American College of Physicians and the Dean’s Excellence in Teaching Award from Brown Medical School and is a frequently invited guest lecturer and contributor to KevinMD.com.

Although the path through medical school is fairly regimented, the paths open up after residency. Private practice is one possible choice. Today, Dr. Yul Ejnes shares a unique career path, from private practice to Brown Medical School; leadership in a primary care physician group to professional societies. When Dr. Ejnes advocates for having variety in your career, he doesn’t just talk the talk. A primary care physician through it all, Dr. Ejnes measures his success as “ going to bed even on a day that ended much later than you expected, having a smile on your face, saying ‘we did a lot of good stuff today'.”

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Don’t say yes to everything, but when you say yes, give it your 110%. That’s what catches people’s attention and creates a chain of sponsors that can lead to more opportunities.
2. When you need more confidence to see yourself doing amazing things, mentors can give you the encouragement you need to take risks and go beyond what you thought was possible.
3. To move from a good internist to a great internist, work on making your patient relationships non-adversarial. Your goal is not to lower someone’s blood pressure, it’s to keep the patient engaged which leads to better long-term effects.
4. Introduce variety in your career. Find other interests outside of patient care and protect time for yourself to have a degree of control over your schedule.

Apr 02, 2021
The Pies That Define our Life with Dr. Stefanie R. Brown
13:24

Stefanie R. Brown, MD is the Internal Medicine Residency Program Director at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine and Section Chief for the Med-Peds and Pediatric Hospital Medicine. Dr. Brown completed her medical school from the University of Cincinnati, pursued a residency in Med-Peds from Rutgers New Jersey followed by a chief resident year. Prior to this role, Dr. Brown has been the program director of the Med-Peds Residency at the University of Miami as well as the Assistant Dean for Diversity and Multicultural Affairs. She is the recipient of a number of awards including the Women in Academic Medicine Excellence in Mentorship Award.

Today, Dr. Stefanie Brown shares an analogy that a past mentor taught her about achieving excellence: In medicine, there are two pies that define your life.  The first contains the things you are responsible for. The slices are made up of your job and your responsibilities, whether it be clinical, administrative, research, or teaching. But the second pie is full of the things you really like to do: The slices in this pie contain all the things you are passionate about. The key to success—and excellence—is getting these two pies to intersect as much as possible. The more these pies overlap, the more we will accomplish with less stress and effort.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Moving from good to great is about knowing where your strengths are, and knowing what you need to improve on. From good to great, comes greatness to excellence, then excellence to amazing. And when you are able to pay it forward to others…that is when you move from amazing to inspiring.
2. If you’re not at the table, you’re on the menu. As residents, we have the opportunity to be in the environments where decisions are made, we can sit in on committees, and learn from the best so that we will be more prepared in the future to hold our own seats at the table.
3. In medicine, there are two pies. The first one contains your job responsibilities. And the second one is about what you are passionate about. The goal is to get these two pies to intersect: The better it will be for us, and the less effort it takes to achieve excellence.

Mar 26, 2021
Taking an Alternate Path with Dr. Peter Alperin
12:35

Peter Alperin, MD is a practicing internist at the San Francisco VA Medical Center and leads the growth of the HIPAA compliant physician messaging services at Doximity as the Vice President of Product. He has been the Founding Chair and a Member of Medical Advisory Board at Doximity, Inc. since 2011. He was previously the Vice President of Medicine and Products at Archimedes, a Kaiser Permanente backed start-up where he led the product team on projects includes ARCHeS, a technology platform for clinical trial outcome prediction. Throughout his medical career, he has served as director of medical informatics at Brown & Toland Medical Group and was an early employee at ePocrates where he designed a formulary tool still used by over 100,000 physicians. He completed his medical school from UT Southwestern and residency in internal medicine from UCSF.

Taking an alternate path in the medical field can be daunting, prompting fears of failure. Dr. Peter Alperin discusses how he overcame that fear and navigated a successful career in healthcare technology. He identifies some of the skills doctors tend to have--and some they don’t--that lead to success in other fields. He shares the importance of building “muscles” that will lead to success, such as taking risks, talking to people, working on a team of equals, being humble, and better appreciating the time spent with a patient. Finally, he underscores the need to seek mentors who can help you pinpoint and acquire the skills you need to achieve your goals.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Physicians acquire certain skills in their training that transfer well into alternate fields like business or technology. Learning to be comfortable with risk and learning to elicit information from patients can serve you not only in medicine, but anything you do.
2. As a physician outside the field of clinical medicine, you have to be able to identify what you don’t know. You have to learn to work on a team of equals and to be humble when exposed to ideas from those outside the world of medicine.
3. Embrace mini-mentorship experiences. You’ll find that most people are very generous with their time if you approach them to ask about what they do and how you can get there.

Mar 19, 2021
Building a Development Team with Dr. Kathleen Finn
21:23

Kathleen Finn, MD, is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and the Senior Associate Program Director for resident and faculty development at Massachusetts General Hospital. Dr. Finn completed her undergraduate degree from the University of Pennsylvania and studied at the University of Oxford as a Thouron Scholar where she obtained a Master of Philosophy in Social Anthropology. She attended Harvard Medical School and did her residency training at Brigham and Women's Hospital. Her clinical and research interests include medical education, inpatient transitions of care, quality improvement, resident supervision, and inpatient alcohol withdrawal. Along with her role in the residency program, she also educates at the faculty level as co-director of the frontline case conference series for the division of general medicine and is co-founder of the Boston Society of Hospital Medicine chapter. She's the recipient of major teaching awards and was named one of the top 10 hospitalists by the American College of Physicians in 2014, and won the 2020 Excellence in Teaching award from the Society of Hospital Medicine.

Mentorship puts the “ment” in “development". And today, Dr. Kathleen Finn advises us why—and how—we should grow our own development team as we journey through our career. She offers a new perspective on the importance of building a team of mentors. A development team is made up of mentors of all types: A coach who can help you think about your strengths and will guide you in personal growth. An advocate or sponsor who will go to bat for you when it comes to seeking out and grabbing new opportunities that come your way. And lastly, she recommends getting a therapist to help you process your emotions. Being a physician is an emotional job, Dr. Finn reminds us, and the more we can understand our own emotions, and the emotions of our patients, the healthier we will be.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Move out of the finite mindset. Focus on developing self-compassion, self-regard, and kindness early on.
2. Don’t delay decision-making: Make decisions in the now, and don’t worry so much about the three-year or five-year plan. And remember that nothing is permanent.
3. When it comes to mentorship, build a development team: Teams of mentors for different needs, advocates, and even therapists. Aside from that, ask others what your strengths are, and start every day with that positive mindset.
4. The transition from a good internist and a great internist is when you understand how to put the patient's agenda first and let them be the driver—no negotiations.

Mar 12, 2021
Dreaming Big with Dr. Gifty Kwakye
19:35

Gifty Kwakye, MD is a Clinical Assistant Professor for Surgery in the division of colorectal surgery at University of Michigan. Dr Kwakye completed her medical school from Yale University and holds a Masters in Public Health from Johns Hopkins. She completed her general surgery residency at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School and colorectal surgery fellowship at the University of Minnesota. Dr Kwakye joined the faculty at the University of Michigan in 2018. As a resident she received multiple awards including the Robert T. Osteen and the Partners Health System Medical Education awards for excellence in teaching. Her passion for global health was also recognized with a Global Health Scholarship award from Johns Hopkins during her public health training.

Sometimes it seems like our dreams are too big for us. But it is these dreams that propel us forward. Dr. Gifty Kwakye shares how dreaming big guided her from a village in Ghana to a medical school at Yale University. Today, a surgeon at the University of Michigan, Dr. Kwakye emphasizes the role of mentors as "cheerleaders", the importance of believing in yourself, and connecting to our "why" as the keys to unlocking success. She leaves us with a message of dreaming big and being surprised at how many times those dreams actually come true!

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Stay connected to your why and put it on the wall. Use it as a tool to pick you up when the going gets tough.
2. Mentors are attracted to mentees who know their why, what drives them, and are able to communicate it such that the mentor can really pick up that passion because it's that passion that connects the mentor and the mentee.
3. Medicine is not a sprint; it’s a marathon. It’s not how quickly we can finish. It’s whether we finish at the top of our game.

Mar 10, 2021
Putting Together a Board of Advisors with Dr. Irene Estores
21:19

Irene Estores MD is an Associate Professor of the department of medicine and department of orthopedics at UF College of Medicine. She is also the Director of the integrative medicine program at University of Florida (UF Health). Dr. Estores completed her medical school at University of the Philippines and her residency in physical medicine & rehabilitation from Sinai Hospital - Johns Hopkins Hospital inter-institutional program. She then completed her integrative medicine fellowship at the University of Arizona Center for integrative medicine. To expand her skills as a physician leader, she also completed an integrative healthcare leadership program at Duke University with its Center for Integrative Medicine and Fuqua School of Business.

When Dr. Irene Estores was going through the Duke Integrative Healthcare Leadership Program, one of her assignments was to put together her personal board of advisors. Dr. Estores’ sister, who has a leadership position, but isn’t in the medical field, gave her criteria to help her choose her mentors: "You need someone who can hold your hand, be a shoulder to cry on, but can also kick your butt." Mentorship doesn’t have to come from one person. You need to find people who will not only hear you and support you, but also help you figure out how to get unstuck. 

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Mentoring relationships can be with anyone who shares your values and passions. Your mentors don’t have to be in your institution or even in your profession!
2. Residents: identify what makes you feel alive and lifts your spirit. That will help you stay grounded, which will help you when speaking to patients.
3. Take inspiration from role models who have walked your bath before you.
4. Mentors help you identify your blind sports. It’s helpful to have a board of advisors to help you become a better version of yourself.

Mar 09, 2021
Three Steps to a Career Path with Dr. Andrew Tisser
19:02

Andrew Tisser DO is a board-certified emergency physician and a physician career strategist. He is the Medical Director of Rochester Regional Health Urgent Care-Batavia and also works at the United Memorial Medical Center. Dr. Tisser earned his osteopathic medicine degree from the New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine. He then completed a residency in Emergency Medicine from Upstate Medical University. Dr. Tisser hosts his own podcast show called Talk2MeDoc - which focuses on issues relating to the early career physician.

While medical training is a very linear path, building a medical career can be more challenging. How can residents find their right career path? Today, Dr. Andrew Tisser shares his three-step process. First, figure out who you are and what your values are. Think back to who you were before medical school. The things you liked don’t go away when you bury them in medical training. Next, figure out what you’d like to be doing for eight to 12 hours a day. Sometimes it’s easier to start with what you don’t like doing. Then, third is the strategy: career experiments, talk to people in the industry, see what’s out there, what is possible, and work towards those goals. 

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Learning which path to choose is a three-step process: First, who are you as a person (before medical school)? Second, what do you love doing? Third, strategize and plan a path based on who you are and what you love.
2. Talk to people like a person. Acknowledge people, say hello, sit with patients, make an effort to learn people’s names.
3. Great mentors don’t sugarcoat things. They help you see what you can’t and help you figure out solutions. Find someone you trust enough to be vulnerable with.
4. At any point in your career, you have options. It’s never too late to go after what you love doing.

Mar 05, 2021
Passion Follows Opportunity with Dr. Eduard Vasilevskis
17:17

Eduard Vasilevskis MD is the Chief of Hospital Medicine and an Associate Professor of Medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Dr. Vasilevskis completed his medical school at Oregon Health Sciences University followed by a residency and chief residency at the University of California San Francisco. He then completed a health services research fellowship at the Institute for Health Policy Studies UCSF. Dr. Vasilevskis has been interested in examining delirium as a measure of ICU and hospital quality. Dr. Vasilevskis has been interested in examining delirium as a measure of ICU and hospital quality and has developed a unique prediction model, the acute brain dysfunction prediction model, that predicts delirium for each day in the ICU. His most recent research focuses on polypharmacy and reducing medications in older patients. He's also the clerkship director for the internal medicine program for the Medical School at Vanderbilt.

“Follow your passion” is great advice for those who know what their passion is. You follow your passion and create your own opportunities.  But what if you don’t know what sets your soul on fire? Today, Dr. Eduard Vasilevskis shares his belief that “passion follows opportunity, not the other way around.” It’s more common that an opportunity presents itself. Take advantage of it and then ask yourself, “Is a passion developing? Do I love what I’m doing?” If your answer is yes, you start a positive feedback loop: passion grows, you create more opportunities. If the answer is no, Dr. Vasilevskis says, just look for another opportunity!

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. It’s not about when you make a decision, but that you make a decision. If an opportunity arises, and it aligns with your passion, forget the time clock and take the opportunity.
2. The second sentence of the history is about the patient’s usual state of health: who are they before and apart from this illness? It’s a way to develop a relationship with the patient and to have it in writing.
3. Passion follows opportunity. You may not know what you love to do. Take an opportunity and reflect on it. Here is where mentors can help: they might be able to see in you what you can’t see in yourself.
4. Be humbly confident. We need to commit and let our mentors know what we’re thinking, while at the same time staying humble and open to learning.

Mar 03, 2021
Offering Kindness with Dr. Bethany Pellegrino
18:49

Bethany Pellegrino, MD, FACP, FASN, is an Associate Professor of Medicine and the Chief of the Section of Nephrology at West Virginia University. Dr. Pellegrino completed her medical school, residency in internal medicine, as well as her fellowship in nephrology from West Virginia University. She is currently Medical Director of the Renal Center of Keyser (WV) and the Renal Center of Moorefield (WV). She has served as the Nephrology Program Director in the past. Dr. Pellegrino's interests include home dialysis therapies and improving access for patients with kidney disease throughout West Virginia. She has received many awards including the Cornerstone of Recovery Award and the Press Ganey Top Provider Award: Patient Satisfaction for multiple years.

Dr. Bethany Pellegrino’s mentor told her the most profound thing about medicine: “Sometimes all we have to offer our patients is kindness.” This helped shape the kind of physician that Dr. Pellegrino became. She realizes that sometimes she can’t make the patients better. But she can offer them kindness every day. And what does that kindness look like? “Sometimes the most important thing you’re going to do for a patient that day is sit in their room and listen to them.” Dr. Pellegrino has extended that kindness by listening to her mentees as well. She’s drawn to trainees that have doubt, who worry that they’re not doing the right thing. She offers help by listening, and kindness by telling them she’s been there, and they’ll make it through.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. As a mentee, identify your problem areas and approach people who can help you in those areas, especially during transition, such as medical school to residency, or residency to fellowship.
2. Success comprises lots of small successes. Catalog your small successes! When you’re feeling overwhelmed, look at your catalog for inspiration and motivation.
3. Even as a busy resident, take time to show kindness to patients. That can go a long way.
4. Knowing what you want and customizing your training to align with those goals might require you to say “no” to some opportunities presented by your mentors. Yes, it’s difficult, but you’d be surprised how understanding they can be.

Feb 27, 2021
Keeping Your Antenna Up with Dr. Santhanam Lakshminarayanan
22:46

Santhanam Lakshminarayanan MD is an Associate Professor of Medicine and the Chief of the Division of Rheumatology at the University of Connecticut. He is also the program director for the rheumatology fellowship program and the director of the Rheumatology Fellow Journal Club at UConn health. Dr. Lakshminarayanan earned his medical degree from The Armed Forces Medical College in India. He then pursued a residency in Internal Medicine and rheumatology fellowship training at the UConn School of Medicine. His research interests include scleroderma, SLE, and the use of P32 radioactive synovectomy in refractory inflammatory monoarthritis. Dr. Lakshminarayanan serves on the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) subcommittee for medical student and resident education, and ACR New England OSCE program development for rheumatology fellows.

Wellness shouldn’t be an online course you take or a box you tick off. Wellness is something that needs to be pursued personally. Residents have so much work to do and overwhelm is a constant threat. Today, Dr. Santhanam Lakshminarayanan tells us that one way to promote wellness is to de-stress trainee’s clinical environments. Overwhelming trainees takes away their joy of medicine and when that goes, stress goes up and wellness becomes a real issue. Dr. Lakshminarayanan reminds us to keep our antenna up for our colleagues and ask them how they’re doing. While you don’t want to invade anyone’s privacy, you also don’t want to build walls so your colleagues can’t communicate with you. Be open and let them know you’re available.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. When you choose a mentor, choose someone who is invested in you and wants to see you succeed.
2. When a patient walks in for a follow-up, you shouldn’t have to check the charts to find out how they are. Be observant during their first visit to help you remember the patient.
3. Patient advocacy is fundamental to being a physician. As a resident, if you notice the attending not addressing a symptom the patient told you about, speak up. Don’t be intimidated by the attending’s time constraints.
4. Wellness needs to be pursued more personally and be put in the perspective of the person and their environment. Also, when you’re working as a team, “keep your antenna up” for your colleagues’ wellness.

Feb 26, 2021
Stick With It with Dr. Susan Quaggin
18:22

Susan Quaggin MD is the Charles Horace Mayo Professor of Medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, the Director of the Feinberg Cardiovascular Research Institute and the Chief of the Division of Nephrology in the Department of Medicine. Dr. Quaggin completed her Medical school, residency in internal medicine, and fellowship in nephrology from the University of Toronto and then pursued a postdoctoral fellowship at Yale University. Over her career, she has contributed to over 150 publications in nephrology and vascular biology, and her research lab has helped enhance the understanding of common glomerular diseases and inspire the development of promising therapeutics. She is an elected member of the Association of American Physicians and the National Academy of Medicine and is currently serving as the President of the American Society of Nephrology.

After Dr. Susan Quaggin completed her nephrology fellowship, she picked up a pipette for the very first time upon entering a basic science lab. Her mentor, Dr. Mitchell Halperin told her, “You’re leaving at the top of your clinical game. In the research lab, you’re gonna be at the very bottom and you’re going to have to walk up that hill again.” Those first two years, nothing seemed to work for Dr. Quaggin. There were times she just wanted to go back and practice medicine. But she stuck with it. Why? “There were all these questions I’d seen as a resident and fellow that we did not have treatments for. The patients would be asking about their diseases and what’s on the horizon. That drove me to stick with it.” The strength of her vision allowed her to persevere into becoming a nationally recognized physician scientist today.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Mentors can have a tremendous impact when making important life decisions.
2. Take a step and reach out to mentors. You’re not bothering senior faculty when you reach out. On the contrary! They get really excited! It’s a win-win for everybody!
3. The power of your vision can help you persevere past challenges, despite failure.
4. Identify the value that every team member brings. Remember that medicine is a team sport, not an individual superstar game anymore.

Feb 25, 2021
Be a 'Persister' with Dr. Elie Berbari
19:30

Elie Berbari, MD is a Professor of Medicine and Chair of the Division of Infectious Diseases at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. Dr. Berbari graduated from St. Joseph Medical School and completed his residency in Internal medicine from the State University of New York Health Science Center before joining Mayo for a Fellowship in Infectious Diseases. His primary area of research interest is osteoarticular infections specifically prosthetic joint infections. A passionate clinician educator, Dr. Berbari has consistently been awarded by the Department of Medicine at Mayo Clinic for Excellence in Clinical Teaching and was named Top Educator by the Internal Medicine Residency Program at the Mayo Clinic in 2014.

The values that our parents embody and pass on to us when we’re growing up have the ability to shape our lives. Lucky for Dr. Elie Berbari, his parents instilled in him the values of education, hard work, and persistence. Today, Dr. Berbari shares stories from his life: growing up during the civil war in Lebanon, getting shot when he was 12, losing both his parents in med school, moving to the United States to complete his residency -- all formidable challenges. It would have been easy for Dr. Berbari to give up at any of those points, but he persisted.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Success comes from hard work plus persistence. Being a persister is key: don’t stop in the face of challenges or failure.
2. A majority of residents around the country feel burned out. An antidote to burnout is to practice gratitude -- be grateful for what you have and express it -- and forgiveness -- don’t hold a grudge against inequities.
3. Finding the right mentor is key to an effective mentoring relationship. Try finding someone who’s different than you, and make sure it’s someone you’re comfortable speaking your mind with.

Feb 25, 2021
The Power of Authenticity with Dr. Lisa Skinner
13:40

Dr Lisa Skinner is an Associate Professor of Medicine and the Internal Medicine Residency Program Director at the David Geffen School of Medicine at the University of California Los Angeles. She completed her Medical school from Yale University School of Medicine and Residency in Internal Medicine from UCLA School of Medicine where she stayed on as a Chief Resident. She maintains an active clinical practice focusing on women’s health at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center and Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital. A graduate of the Stanford Faculty Development Center, Dr. Skinner is passionate about faculty development around medical teaching, especially focused on the topics of coaching, learning climate and feedback. She is an instructor for the medical education fellowship at UCLA and a regional hub leader for the ACGME initiative: Developing Faculty Competencies in Assessment. She has received numerous awards including the housestaff teaching award at UCLA.

What does it mean to be authentic? Today, Dr. Lisa Skinner explains that the best mentees are those who own their story—and share it. She shares that when she meets medical students, the number one thing she looks for is a ‘real’ person. Someone who isn't just trying to say what they think others want to hear. Rather, those who recognize—and own—their own unique superpowers. Dr. Skinner reflects that although we all have different backgrounds, different biographies, and different stories; when we share them with each other, we find that we are more alike than we initially thought. So, she encourages us to be authentic, especially when we communicate with our mentors. It's often our unique stories, our vulnerabilities, our hopes and dreams that motivate them. 

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Have a moral compass. Look for examples in the people in your life that inspire you. Their values and inspiration will guide you.
2. Mentors are looking for a relationship with us, too. And the one thing that will strengthen that relationship is learning to be authentic with ourselves and our story.
3. Recognize and own our unique superpowers, and share those with our mentors. Our stories are powerful and will help us connect to our mentors.

Feb 24, 2021
The Key is in the Details with Dr. Thomas Russo
19:02

Thomas Russo MD is the Professor and Chief of Infectious Diseases at Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. Dr. Russo completed his Medical school at McGill University and Residency in Internal Medicine from Harvard-New England Deaconess Hospital. He then pursued a Fellowship in Infectious Disease from Tufts-New England Medical Center. He has an active, nationally funded translational research program and research focuses on Gram-negative bacilli (GNB). Dr. Russo has been the recipient of many awards and honors including the Veterans Administration Biomedical Laboratory R&D Senior Clinical Scientist Award.

Modern medicine is complex. We have tons of data available on our patients now. Residents spend so much of their time in just gathering the data and dealing with logistics that the time to pay attention to details becomes a rare commodity. Today, Dr. Thomas Russo explains how the details can make the difference: Observing the patients from the moment they walk in, asking the patients about their kids, pets, travel, and occupation. Gathering all those details in the chart, thinking about the patient and then letting the differential diagnosis go through your head. All of those can be the difference between a correct diagnosis and a misdiagnosis. Pay attention to the details.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Spend more time asking the ‘why’ questions and think about the patient rather than just focus on gathering data. The key to that is in the details – the little things we should not ignore.
2. To maximize our potential, we should see as many patients as we can. Maximize our exposure to clinical experience, and from that, build our knowledge database. Ask for help when you need it and keep working hard.
3. Don’t forget the importance of history and examination. Even with more technology and investigative options, those can be put to better use if we practice rigorous history and examination.

Feb 19, 2021
The Path for Long Term Success with Dr. Richard Bucala
21:32

Richard Bucala, MD is the Waldemar Von Zedtwitz Professor of Medicine, Professor of Pathology, Epidemiology & Public Health, and Chief of Rheumatology, Allergy & Immunology at Yale School of Medicine. Dr. Bucala completed his Medical school at Weill Cornell and Residency at Brigham & Women's Hospital. He pursued a Fellowship in Rheumatology from the Hospital for Special Surgery. He studies the mechanisms by which protective immune responses lead to immunopathology and his lab is leading multidisciplinary efforts to develop immunotherapies. Dr. Bucala also is credited with the discovery of the fibrocyte, which is being targeted therapeutically in different fibrosing disorders. He is a co-founder of Cytokine Networks and of MIFCOR, a biotechnology startup. He is the Editor-in-Chief of Arthritis & Rheumatology and has served on numerous advisory boards for the NIH, the pharmaceutical industry, academia, and private foundations.

The buzzword usually is ‘goals’: We are often asked - what are your goals? Often told to dream big and make lofty goals. Not much is said about the path we should follow to achieve our goals. Today, Dr. Richard Bucala reflects on his journey and shares how the path is more valuable than the end point. Medicine is a long educational path, but if pursued with honesty, integrity and diligence, forms us into the person we aspire to become. Focusing on these virtues while traversing this path helps us develop our professional character and ultimately determines our professional success in the long term.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. The path is more valuable than the goal. The way we achieve our goals – with honesty, integrity, ad character – is more important for the long-term, than short-term successes.
2. Honesty is knowing one’s limitations; : realizing that no one person has all the answers, gives us the humility to be a great team player. But even more important than honesty is courage. Without courage, we cannot be honest.
3. Embrace the complexity and multidimensionality of medicine. It’s what makes medicine so gratifying.

Feb 18, 2021
Embracing a Collaborative Mindset with Dr. Adam Atoot
10:16

Adam Atoot, MD  is currently the director for the transitional year resident training program at Hackensack Meridian Health Palisades Medical Center. Dr. Atoot earned his medical degree from the American University of Antigua and completed his residency in internal medicine from Staten Island University Hospital at Northwell Health. As one of the youngest program directors in the country, he takes pride in mentoring residents and medical students. His focus area in clinical medicine is in providing preventive care to his patients.

As the director for residents’ training, Dr. Adam Atoot interacts with medical students and residents regularly. He believes that these interactions should be collaborative: yes, he teaches his students, but he recognizes that students can also teach him, or each other. By encouraging his students to read daily and asking about what they read, he demonstrates that they can also share knowledge. It’s not just about one person having all the answers. Introducing new ideas leads to questioning what happens in the clinic: searching for the rationale or looking for ways to improve medicine as it is today. Today, Dr. Atoot shares his vision of a collaborative learning environment.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Students and residents should strive for a collaborative mindset, be humble, and realize that we know that we don’t know.
2. Question what you do in clinical practice and understand the rationale behind what you’re doing. This questioning can lead to innovation and improvement.
3. The best mentor/mentee relationships are between people who have intellectual compatibility: that are interested in the same thing and are on the same path.

Feb 16, 2021
The Great Symphony of Medicine with Dr. Gailen Marshall
22:53

Gailen Marshall, MD, PhD, FACP, FACAAI, FAAAAI, is The R. Faser Triplett Sr MD Chair of Allergy and Immunology, and a Professor of Medicine, Pediatrics, Pathology and Population Health Sciences at the University of Mississippi Medical Center. Dr. Marshall completed his medical school from University Of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and residency from University of Iowa Roy J. and Lucille A. Carver College of Medicine. He pursued a fellowship in Allergy and Immunology from the University of Tennessee-Memphis. Dr. Marshall has published over 200 original articles, reviews, perspectives, book chapters and is a frequent keynote speaker and presenter at various international conferences. He has received many awards and honors including Gold Headed Cane Award by the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology and has been featured in America’s Top Doctors, Who’s Who in Science and Engineering and named the Top Allergist/Immunologist by International Association of HealthCare Professionals.

Modern medicine seems designed to compartmentalize patients. You have a problem with your heart. Your joints ache. You have diabetes. Each one requires specialists who focus on one part of a patient. But a patient is a whole person with a whole life and everything is interconnected. Today, Dr. Gailen Marshall shares his view of patient care by giving us an analogy, which begins with this question: “For a great symphony, which is the most important instrument?” There is no “most important instrument”. A symphony is great when all the instruments play their part in harmony. And according to Dr. Marshall, that’s what the best patient-centered healthcare should do.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. We should work hard enough to say at the end of the day, “it’s time to relax.” It’s okay to be tired as long as you wake up the next day, still loving the work you do.
2. Try to achieve balance between humility and self-confidence: know that you know a lot, but there’s more that you don’t know.
3. Mentor relationships are two-way streets. For a mentee, find someone who has a genuine interest in you, have a realistic expectation of what you want, discern who you are and find a mentor who is that way.
4. The difference between a good physician and a great one is that the good one is competent; the great one is committed. A great physician doesn’t compartmentalize a patient, but rather treats them as a whole.

Feb 12, 2021
Establish Trust with Patients with Dr. Padmanabhan Premkumar
15:39

Padmanabhan Premkumar, MD, is an Associate Program Director at the University of Connecticut - Hartford Hospital. He also serves as the Medical Director of Clinical Documentation. Dr. Premkumar was born in Southern India and migrated to Canada during high school. After graduating from The University of Toronto, Dr. Premkumar earned his medical degree from Ross University School of Medicine, and completed residency and a subsequent year of chief residency at UConn Health. His passion for teaching and education has led him to pursue a career as an educator at Hartford Hospital.

You can be the smartest person in the world, says Dr. Padmanabhan Premkumar, but if you can’t go into a patient’s room, and walk out with someone thinking of you in a different light, you haven’t achieved anything. Today, Dr. Premkumar teaches us what it means to be fully present with our patients in order to build meaningful trust with them. He believes it’s important for us to establish a good relationship with our patients as early as possible. And he reminds us that all patients want with us is to be able to connect—and as physicians, we owe them that right.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. In all of our interactions—not just with patients—let the other person have a voice. The best residents are those who can engage others, let them know that you are present when you are talking with them. That is the key to building a trusting relationship.
2. As mentors, and as leaders, we need to lead by example. We can’t expect someone else to do something that we aren’t ready to do ourselves.
3. The key traits of successful people are having the communication skills and the presence of mind to be able to apply knowledge to difficult situations.

Feb 12, 2021
Leadership 101 with Dr. Thomas De Fer
18:12

Thomas De Fer MD is the Interim Chief of Medicine, the Associate Dean of Medical Student Education and a Professor of Medicine at Washington University School of Medicine. Dr. De Fer is passionate about medical education and has published extensively on topics of curriculum development in undergraduate and graduate medical education. He is the former president of the Clerkship Directors in Internal Medicine and a recipient of numerous awards including the CDIM Service Award by AAIM. Dr De Fer completed his Medical school from University Of Missouri-Columbia and Residency in Internal Medicine from Barnes-Jewish Hospital at Washington University.

All of us want to become leaders, but is it possible to flex the muscle of leadership during our training period? Today, Dr. Thomas De Fer shares how everyday, all of us, regardless of our seniority are put in positions of leadership, from being a fourth year medical student teaching other students to a senior resident on an inpatient team with interns and medical students. What do we need to practice to become great leaders? Two things. Clarity of requests and stating the conditions of satisfaction. Tune in to learn Leadership 101 with Dr. De Fer.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. A good internist isn’t just a great communicator, but rather someone who can mold their communication to suit the patient in their current situation. Being upfront and honest with patients builds strong, therapeutic relationships with them.
2. Leadership isn’t just at the macro level. It can also be subtle. There are small leadership opportunities where residents can flex those muscles: practice clarity of requests and stating conditions of satisfaction.
3. The critical ingredient that a mentor is looking for in a mentee is engagement:  mentors don’t carry the weight of engagement. That’s the mentee’s job.

Feb 12, 2021
You Were Rejected - Now What? with Dr. Stanley Schwartz
16:16

Stanley Schwartz MD, PhD, is the UB Distinguished Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics; and serves as the Division Chief of Allergy-Immunology-Rheumatology at Jacobs School of Medicine & Biomedical Sciences at the University at Buffalo. Before pursuing medicine, Dr Schwartz obtained a PhD in Cellular Biology from Univ of California San Diego.  He then completed his Medical school and Residency in Pediatrics from Albert Einstein College of Medicine. Dr Schwartz pursued a Fellowship in Clinical Immunology from Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. He is a passionate researcher and has published over 150 journal articles, case reports and many book chapters.

We will all experience rejection at some point. Your grades might not be high enough. Funding for research may decrease. You might not get into the fellowship you want. The question is what will you do after the rejection? Today, Dr. Stanley Schwartz shares, “if the opportunity you were seeking is not available, what are the other opportunities you hadn’t considered?” Maybe you need to move in a different direction. Think outside the box. Talk it over with your mentors. They can help you see the bigger picture and help you make the most of whatever hand you were dealt.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Success relates closely to gratification and this can be achieved in several ways: helping someone in their time of need, achieving peer recognition, being a mentor to someone and seeing them succeed.
2. You will experience rejections. Develop a thick skin, think outside the box, and see the big picture. Know that mentors can help!
3. Successful people are team players and collaborative. It sharing the workload and collaborating with colleagues.

Feb 05, 2021
Welcoming Diversity with Dr. Clyde Yancy
16:47

Clyde Yancy, MD is the Vice Dean for Diversity and Inclusion and Chief of Cardiology in the Department of Medicine at Northwestern University. He is the Magerstadt Professor and Professor of Medical Social Sciences at Feinberg School of Medicine. Dr. Yancy completed his medical school at Tulane University and his residency in internal medicine at Parkland Memorial Hospital. He pursued a Fellowship in Cardiology and Advanced Heart Failure Transplant from UT Southwestern. A renowned cardiovascular researcher, he has been consistently recognized by Thomson Reuters as a Highly Cited Researcher in the Top 1% of all Researchers in the Field and is the Deputy Editor of JAMA Cardiology. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine and the Association of American Physicians and has been recognized with the Excellence in Teaching Award by Northwestern Medicine.

Dr. Clyde Yancy was born in 1958 in the deep south, raised by a single mother. He is the grandson of sharecroppers, the great-great-grandson of slaves. Growing up, Dr. Yancy understood what it was like to not be welcomed. Now the Vice Dean for diversity and inclusion at Northwestern University, Dr. Yancy shares how society can only thrive in a world where we accommodate, welcome and understand diversity. “Our future excellence will not come from a single monochromatic lens. It's going to come from a kaleidoscope.”

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Future excellence will not be through a single lens, but a kaleidoscope. We must embrace, welcome, and promote diversity. That will bring innovation, which is needed in medicine today.
2. In mentorship, nothing is more important than Competence (with a capital C). Also, you will need different mentors at different stages of your life.
3. Sometimes we are lucky enough to find mentors who give us professional guidance, such as teaching us that busy doesn’t equal productive, and who personally support us during the most difficult times in our lives.
4. Embrace the fail. Failure teaches more than success ever could.

Feb 05, 2021
Humanism is AI-Proof with Dr. Vijay Shah
17:43

Vijay Shah MD is the Chair of the Department of Medicine and Professor of Medicine & Physiology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Dr. Shah completed his undergraduate, medical, and residency training at Northwestern University. He then pursued a fellowship in gastroenterology and hepatology at Yale University. Dr. Shah has maintained an NIH funded program at Mayo Clinic for more than 22 years, which focuses broadly on alcohol-related liver disease, and has over 200 peer-reviewed research publications. He is a member of the prestigious American Society of Clinical Investigation, and has been awarded numerous awards, including Distinguished Investigator Award at the Mayo Clinic.

Artificial Intelligence is on the horizon, with hopes of driving care using data analytics, technology, and algorithms. So what impact will that have on our role as physicians in the future? Today, Dr. Vijay Shah highlights that while AI progresses, “the most beautiful niche for humans will be in their ability to be human. What makes people special is their empathy, their compassion, their ability to care and their creativity.” It is these traits that will remain “AI-proof” and best compliment the advances in AI that will gradually incorporate a lot of the knowledge and data that we rely on today.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Resiliency. Tenacity. Power. Agility. To incorporate these words into your actions, really think about what those words mean to you.
2. There are different phases in a medical career and in each phase different things are important for us: During training, its important to be accountable. Early in careers, ambition takes precedence. Mid career, being magnanimous becomes important. Late career, becoming a visionary and acting now to make the world better takes precedence.
3. As AI becomes more a part of medicine, we may wonder what our role is as doctors. The most AI-proof quality we have is our humanism: empathy, compassion, and our ability to care.
4. Great mentees exhibit three qualities. First, have fun with your mentors. Second, show them appreciation. Finally, be accountable and deliver on the things you agreed to do.

Feb 02, 2021
Percentiles Don’t Determine Success with Dr. Troy Krupica
16:20

Troy Krupica MD is the Assistant Professor, Section Chief of Hospital Medicine at West Virginia University. Dr. Krupica completed his Medical school at Georgetown University School of Medicine and Residency in Internal Medicine from the WVU School of Medicine. After completing his education, he then joined as a faculty at WVU. He also serves as an associate program director for the Internal Medicine Residency and as the co-director of the Global Health Track for Internal Medicine Residency.

Your boards scores were not great. That’s it, your dream is over. You will never wear a stethoscope around your neck. Hold on… that’s not necessarily the case. While our educational system and healthcare do place emphasis on standardized test scores, scores alone don’t predict career success. Today Dr. Troy Krupica shares that while standardized tests didn't come easy for him, he has a successful and fulfilling medical career. In fact, that’s one of the lessons he passes on to his own mentees: focus on the bigger picture of caring for patients and improving healthcare.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. When faced with challenges, hold tight to your support system and reach out to mentors to help you refocus and shift your perspective to what really matters.
2. Don’t fall into believing you know better. Other people have been on this path and gotten to the other side. That’s why we need mentors: for their experience and advice.
3. Don’t lose focus on the bigger picture; focus on care and commitment to patients. Individual accomplishments mean little compared to the bigger goal of making all healthcare better.

Feb 01, 2021
Groundwork for Making the Right Decisions with Dr. Ronnie Fass
21:32

Ronnie Fass MD is a Professor of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University. He is the Director of the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, and Heads the Esophageal and Swallowing Center at MetroHealth Medical Center in Cleveland. Dr. Fass earned his medical degree from Ben-Gurion University Faculty of Medicine in Israel. He then moved to the United States and pursued a residency in Internal medicine at the University of Arizona Medical Center before completing his fellowship in Gastroenterology from UCLA Medical Center. Dr. Fass serves as the editor-in-chief of the Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology and The Journal of Neurogastroenterology and Motility. Dr. Fass has published more than 550 articles, editorials, commentaries, and abstracts in reputed journals. He is the recipient of various awards and honors including the American Gastroenterological Association/Janssen Award for Digestive Sciences in Clinical or Basic Research.

When did you decide to study medicine? What about a specialty? These are big decisions which are likely to affect the rest of your life. How do you make the right decision? Today, Dr. Ronnie Fass shares the secret to his approach on making these decisions. He tells us that he made sure to lay the groundwork, he did his research, but most importantly he talked to people who had already taken the journey he was considering, and his mentors. So how did it turn out? Dr. Fass asserts, “Even now, 30, 40 years down the line, I still feel this was the proper path for me.”

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. When you need to make an important decision, lay the groundwork: talk to people who know you and understand the subject that you’re making a decision about, and consult with expert mentors.
2. When you reach out to mentors, show enthusiasm and seriousness. It’s not just that a mentor feeds you and you eat. You have to have the ingredients and listen to them about how to prepare an amazing meal.
3. Listen to patients and give them time. Read their charts beforehand so that you have a background. Never skip the physical examination, which is critical to your role as a healer. Follow up in a timely manner and keep communication open.

Jan 28, 2021
Clinical Outcomes plus Patient Experience with Dr. Kimryn Rathmell
20:00

Kimryn Rathmell MD is the Physician-in-Chief at Vanderbilt Hospital, the Cornelius Abernathy Craig Professor of Medicine & Biochemistry and Chair of the Department of Medicine at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. Dr. Rathmell completed her Medical school and Ph.D. in biophysics at Stanford University, completed internal medicine training at the University of Chicago and the University of Pennsylvania, and completed a medical oncology fellowship at the University of Pennsylvania. A genitourinary oncologist, Dr. Rathmell’s clinical practice and research lab focuses on renal cell carcinoma. She has held leadership roles in the American Society of Clinical Oncology and is an elected member of the American Society of Clinical Investigators, where she has served as the immediate past President and an associate editor for the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

As Physician-in-Chief at Vanderbilt Hospital, Dr. Kimryn Rathmell often reviews patient feedback and how patients perceive “a great doctor.” Part of it has to do with whether the physician’s advice led to improvement in their condition and clinical outcome. “It’s actually much more about their experience - whether the doctor was listening to them, if they felt like they were part of the solution and the doctor had their best interest at heart.” Today, Dr. Rathmell shares the importance of connecting with patients. She has developed a habit of taking a pencil & paper with her in the exam room to draw for her patients - “it might be a schematic outlining a treatment plan or a picture of a kidney showing where the tumor is or why it’s more complicated than average.” This has helped her engage with patients and ultimately improve their experience.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Remove the invisible barriers that you put in front of yourself that hold you back and limit your potential.
2. Mentorship is a two-way street: for the mentee, it’s not just how the mentor can impact your life, but how you can help your mentor reach their goals. This is empowering because you don’t just ask, you can also give.
3. To move from good to great, first, know what you know, but also what you don’t know.  Ask for help when you need it. Then, focus on the patient experience and not just outcomes.
4. Don’t lose your passion. It can be directed in different directions, but it’s that passion, that fire in the belly, that leads to success more than what you’re actually doing.

Jan 28, 2021
Passing it Forward with Dr. James de Lemos
21:56

James de Lemos MD is a Professor of Medicine and holds the Sweetheart Ball-Kern Wildenthal, MD, Ph.D. Distinguished Chair in Cardiology at UT Southwestern Medical Center. Dr. de Lemos completed his Medical school at Harvard and Internal Medicine Residency at UT Southwestern, where he also served as Chief Medical Resident.  He completed a fellowship in Cardiovascular Medicine and served on the faculty at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital before returning to UT Southwestern in 2000. He is an invited member of the Association of University Cardiologists, the American Society of Clinical Investigation, and the Association of American Physicians. He has mentored >30 post-doctoral research trainees and authored over 300 manuscripts. He is the Executive Editor for Circulation and previously served on the editorial board of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, the American Journal of Cardiology, and the American Heart Journal. He has won several teaching and mentorship awards including 2015 Women in Cardiology Mentoring Award by the American Heart Association and the 2020 Distinguished Mentor Award from the American College of Cardiology.

As a medical student, Dr. James de Lemos was often hesitant to reach out to mentors because he didn't want to impose on their time. Today, he considers mentorship one of his great joys, one he finds immensely rewarding. Today. Dr. de Lemos shares his philosophy around mentorship thru various perspectives: as a mentee and as a mentor; for research, career, and life. He sheds light on the importance of finding the right mentors earlier in life and the joys of being a part of a mentees’ early accomplishments. It’s clear that mentorship is the favorite part of Dr. de Lemos’ job.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Mentors are looking for mentees that do what they say they’re going to do when they say they’re going to do them.
2. The right mentor is oftentimes more important than the right project. Find out about the mentor before signing up: how successful have they been working with other mentees at your level? Will they work in your best interest? Is it fun to work with them?
3. Don’t look only for career mentors. Look for life mentors. Oftentimes, these are the people who remind you that the journey is more important than the destination.
4. What muscles should medical students work to build? First, challenge yourself to pass it forward through teaching. Then, in clinics,  practice deliberate decision-making and empathy with humor. Finally, train yourself to be efficient.

Jan 25, 2021
Learning How to Juggle with Dr. Aditi Singh
21:46

Aditi Singh MD is an Associate Professor of Medicine in the University of Nevada Las Vegas School of Medicine. She also serves as the director of the internal medicine residency program. Dr. Singh completed residency and chief residency at the University of Nevada—Reno School of Medicine. She is an active member of the Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine, frequently presenting medical education related sessions at national and international meetings. She is the recipient of multiple awards, including the Leonard Tow Humanism Award and the Nevada Chapter Volunteerism and Community Service Award, amongst many others. Dr. Singh has several peer-reviewed publications, including in the International Journal of Cardiology and JAMA Internal Medicine.

Are you good at juggling? Today, Dr. Aditi Singh shares an analogy she learned after listening to a speech by the CEO of Coca-Cola. We’re all juggling multiple glass balls: Work, friends, family, hobbies, career. The one that drops—shatters. In medicine, we have to decide which balls to juggle, and how to do it well. Dr. Singh explains how important it is for us to identify what we need to keep in the air, and what we are comfortable dropping. And part of this is reflecting on our personal priorities, and then making sure to carve out time to meet those expectations of ourselves. The question we should be asking ourselves is: What is most important to us?

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Identify the difference between tiredness—and burnout. As a physician, you have a role in removing the stigma and create an accepting environment to be able to communicate about well-being.
2. You can’t juggle every ball. Identify what the most important things in your life are, and carve out time for those things. Know what balls you want to keep juggling, and which you are okay with dropping.
3. To become a master of bedside skills, teach other students and trainees how to be excellent at the bedside, too.
4. Two predictors of success are compassion for patients, and having the innate desire to work hard.

Jan 25, 2021
Giving Back with Dr. Joseph Hill
19:21

Joseph Hill MD is a Professor of Medicine & Molecular Biology, the James Willerson Distinguished Chair in Cardiovascular Diseases, the Frank Ryburn Jr Chair in Heart Research, the Director of the Harry Moss Heart Center and the Chief of Cardiology at UT Southwestern Medical Center.  Dr. Hill graduated from Medical school at Duke with an MD-PhD, worked as a postdoctoral fellow at the Institut Pasteur in Paris for 5 years before pursuing residency in Internal medicine from Brigham & Women's Hospital, where he stayed on to pursue a Fellowship in Cardiovascular Disease. Dr. Hill worked at the University of Iowa before joining UT Southwestern in 2002. His Research focuses on remodelling in cardiac hypertrophy & failure and has published over 160 articles and contributed to 14 books. He is the editor-in-chief of Circulation. His many honors include serving as the President of the Association of University Cardiologists, election to the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society and the Association of American Physicians, and being named an American Heart Association’s Established Investigator.

“Being a physician is an incredibly high calling,” says Dr. Joseph Hill, as he reflects on the tremendous privilege we have as physicians to help people who have entrusted their well-being into our hands. Yet, he reminds us all today to not stop there. “You owe it to this profession to give something back.” Whether it be in advancing the body of knowledge through research or mentoring the next generation as an educator or improving healthcare delivery as an administrator, he encourages us to think beyond our clinical encounters and proactively give back to the profession out of gratitude for the privilege it has bestowed upon us.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Be mentorable. You may not hear what you want to hear from your mentors, but the best mentees keep an open mind and reflect on the advice given to them.
2. True success is holistic : family is just as if not more important than our profession and therefore we need to carve out time for our family. It will only help us in advancing our careers.
3. In the clinical encounter, make sure to acknowledge the patient’s family members who accompany them.

Jan 21, 2021
The Power of Humor with Dr. Mark Metersky
18:34

Mark Metersky MD is a Professor of Medicine, the Chief of the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, and the Director of Center for Bronchiectasis Care at UConn Health. He is also the associate Chief of Service in the Department of Medicine at the University of Connecticut. Dr. Metersky earned his medical degree from New York University School of Medicine and completed his residency in Internal Medicine from Boston City Hospital. He then pursued a Fellowship in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine from the University of California San Diego Medical Center. Dr. Metersky has published extensively throughout his career and has received many awards and honors including being named in ‘America’s Top Doctors’ and included in ‘Guide to Top Doctors’.

How do you feel when someone makes you laugh? What if you’re in a stressful situation, like seeing a doctor? Medicine is serious and patients are often uncomfortable and are suffering. If your doctor cracks a funny joke, you are more likely to feel relaxed and open to communicating, which can only improve the doctor/patient encounter. This is the power of humor. Today, Dr. Mark Metersky shares his stories on how humor can make a difference in our practice of medicine.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. If you don’t already have a specific track, you need to find what fulfills you. Say ‘yes’ to all opportunities and explore everything. Once you’ve figured out where you find fulfillment, then start saying ‘no’ to manage your time.
2. Respect your time and your mentor’s time. If your mentor is willing to invest time and energy, you should show interest by working hard and fulfilling your commitment and show that you’re striving for excellence.
3. With your patients, take advantage of humor and make them laugh! This could make their day and help build a stronger relationship with them.

Jan 18, 2021
Tiny Wins with Dr. Kevin O'Leary
17:46

Kevin O'Leary MD is the Chief, Division of Hospital Medicine, Associate Chair for Quality in the Department of Medicine and John Clarke Professor of Medicine at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. He is the founding Director of the Northwestern Medicine Academy for Quality and Safety Improvement. Dr. O'Leary completed his medical school at the University of Illinois, Chicago, and his residency at Northwestern University. He is the Deputy Editor for the Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety and also serves as principal investigator of the Redesigning Systems to Improve Quality for Hospitalized Patients (RESET). He is the recipient of multiple awards including the Leape Ahead Award from the American Association for Physician Leadership, Award for Excellence in Teamwork in Quality Improvement from Society of Hospital Medicine, and Award for Clinical Innovation from Northwestern.

When Dr. O’Leary was a pre-med student, he envisioned success as making great saves as a doctor. Yet, as he progressed on his journey to being an internist and leading Northwestern's hospital medicine division, the definition of real success changed. Now it is about helping patients understand their illness a little bit better, addressing their fears and their concerns, helping them navigate a complex healthcare system and seeing them achieve their goals. True success lies in “those tiny wins” says Dr. O’Leary, “that can occur with almost every patient, every single day.”

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. As a resident, when you hear a leader give an inspiring talk, yes - take mental notes. But go one step further: reach out and engage them in a conversation about it.
2. Real success as physicians lies not only in the occasional miraculous saves, but more so in the tiny, everyday wins, such as helping a patient have a good death.
3. Be careful about what advice you accept and don’t accept from a mentor. It’s good to have a team of mentors to bounce ideas off of. If a mentor gives you the same advice twice, consider accepting it.
4. It’s fine to have an idea of the direction you want to go, but recognize that you’re going to get unexpected opportunities. Keep an open mind and tap into them.

Jan 18, 2021
Finding your Fire with Dr. Calvin Thigpen
16:21

Calvin Thigpen MD is an Associate Professor of Medicine and the Program Director for the Internal Medicine Residency at the University of Mississippi. He completed his medical school, residency, and chief residency in internal medicine from the University of Mississippi Medical Center, and then obtained  ABIM Oncology Board Certification. Dr. Thigpen serves on the ACP Board as the Mississippi chapter governor and in various capacities in many other committees. With more than over two decades of experience mentoring students and residents, he has been the recipient of a many awards, including the Nelson Order of Teaching Excellence.

What makes you come alive? What lights up your spirit—and sets you on fire? If you haven’t found out what that is yet—make that your top priority. Find out, and go do it. Today, Dr. Calvin Thigpen explains that the world needs people who have come alive. The world needs the people who are living in alignment with what fulfills them most, and brings them passion. In medicine, Dr. Thigpen recalls struggling between what he’s good at—and what he really wanted to do. He advises us to not simply make decisions based on what others may think we’re good at. He shares a story about making the difficult decision to leave oncology after realizing it’s not what he was passionate about. And that as we journey through life, we need to honor our own passions, and not worry about disappointing others.

Pearls of Wisdom:

  1. Be cognizant of what makes you feel fulfilled. That will guide you in making career decisions. In whatever you do, go all in: It’s the only way to find out what you’re made of. 
  2. Be honest with what you want, both with yourself and with your mentors. Know that mentoring relationships develop over time, and need to be built on trust. 
  3. What other people say you’re good at doesn’t necessarily mean you should do it. Finding what makes you fulfilled is going to pull you through the tough times. 
  4. In life, find whatever it is that makes you come alive—and do it. What the world needs is people who come alive. The world needs passion. 
  5. Successful people all have one thing in common: they have come alive, they are on fire for what it is they’re doing. You really have to have that fire to be successful.
Jan 14, 2021
Life is All About the Tangents with Dr. Michael Hochman
17:50

Michael Hochman MD is the Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine and Director, Gehr Family Center for Implementation Science at Keck School of Medicine of USC. Dr. Hochman completed his Medical school from Harvard Medical School and Residency in Internal Medicine from Cambridge Health Alliance. A practicing internist, Dr. Hochman also hosts the Healthy Skeptic podcast which focuses on taking a deeper dive into health issues and recently authored the book 50 Studies Every Doctor Should Know. He is a passionate clinician educator and is a recipient of numerous teaching awards including the Medical Student Teaching Award & Resident Teacher of the Year Award while at Harvard and the Faculty Teaching Award at Keck School of Medicine.

The conventional mantra in medicine is to know more and more about less and less and get more specialized, shares Dr. Michael Hochman. Yet he found individuals who didn’t necessarily follow that mantra and get their feet wet in multiple different arenas: from doing policy for a few years to working at a community health center to doing academic medicine. That’s when he realized that career decisions you make don’t have to be lifelong. It’s fine to try things out and find your passion. “Life is all about the tangents” says Dr. Hochman. “A lot of times, the tangents are what really make things interesting and help you grow as a person.”

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Recognize the value of a team: Doctors work with nurses, pharmacists, and a group of other people that, together, do what’s best for the patient..
2. Career decisions that we make are not lifelong. Experience different paths to identify your passion. The fun of life is in these tangents.
3. There are three golden rules of medicine: When in doubt, put the patient first. Be optimistic. And always try your hardest.
4. Don’t go into a patient’s room with your agenda. Go in asking what is the patient’s agenda with you.

Jan 14, 2021
Following Your Bliss with Dr. Rebecca Gruchalla
19:12

Rebecca Gruchalla MD is a Professor of Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, and Director of the Division of Allergy and Immunology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, Texas, where she holds the William A. Sellers MD and Joyce M. Sellers Distinguished Chair in Allergy and Immunology. Dr. Gruchalla received her PhD and MD from UT Southwestern, went to UPenn to complete her residency, and completed her fellowship in allergy and immunology from UT Southwestern, where she stayed on as faculty. She's an active Physician Investigator, and has been leading inner-city pediatric asthma studies since 1994. She's a past member of the Board of Directors of the American Academy of Allergy and Immunology, and the Board of Directors of the American Board of Allergy and Immunology.

“Wherever you are, if you are following your bliss...doors that you didn't know existed will open...invisible hands will guide you.” Dr. Rebecca Gruchalla reminds us of this quote from Joseph Campbell’s The Power of Myth as she shares the impact of her parents and physician mentors in shaping who she is today. Working with her mentors (and responding to the occasional ‘zingers’ with a can-do attitude), connecting with her patients on a personal level before getting down to medicine, and nurturing her trainees as they progress on their path - these are some of the things that bring joy to Dr. Gruchalla’s life. She leaves us with a simple, yet profound message: Follow your heart and you’re going to be great!

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. When you’re feeling overwhelmed, take it one step at a time. And give it 24 hours before making any major decisions.
2. In a patient encounter, don’t worry about what to say at first. Instead, observe: what do you see in the room, next to the patient’s bed? Start a conversation with the patient. Make a connection.
3. Great mentees don’t approach their mentors with just a problem; they also bring a solution. Plus, they are prepared to take criticism because they know that’s what helps them grow.
4. Be joyful, be delighted. Medicine is a serious profession dealing with life and death, but doctors are following their bliss.

Jan 11, 2021
Overcoming Challenges with Dr. Naftali Kaminski
15:48

Naftali Kaminski MD is the Boehringer-Ingelheim Endowed Professor of Internal Medicine and Chief of the Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, at Yale School of Medicine. After completing his medical school residency and fellowship in pulmonary medicine in Israel, Dr. Kaminski was appointed head of functional genomics at Sheba Medical Center. In 2002, he was recruited to head the Simmons Center for Interstitial Lung Diseases at University of Pittsburgh, where he stayed for over a decade before joining the faculty at Yale. Dr. Kaminski and his team are responsible for many breakthroughs in the diagnosis and treatment of interstitial lung diseases. And he has authored over 275 research papers. He was an associate editor of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine and deputy editor of Thorax BMJ. He's an elected member of the Association of American Physicians, a fellow of the European Respiratory Society, and a fellow of the American Thoracic Society. In 2018, Dr. Kaminski received the Andy Tager Excellence and Mentorship Award by the American Thoracic Society for his contributions in training the next generation of physician scientists.

Dr. Naftali Kaminski came to the United States from Israel for a research fellowship. He immediately went from being a confident and successful pulmonologist to feeling like the “dumbest person in the lab (and that too with an accent)”. With integrity, persistence, and some knowledge of baseball, Dr. Kaminski shares an incredible journey from shaping his career as a physician scientist to leading the Division of Pulmonary & Critical Care at Yale. He leaves us with some sage advice to overcome challenges: 1) leave your comfort zone and 2) advocate for yourself.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Advice Dr. Kaminski’s mother (who made him feel as the best person in the world) gave him: Don’t think you’re better than anyone else because of achievements, privilege, or financial status.
2. Two tips for overcoming challenges: First, don’t withdraw into your comfort zone. Second, Don’t be afraid to advocate for yourself.
3. A great formula for moving from the good to the great is full integrity plus persistence.
4. Being a physician, although a challenging profession, is a privilege. Appreciate the beauty in small, everyday successes so you don’t live a one-dimensional life.

Jan 11, 2021
The Quiet Strength of Listening with Dr. Sriram Narsipur
17:35

Sriram Narsipur, MD, FASN, FACP, MRCP is the Edward C. Reifenstein professor and chairman of the department of medicine at Upstate Medical University. In addition to serving as the chief and medical director of the division of nephrology, he's also a professor of pediatrics and surgery at the institution. Dr. Narsipur earned his medical degree from University of Michigan Medical School. He then pursued a residency in internal medicine and pediatrics from Baystate Medical Center, Tufts University School of Medicine, where he served as the chief resident in pediatrics. He then did a fellowship in nephrology from University of California at San Diego. His clinical interests include clinical transplantation, dialysis and research interests include cardiovascular disease in patients with end stage renal and chronic kidney disease.

Most people say a successful leader is someone with big ideas that shares them with others to reach an end goal. Dr. Sriram Narsipur agrees that those traits are important, but points out that the best leaders are effective listeners. Listening is the most important skill for leaders so they understand their environment and the people they deal with. Listening is also important in patient interactions. Dr. Narsipur connects this undervalued skill with everything from building trust with patients, to getting advice from others when making a big decision. And without listening, the mentor/mentee relationship would fall apart. Join us as Dr. Narsipur shares the strengths of listening.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Listening is the most important skill for a potential leader, and a good leader is always a good follower first.
2. After contact with a patient, follow up. Call them. This will go a long way in their immediate care, as well as build a better long-term relationship.
3. When making a big decision, look to collective experience and well-rounded advice. Even if things go wrong, at least you made the best decision you could.
4. Take advantage of understanding your patient’s perspective and see the world through your patient’s lens in order to become a more compassionate physician.

Jan 08, 2021
Focus on Medicine not Noise with Dr. Michael Karp
15:52

Michael Karp MD is the Chief of the Division of Geriatrics, Hospital, Palliative and General Internal Medicine and Vice Chair for Clinical Affairs for the Department of Medicine at University of Southern California Medical Center. He is a clinician educator and an Associate Professor of Medicine at the Keck School of Medicine where he enjoys mentoring young physicians. Dr Karp completed his Medical school from the Keck School of Medicine and his residency in internal medicine at USC, where he also served as chief resident. He has been awarded numerous teaching awards and is passionate about improving quality, safety, access and satisfaction for patients.

Dr. Michael Karp wanted to do something noble with his life, so he became a doctor. He learned early on that his job was to practice medicine and to take care of patients, regardless of who they were, their circumstances or past history. Today, he shares a poignant personal story that taught him a lesson about how important it is to not judge and listen to the patient - to stay focused on the medicine and not the 'background noise'. In this episode, Dr. Karp talks about the lessons he has learned and his message for the next generation of physicians.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Medicine is a noble profession. Your job is to care for the patent: Practice medicine, be the doctor, and don’t be judgmental.
2. Before you start going down the checklist of what to ask a new patient, remember they’re a real person. Find some point of connection first.
3. A great mentor is someone who sees things in you that you might not see yet. Finding the right mentor might require some help: Ask the people at your institutions that have been there longer to be your matchmaker!

Jan 08, 2021
"Don’t Be Afraid to Be Wrong” with Dr. John Pandolfino
15:53

John Pandolfino MD is the Chief of Gastroenterology and Hepatology in the Department of Medicine and the Hans Popper Professor of Medicine at Northwestern University. Dr. Pandolfino completed his medical school from Loyola and residency from Northwestern, where he stayed to pursue a fellowship in gastroenterology. He is the President of the American Neurogastroenterology and Motility Society and an elected member of the American Society of Clinical Investigation. He has been recognized with numerous awards, including the Research Mentor of the Year from the American Gastroenterological Association and Outstanding Mentor Award from the Department of Medicine at Northwestern University.

Dr. John Pandolfino remembers his mentor and role model, Dr. Lewis Landsberg, being the perfect physician. “We never saw him miss a diagnosis or not be right.” Yet, one piece of advice Dr. Pandolfino received from Dr. Landsberg was “Don’t be afraid to be wrong.” And this is a mindset that he has carried with him throughout his career. Today, Dr. Pandolfino reflects how this advice has given him the flexibility to be successful. Instead of fighting and defending a hypothesis which is wrong, Dr. Pandolfino embraces failure and doesn’t hesitate to change course. And it is this agility that gives him the freedom to continuously experiment. After all, the people who make an impact in medicine are those who take a shot.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. It doesn’t matter if you’re having a bad day. When you enter a patient’s room, you have a job and an obligation to help the patient.
2. To find the right mentor for you, ask yourself, “Is this the person I want to be like when I’m their age?”
3.  When you realize you’re wrong, rather than defend your position, fix the mistake. Have the ability and the agility to change.
4. The difference between a good internist and a great internist is not a matter of knowing facts. It’s the ability to listen to the patient’s story, synthesize it, and come up with the one thing that’s going to be right.

To learn about a patient that changed Dr. Pandolfino's life, visit the Motts 58 Foundation.

Jan 08, 2021
Advocating for Our Patients with Dr. David Reuben
18:25

David Reuben MD is the Director, Multicampus Program in Geriatrics Medicine and Gerontology and Chief, Division of Geriatrics at UCLA. He is the Archstone Foundation Chair and Professor at the David Geffen School of Medicine and Director of the UCLA Alzheimer's and Dementia Care Program. Dr. Reuben completed his medical school at Emory and residency at Rhode Island Hospital. He pursued a fellowship from UCLA. He has served as principal investigator of numerous large studies including the STRIDE study aimed at reducing serious falls related injuries in the elderly. His bibliography includes more than 200 peer reviewed publications in medical journals and over 30 books including the widely distributed Geriatrics at Your Fingertips. Dr. Reuben has received numerous awards including the Henderson Award from the American Geriatrics Society and the 2008 John Eisenberg Patient Safety and Quality Award. He has served in a number of important leadership roles including the Board Chair of the American Board of Internal Medicine, President of the American Geriatrics Society and President of the Association of Directors of Geriatric Academic Programs.

What is the hallmark of a great physician? Today, Dr. David Reuben reflects on how we as physicians are very powerful people: people listen to us, return our phone calls. A great physician, according to Dr. Reuben, is one who uses that power to advocate for their patients. Sharing anecdotes from his own life, Dr. Reuben shares how many of our real achievements never make their ways on a CV. Oftentimes, those lie in the small differences we can make for our patients and their families. And that is true success.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. In a patient encounter, building a relationship with a patient should be the first thing on our checklist.
2. The move from a good internist to a great internist is built on advocacy for the patient. Physicians are powerful. Use that power to advocate.
3.  Your mentor and your role model don’t have to be the same person. Having multiple people as mentors offers a variety of perspectives.
4. Think about the long-haul. Is what you’re worrying about now going to matter in five years?

Jan 07, 2021
The Three Rules of Patient Care with Dr. Michael Saag
13:46

Michael Saag, MD is a Professor of Medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases, Director of the UAB Center for AIDS Research and the Associate Dean for Global Health at the University of Alabama School of Medicine. Dr. Saag completed his Medical school from University of Louisville and Residency from UAB where he continued to pursue a fellowship in infectious diseases and molecular virology. During his fellowship he conceived the concept of a comprehensive HIV outpatient clinic dedicated to the provision of interdisciplinary patient care in conjunction with the conduct of high quality clinical trials, translational science, and clinical outcomes research. Over his career, he has published over 450 articles in peer reviewed journals and has directed the first in-patient studies of 7 of the 30 antiretroviral drugs currently on the market. He has been listed as one of the top ten cited HIV researchers by Science and was recently inducted into the Alabama Healthcare Hall of Fame.

Today, Dr. Michael Saag synthesizes a lifetime of experiences with us into three simple rules that he lives by and encourages his students to adopt. First, treat each patient as if they are a family member - ‘If Aunt Martha’s on service and I have an X-ray that has to be read before I go home, I’m not going to skip that.’ Second, be honest when you don’t know (even if you’re in a position where you’re expected to know the answer). Admit it and commit to figuring it out. Third, have fun! The practice of medicine should be joyful. Celebrate the small successes everyday.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. There are three rules of patient care: Treat every patient like family; be honest when you don’t know; and have fun by celebrating the everyday successes.
2. When walking in to meet a patient for the first time, bring all your energy in the room. That energy will build trust with the patient.
3. The training years are to learn habits more than knowledge. Those habits you develop will carry you through the next 30 years of your life.
4. The role of a year one resident is to gain knowledge without relying on textbooks. In year two, residents should understand the why behind the practice. And Year three is to practice exercising judgment.

Jan 04, 2021
Setting Habits and Achieving Goals with Dr. Gurpreet Dhaliwal
17:27

Gurpreet Dhaliwal MD is a Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco and site director of the internal medicine clerkship at the San Francisco VA Medical Center. Dr Dhaliwal completed his medical school from Northwestern University and residency in internal medicine from University of California, San Francisco, where he stayed on as chief resident. He is best known as a medical educator with a specific emphasis on diagnostic reasoning and clinical problem solving and has been lauded by The New York Times as “one of the most skillful clinical diagnosticians in practice today.” From being nominated for a medical student teaching award while still a resident, Dr. Dhaliwal has received multiple Excellence in Teaching awards including the Osler Distinguished Teacher Award at UCSF and has been inducted into the UCSF Department of Medicine Council of Master Clinicians.

Think a goal is impossible to achieve? Think again. Today, Dr. Gurpreet Dhaliwal shares a powerful technique that he uses to achieve his goals: set regular habits. Determined to achieve his goal of becoming an expert diagnostician, Dr. Dhaliwal set a habit of reading the New England Journal of Medicine’s Clinicopathological Conferences series as a medical student. Now, more than 20 years later, he shares not having missed reading a single weekly case report and the marked impact this has had on moving him closer to his goal. Join us as Dr. Dhaliwal explains how to incorporate regular habits into our routine to achieve our goals and realize our maximum potential.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. The key to achieving seemingly “impossible” goals is setting daily habits.
2. To go from experience to expertise, be deliberate about continuing to challenge and push yourself.
3. Practice the framework of relationship-task-relationship with the patient. It not only improves the relationship with the patient, but acts as a memory hook for recall at a later timer.
4. Students really stand out when they show enthusiasm for the 'extra' work in medicine.

Click here to listen to Dr. Dhaliwal's inspiring Commencement Address to the 2014 UCSF School of Medicine graduating class.

Jan 01, 2021
Observe, Listen, then Decide with Dr. George Abraham
19:08

Dr George Abraham, President-elect of the American College of Physicians (ACP), currently serves as the Chief of Medicine and Emeritus President of the Medical Staff at Saint Vincent Hospital in Worcester, Massachusetts, and a Professor of Medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical School. Dr. Abraham earned his medical degree from the Christian Medical College in India, completed his residency and chief residency at Saint Vincent Hospital, and received his master’s degree in public health from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He has authored over 100 publications, abstracts and book chapters, and has received several awards including the Leadership Award of the MA chapter of the ACP, among others.

Dr. George Abraham’s career is equal parts hard work, and deliberate decision-making.  He built his successful career by figuring out what he was good at, looking for opportunities for growth, and planning his next steps. Dr. Abraham shares important wisdom on how to deal with a conflict. It is important that we take a step back, observe and listen, rather than react in haste in any such situation. He adds that in order to continue to grow, we must embrace change.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Be comfortable with the decisions you make, but also stay flexible in case you need to change course. When one door closes, another one opens.
2. Be a good observer, an avid listener, and don’t be so quick to react. This helps to make better decisions.
3.  When deciding what opportunities to take, consider: what you’re good at, where mutual professional growth can occur, and what can serve as a stepping stone in your career path.
4. When a mentor is deciding whether to invest their time in helping a mentee be successful, the best traits a mentee can have are  initiative, being flexible, and being a team player.

Jan 01, 2021
Standing For Your Values with Dr. Oliver T. Fein
22:46

Oliver T. Fein, MD, serves as a Professor of Medicine, Professor of Clinical Healthcare Policy and Research and as the Associate Dean (Affiliations) at Weill Cornell Medicine. He also chairs the New York Metro chapter of Physicians for a National Health Program (PNHP), and is the former president of the national organization. He completed his medical school from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and his residency at Lincoln Hospital in the Bronx. Dr. Fein has made outstanding contributions to health system delivery reforms on both local and national levels. His contributions to medicine and the healthcare system of the United States have been recognized through a number of honors and awards, including the Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Fellowship Alumni Award for Lifetime Achievement.

Do you stand behind your values? When something comes along that goes against what you believe—how do you react? Today, Dr. Oliver T. Fein shares fascinating anecdotes about his efforts to improve healthcare throughout his long tenure. Since the very beginning of his career, Dr. Fein has stood up for what he believes in. And on top of that, he knows how to unite groups of people to fight toward shared goals. He teaches us how teamship is a key to success. And that when we feel strongly about something, we need to speak out. And we should never have to go at it alone.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Things happen by chance. Seize those chances when opportunity arises. The way we approach these chances has the power to define our journey?
2. Stand up for what you believe in, don’t be afraid to speak out, and find others who will join you in your stance.
3.  Not just mentorship—but ‘teamship’—is a key to success. Find issues that can unite us, work toward shared goals together, and the rewards will be exponential.
4. Take a “family history” from your mentor. When we aim to get to know them on a deeper level, we’ll find they’ll relate to us more.

Dec 29, 2020
Asking Critical Questions with Dr. John Perfect
13:34

Dr. John R. Perfect is James B. Duke Professor of Medicine and Chief, Division of Infectious Diseases and International Health at the Duke University Medical Center in Durham, NC; Professor of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology, Duke University Medical Center; Faculty member in Duke University Program in Genetics; and Director, Duke University Mycology Interdisciplinary Research Unit. His research interests focus around several aspects of medical mycology where he is currently investigating antifungal agents in animal models of candida and cryptococcal infections and is PI of a NIH-sponsored interdisciplinary antifungal drug program project. He is the author of more than 600 peer-reviewed journal articles, book chapters, books and reviews. Dr. Perfect has received the Duke University Teacher of the Year Award in 1999 and has received The Littman Award, The Rhoda Benham Award and the Lucille George Award.

Dr. John Perfect examines some of the real, practical challenges of navigating a career in medicine. It’s not easy to get through medical school, and it can be even harder to discover where you want to go in your practice. In making these tough decisions, Dr. Perfect discusses the importance of asking ourselves critical questions about our desires, our skill sets, and what makes us happy. He then outlines three primary factors for success in the field: We need passion to smooth out the inevitable ups and downs that come with the territory; we need commitment to stick through the doubts and difficult moments; and we need a supportive network of family, colleagues, and mentors to amplify our abilities and ambitions. Above all, he encourages us not to be afraid to chase our dreams.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. In committing to medicine, we ask ourselves critical questions: First, do we really have the desire to help people? Second, what is our skillset? What makes us happy?
2. There are three main factors to success. One is passion. The second is commitment. The third is made up of the people around us who amplify our abilities and desires.
3.  If we seek out a mentor, the process of navigating the field of medicine will be much easier. However, we need to come prepared with our own investment as mentees.
4. Don’t fear failure, and don’t be afraid to go after your dreams and throw yourself in.

Dec 29, 2020
Cultivating Community with Dr. Chethan Bachireddy
19:16

Chethan Bachireddy, MD, MSc is the Chief Medical Officer for Virginia's Medicaid Program. Dr. Bachireddy studied economics at Harvard, attended medical school at Yale, trained in internal medicine at Brigham and Women's Hospital, and completed a master's in health policy research at the University of Pennsylvania. He is a physician, economist, and social entrepreneur dedicated to improving health for vulnerable populations. He's worked with the Clinton HIV/AIDS Initiative to deliver life-saving medications in resource-poor settings, founded the Health Advocacy Program, which is an afterschool program to empower students to become health advocates for themselves in their communities. He led a team of researchers and policymakers in a multi-study of integrated health services for individuals with HIV, substance abuse disorder, and mental illness in Ukraine.  He has collaborated with prison and jail officials to initiate and improve addiction treatment services, and partnered with behavioral sciences and technology companies to develop mobile-based smoking cessation and physical activity programs. He was most recently a National Clinician Scholar at the University of Pennsylvania.

From an early age, Dr. Chethan Bachireddy knew not only the importance of achieving excellence--but also what it means to be involved in, and contribute to, the community. And that if we want to change the world in a positive way, we need to stay accountable and stay motivated. Maintaining these two things requires a strong community to rely on and to help push us forward. Today, Dr. Bachireddy explains that working hard to cultivate community is what will help us grow, and help give us the courage to truly express our values. Community is what gives us a platform to lead change: And leading change is a responsibility we all have as physicians. But the goal is not just to have an impact, says Dr. Bachireddy, it is also to find fulfillment and meaning while doing the work.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Shift mindset from being a doctor to being a healer - one who allows their patients to develop their narrative and transform their pain into meaning.
2. Work hard to figure out the why and even harder to build a community that can keep your why alive.
3.  If an opportunity fits with your Why, don't say no for fear of failure.
4. Mentors give us the 'gift of perspective'. Before making critical decisions, we should reach out to not only one but many mentors to add perspective to our thought process.

Dec 22, 2020
Making a Difference with Dr. Bruce Rollman
13:39

Dr. Rollman is the UPMC Endowed Chair in General Internal Medicine, and Professor of Medicine, Psychiatry, Biomedical Informatics, and Clinical and Translational Science at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. Dr. Rollman completed his Medical school from Jefferson Medical College and Residency from the University of Maryland and a Fellowship in GIM from Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Rollman launched and directs the Center for Behavioral Health, Media and Technology at UPMC which provides an academic home for investigators and faculty pursuing efforts at the intersection of clinical medicine, health services research, and computer science. He in fact pioneered the use of electronic medical record system alerts to identify patients for enrollment into clinical trials at the time of the physician encounter, and has published over 100 scientific papers, including first-authored papers in the New England Journal of Medicine and the Journal of the American Medical Association, and has multiple U.S. patents.

Dr. Bruce Rollman is inspired by the belief that we have a duty, both inside and outside the medical field, to do what we can to help make the world a better place. It’s a big job, and while we may not be able to complete the work, we must be prepared and willing to start. With anecdotes from his career, he shares the  importance of keeping an open mind, pursuing broad interests, being observant, and working with great teams as we seek to fulfil this greater purpose in our careers and our lives.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Some of the best ideas can come from unexpected places. Keep an open mind, pursue broad interests, including interests outside of medicine. Be observant.
2. The world needs repairing, and we have an obligation to do our part, however small. We are not required to finish the job, but we have a duty to start and hope that someone picks up where we left off.
3.  If we look for opportunities to fill a need in our community, we may be able to make a difference by applying the skills we have learned in research and medicine to other facets of life.
4. The most important thing in this early stage of a medical career is to build a solid foundation. It takes time, but with the right knowledge and credibility, we can be prepared to do almost anything.

To read Dr. Rollman's article referencing Ernest Shackleton's expedition, please visit this link.

Dec 18, 2020
Empowering the patient with Dr. Sam Brondfield
17:12

Dr. Sam Brondfield, MD, MA, is an Assistant Clinical Professor in the Department of Medicine in the Division of Hematology/ Oncology at the University of California, San Francisco. He earned his medical degree, completed a residency in internal medicine and pursued a fellowship in Medical Oncology at UCSF. He also served as the Chief Resident during his residency. He has a Masters in Education from the University of California, Berkeley. His research focuses on medical education and cognitive load in clinical trainees, as well as the teaching and learning process as trainees perform consults.

Today, Dr. Brondfield talks about our responsibility to not only understand our patients, but to make sure they understand the information we are providing for them in order to empower them. Part of this requires us working as a “translator” for our patients: Taking complicated medical information and translating it into words that our patients can understand. Among many reputable traits, there are two characteristics of a great physician that stand out to Dr. Brondfield: Reliability and Humility. On top of that, he reminds us that it is okay to laugh and have fun at work when appropriate. He also explains how building bonds and close relationships with those we work with is a great way to avoid burnout—and to make the day to day hardships more manageable.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Reliability, follow-up, and simply show up: Earn the trust and respect of those around you when you do what you say you’re going to do. Following up with patients, and simply showing up can be one of the most meaningful—and rewarding—parts of medicine.
2. Know when to be serious—but know when to laugh and enjoy yourself. Being able to laugh with colleagues and keep each other happy is a huge morale booster for taxing and emotionally draining professions such as oncology.
3.  Become a translator: Your role as a physician is also to translate complex, scientific explanations and break them down into simple terms for your patients.
4. Develop cultural humility: Don’t assume you understand the person in front of you, whoever it is.

Dec 15, 2020
I Can’t Hear You While I’m Listening with Dr. Richard Baron
24:10

Dr. Richard Baron is the President and Chief Executive Officer of the American Board of Internal Medicine, and the ABIM Foundation. Prior to this role, he served as group director of seamless care models at the centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Innovation Center. Dr. Baron received a bachelor's degree in English from Harvard, and his medical degree from Yale. He completed house staff training at NYU's Bellevue Medical Center, and served a three-year commitment in the National Health Services Corps in rural Tennessee. Dr. Baron has practiced general internal medicine and geriatrics for almost 30 years at Greenhouse Internists located in Philadelphia, which pioneered the comprehensive adoption of electronic health records in a small practice environment. During this time, he also served as chief medical officer of Health Partners, a non-for-profit Medicaid HMO, and was the architect of the Best Clinical and Administrative Practices program, which in collaboration with health plans around the country is touching the lives of more than half of Medicaid managed care population in the U.S.

As a trainee, Dr. Richard Baron remembers listening to a patient’s chest with his stethoscope when the patient began talking to him. “Quiet,” he said. “I can’t hear you while I’m listening.” The irony of his words was not lost on him as he began to ask himself some critical questions - what was I actually listening for? Today, Dr. Baron speaks to the vision of human service that brought him and many others into medicine. Yet as a student, he was taught that the core problem was the diagnosis and that the patient was a ‘translucent screen on which the real disease was projected’. And his job was to subtract the patient, make the screen transparent, and treat the disease. Join us as Dr. Baron shares his journey from rural Tennessee to Philadelphia to becoming a national leader --- pursuing one mission: adding the patient back to the center of medicine.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Being a doctor is like being a police officer in that you are present during critical moments in a person’s life.
2. A patient is not a translucent screen on which a disease is projected. Instead of removing the patient and focusing only on the disease, add the patient, their story, their life, into the diagnosis. Then, treat the whole person.
3.  Instead of viewing technology in healthcare as an obstacle, view it as a tool that allows information to be instantly available. Technology was a response to many problems being faced.
4. The fundamental questions a leader should ask is: What does it take for a group of people to work together to take care of a patient? And how do you get everyone on the same page?

Dec 15, 2020
It, Where and How with Dr. Katrina Armstrong
21:42

Katrina Armstrong, MD, is the Jackson Professor of Clinical medicine at Harvard Medical School, Chair of the Department of Medicine and Physician-in-Chief of the Massachusetts General Hospital. She is an internationally recognized investigator in medical decision making and quality of care in cancer prevention and outcomes. An award-winning teacher and a practicing primary care physician, Dr. Armstrong has served on multiple advisory panels for academic and federal organizations and has been elected to the American Society of Clinical Investigation and the Institute of Medicine. Prior to coming to Mass General, Dr. Armstrong was the Chief of the Division of General Internal Medicine, Associate Director of the Abramson Cancer Center, and Co-Director of the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program at the University of Pennsylvania.

It, where and how: How do these three words intersect? Today, Dr. Katrina Armstrong shares her life story and experiences as she found her passion, defined the direction of her career, and reached out to mentors every step of the way. She talks about finding our “it”: the thing that lights us up. Something that gets us so excited that we feel like sharing it with everyone--even our taxi driver! And then using that to define "where" we want to go in our careers, a decision that each one of us has to take individually. Now we need to turn to our mentors for guidance. They will share the "how": the tools and experience we need to move towards our "where" and fulfill our "it"!

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. The key to balance is knowing we aren’t going to be perfect at it. There is magic in accepting our limitations. Because when we learn how to forgive ourselves for being imperfect, it becomes infinitely easier to forgive those around us too.
2. The goal of the patient encounter is to find some way to connect with that patient in the first five minutes. We need to remember that they are often terrified of their illnesses, of being in the hospital it’s up to us to ease that for them as soon as we meet them.
3. You know you’ve found your “it” when you feel like you have to share it with everyone: Even your taxi driver. That’s the litmus test for finding your true passion in medicine.
4. Mentees should set the ‘where’ and mentors should set the ‘how’. Mentors help us figure out how to get to where we want to go. But where we want to go depends entirely on us.

Dec 11, 2020
How Values Drive Decision Making with Dr. Amber Deptola
17:15

Amber Deptola, MD is an Associate Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency Program at Washington University in St. Louis and Director of the Explore Program for medical students, which fosters career exploration and scholarship in advocacy, education, innovation and research. She is also an Assistant Director of the Teaching Physician Pathway. Dr. Deptola completed her medical school from the University of Louisville School of Medicine and residency from Washington University. Her research interests include resident wellness, interprofessional education, and the science of education and learning.

It's time to get definitive about our core values. We’re on an ever-evolving journey, and our values will be our lighthouse in times of need. Today, Dr. Amber Deptola explains that we must take time to self-reflect, find moments of clarity and discover our values. Knowing our values will help us define our priorities, and our priorities will help drive our decision-making. Using our values to guide our decisions will typically lead us down the right path, and help us say yes when we should say yes, and no when we need to say no.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Be definitive about your core values, even though we’re in an evolving journey. Self-reflect to get to a level of clarity, because your value will drive your priorities, and your priorities drive your decisions.
2. When we’re facing despair, or experiencing burnout, use a mantra: Listen and connect.
3. Find and build a crew of mentors; a team. Remember that for mentors, it’s often the best part of their day to be able to guide you in the right direction, to hear about your career aspirations.
4. Selfless doesn’t mean there is no credit involved. When we work as a team to achieve a goal, we’ll all get credit and the reward will be much greater.

Dec 10, 2020
Handling Adversity with Dr. Charles Hatem
20:01

Charles Hatem, MD, is the Harold Amos Distinguished Academy Professor and Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Chair Emeritus of the Department of Medical Education at Mt Auburn Hospital. Dr Hatem completed his Medical school from Harvard Medical School and Residency from Boston City Hospital. Dr. Hatem has pioneered the application of educational theory to medical training of both hospital staff and practicing physicians. He served as the Director of the Rabkin Fellowship in Medical Education which is devoted to training faculty to become clinician-teachers. He has also served as a consultant to numerous medical schools in the development of their medical education programs in Argentina, India, Thailand, and Saudi Arabia. Dr. Hatem has additionally served as the co-editor-in-chief of ACPs’s Medical Knowledge Self Assessment Program and has developed the widely used series of “Can’t Miss Cases”.

In life, we will face adversity. That is guaranteed. Today, Dr. Charles Hatem recalls the wise words of Viktor Frankl as he looks at the profession of medicine. The hardships we face, the struggles we encounter, and the obstacles in front of us are inevitable. The key lies in how we choose to face that adversity. That is what defines our true character. Dr. Hatem shares many wise stories about the value of kindness, of taking the time to listen and help others, and what success means to him. He believes that success is not about title; it is more so about the commitment to others, being the best physician he can be, and to be grateful and astonished by life. And that at the root of it all—is uncovering who we are as humans.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Understand the value of kindness, and how we can apply it in our life: Allocate the time to hear someone else’s story, despite anything else going on in our lives. Use that information to help that person. That is the most basic definition of kindness in medical practice.
2. The development of who we are as a person should be paralleled to our pursuit of achievement.  We need to honor love, well-being of self, and commitment for the others in our lives, even as we focus on achievements.
3. In life, we will face adversity. That is guaranteed. What is important is how we face that adversity. It’s how we choose to deal with it that defines our true character.

Dec 08, 2020
Keeping At It with Dr. Jessica Merlin
12:19

Jessica Merlin, MD, PhD, MBA is an Associate Professor in the Division of General Internal Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh. She is board certified in internal medicine, infectious disease, palliative care, and addiction medicine. Dr. Merlin is a  PhD-trained behavioral scientist and an NIH-funded clinician-investigator. Her research includes foundational work on the pathophysiology, clinical epidemiology, and behavioral management of chronic pain in people with HIV. This work has extended to management approaches to pain and opioid misuse/use disorder in individuals with serious illness in palliative care settings. Dr. Merlin has been recognized nationally for her work with three Young Investigator awards from relevant societies, an Inspirational Leader Under 40 Award from the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine, and a Cambia Foundation Sojourns Scholar Leadership Award. She is an active scientific mentor to trainees at the doctoral, post-doctoral, and junior faculty level, as is the Director of Mentoring for Pitt's Institute for Clinical Research Education as well as the Associate Program Director for Research for Pitt's Internal Medicine residency and director of the General Internal Medicine research fellowship.

We all want to—and should—achieve our highest goals. But, we also want to—and should—have a good time on the journey. Today, Dr. Jessica Merlin explains how we can make difficult decisions—and assess the outcomes—in order to feel most fulfilled in our careers. There are many paths to success, so we may feel bogged down by choices, or what we fear to be “wasted time”. Dr. Merlin reassures us that pursuing opportunities in and of itself is a great way to find out what you do and don’t like, and that there really are no permanent decisions in our careers in medicine. As long as we remain persistent, we will eventually get to where we want to go. After all, part of the fun of being a doctor is figuring out what that means for you, says Dr. Merlin.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Find mentors who you want to emulate, and let their decisions influence your decisions as you progress on your career path.
2. Keep at it. The one thing that will get a project or a goal over the finish line is persistence. Persistence has value.
3. Don’t put good money after bad money. Don’t stick with something if you’re miserable. you’re allowed to take risks, reassess, and course correct. You want to reach your goals—but you want to have a good time getting there.

Dec 07, 2020
Moving from a Fixed to a Growth Mindset with Dr. Eric Warm
16:30

Eric Warm, MD, holds the endowed Richard Vilter Chair of Medicine at the University of Cincinnati. He is the Vice-Chair for Graduate Medical Education, the Medical Director of the Resident Ambulatory Practice and the Internal Medicine Program Director. Dr. Warm served as the first chair of the ACGME Educational Innovations Project Council and was the principal architect of the University of Cincinnati’s comprehensive redesign of resident education in internal medicine. In recognition for the work that Dr. Warm and his team have done, he has received multiple awards including the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada International Residency Educator of the Year Award, the ACGME Parker J. Palmer Courage to Teach Award, the APDIM Spotlight Innovator Award and Distinguished Medical Educator Award. Dr. Warm is currently editor-in-chief of the International Clinician Educator’s Blog.

As an educator, Dr. Eric Warm believes in moving away from the fixed mindset, and toward a growth mindset. Today, he explains that historically, we have encouraged students to be ‘fixed’; focusing on high grades, test scores, and trying to ‘know’ as much as possible. But the key to finding joy in learning is in embracing what we do not know. When we believe that we are a work in progress, that we have not reached our potential, that is when we seek feedback, internalize it, use deliberate practice, and get better. This helps us reframe our goal entirely: Growth over performance.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Move away from a fixed mindset, and toward a growth mindset. In order to do that, we need to embrace what we don’t know. That requires vulnerability.
2. Practice makes permanent, and perfect practice makes perfect. And deliberate practice helps us achieve perfection in that practice.
3. Find the joy in learning. Make a commitment to yourself that any concept you don’t understand at first, delve into the subject until you know it. Your goal should be growth over performance.

Click here to view a video on growth mindset by the Internal Medicine Residents and Faculty at the University of Cincinnati.

Dec 04, 2020
Mentorship and Hematopoiesis with Dr. Charles Wiener
20:27

Dr. Charles Wiener is the President of Johns Hopkins Medicine International and Professor of Medicine and Physiology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is the director emeritus of the Osler Internal Medicine Training Program and has previously served as chair of the committee that created the school of medicine's "Genes to Society" curriculum. Dr Wiener completed his Medical school from the University of Miami and his training and chief residency in internal medicine at the University of Washington. During his time at Johns Hopkins, he has been recognized for his academic leadership, extensive institutional and clinical knowledge and ability to build productive business relationships across diverse groups. He has received various awards including the Professors Teaching Award and George Stuart Award for Clinical teaching from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Mentorship is a lot like hematopoiesis. Today, Dr. Charles Wiener explains how all of us are pluripotent stem cells. And it’s important that we be exposed to the right growth factors (right mentors) at the right time in our differentiation (personal development). Depending on where we are both temporally in our differentiation and phenotypically in what we want to develop into, we need different growth factors, and thus different mentors. Therefore, it is critical that we create an environment around us where we can be exposed to the right people at the right time to fuel our development. 

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. If you’re excited about an opportunity…sometimes you just have to jump through the window. And although doors may close behind us, new doors will be created along the way.
2. Take the “work” out of “work life balance”. It’s life balance. We should realize that there are no compartments in life…they are all subsets of one holistic life.
3. External validation will never lead to a life where we love what we’re doing. To love what we’re doing, we need to build a foundation based on honesty and self-reflection.

Dec 04, 2020
Learning from Patients, Mentors and Peers with Dr. Amanda Clark
22:55

Amanda Clark, MD, is an Associate Professor of Medicine and an Associate Program Director for the Internal Medicine Residency Program at the University of Mississippi. Dr. Clark completed her medical school degree at the University of Mississippi School of Medicine and went on to the University of Alabama at Birmingham for residency and chief residency. She also serves as the Associate Vice Chair for Communications, Development, and Technology in the Department of Medicine. She is the advisor for the Resident Wellness Committee and Co-Director of the Clinician Educator Track. She practices inpatient and outpatient medicine and has been awarded several teaching awards, including All-Star Teacher three years in a row by the Evers Medical Student Society and Teacher of the Year in 2018.

Dr. Clark offers us important wisdom in how to develop the essential skill sets for a successful career. First, the patient emerges again as the center-point of practice. Dr. Clark offers a simple yet novel approach of including the patient in decision-making processes. Other points of wisdom discussed in this episode are on how to successfully approach mentorships, engaging in shared and vulnerable reflection with your peers, and developing communication and emotional intelligence skills. Today, we will learn from a role-model who demonstrates competence and fulfillment in her practice.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Time spent outside the patient's room is better spent inside while including the patient in the decision making process - This will not just save time but also lead to better decisions for the patient.
2. Define the roles of each of your mentoring relationships. Define your goals and approach each mentoring conversation with an agenda in order to optimize it.
3. To combat physician burnout, have sessions of reflection with your peers. Share with them the events that affect you and create a welcoming environment for others to do the same with you.
4. The three predictors of success as a physician - Emotional intelligence, Growth mindset and Good communication skills - They can be best developed by seeing as many patients as we can and taking each of those interactions as a learning experience.

Dec 01, 2020
How Outstanding Physicians Become Outstanding Leaders with Dr. Seth Landefeld
19:55

Dr. Seth Landefeld is the Chair, Department of Medicine and the Spencer Chair in Medical Science Leadership at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Prior to joining UAB, Dr. Landefeld founded and led the development of UCSF’s Division of Geriatrics and ultimately served as Associate Chair of the Department of Medicine for Strategic Planning and Implementation. Dr. Landefeld completed his undergraduate work at Harvard and New College, Oxford, where he was a Rhodes Scholar. He received his M.D. from Yale. He trained in internal medicine at UCSF, where he served as chief resident, and in clinical epidemiology at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Landefeld’s research has improved outcomes for older persons with serious illness, including inventing the Acute Care for Elders Unit, a model which has been adapted at medical centers nationwide. He is a member of the American Society for Clinical Investigation and the Association of American Physicians and was a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University. He is Past-President of the Society of General Internal Medicine and subsequently received the Robert J. Glaser Award “For Exceptional Contributions to Education and Research.” Dr. Landefeld currently serves on the Boards of the American Board of Internal Medicine and the Holy Family Cristo Rey High School in Birmingham.

Although our main priority now is becoming excellent physicians—we should also be considering what it means to be a great leader. Dr. Seth Landefeld explains that the skill set we need to become a great internist is the same skill set we need to be an effective leader. The skill of thinking critically to evaluate data. The skill of motivational interviewing - if you can help somebody stop smoking, you can probably help your colleagues or learners improve their practices. And most importantly the skill of listening - if we’re not listening to our patients (or students, for that matter), we won't be able to care for them—or guide them—effectively.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Everything we need to be a great internist is what translates into becoming a great leader. We have to recognize this in order to make a meaningful impact in healthcare.
2. Recognizing our limitations may be one of our greatest limitations. Because of that, it’s important to ask others what our blind spots are, and learn from their perspectives.
3. The way to approach mentorship is to find somebody you admire—and don’t stop at that. Take the initiative to reach out, ask for their guidance, and develop ourselves along a path that they’ve followed as well. Commit to learning from them. And  when it comes to paying it back, always pay it forward.

Dec 01, 2020
Choosing the Right Environment with Dr. Stephanie Detterline
19:00

Stephanie Detterline, M.D., FACP, is the Vice-Chair of Education and Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency program at MedStar Health Internal Medicine, Baltimore. She also is the Associate Designated Institutional Official (DIO) for the Baltimore programs in MedStar. Dr. Detterline received her medical degree from Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis and completed internship and residency at Loyola University Medical Center in Maywood, Illinois. She is the Associate Dean for Medical Education, Baltimore at the Georgetown University School of Medicine and is heavily involved with the student programs at Georgetown University School of Medicine. She is Board certified in Internal Medicine. Dr. Detterline has a particular interest in patient-physician communication, factors influencing resident career choice, and the health and fitness of residents in training programs.

As you consider residency programs, and potential mentors, ask yourself this question: Do you feel supported? Today, Dr. Stephanie Detterline urges us to choose working environments that align with our goals and aspirations, and that give us permission to bring love and passion into a career path we are enthusiastic about. She believes we will find the most success when we are able to be open and honest to our mentors about our struggles, as well as our love for the work we do. Lastly, she talks about differentiating between physician burnout and exhaustion: While tiredness is common and probably inevitable, physician burnout is much more likely to creep in when we feel undervalued, underappreciated, and unfulfilled.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. It’s important to choose an environment that matches our goals and aspirations, and that can enable us to bring love and passion in a job we look forward to.
2. Own your history, admit your mistakes, and develop a growth mindset.
3. Distinguish between physician burnout and tiredness. While burnout may include elements of tiredness, it is more about not feeling appreciated and valued in your work.

Nov 25, 2020
Shifting From ‘Did’ to ‘Can’ with Dr. Sima Desai
20:28

Sima Desai, MD, FACP, is a Professor of Medicine, Division of Hospital Medicine, Vice Chair of Education in the Department of Medicine and Program Director of the Internal Medicine residency program at Oregon Health & Science University. Dr. Desai graduated from the University of New Mexico School of Medicine and pursued her residency at Oregon Health. Shortly after completing her chief residency year, she was recruited to start the hospitalist program at Oregon Health. Her Interests include medical education, adult learning theory, diagnostic reasoning, and mentorship. She has been awarded the Parker J. Palmer Courage to Teach Award by the ACGME, Marion L. Krippaehne MD Humanism Award at Oregon Health and the Walter McDonald Award for Young Physicians from the American College of Physicians, an organization that she has held leadership positions in including Vice Chair & Chair of the Council of Young Physicians.

‘Good’ is where you are right now. And ‘great’, according to Dr. Sima Desai, is that you will be better tomorrow. Today, Dr. Desai teaches us what makes a great internist. Part of it means ditching the idea we’re not worthy of asking for help. Another part of it means shifting our perspective from “what did I do” to “what can I do?”. It also means letting go of the idea that we’ll one day know everything (hence lifelong learning). So the best thing we can do is commit to challenge ourselves every day to find the answers to what we do not yet know. To carve out time to work on ourselves. And to never let our learning become stagnant. The most important question we must ask ourselves to become a great internist is: How can I do better?

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Rather than stating what you did do for someone, ask what you can do for someone to make their life better.
2. Ditch the idea that we are not worthy of reaching out. Or that the question we want to ask is insignificant. The reality is, mentors are there to help us.
3. Find your reset button: Slow down one or two extra minutes in a patient encounter. When we see ourselves rushing, stop and reset. Ask ourselves why we are doing this work. And it will make a powerful difference in how we work, and how we treat our patients.
4. The turning point from good to great means embracing the everyday challenge to become better. And making the commitment that if we don’t know something, we’ll stop and learn it.

Nov 25, 2020
The Art and Science of Choosing a Mentor with Dr. Sanjay Saint
22:21

Dr. Sanjay Saint is the George Dock Professor of Internal Medicine at the University of Michigan and Chief of Medicine at the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System. Dr Saint completed his Medical school at UCLA and Residency and Chief Residency in Internal Medicine at UCSF. He was a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar at the University of Washington where he also received his Masters in Public Health. His research focuses on patient safety, implementation science, and medical decision-making; he has authored over 350 peer-reviewed papers. He serves on the editorial board of multiple peer-reviewed journals including the BMJ Quality & Safety and NEJM Catalyst. He has been awarded the Distinguished Mentor Award from the University of Michigan, and has received the National VA Physician of the Year Award.

Our success in a career in medicine is heavily influenced by the mentors who we choose to surround ourselves with. But the challenge is finding and building relationships with said mentors. Today, Dr. Sanjay Saint teaches us the science and the art of finding a great mentor. The science being: The past is a great predictor of the future. Most great mentors will have a track record of positively impacting other mentees. The art is: Following our gut instincts, How do I feel when I’m in the presence of a potential mentor? Do I feel positive, supported, and seen? If the answer is yes, we should listen to our instincts—and trust our hearts. As Dr. Saint puts it, we’ve gotten this far as humans by trusting our instincts with individuals, whether it’s with friendship, love, or business. Those instincts are finely honed—and we should respect and trust them.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Practice mindfulness during our hand wash. During that time, reflect on the way you have the ability to change the atmosphere in the room you are about to enter. And when you get into the patient’s room, be fully present: Don’t think about the previous or the next patient. Give that patient your time.
2. Everyone is an expert in something, and we can learn something from everyone. Pay attention to each interaction with another person—there is always something new to learn.
3. The key to finding a great mentor is a balance of science and art. Science in the way that the past is a great predictor of the future: Great mentors will likely have a great track record. And art is where our gut feelings will help us: How do we feel in a mentor’s presence? If it’s a positive feeling, trust that and move forward.

Nov 24, 2020
The Others-Centered Mindset with Dr. Rob Bradsher
21:17

Rob Bradsher, MD, is an Assistant Professor of Medicine and the Program Director for the Internal Medicine Residency Program at the University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center. He completed his medical school at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences and his Internal Medicine residency in the Osler Medical Training Program at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He practices hospital medicine and is a member of Alpha Omega Alpha, the Association for Program Directors in Internal Medicine, and a Fellow of the American College of Physicians. He's been awarded a number of leadership and teaching awards including the James B. Lewis Teacher of the Year and the Golden Apple Awards at the University of Tennessee, and the Daniel Baker and Most Oslerian Awards during his residency at John Hopkins. He enjoys helping his residents achieve phenomenal success.

The most important quality Dr. Rob Bradsher looks for in his residents is an others-centered mentality. He believes the best mentees—and the best physicians—are those who prop others up for success, even sometimes at their own expense. As physicians, we have to embrace being on a team. Our day isn’t over when we’re finished with our responsibilities—we win as a team when we all walk out of the hospital doors together at the end of the day. Having an others-centered mindset means putting patients, staff, and colleagues first, and making sure no one gets left behind. It’s the small sacrifices we make everyday, according to Dr. Bradsher, that speak volumes.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. The best mentors are the people at the top want to help pull others up. They have a pay it forward mentality, because someone else did it for them. Knowing this should make us less fearful about reaching out—because it’s the right thing to do.
2. The key trait of a successful physician is an others-centered mentality. It’s thinking about the other person. It’s sacrificial love, kindness, and hard work. It’s knowing we’re all on the same playing field.
3. Define your own goals and priorities because it doesn’t matter how many mentors we have around us, they can’t set our goals for us. That is something we have to figure out—and mentors will help us execute them.

Nov 23, 2020
Building a Team with Dr. Jed Gonzalo
14:00

Jed Gonzalo, MD, is a Professor in the Department of Medicine and the Department of Public Health Sciences. He is the Associate Dean of Health Systems Education at Penn State College of Medicine. Dr. Gonzalo completed his medical school from Penn State, and his residency in Internal Medicine from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. He completed his fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Dr. Gonzalo joined as faculty at Penn State where he is extensively involved in curriculum design and health systems science with a specific emphasis on implementing bedside rounds to improve patient-centered outcomes. He is the recipient of the Herbert W. Nickens Faculty Fellowship Award from the AAMC, and the National Award for Scholarship in Medical Education from the Society of General Internal Medicine.

Ask yourself: How do you feel when you walk into a hospital? Do you love what you do? Today, Dr. Jed Gonzalo reminds us what it means to truly love what you do—and that a sincere appreciation for providing patient care is what will energize you throughout your career. We’ll also learn about what it means to build a team of mentors—and one mentor alone cannot fulfill all of our needs. Lastly, he reminds us that mentors want to help us. Don’t worry about having it all figured out at once—but do make the first step, and connect with your mentors.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Notice the people who have been in this field for a long time, and recognize that they endure it because they sincerely love their job. Ask yourself what it is about your job that you love, and ask if there’s a way to enhance that further.
2. It’s not about having one or two mentors that “do it all”. It’s about finding mentors that facilitate you in building your own network of mentors, based on your various needs.
3. You don’t have to have everything figured out before you see a mentor. Strong mentors will meet you where you’re at, and help you find your path.

Nov 20, 2020
Owning Our Experiences with Dr. Sanjay Desai
22:11

Sanjay Desai, MD, is a Myron Weisfeldt Professor of Medicine, Vice-Chair for Education and Director of the Osler Internal Medicine Residency Training Program at Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Desai graduated from the University of Pennsylvania with a Bachelor of Science in bioengineering, and a Bachelor of Economics from the Wharton School of Business in healthcare management. He earned his medical degree from Harvard Medical School, completed his residency in Internal Medicine from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, where he stayed to pursue a Fellowship in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine. During his training, he spent two years as a consultant for McKinsey & Company working in a variety of industries both in the US, and in Southeast Asia. Dr. Desai holds appointments in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, General Internal Medicine and the Carey School of Business. He chaired the executive committee of the iCOMPARE study group and is a principal investigator of the AMA Reimagining Residency grant. Dr. Desai has been recognized for his skills as an educator with numerous teaching and leadership awards and has been elected as a Fellow of the American College of Physicians. He is active on national committees for the ACGME and Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine.

We need to shift our mindset from being a consumer of our experiences to owning them. Today Dr. Sanjay Desai shares how what we learn, how we develop, and who we become is based on how many of our experiences we own. During our training, we’ll likely have access to the resources we need, with faculty and mentors available at our disposal. But it’s the ownership mindset which will determine how much we get out of the opportunities that present themselves. Central to this mindset is a willingness to be vulnerable, to be proactive in saying ‘I don't get it, or I didn’t hear that murmur’. Only when we are honest with our struggles and commit to learning that which is required to achieve excellence in our domain, is when we will achieve the purpose of our profession: serving our patients.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. As physicians, we are critical thinkers and problem-solvers. Being at the center of healthcare, we have a unique ability to solve challenges through the lens of a clinician—and it’s important for clinicians to be in the positions of leadership.
2. As healthcare is becoming more complex, there are many tracks for us to get involved with to make an impact. It’s important to find our passions in those avenues. A structured program, and the embracing of mentorship is the way to become successful in these paths.
3. As mentees, we need to be willing to be vulnerable. To admit if we don’t understand something, and then seek to grow from it. When we adopt that attitude, we’ll move in the right direction. Because when we get it wrong, the only person that is going to suffer is the patient.

Please click here to read the inspiring life story of the late Dr. Fred Brancati (one of Dr. Desai’s mentors).

Nov 20, 2020
Listening to—and Guiding—Mentees with Dr. Laura Davisson
14:53

Laura Davisson, MD, MPH, FACP, is an Associate Professor of Medicine at West Virginia University. Dr. Davisson earned her medical degree and completed a residency in internal medicine at West Virginia University, where she also served as the chief resident. She then earned her Master’s Degree in public health in West Virginia University's biostatistics and epidemiology track. Dr. Davisson is an active member of American College of Physicians and serves as the governor of ACPs West Virginia Chapter. She is passionate about resident and student teaching and also serves as an associate program director for the Internal Medicine Residency Program. Dr. Davisson is also certified by the American Board of Obesity Medicine. She founded WVU Medicine's Medical Weight Management program.

There is a major similarity between patient-doctor relationships, and mentee-mentor relationships. Today, Dr. Laura Davisson explains how as a doctor, although we may believe we know best for our patients, we have to take the time to listen to our patients. And when we listen to them, we need to guide them toward feeling empowered to make the best decisions for their own health. When it comes to mentorships, mentors have the responsibility of listening to our goals as mentees. And when they do that, they need to guide us toward feeling empowered to make our own decisions. As the mentee, our job is to be open, honest, and genuine with our mentors about what those goals and passions are, what we’re struggling with, and what we’re hoping to achieve.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Pick a career that inspires you. Narrow down your areas of interest, and pursue a specific area within that interest.
2. When it comes to bedside care, give our patients the time to tell their stories. We also need to give our patients room to make decisions themselves, instead of telling them what to do. Even if we know the ‘right answer’, we should do our best to walk the patient toward that answer, and empower them to find it themselves.
3. As a resident, incorporate physical exercise whenever possible. It will make you more focused, and you will find you’ll be able to get more done in less time.
4. Be honest and genuine in everything we do. Remember that our mentors have been in our shoes before, and recognizes the challenges we’re facing. It’s better to be honest with them, rather trying to hide anything.

Nov 19, 2020
The Perfect Equation for Loving Medicine with Dr. Carmen Mendez
16:44

Carmen Mendez, MD, is an Associate Professor of Medicine at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, and the Internal Medicine Program Director at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. Dr Mendez completed her medical school from the University of California Davis School of Medicine and her residency  from Harbor - UCLA Medical Center, where she stayed on as chief resident before joining general internal medicine faculty. Dr. Mendez is committed to resident education and serving underserved communities.

Find the thing you love—really love—and go do it. Dr. Carmen Mendez’s advice is simple: We have to love what we do at work just as much as what we love outside of medicine, in our personal lives. It’s a long career, as she says, and doing the thing that really ignites us is what makes it all worth it. She advises us to get off the “hamster wheel of success,” and think about what is truly motivating us to show up at work each day. She shares stories of an upbringing filled with love, compassion, and humor, and how she developed her purpose. Dr. Mendez urges us to move toward the thing we want to do the most. Because nothing is really stopping us.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. We have to love what we do just as much as we love what we have at home in our personal lives. Find what you really love—and go after it. There’s nothing you can’t achieve.
2. Develop the perspective that our privilege as physicians gives us a greater opportunity to be an advocate for those who need it most.
3. All of us are running on a hamster wheel of success in some way. But when we put too much pressure on ourselves, it takes away from the reason we entered medicine in the first place. Think critically about what’s driving you, and know how to get off the wheel.
4. The most important thing we can do for patients is to sit down with them, and show them we’re not in a rush. And when it comes to staring at the computer—there’s nothing on a computer screen that is going to shed light on the conversation at hand.

Nov 19, 2020
Being Prepared for the Unexpected with Dr. Christine Bryson
19:06

Christine Bryson, DO, is an Associate Professor of Medicine, the Medical Director of Teaching Services in the Division of Hospital Medicine, and an Associate Program Director for the Internal Medicine Residency program at the University of Massachusetts Medical School at Baystate Health. Dr. Bryson completed her medical school from Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine, and her residency from Christiana Care Health System. She has been training and mentoring students and residents for almost two decades.

Be prepared for the unexpected. Today, Dr. Christine Bryson reminds us that it’s okay for our priorities to evolve as time goes on—and to look at everything with an open mind. Although some people seem to have it all figured out from day one, it’s okay for us to go with the flow, figure out what we want as we gain more experience and knowledge. The most important thing for us to keep in mind, though, is the search for finding our passion: We need to ask ourselves what makes us excited to get up in the morning and go to work each day.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Leading a team involves humility on the part of the leader, and transparency with the team. Not everyone will agree with every decision that is made, but keeping the process transparent helps keep the team together.
2. Give space for the patient to tell you what is important to them, and leave your own preconceived notions at the door.  The best patient care comes with listening.
3. Be confident in your training, but know that this is a lifelong learning process. It’s okay to know everything—because we are here to learn. Ask questions, admit what we don’t know, and take on any opportunity for growth with an open mind.
4. Do not bring your life outside the hospital inside the patient’s room. Pause to reflect on what is affecting us in our day to day lives, and know it’s okay to take a day off, and talk to our peers about our experience. In order to give quality care to patients, we have to take care of ourselves.

Nov 18, 2020
At the End of the Day in Medicine with Dr. William Surkis
20:37

William Surkis, MD,  FACP, is the Associate Chief Academic Officer, Co-Vice President for Medical Affairs, Vice-Chair for Education and Director of the Internal Medicine Residency Program at Lankenau Medical Center, part of Main Line Health in Philadelphia. Dr. Surkis attended Bates College in Lewiston, Maine, completed his medical school from MCP-Hahnemann School of Medicine (now known as Drexel College of Medicine), and completed his internship and residency in internal medicine at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Surkis is passionate about graduate medical education and is involved in a number of national organizations including the American College of Physicians as a Councilor for the Philadelphia chapter. He has been recognized for excellence in teaching with a number of awards including the Leon A. Peris Memorial Award.

Burnout nothing but a repeated cycle of exhaustion. Today, Dr. William Surkis shares a way to reframe our thinking by reconnecting with our purpose. When we’re having a rough day or week, says Dr. Surkis, every part of us is saying, “Finish and leave, finish and leave.” Sometimes, spending time with difficult patients and families can feel morally depleting. But Dr. Surkis reminds us to look for the patients and families we love—and take a few extra minutes with them before leaving the hospital. When we’re with the patients we care for, it can be helpful to refocus on why we love being physicians. And it will inspire us to show up energized the next day—and to do our very best.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. If we are proactive in identifying our own deficits, and we are attentive to those around us who are good at those things, we can ask them to help us learn from them. That is the best way for us to grow (and to develop mentorship organically).
2. Build administrative responsibility by writing things down, making lists, and building an organizational system that we can rely on.
3. Spend the few extra minutes with a patient we love when we’re down. Burnout is nothing but repeated cycles of exhaustion. Take a few extra minutes to reconnect to our purpose of being in medicine, so we can rectify some of the exhaustion we feel throughout the day.

Nov 18, 2020
Finding Our Why with Dr. Aashish Didwania
17:37

Aashish Didwania, MD, is the Vice Chair of Education in the Department of Medicine, an Associate Professor of Medicine, and the Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency Program at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. Dr. Didwania completed his medical school at the University of Michigan, and his residency at Northwestern University. His clinical interests include general internal medicine, community health, and hospital medicine. His research focuses on improving medical education, specifically in curriculum design that focuses on improving health equity and advocacy. Dr. Didwania’s passion for teaching has been recognized through a number of Outstanding Teacher Awards from the Feinberg School of Medicine, and the Program Director of the Year Award at the McGaw Medical Center of Northwestern University.

Dr. Aashish Didwania is the first to admit that he struggled with finding his personal “why”. When he realized that his motivation was seeing other people succeed, and making a positive impact in medicine, his career became much more fulfilling. Dr. Didwania shares that when the vision or purpose is not clear, the journey is much more difficult—especially in medicine.  Because it is our personal “why” that empowers us to persevere in the face of challenges.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Your mentors have gone through many of the same challenges you are facing.  Embrace your challenges as normal, take the initiative to approach your mentors, and you’ll likely find a deep connection.
2. Finding and remembering your ‘why’ will help you stay resilient through the challenges/downturns in your career.  While it is awkward, read your old personal statements every 6 months to remember your journey and purpose in medicine.
3. Hospitals are tough environments and sometimes that environment distracts one from being kind.  Being nice in the hardest of times is what stands out and makes one a leader and role model.

Nov 18, 2020
Why Imagination is the Key to Greatness with Dr. Robert Finberg
17:00

Robert Finberg, MD is the Chair and Richard M. Haidack Professor of Medicine at University of Massachusetts Medical School. Dr. Finberg completed his medical school from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine and his residency in internal medicine from Bellevue Hospital. He pursued a research fellowship in pathology & medicine from Harvard Medical School. With more than 200 publications, Dr. Finberg’s research is focused on host-microbial interactions. Under his leadership as the chair of medicine, Dr. Finberg has skillfully directed the educational, clinical and research activities of the university’s largest academic department. His contributions have been recognized with a number of honors and awards including the Hartford Foundation Award.

The difference between a good internist and a great internist is imagination. Today, Dr. Robert Finberg explains that in medical education, mentors have a responsibility to inspire the curiosity and thirst for knowledge in students. He believes that students need to foster a desire to keep looking for things that are new. A good internist will stick to the textbook…but a great internist will use their imagination to constantly look outside the box for new solutions. That internist will always have the patient’s best interest in mind, in their continual pursuit of new answers. It is the imagination of that internist that differentiates them from good to great.

Pearls of Wisdom:

  1. The qualities of a great leader are having the ability and desire to see others to succeed, the tolerability to accept other people’s opinions, and surrounding yourself with people who are willing to say ‘no’ to you.
  2. The difference between a good internist and a great internist is imagination. A great internist will go beyond the existing knowledge base in continual pursuit of finding what’s new. And they will use that imagination to help patients.
  3. To be successful, you need to establish what your patients goals are. Don’t come in with an agenda, listen to the patient’s needs first.
  4. Medicine is a team sport. There is no one sole person responsible for patient care.
  5. The two key ingredients of being a successful physician are being self confidence, and having a goal oriented approach. Even if our goals change later, each of them have their own value.
Nov 17, 2020
Being Honest When Life Gets Complicated with Dr. Jennifer Swails
19:31

Jennifer Swails, MD, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Medicine, the Co-Director of Interprofessional Education, and Program Director of the internal medicine residency program at McGovern Medical School at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston. Dr. Swails received her bachelor’s degree in biology from Davidson College, and her M.D. from Weill Cornell. She then completed residency training in internal medicine and primary care at Brigham and Women's Hospital and joined the faculty at UT Houston in 2012. Dr. Swails has received numerous awards for teaching and patient care, including the Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine Award, the Dupont Master Clinical Teaching Award, and the John P. McGovern Outstanding Teaching Award.

Often in Dr. Jennifer Swails’ career, she struggled with feeling like she had to choose between being smart or likeable. Today, we learn that it’s okay to be both. It works to our benefit to express when we’re facing difficulty, and we need to be honest when life gets complicated. Dr. Swails’ best advice for students and residents is to be honest when we need help. She advises us to look for the mentors who will provide a safe space for us to express our concerns and struggles. And in the end, it’s that honesty and vulnerability that will lead to a greater reward.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. As Glennon Doyle stated: Disappoint everyone in the world, but not yourself. When we’re honest with ourselves, we may take the risk of disappointing a few other people—but it’s important not to let ourselves down.
2. Lower the stakes when it comes to mentorships: It’s not always so formal. Ask a mentor if you can simply shadow them for a few hours, or talk to them about what they do. It will go a long way and make a big impact on you.
3. Have an attitude of resiliency throughout your career. The key qualities of a great residence are having a deep sense of purpose.

Nov 17, 2020
Reaching out to Mentors with Dr. Simerjot K. Jassal
21:55

Simerjot K. Jassal, MD, is the Director of the Internal Medicine Residency Training Program at the University of California—San Diego, and practices as a primary care physician at the VA San Diego. Dr. Jassal completed medical school at UCSF school of medicine and residency in internal medicine from UCLA where she was also a chief resident. She has pursued a Master’s in Advanced Studies in Clinical Research from UCSD. Presently, she's a collaborator on the Chronic Kidney Disease Prognosis Consortium, analyzing data from over 2 million people across 40 countries. She is also a co-investigator on the Rancho Bernardo Study, a 40 year observational study of the differences in men and women in heart disease and diabetes. She has won numerous awards over the years, including teacher of the year from the American College of Physicians, Southern California and Spirit of Planetree physician champion of the year from the VA San Diego Healthcare System.

Dr. Simerjot K. Jassal learned the power of persistence—and reaching out—when in junior high school she sent several letters to people in space medicine asking how she could become an astronaut and a physician. When she realized there was plenty of medicine to practice here on planet earth, she pivoted to applying to medical school. As a freshman in college, she wrote to chairs of various departments at University of California—San Diego asking to join a research project. Her determination resulted in her meeting one of her most important mentors. Today, Dr. Jassal explains how we too can be fearless in reaching out to mentors for guidance. She reassures us that what we lack in experience and skillset, we can make up for through our enthusiasm, our desire to learn and grow, and our willingness to work hard.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Be fearless in reaching out to mentors. Don’t count the rejections, count the one person that says yes. And be willing to put as much effort in as need to get that yes.
2. What you lack in experience, make up for it by building credibility: As a mentee, prove that you have enthusiasm, the desire to learn and grow, and the willingness to work hard.
3. Our decisions have to be in line with our values. Trust what you want to achieve in life, even if it means disappointing others.
4. We will find our best mentorship from our peers. And those peers will also be our best friends throughout this journey. So pay attention to that and try to get the most out of it, because it’s a limited time experience.

Nov 17, 2020
Real Time Feedback with Dr. Kathlyn Fletcher
19:58

Kathlyn Fletcher, MD, MA, is a Professor of Medicine in the Division of General Internal Medicine, and the Director of the Internal Medicine Residency Program at Medical College of Wisconsin. Dr. Fletcher completed her medical school from University of Chicago and her residency in Internal Medicine from University of Chicago Hospitals. She then was a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar at the University of Michigan. Dr. Fletcher has held a number of leadership positions including Section Chief of General Internal Medicine, and Director of Hospital medicine at Milwaukee VA Medical Center. Dr. Fletcher is active in a number of local and national bodies including the Society of General Internal Medicine and the Society of Hospital medicine, and is a recipient of numerous teaching and leadership awards including the 2013 Helen Dickie Woman Physician of the Year by Wisconsin State ACP, and the National Award for Scholarship in medical Education from the Society of General Internal Medicine.

After reading Kim Scott’s book, Radical Candor, Dr. Kathlyn Fletcher reframed her perspective on giving feedback. As someone who had previously been hesitant about telling students they needed to do better, Dr. Fletcher realized that to encourage others to improve is to truly care about them. Since then, Dr. Fletcher practices giving feedback in real time for her students and mentees. She takes advantage of small coaching moments that occur throughout the day as she guides her students. And while she gives positive feedback as much as possible, she recognizes that in order for it to resonate, she has a responsibility to create a safe environment for her learners. Dr. Fletcher recognizes how important it is for her students to be continually improving in order to reach the next level of competency, and she prioritizes leading with warmth, positivity, and encouragement.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Know the three C’s: Competence, character, and caring. In medicine, caring is all about the other person, and we need to pay more attention to care especially in a time of our life where it can be easy to be selfish.
2. Active feedback and encouragement—in real time—is the best way to not only improve as a physician, but it’s a way for mentors to show mentees that they care about their growth. We also gain more trust when we are actively giving feedback.
3. By the nature of our profession, we are constantly living on the edge of burnout—a problem that is not likely to ever go away. So we have to learn how to deal with it proactively: This is where reflective writing, collegiality, and genuine personal interactions come in.
4. At the end of the day, medicine is a service industry. When we remember that our job is to serve others in their sometimes darkest moments, we will recenter with our purpose.

Click here to read words of Hope, Character & Resilience from the monthly newsletter at The Kern Institute at the Medical College of Wisconsin. 
Nov 17, 2020
Removing the Stumbling Blocks with Dr. Hilary Ryder
19:08

Hilary Ryder, MD, is an Associate Professor of Medicine and Medical Education and Director of the internal medicine residency program at Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center. Dr. Ryder completed her medical school from Yale University School of Medicine and her internship and residency training in internal medicine at Dartmouth-Hitchcock before joining the faculty in the Section of Hospital Medicine where she focuses on end of life care, medical decision making and medical ethics. She is a nationally certified Health Care Ethicist and was the chair of the clinical ethics committee. Dr. Ryder has a keen interest in medical education and also served as Medical Editor for SIMPLE, the most widely used on-line, case-based third-year medical clerkship curriculum. Her current work focuses on meaning and understanding of assessments and evaluations, understanding how medical students learn (including mastery of hidden curriculum), and improving clinical systems to maximize education.

When Dr. Hilary Ryder was in second grade, she refused to sit at a table with a child in her class that was bullying her. Her mom—her first mentor—sat with her in protest outside of the classroom until the bully was moved to a different table. It was there that Dr. Ryder experienced how mentors are advocates for mentees. When mentees are faced with obstacles that inhibit their learning or well-being, it is the role of the mentor to stand behind them in support until those obstacles are removed. Since then, Dr. Ryder has practiced supporting her mentees in the same way. When we face “stumbling blocks” in medicine, we can count on strong mentors to help us remove them—and realize our potential.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Mentors help us remove our “stumbling blocks”. When obstacles come our way, good mentors stand behind us and help remove them, and then we realize our potential.
2. As Ruth Bader Ginsberg would say, “you can have it all in your lifetime, but you can’t have it all at once.” Think critically about your core values, and your priorities, as you make decisions along the way.
3. The attitude of gratitude is a driving force for fulfillment. And realizing that we are so privileged to have been given so much so far, should push us to want to give back in return.

Nov 16, 2020
Wholeheartedness in Medicine: Bringing Your “A” Game to Your Work Every Day, with Dr. Sherine Salib
21:45

Sherine Salib, MD, MRCP, FACP, is an Associate Professor of Internal Medicine at Dell Medical School at the University of Texas at Austin. She is the, Director of Undergraduate Medical Education in the Department of Internal Medicine. Dr. Salib attended medical school at The University of Bristol in England and went on to become a member of the Royal College of Physicians of London. Dr. Salib completed her residency in internal medicine from the University of Texas Houston Health Sciences Center. She has had several publications in journals including Academic Medicine and British Medical Journal. She takes special interest in writing about innovative educational endeavors and the medical humanities, as well as developing workshops and curricula for residents and students. Dr. Salib has received many awards and honors for her contributions as a clinician and an educator.

According to Dr. Sherine Salib, there are only three things you need to be an excellent physician: Great attitude, best effort, and curiosity. Today, Dr. Salib breaks down what each of those traits mean to her, and how we can bring these qualities to our work each day. She talks about reframing ‘work life balance’ into ‘work life integration’, and how finding our joy in work will positively influence our personal life, and vice versa. And lastly, she talks about leadership. Everybody is a leader. And the best leaders, according to Dr. Salib, are the ones who know how to combine leadership approaches that will best suit each situation. The best leaders are ones who know how to serve others, and to take care of those in their charge.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Reframe ‘work life balance’ as ‘work life integration.” Find the type of work that gives you joy and purpose in life, and that you want to wake up for each day.
2. Look for mentorship outside just your field in medicine. Seek guidance from people who have a different perspective and look for innovative ideas to act as a bridge for positive exchange across fields.
3. Attitude, best effort, and curiosity are the three most important traits of a successful trainee.
4. Everybody is a leader. Whether you have that official title or not, you are a leader in what you do. In order to excel as leaders, we need to combine various approaches, and know how to serve others; and take care of those in our charge.

Nov 16, 2020
The Three Places We Find Joy with Dr. Richard Abrams
13:59

Richard Abrams, MD, is an Associate Professor of Medicine and Associate Dean of Learning Environments at Rush Medical College (Rush University). Dr. Abrams completed his Medical school from University of Illinois College of Medicine at Chicago and Residency from Rush University Medical Center, where he continued on as a chief resident. He practices as a general internist and hospitalist at Rush and has been heavily involved in graduate medical education as a past internal medicine residency program director, a dean for graduate medical education at Rush and in his current role as an Associate Dean of Learning Environments is bridging the gap between graduate and undergraduate medical education.

There are three places to find joy, according to Dr. Richard Abrams. There is joy in what we do, there is joy in working with others, and—most importantly—there is the joy we find within ourselves. Today, we discover how to find joy in each of these areas of life. And as we continue on this journey of medicine, asking ourselves what brings us joy should be a driving force behind the decisions we make. When we realize how to find joy within ourselves, we’ll find it in the people that we work with, and in our careers.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. The joy in medicine exists in three parts: The joy in what you do, the joy in working with others, and finding joy within yourself. We should ask ourselves how we can start to find joy in each compartment of our life.
2. Your relationship with a mentor is like a professional mother or father. They not only shape your career trajectory, but they’ll imbibe in you the values they teach. And, they’ll treat you like family.
3. We need to be open to the things we don’t want to hear, because sometimes people can see things in us that we don’t necessarily see in ourselves.
4. Success as a young physician contains three things: Being present, being reflective, and being able to utilize the knowledge that is at our disposal in the very best ways we can take better care of our patients.

Nov 16, 2020
Becoming Part of the Solution with Dr. Gopal Yadavalli
20:57

Gopal Yadavalli, MD, FACP, is the Vice Chair of Education and Program Director for the Internal Medicine Residency in the Department of Medicine at the Boston University School of Medicine. Dr. Yadavalli completed his medical school from Thomas Jefferson University, pursued a residency in Internal Medicine, followed by a fellowship in Infectious Diseases from Case Western Reserve University. At Case Western, Dr. Yadavalli was Chief of the Infectious Diseases Clinic at the Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, and an active member of the CWRU Center for AIDS Research, where his research focused on clinical outcomes of anti-retroviral therapies. Dr. Yadavalli has also developed a passion for graduate medical education, becoming a Senior Associate Program Director for the Internal Medicine Residency and Director of the Global Health Track at Case Western. In 2011, he joined Boston University and has received a number of distinctions and teaching awards including induction into the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society.

As burnout becomes more and more prevalent in the field of medicine, we need to ask ourselves how we can make a difference in changing that for the better. The best way to combat burnout is to become part of the solution, says Dr. Gopal Yadavalli. Today, he shares how, making a positive impact on the world starts with the very hospitals we work in each day. When we focus on getting involved with those at our institution and help develop systems that can improve the lives of everyone around us, we will experience much less burnout ourselves.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. The key to being an excellent educator: Relationships. As a mentee, understanding that mentorships should be relational, not transactional, is key.
2. Live a life based on your own interests and passions, not based on the perspectives of what others’ expectations of you are.
3. The key to combatting burnout is becoming part of the solution. Think about improving the system that fuels burnout itself, and you—and others—will unburn yourselves.
4. What distinguishes a great resident from an okay resident is the one who is willing to do what it takes to improve themselves, who is open to feedback, and accepting criticism. It’s not just about board scores.

Nov 16, 2020
Mindfulness in Medicine with Dr. Chadwick Flowers
15:10

Chadwick Flowers, MD, is an Assistant Professor of at the University of Miami as well as an Associate Director of the Internal Medicine Residency Program at Jackson Memorial Hospital—University of Miami. Dr. Flowers completed his medical school from Indiana University and a Med-Peds Residency from the University of Miami where he stayed on to become a Chief Resident. He is a Med-Peds hospitalist providing inpatient care to adults and children at the University of Miami, Jackson Memorial Hospital and Holtz Children’s Hospital. His academic interests include medical education, inpatient quality Improvement, and bedside procedure/diagnostics.

In medicine, our top priority should always be the patient. But in order to provide the highest quality of care for patients, we cannot forget about our own well-being. Today, Dr. Chadwick Flowers explains the importance of self-care and the prevention of burnout in medicine. We’ll learn a few mindfulness techniques (and what box-breathing is), and he reassures us that if we need to take a break—we are entitled to that. Aside from self-care alone, he shares the best habits of successful residents: The ones who are willing to dive into residency with an open-mind, and who aren’t afraid to put themselves out there, even when rejection is inevitable.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. We cannot leave behind our own mental health. Develop and practice mindfulness techniques, breathwork throughout the day and in moments of stress, and know when to take a break.
2. We need mentorship for every aspect of our life. Find someone who is doing what we want to do, and reach out to them. Often, our mentors are what guide us toward our true passions.
3. Be willing to face rejection. Still, have the ability to put yourself out there. If we are persistent in our goals, and finding good mentors, we will eventually find the people who invest in us.

Nov 13, 2020
Why the Self-Made Person is Flawed with Dr. John M. Flack
14:21

John M. Flack, MD, MPH, is the Sergio Rabinovich Endowed Chair of Internal Medicine and the Professor and Chair, Department of Medicine as well as the Chief of Hypertension Specialty Services at the Southern Illinois University. He also serves as the President of the American Hypertension Specialist Certification Program. Dr. Flack received his internal medicine residency training as well as his medical degree from the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, where he served as chief medical resident. He then completed an NIH postdoctoral fellowship in cardiovascular epidemiology at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health. Dr. Flack has led various clinical trials and has been the recipient of a number of research grants including several grants funded by the NIH. He is a renowned hypertension specialist with more than 200 peer-reviewed publications. Dr. Flack also serves on the editorial board of many peer-reviewed Journals including the American Journal of Hypertension. Among his many honors, Dr Flack has been repeatedly named in Top Doctors, Detroit's Super Doctors and Hour Magazine Best Doctors lists.

There is no such thing as a self-made person. Today, Dr. John M. Flack reminds us that acknowledging the people who have guided us to success does not take away from our accomplishments. He also shares his perspective on work/life balance (Hint: In medical school, there isn’t one). And why mentorship is not about getting a pat on the back: We have to be willing to accept constructive criticism. Lastly, he believes the key to staying motivated in medicine is an insatiable appetite for learning.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. An insatiable appetite for learning is the key to staying motivated in medicine.
2. Be open to choosing mentors who are different than you, who can offer you open and honest feedback, and be willing to accept constructive criticism.
3. The “self-made person” is a flawed concept: Be grateful to all of the people who have contributed to your success along your way.

Nov 13, 2020
How to Get Comfortable with Feedback with Dr. Jill Patton
18:50

Jill Patton, DO, is the Chair of Internal Medicine and the Program Director of the Categorical Internal Medicine Residency Program at Advocate Health Lutheran General Hospital in Illinois. Dr. Patton completed her medical school from Michigan State University Osteopathic medical school and residency from Lutheran General Hospital, where she was also appointed as the chief resident. Having served in multiple leadership roles over the years, she has mentored trainees at all levels. She has been awarded as one of the 2017 Parker J. Palmer Courage to Teach Award honorees by the ACGME. This award is given by the ACGME to program directors, who find innovative ways to teach residents and provide quality health care while remaining connected to the initial impulse to care for others in this environment.

Does feedback ever get less uncomfortable? Dr. Jill Patton believes it does. Today, she explains that feedback only gets easier when we allow ourselves to hear it. We have to let our mentors know that it’s okay: We want to hear the tough feedback. We want to know the hard stuff. Because acknowledging the things that aren’t always easy to hear is the only way we can move forward and grow. She believes that mentorships can feel like parental relationships: With her mentees, she cares deeply for them. At the same time, she recognizes that she also needs to give them feedback, and to let them know how they can improve each day.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Find mentors not just on the local level, but on the national level as well. Find ways to attend meetings, conferences, and to join committees to help grow your network.
2. Communicate your goals clearly to your mentors in order to get optimal advice.
3. When you self-reflect, don’t just focus on what you didn’t do well. All yourself to look at what you are proud of, what you did do well, to find encouragement and motivation.

Nov 13, 2020
Getting Creative with Dr. Abby Spencer
18:00

Abby Spencer, MD, is a Professor of Medicine at the Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine and the immediate past Vice Chair of Education and Internal Medicine Residency Program Director at the Cleveland Clinic. Dr. Spencer completed her medical school from University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and her residency in Internal Medicine from Cornell University. She pursued a Fellowship in Women's Health from University of Pittsburgh in 2007. Dr. Spencer has recently been selected as a 2020 Fellow for the Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) program. She is active in various national organizations which focus on resident education including being a Councilor for Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine (APDIM). She initiated APDIM's national 1:1 mentoring program over a decade ago and was founding faculty for SGIM Teach Program. She has received numerous awards, including the 2019 recipient of the ACGME Parker J. Palmer Courage to Teach Award, and the Women’s Professional Staff Association (WPSA) Champion Award for advocating for and supporting women.

Want to be more creative? Today, Dr. Abby Spencer talks about how she inspires her learners to innovate, leverage their creativity, and allow new solutions and ideas to emerge. The questions we need to constantly ask ourselves are: How can we improve? What could we do better? And how could we better serve our patients? In her students, Dr. Spencer values those who offer new ideas, even if they seem crazy at first. She reminds us that the goal isn’t to go with the first solution. The goal is to be able to talk freely about what could be accomplished, and how we might get there. As residents, we need to leverage our curiosity to create opportunities to explore new endeavors. Because when we have the courage to brainstorm, to collaborate, and to ask questions, we’ll eventually land on a solution that works--and now, we’re innovating!

Pearls of Wisdom:

  1. In building innovation and creativity, ask the simple questions: What do we wish was different and better? And then pursue that. Know that your first solution may not be the right solution, but with the psychological safety and space to explore, you’ll find the right solution.
  2. If you’re having trouble finding your “why”, ask someone else. Ask them when they notice you getting excited as you talk about your interests, when does your voice get fast, or your hands go up? Sometimes other people can spot what lights you up before you can.
  3. In initiating mentorship, spot the person you admire, and ask a focus question rather than trying to “get married on day one..
  4. Manage up with your mentors. Be prepared to ask the questions that nobody but them can answer. That is the key to building engagement and having the mentor invest in our life.
  5. There’s always time to read. Commit to reading for at least five minutes every day.
Nov 13, 2020
You have a Voice with Dr. Alysia Kwiatkowski
16:33

Dr. Alysia V. Kwiatkowski is an Assistant Professor of Medicine, Allergy, Immunology & Rheumatology at the University at Buffalo (UB). She is the Senior Associate Program Director and Director of Curriculum Development for the Internal Medicine Training Program and an education development specialist for UB’s Medical Education and Educational Research Institute. Dr. Kwiatkowski is also the Site Director of Internal Medicine & Advanced Medicine Clerkships at Erie County Medical Center. She completed her Masters of Science at Roswell Park Cancer Institute and her DO in Medicine from New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine. Dr. Kwiatkowski then completed Residency in Internal Medicine from the Albany Medical Center where she was also the Chief Resident. She then pursued a Fellowship in Rheumatology from Rush University Medical Center, where she received certification in teaching excellence. In 2018, Dr. Kwiatkowski was invited by the Rheumatology Research Foundation as a fellow in training and furthered her research in medical education comparing team-based learning with non-interactive learning and the incorporation of musculoskeletal examination workshops into rheumatology electives. Her awards include the Psi Sigma Alpha from the National Osteopathic Scholastic Honor Society and Sigma Sigma Phi from the National Osteopathic Service Fraternity, in addition to awards for recognition of her skills as an educator.

If there is one thing we should take away from this conversation with Dr. Alysia Kwiatkowski, it is that we have a voice, and we need to use it. Today, we realize how we as learners are the ultimate stakeholders in medical education therefore our voice is just as important if not more. Dr. Kwiatkowski’s mission in medicine is to improve education and leadership for her students and generations to come. And today, we’ll learn from her story that the most powerful thing we can do is to get the best training we can, give back to our community, and make a positive impact.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Get the best training you can, and give back to your community. There is value in thinking beyond ourselves.
2. Have a voice, and use it (even when we feel intimidated). We as the learners are a valued member of decision-making as the ultimate stakeholders in medical education.
3. The mentor’s role is to help us set and achieve goals. As mentees, our role is to be open and honest with them.
4. There is no failure, just feedback.

Nov 13, 2020
How to Say Yes (And When to Say No) with Dr. Lyssa Weatherly
20:42

Lyssa Weatherly, MD, is an Assistant Professor of Medicine and Assistant Dean for Student Affairs at the School of Medicine at the University of Mississippi Medical Center. She attended medical school at UMMC where she also completed a residency, chief residency and geriatrics fellowship.  Dr. Weatherly serves as an Associate Program Director for the Internal Medicine Residency Program with a strong interest in medical student and resident education and mentorship. She also enjoys serving as the UMMC chapter advisor for the Gold Humanism Honor Society. Dr. Weatherly has received a number of awards including recently awarded Norman C. Nelson Order of Teaching Excellence.

When we say yes to one thing, says Dr. Lyssa Weatherly, we are saying no to something else. Today, shares a career-defining moment when she realized she was going to have to say “no” to some things—so she could say “yes” to what was most important to her. As physicians, we need to think critically about what we value most. And what do we have to be willing to let go of…so that nothing gets in our way? Dr. Weatherly teaches us how to expertly navigate these obstacles, and offers us simple advice for pushing through: When we’re stuck, think back to when we first started, and remember why we’re here. And from there, evaluate if the roadblock we’re up against is worth pushing through in order to become who we’ve always wanted to be.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Find ways to marry the patient experience with the student experience. When we involve the patient in the student’s success, and vice versa, it creates a positive cohesive learning environment.
2. When we face roadblocks, think back to when we first started to remember why we’re here. Evaluate if the roadblock is worth pushing through in order to get where we’ve always wanted to be.
3. When we say yes to one thing, we are saying no to something else. Our time is finite, so consider carefully the things we do—and don’t—want to say no to.

Nov 12, 2020
Work Ethic and a Good Idea with Dr. Aimee Zaas
23:17

Dr Aimee Zaas is a Professor of Medicine at Duke University and the Director of the Internal medicine residency training program. Dr Zaas completed her Medical school from Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine (Illinois), 1998 and Residency and Chief Residency in Internal Medicine from Johns Hopkins Hospital. She pursued a Fellowship in Infectious Diseases from Duke University Medical Center, 2001-2005. Her early career focused on finding genetic determinants of susceptibility to fungal infection and identifying genomic signatures of infectious diseases before she re-entered the world of medical education. She has served as the Program Director for the Duke Internal Medicine Program for 10 years. When not at work, you can find her spending time with her husband watching her two boys (ages 15 and 17) play soccer, going for a run with her energetic but ill- behaved dogs and enjoying the company of friends.

What do you do when you lack experience and accolades? Today, Dr. Aimee Zaas shares a powerful story of how a good work ethic—and a good idea—when supported by mentors turned into a new opportunity for her, dramatically changing the trajectory of her career. She encourages us to start listening to our inner voices and understand what is important to us and choose careers that maximize that. Today, we learn how having a network of mentors who believe in us, support us, and encourage us, can open us up to the endless possibilities in medicine today. And while sometimes from the outside, successful mentors around us can seem to have a straight line pointing up towards success, when we take the time to connect, we will see that the lines are often squiggly with ups and downs, twists and turns, and much more similar to us than we think!

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. When we look at the lives of successful people, we feel like there is a straight line trajectory. But when we talk to them, we find that there are ups, downs, twists and turns. But through it all, it’s always a positive trajectory.
2. What you lack in experience and accolades, you can make up for in work ethic and ideas. And when you have work ethic and ideas, mentors are going to invest in you, support you, and trust you to take an opportunity and run with it.
3. Recognize who you are. Find your passions objectively by picking up the NEJM, scanning the articles, and paying attention to what is most interesting to you. And once you know that, talk to as many people as possible about your interests.
4. The best trait in successful residents is a ‘multiplier quality’. It’s the people who have the ability to help others shine.

Nov 12, 2020
Resolving to Love What We Do with Dr. Mark Siegel
18:19

Mark Siegel, MD, is a Professor of Medicine and the Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency Program at Yale School of Medicine. Dr. Siegel graduated from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and completed his residency in Internal Medicine at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. He joined Yale as a Pulmonary & Critical Care fellow and has been a full time Yale faculty member since then. His major clinical focus is in the ICU and has participated in several multicenter clinical research trials investigating new treatments for sepsis and ARDS. He serves on the Editorial Boards of Critical Care Medicine, Chest, the Annals of the American Thoracic Society, and the American Journal of Medicine and is a recipient of several awards including Teacher of the Year at Yale University and the Leonard Tow Humanism in Medicine Award.

Dr. Mark Siegel has simple, yet powerful advice for new physicians: Whatever we do, and wherever we end up, resolve to love it. Today, we learn what it means to fully recognize the gift we have as physicians. Taking care of patients during critical times of their lives is a massive responsibility--and a massive privilege as well. Dr. Siegel encourages us to recognize the honor of having patients put their faith and trust in us, knowing that their well-being depends on our care. As we go forward in our journey, keeping our patients at the center of our motivation is what will lead to more meaning and joy in our careers.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Whatever you do, and whatever field you end up in, resolve to love what you do.
2. Appreciate the gift of being a physician: Remember it is a special privilege to be with patients during these critical times of their lives.
3. Look for mentors with generosity of spirit. And remember that the relationship is bi-directional. They are making a commitment to us, so we need to honor that and reciprocate.
4. Residence is tough, but self-care is not selfish. Prioritize wellness throughout your career. Get enough to eat, get enough sleep, and remember the basic tenets of personal health.

Nov 12, 2020
How to Thrive in Mentorship with Dr. Margaret C. Lo
20:03

Margaret C. Lo, MD, FACP, is a Professor of General Internal Medicine division and the Associate Program Director of Internal Medicine Residency at the University of Florida. She earned her medical degree from SUNY Upstate and then completed her residency at the University of Florida. Dr. Lo has a unique focus in medical education and strives for Innovation in residency medical education, multidisciplinary education and resident performance. Dr Lo has received numerous awards for her outstanding dedication to patient care and mentorship in medicine, including awards from the Society of General Internal Medicine and the American Medical Women’s Association. She was also inducted as a member in the Gold Humanism Honor Society in 2018.

What does it mean to put yourself in an environment of encouragement? Today, Dr. Margaret C. Lo explains how her mother set a high bar for her success, but always encouraged her to be proud of her accomplishments. Dr. Lo developed a healthy mindset toward working hard—and maintaining balance. Today, we learn how to become a reliable and accountable resident that sets us apart from the status quo, how to enhance trust and connection with our patients, and how to know when to step away from medicine to re-energize.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Surround yourself in an environment of encouragement and high expectations. It will bring out the best in you.
2. Find a mentor that matches both your goals and personality, aligns with your interests, and one who is invested in your success.
3. Continuity is a key aspect in building trust with patients, and motivational interviewing is a key skill for developing these connections.
4. Pay attention to your own self-care and well-being: Remember the importance of relaxation, networking, and keeping in touch with friends outside of medicine.

Nov 11, 2020
It Doesn’t Get Easier, You Get Stronger with Dr. Steven Tringali
18:28

Steven Tringali, DO, is an Associate Professor of Medicine and the Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency Program at UCSF—Fresno. He earned his medical degree at Touro University—Nevada, and went on to complete his residency in internal medicine at UCSF. His interests include point-of-care ultrasound, procedural training, teaching residents and medical students, and coaching residents to become better teachers. His research interests include cardiovascular risk factors, including blood pressure, atrial fibrillation and cardiovascular events. Dr. Tringali has won multiple awards, including the Excellence in Teaching Award from the Haile T. Debas Academy of Medical Educators at UCF School of Medicine and the Faculty Best Teacher Award from the UCF Fresno Life Program.

Dr. Steven Tringali puts it simply: It doesn’t get easier. You get stronger. Today, he shares helpful strategies for facing and overcoming challenges we face in medicine. He believes that we shouldn’t be focused on how right we are, and what we know. That the best students are those who are willing to accept failure, feedback, and criticism. Dr. Tringali also believes in creating an environment that is built around serving the community. And every day he aims to not just touch the patients he is seeing with his students, but train physicians who will touch hundreds of patients over their lifetime.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Service attitude which you observed in your parents early on really became a driving force in your own life and formed your mission to train the future physicians that will serve Central California.
2. One mentor is not enough, we need a team of mentors and the good thing is - there is no dearth of mentors. We need to have the courage to reach out.
3. It doesn't get easier. You get stronger. We need to continually build from the feedback we receive from our mentors to become stronger.

Nov 11, 2020
A Mindful Approach to Patient Care with Dr. Raquel Belforti
19:15

Raquel Belforti, DO, MS is an Assistant Professor of Medicine at University of Massachusetts Medical School-Baystate, and an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine. She also serves as the Associate Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency Program and Medicine Clerkship Director. Dr. Belforti completed her medical school from the University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine, and her residency from Baystate Medical Center, where she was also appointed as the Chief Resident. Dr. Belforti has  a Masters in Medical Education and been leading educational curricula for students, residents and faculty at Baystate. Recognized for her outstanding contributions as a clinical educator, she has been awarded a number of awards, including the L. Randol Barker Award at Johns Hopkins and the Education Achievement Award for the University of Massachusetts School of Medicine Population-Based Urban and Community Health Track (PURCH) curriculum.

The next time you enter a patient’s room, pause at the door to become mindful. This is the advice Dr. Raquel Belforti shares with us today about the best way to approach patient care. Being able to be a part of the patient’s world is a gift, and we can honor that by taking the time to listen to them mindfully. As physicians, our job is to establish trust and connection quickly—because the patient is putting their life in our hands. The best thing we can do is take the time to be present, and ask the patient not just about their diagnosis—but about their story. Dr. Belforti explains that it’s not so much the medical knowledge, but the role modeling, where she feels she’ll leave her biggest impact as a mentor. And the best place to make that impact is at the bedside.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Stop yourself at the patient’s door and be mindful of the role you’re going to play in that patient’s life. Then, take the time to sit and listen to the patient.
2. A career in medicine requires us to be at our best at all times. If there is something that is preventing us from doing that, we need to actively speak up and gather support from others—which is a sign of strength, not weakness.
3. Build a mentorship map: Have a mentor for each category of your professional and personal life in that map, and seek advice based on the role they fit into.
4. Take advantage of opportunities that come your way. But first, ask yourself first if you can commit 100% to it, if you can give it your all.

Nov 11, 2020
Being a Positive Force for Change with Dr. Rebecca Berman
18:14

Rebecca Berman, MD, is the Program Director for UCSF's internal medicine residency program, and a Professor of Clinical Medicine. Dr. Berman completed her medical school from Harvard Medical School and her residency in primary care internal medicine from Brigham and Women's Hospital. After completing her chief residency at Brigham and Women's in 2009, she joined Mass General Hospital where she built a network of student faculty primary care practices known as the Crimson Care Collaborative. Over a thousand Harvard medical students have participated in the Crimson Care Collaborative gaining early exposure to primary care, to care for the underserved and interprofessional education opportunities. In 2013, Dr. Berman returned to Brigham and Women's to direct its primary care residency program and in 2018 was recruited to UCSF. She's the founder and co-leader of the National Association of Program Directors of Internal Medicines, Primary Care Group, and is the editor of their primary care toolkit, which offers a blueprint for building and strengthening primary care tracks. To help reduce pay disparities and improve diversity in medical leadership positions, she teaches nationally on negotiation skills for physicians. She's a member of the Society of General Internal Medicine and serves on their national career development working group. Other areas of interest include Novel Curriculum, Health Literacy, Women in Medicine and Care for The Underserved.

Don’t let your lack of confidence get in the way of your intelligence. That is the wise advice Dr. Rebecca Berman received early on in her career, and she’s been practicing it—and preaching it—ever since. Today, she empowers us to use our voice, to share our ideas, and to dare to not only ask questions, but to seek the solutions that come from complex issues. Dr. Berman explains that when we know something, we need to simply say it. If we’re wrong, we can own it. But the key is to communicate confidently, clearly, and directly. She believes that strong mentors are who empower us to be innovative within and outside our hospital networks, and to encourage us to become a force for positive change.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Medicine is an atypical journey. The ‘atypical student’ with the non-linear path is much more common than the typical one. And it’s the varying perspectives and journeys that lead to more innovation along the way.
2. Don’t let lack of confidence get in the way of your intelligence. If you have something to say, say it clearly and directly, and don’t undermine yourself.  If you’re wrong, own it and move on.
3. We all want to be innovative. But we can get a lot more done creatively if we look at it with two mindsets. It’s not just criticizing the problem, it’s about working to find that complex solution.
4. It’s not always about getting credit. We need allies and formed partnerships to accomplish more and create change.

Nov 11, 2020
Climbing the Wall of Knowledge with Dr. Salvatore Cilmi
18:29

Salvatore Cilmi, MD, is an Associate Professor of Medicine, an Infectious Diseases Specialist, and the Director of the Internal Medicine Residency Program at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Dr Cilmi completed his Medical school from Harvard University Medical School and Residency in Internal Medicine from Massachusetts General Hospital where he stayed on to pursue a Fellowship in Infectious Diseases. Dr. Cilmi has published extensively and has developed curricula for residency programs. He is a recipient of numerous teaching awards including the Hospital Medicine Attending of the Year, the James Smith Memorial Award and the Richard A. Herrmann Teaching Award at Weill Cornell Medical Center and the Excellence in Teaching Award from the Institute for Medical Education at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.

As physicians, we’re all climbing a wall of knowledge. And in the beginning of our careers, we may feel the pressure to leap over it as fast as we can. Dr. Salvatore Cilmi recalls that feeling when he was first given the title ‘doctor’, but not feeling equipped to be someone’s doctor just yet. And even today as a PGY-23, with massive amounts of training and experience under his belt, he continues to learn and practice. And so he reassures us: No one is expecting you to leap over the wall at once. You’re not even expected to get halfway up in your first few years. But what you do need to do is find those points during this climb where you feel safe and secure - the mentors and colleagues in whom you feel comfortable revealing what you know and don't know. And through them, you will obtain the skillset and mindset to continue the climb.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. We’re all climbing a wall of knowledge. Although no one expects you to leap over the whole thing, it’s important to find—and hold onto—the areas of that wall you feel steady and confident.
2. As Winston Churchill said, no success is final, and no failure is fatal. It’s the courage to continue. In moments of weakness or vulnerability, that is where we’ll find our greatest opportunities.
3. Mentorship is learning from the whole experience. Learn from the good things and the things we don’t like. This combination will help us identify what we really want.
4. Be a good listener, have an open mind, have respect, and an enthusiasm for the quest for knowledge.

 

Nov 11, 2020
Thriving, Not Surviving with Dr. Lindsay Sonstein
15:08

Lindsay Sonstein, MD is a University of Texas System Distinguished Teaching Professor, the Clinical Vice Chair and Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency Program at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. Dr. Sonstein focuses on quality of care, patient satisfaction, and innovative health delivery systems. She is passionate about resident education, has won numerous teaching and educational awards, and was inducted as a member of the UTMB Academy of Master Teachers in September of 2012 and UTMB Academy of Master Clinicians in 2018. Nationally, Dr. Sonstein is involved in the APDIM (Association for Program Directors in Internal Medicine) and serves on the program planning committee.

We don’t want to survive residency, we want to thrive. And today, Dr. Lindsay Sonstein shares how to do exactly that. She urges us to tap into why we entered medicine in the first place, because it will provide the endurance and resilience we need to carry us through our journey. She notes the importance of building a team that complements our own strengths and weaknesses. And that mentors are here to push us in the direction where we can fulfill our potential—and as mentees, we must be open to taking those chances. Lastly, she defines the true meaning of hard work in medicine - doing what it takes to care for the patient.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Find your strengths, find your weaknesses, and then build a team to help you complement those strengths and weaknesses.
2. Everyone can work-hard. It’s working hard toward the benefit of the patient that sets you apart as an excellent physician.
3. Whenever you are struggling, tap back into why you came into medicine. That will carry you through your career.

Nov 11, 2020
Teamwork and Collaboration with Dr. Carrie Thompson
17:42

Carrie Thompson, MD, is a Consultant in the Division of Hematology, an Associate Professor of Medicine, and the Director of the Internal Medicine Residency Program at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Dr. Thompson completed her medical school from St. Louis University School of Medicine and residency in internal medicine from the Mayo Clinic where she continued her fellowship in hematology-oncology. Her clinical practice focuses on hematologic cancers with a special focus on lymphomas, and aligns with her research interest in studying quality of life and long-term issues in lymphoma survivors. She's passionate about education and mentorship, and has been awarded Teacher of the Year and Excellence in Teaching awards at Mayo. Dr. Thompson is also a Fellow of the Academy of Educational Excellence at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and Science.

There is a reason why Mayo Clinic has been so successful for over 100 years. Today, Dr. Carrie Thompson shares why: It comes down to collaboration. She reminds us that medicine isn’t a one-on-one relationship between the doctor and the patient. It takes teamwork, respect, and communication to provide the best care for patients. Dr. Thompson also shares what she finds most fulfilling about mentoring: It’s helping her mentees find success beyond just the research paper they are writing. She uses her past experience—and what she’s learned from her former mentors—to carry the torch. And although there will be many U-turns, right turns, and left turns throughout our career, Dr. Thompson encourages us to take one step at a time. And to keep our mind open to opportunities—we never know what’s just around the corner.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Patient-centric organizations are successful because of collaboration and teamwork. It is remembering that the patient and doctor is not a one-on-one relationship. It takes a team.
2. Medicine is a long career with many different opportunities. Don’t try to do everything at once. Take one step at a time and you will be amazed at what you’re able to achieve in the long haul.
3. Live in the present. Try not to put your personal life on hold waiting for a certain time to pass. As we move forward, each new phase in our careers will present new challenges.
4. Mentors can’t read our minds. The key to building rich relationships with our mentors is spending time self-reflecting and identifying areas that we need to grow in.

Nov 10, 2020
Having the Confidence to Believe in Yourself with Dr. Fariha Shafi
19:55

Fariha Shafi, MD is an Associate Professor of Medicine, the Chair of the School of Medicine Diversity Council, and the Co-Director for Women in Medical Sciences Programming at the University of Missouri—Kansas City. Dr. Shafi completed her medical school from Universidad Tecnologica De Santiago (UTESA) and residency in drug medicine from The State University of New York—Buffalo. She has a strong interest in physician wellness, and also serves as the Chair of the ACP's Wellness Committee of the Missouri chapter. Dr. Shafi serves as a docent to medical students through year one to six and, and is passionate about mentoring medical students and residents. Recognized for her contributions, Dr. Shafi has received a number of awards and honors. Most recently, she was awarded the Betty M. Drees Excellence in Mentoring Award.

If you don’t believe in yourself, why should someone else? That is the advice Dr. Fariha Shafi learned at a young age; and she shares it with us today. She explains the true power of mentorship; how those that stand behind us are the ones who inspire us to be the very best we can. That mentors (and sponsors) are the ones who will invest the most in our success; but it is up to us to carry ourselves across that finish line to success. The more honest, intentional, and confident we can be with ourselves and our mentors, the clearer we will get on our goals,; and the more our mentors will be able to help us achieve them.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. A mentoring relationship has to be approached actively - We should identify our challenges, and approach a mentor with an agenda.
2. Every morning, give yourself a few minutes to think about 3 things you are grateful for in your life. This gratitude exercise will help us see positivity in our lives.
3. Learn to say NO. Be mindful of what all you pile up in your plate and have the realization that there is a finite amount of space in that plate.
4. Remember the 4 key traits to be successful: Be goal-oriented, work hard, ask for feedback and self-reflect often.

Nov 10, 2020
Excellence without Ego with Dr. Lisa Willett
14:34

Lisa Willett, MD, is a Professor of Medicine, the Vice-Chair of Education, and the Director of the Tinsley Harrison Internal Medicine Residency Program at the University of Alabama—Birmingham. Dr. Willett completed her medical school, residency, and chief resident year at UAB. She is nationally recognized for her work in resident development, and is currently the President of the Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine. Dr. Willett is also the recipient of this year's prestigious Parker J. Palmer Courage to Teach Award from the ACGME.

There is a motto at University of Alabama--Birmingham: Excellence Without Ego. Today, Dr. Lisa Willett teaches us exactly what that means--and how to develop that mindset as a physician. According to Dr. Willett, self-awareness and humility are two major components in achieving this attitude. As Dr. Willett puts it, medicine is the great humbler: It’s impossible to predict every outcome in medicine, so our focus should be on the continuous pursuit of learning, understanding--and performing. And along with being physicians, we’re humans, too: Although we all have limitations, we have an exciting opportunity to leverage what we don’t know into new learning opportunities. Dr. Willett reminds us to check any arrogance at the door, because there is no room for that in medicine. What’s more important is to strive to be the very best for our patients and those around us. And to remember success lies in our persistence, courage, and determination. That being committed to excellence--not perfection-- is what will carry us the farthest, and bring us the most joy.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. When you say yes to opportunities, you need to deliver. Delivery creates the promise of future delivery, and creates the confidence in others that you’re somebody who can be trusted, sponsored, promoted, and advanced..
2. Build a portfolio of mentors. That portfolio doesn’t stop at clinical research, it goes beyond into personal aspects of life (like work life balance).
3. Develop excellence without ego. We always have more to learn, there are always areas we need to improve in, so we must maintain humility throughout our career.
4. Put the oxygen mask on yourself first. At the end of the day, you have to take care of you, your family, and loved ones—so you can bring your A-game to the hospital.

Nov 10, 2020
Doing Everything Well or Not At All with Dr. Nicholas Gowen
18:44

Nicholas Gowen,‌ MD, is ‌the‌ Associate Program Director of Internal Medicine Residency, Assistant Professor of Medicine and Pediatrics, and the VA Site Director of the Internal Medicine Residency Program ‌at‌ University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences.‌ ‌Dr‌ ‌‌Gowen ‌completed‌ ‌his ‌Medical‌ ‌school‌ and ‌Residency‌ ‌in‌ Internal Medicine and Pediatrics ‌from‌‌ UAMS.‌ He takes keen interest in mentoring and education of medical students and residents. He has also created a number of lecture series to help guide medical students and interns. Dr Gowen’s commitment to teaching and mentoring of students has been recognized by a number of awards for teaching - including the recently awarded UAMS Gold Sash Teaching Award.

Dr. Nicholas Gowen’s father used to tell him: Anything you do, do it well (Or don’t do it at all). Today, Dr. Gowen teaches us how we can put our very best into everything we do. Even though we’re facing long nights and packed schedules, there is no use in taking shortcuts if it sacrifices value in our lives—or a patient’s life. And in everything we do, it’s important to self-reflect on how our time is being used. We should learn to ask ourselves the questions: Is this the best use of my time? And does it align with my goals and values?

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Anything you do, do it well (or don’t do it at all). And when you do it, self-reflect: Is this the best use of your time? Does it match up with your short-term or long-term goals?
2. In trying to establish a good mentoring relationship, pick up on signs and cues that signal a mentor’s approachability. Find something you admire about that mentor, and take the next courageous step to let them know.
3. Be humble: Develop the attitude of learning new things now matter how brilliant you already are. Be charitable and generous in all of your interactions: Because every single interaction is a new opportunity to learn and grow.

Nov 09, 2020
Good to Great with Dr. Dominique Cosco
15:44

Dr Dominique Cosco is an associate professor of Medicine and Director of the Internal Medicine residency program at Washington University School of Medicine/Barnes-Jewish Hospital. In addition, Dr. Cosco is the Director of Teacher Development for the Academy of Educators at Washington University School of Medicine. Dr Cosco completed her Medical school from Tulane University and Residency in Internal Medicine from Emory. During her time as a faculty member at Emory University, she served as an Associate Program Director of the Emory University Internal Medicine Residency Program and directed the Global Health Distinctions Program. She is widely recognized for her role as Director of the Coaching Program at Emory and as Director of the TEACH (Teaching Educators Across the Continuum of Healthcare) Program in the Society of General Internal Medicine. She has also held significant educational and leadership roles in Academic Alliance for Internal Medicine (AAIM) and the Association for Program Directors in Internal Medicine (APDIM) where she is the Chair for the program planning committee. Because of her exceptional skills and expertise, she has received a number of honors and awards for her educational contributions and citizenship.

As physicians, we each have individual strengths. And while they should be recognized, Dr. Dominique Cosco reminds us that we should be continually looking for ways to improve and refine those strengths. Today, she talks about embracing new opportunities for growth that we encounter throughout our career in medicine. Dr. Cosco realized early on that growth and learning never stop. And in medicine, leaning into the ways we can build on our strengths will take us from good…to great.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Even in our strengths, we have an opportunity to grow and refine them. Recognize your unique strengths but understand that you will continually have opportunities to improve those strengths. That will take us from good to great.
2. We have to be flexible, yet willing to make small decisions. As we make small decisions along the way, keep our minds open to the big picture, so we can continue to navigate the ship in the right direction.
3. It’s not about how smart you are, it’s about how well you play on a team. To lead well, you have to know how to lead from within.

Nov 09, 2020
Holding Space for Processing Emotions with Dr. Victoria Montgomery
14:36

Victoria Montgomery, MD, is the Associate Program Director and Ambulatory Training Safety and Quality Director for the internal medicine residency program at Advocate Lutheran General Hospital. Dr. Montgomery completed her medical school from Michigan State University’s College of Osteopathic Medicine, and pursued residency in internal medicine from Advocate Lutheran General Hospital.

Often, the best care we can give our patients is when we hold space for them. Today, Dr. Victoria Montgomery teaches us why we need to accept—and process emotions. Her personal challenges taught her how important it was to process her emotions. It also taught her how powerful it can be when someone simply asks you how you’re doing. Dr. Montgomery teaches us why silence is our partner: For each of our patients, we must learn how to ask how they are feeling…and wait for them to open up. Dr. Montgomery also reminds us to trust ourselves, to be kind and compassionate toward our own journey, and to remember our value that we add to our teams.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Silence is our partner. When we’re with patients, we must hold space for them to process emotions, reveal their true feelings, and tell us what’s bothering them. It will help us connect more deeply with them, and it will better inform their care.
2. Mentors help us realize who we want to be—often before we know it ourselves.
3. Trust yourself. We have the knowledge and skills to contribute to the team. So see yourself as human: Be patient and kind with yourself.
4. Thinking that there is always someone smarter in the room is just perspective. People will always have unique talents and skills to bring to the table, but it doesn’t mean that they are any smarter than you are.

Nov 09, 2020
Training is a Time-Bound Gift with Dr. Jennifer Corbelli
14:26

Jennifer Corbelli, MD, MS, is the Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency Training Program and an Associate Professor of Medicine at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Dr. Corbelli completed her Medical school from the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Residency in Internal Medicine from the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center where she was also the Chief Resident. She then pursued a Women’s Health Fellowship at VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System. Dr. Corbelli has a special interest in health care for the underserved and is the Co-Medical Director of the Program for Health Care to Underserved Populations (PHCUP) through which she directs a volunteer team of clinicians and health professionals at the Birmingham Free Clinic. She has presented nationally and published on various topics within medical education research such as curriculum development and evaluation, while actively mentoring residents and fellows. She is the recipient of Pennsylvania Medical Society’s Top Physicians under 40, Outstanding Teaching Attending Award and Innovation in Medical Education Award from University of Pittsburgh.

If you are ready for the job on day one, you are overqualified. That is the advice Dr. Jennifer Corbelli shares with all of her residents and students. Today, we’ll learn why mentorship can be a powerful tool for pushing us towards the opportunities we need (although we might not realize it yet). If we wait until we’re fully ready to take on a new challenge, we’ll end up stuck in one place. Dr. Corbelli teaches us that training is a gift, but it's time-bound. We must use our time wisely with our mentors, our training opportunities, and our experience and aim to take as much as we can from it.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. You are not better than anyone else, but no one is better than you. Learn how to discern between confidence and superiority.
2. Training is a gift. We have access to a network of mentors that can give us honest feedback and seek out the best opportunities for us. But the clock is ticking: Use your time in training wisely.
3. When opportunities present themselves, say yes. If you’re ready for a job on day one, you’re overqualified.

Nov 09, 2020
Developing a 360 Degree View in Medicine with Dr. Adrian Tyndall
17:16

Dr. Tyndall assumed the role of the Interim Dean of the University of Florida College of Medicine on July 31st 2018. He is a Professor of Emergency Medicine and has been the Chair of the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Florida College of Medicine since 2008. He is a graduate of the University of Maryland School of Medicine and the Emergency Medicine Residency at the University of Maryland. In addition, he received his Master’s Degree in Health Services Management and Health Policy from Columbia University, NY. Prior to his recruitment to UF, Dr. Tyndall held academic appointments at Cornell and SUNY Downstate and served as a residency program director for emergency medicine. At UF, he has served on the board of directors of UF Health Shands at the University of Florida since 2010. He was the Chair of the Dean’s council for diversity, inclusion and equity at the University of Florida from 2010-2018. He was also the senior medical school representative to the Council for Faculty and Societies at the Association of American Medical Colleges from 2013-2018. He was also named a 2018-2019 fellow of the Council of Deans of the AAMC. He is a member of the Board of Directors and Immediate Past President of the Florida College of Emergency Physicians and is a member of the Board of Trustees of the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Foundation. He has been inducted in both the Alpha Omega Alpha as well as the Gold Humanism honor societies. His research interests focus on brain injury and health services research. He is also an editor for the upcoming 10th edition of the emergency medicine text book - Rosen’s Emergency Medicine - Concepts and Clinical Practice. He was most recently appointed to the role of Associate Vice President for Strategic and Academic Affairs at UF Health.

As mentees, according to Dr. Adrian Tyndall, we must be bold in pursuing mentors. Today, Dr. Tyndall explains how mentorship is a bi-directional relationship: The mentee must actively show interest in the mentor and their areas of research, and in turn, this will activate the intrinsic motivation in that mentor to invest their time in the mentee. Simply put, it’s all about give and take. On top of that, we’ll learn how mentorship is helpful in self-reflection: All of us have blind spots, and we’re able to achieve a “360 degree view” of our trajectory when we ask for guidance from mentors and peers. And Dr. Tyndall reminds us that if we look around and we don’t like what we see, we have to have the courage to adjust our forward trajectory.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Mentorship is a bi-directional relationship. As the mentee, we need to show our interest in the mentor and their work. In turn, that will activate a mentor’s intrinsic motivation in the mentee.
2. As physicians, we need to know how to refuel our energy tank. Self-reflection is key, and seeking guidance from those around us will give us a 360 degree view of our journey.
3. There are four core values to live by in medicine (especially as a student): Self-reflection, balance, confidence, humility.

Nov 06, 2020
Being Honest with Our Struggles with Dr. Todd Barton
19:31

Todd Barton, MD, is a Professor of Clinical Medicine and the Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency Program at the University of Pennsylvania. He is an attending physician at the Hospital of University of Pennsylvania and Penn Presbyterian Medical Center where his clinical practice focuses on transplant-related infectious diseases and clinical infectious diseases. Dr. Barton completed his medical school from the University of Rochester School of Medicine and his residency from the University of Pennsylvania where he also completed a fellowship in infectious diseases. He's passionate about medical education, and is an active member of a number of local and national organizations influencing resident education.

Give yourself permission not to be the best. Today, Dr. Todd Barton shares how being open and honest with our own struggles will ultimately lead us to the right path. He explains that we can take the pressure off trying to be outstanding in everything in our lives. But at the same time, it will serve us well to do the best we can—and try to get as much as possible out of each experience. In his own career, Dr. Todd Barton is forthcoming about what he struggled with, what he decided was not right for him, and figuring out what his true passions were. He assures us that the environments we are in, the people we meet, and the experiences we have will be our greatest guides toward our own passions in medicine.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Embrace kindness: something you observed in your parents who were a symbol for kindness for you early in your life in the early parts of the AIDS epidemic.
2. We have to give ourselves permission not to be the best.
3. Key trait of a mentee is flexibility - the flexibility to adapt to different challenges, opportunities, rotations, experiences that we go through in order to find the one we will really focus on.
4. We have to be intentional, only only about our work in the hospital, but our life outside of the hospital.

Nov 06, 2020
The Cycle of Kindness with Dr. Charles Christopher Smith
18:08

Dr. Charles Christopher Smith is the Director of the Internal Medicine Residency Program, and Associate Vice Chair for Education at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Associate Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School. A graduate of the University Of Tennessee College Of Medicine, he completed his internal medicine residency training at Beth Israel Deaconess followed by a Chief Residency year. Dr. Smith completed the Rabkin Fellowship in Medical Education at Harvard Medical School and later served as the Director of the Fellowship. In addition to being the Program Director, Dr. Smith continues as Director of the Clinician Educator Track, has a busy primary care practice, teaches in many different venues, and has published on a variety of clinical and educational topics. Dr. Smith has been awarded the Alpha Omega Alpha, SGIM New England Medical Educator of the Year Award, the SGIM National Award for Scholarship in Medical Education, and the Robert C. Moellering Award for exceptional contributions as a clinician, teacher and researcher to name a few.

A growth mindset, humility, and curiosity are the pillars of great mentees, says Dr. Smith. But even more important than that, is the environment that enables these kinds of mentees to flourish. Today, Dr. Smith teaches us what it means to create a positive learning climate. His strongest belief is that focusing on the positive—not the negative—is the best way to create an endless cycle of kindness, growth, and excellence within medicine. He makes it a practice to call out acts of kindness when he sees them (no matter how big or small), because it serves as positive reinforcement. And when it comes to feedback, he likes to point out the things he sees that are being done well—and correctly. And he reminds us: When we keep kindness at the forefront of our minds, we’ll look at everything—and everyone—with more gratitude.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Gratitude lies in the center of burnout. When we’re feeling exhausted, reconnect with our patients to remember why we’re here.
2. Kindness is in the small interactions we have every single day. When we see kindness, call it out. It will perpetuate the endless cycle of kindness, and it will build in yourself and others.
3. Say yes to opportunities early in your career. Build a team of mentors that help us lean into our discomfort, to try new things, and to realize our full potential.

Nov 06, 2020
Successful Mentorship = Talent x Accessibility with Dr. Hugo Rosen
18:21

Hugo Rosen, MD is the Chair of Medicine and a Professor of Medicine, Immunology, and Molecular Microbiology at Keck School of Medicine of USC. Dr. Rosen completed his medical school from the University of Miami—Miller School of Medicine, his residency in internal medicine at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center at Harvard Medical School, followed by a fellowship in gastroenterology and transplant hepatology at UCLA. As a highly accomplished physician scientist, Dr. Rosen has more than 180 original peer reviewed manuscripts investigating the cellular and molecular underpinnings of a wide spectrum of innate and adaptive immune responses and developing novel paradigms in liver diseases. Dr. Rosen is an elected member of the American Society of Clinical Investigation and the American Association of Physicians, and currently serves as the deputy editor of the journal Hepatology.

There is a formula for finding a great mentor: Talent x Accessibility. Today, Dr. Hugo Rosen explains that we should look for mentors who are not only talented in their field, but who are also accessible—and invested in you as the trainee. When one of these factors is diluted, it weakens the overall product. Dr. Rosen also reminds us that the lack of mentorship leads to missed opportunities. And it is up to us, as mentees, to not only seek out these relationships, but to prove that we are ones to invest in. “Think of it as an audition,” says Dr. Rosen. He explains that every interaction we have is a chance to display our work ethic, our willingness to learn, our humility—and the fire in our belly that drives us each day.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Mentorship is not just about career development, it’s about personal development. If a mentor is truly invested, the relationship becomes personal by default.
2. Finding a great mentor is about talent times accessibility. If the mentor is extremely talented but not accessible, the product will be zero.
3. Mentorship has to be driven by us, as the mentee. Show your mentor that you have vision and a fire in your belly, and use that to drive the interaction.
4. Every interaction is an audition.

Nov 05, 2020
Stepping Up to Bat with Dr. Jatin Vyas
19:32

Jatin Vyas, MD, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Medicine and the Program Director of the Massachusetts General Hospital's Internal Medicine Residency Program at Harvard Medical School, where he supervises over 200 interns and residents. Dr. Vyas received his PhD in immunology, working in the lab of Dr. Robert Rich at Baylor College of Medicine. After completing his MD at Baylor, he joined as a resident in internal medicine at Mass General, where he stayed on to pursue a fellowship in infectious diseases. An NIH funded investigator with an interest in basic sciences, Dr. Vyas is internationally recognized for his work in fungal immunology, investigating the body's immune responses to fungal pathogens. He is passionate about mentoring physician scientists and has advocated for the interests of physician scientists and training at the national level. Dr. Vyas has been selected as Fellow in the Infectious Disease Society of America and has been elected to the American Society for Clinical Investigation.

It’s not about winning or losing: It’s about stepping up to bat. Today, Dr. Jatin Vyas shares fascinating—and moving—stories about his career in medicine. He explains why as physicians, going up to bat means putting ourselves out there to mentors. In order to learn from mentors, to hear their stories, and to understand the challenges they faced throughout their career—we must ask them. And when we make these connections and build relationships, we’re almost certain to discover two things: That the path to success is never linear, and that prospective mentors we admire are much more similar to us as trainees than we think.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Our mentors have faced similar challenges as us, but we won’t know unless we ask. When we ask mentors about their personal stories, their challenges, and their own goals, we’ll learn how non-linear the path to success really is.
2. It’s not about winning or losing, it’s about going up to bat. Even if we don’t hit every ball, it’s the fact we’re up at bat in the first place that counts.
3. Turn to others—a chorus of voices—to help guide you along your path. Having a multitude of different people and perspectives is the most efficient way to get an answer, solve a problem, or make a decision.
4. Medicine is an infinite game. Burnout and disengagement happen when we view our role as a finite game.

Nov 05, 2020
Becoming a Do-er with Dr. Richard Sterling
16:58

Richard Sterling, MD is Virginia Commonwealth University Hepatology Professor of Medicine, Section Chief of Hepatology, and Medical Director of Viral Hepatitis and HIV Liver Disease. He is active in graduate medical education as a transplant hepatology fellowship director, and an associate program director in the Internal Medicine Residency Program with a focus in scholarship. Dr. Sterling completed his medical school from Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia and pursued his residency and fellowship at Virginia Commonwealth University. His research focuses on HIV liver disease, which is supported by several NIH grants. Dr. Sterling has published over 220 manuscripts and serves on prominent committees of national associations, such as the American Gastroenterological Association and the American College of Gastroenterology in which he has served as the past governor of Virginia for six years. Dr. Sterling has won numerous awards for teaching and leadership and was voted top doc in 2012 and 2013 by Richard Magazine.

If there is one thing Dr. Richard Sterling knows best, it’s that failure is never a means to quit. Today, Dr. Sterling recalls many life stories of persistence and fortitude—and reminds us all that perceived failure is just a door toward a new opportunity. Early on, he was told he could be one of three kinds of people: Those that do, those that watch and those that wonder. Dr. Sterling decided then and there to be a do-er, and he encourages us all to follow that same path. Although persistence is key, Dr. Sterling also reminds us it’s okay to take side trips. To ask for direction when lost, and to appreciate the scenery along the way.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. You can be one of three kinds of people: Those who do, those who watch, and those who wonder. Decide to be the doer.
2. If—and when—we fail, know how to ask for help.
3. Don’t be afraid to take side trips, to ask for directions when lost, and appreciate the scenery.

Nov 04, 2020
How Mentors Can Help You Avoid Burnout with Dr. Karen Law
19:57

Karen Law, MD, is an Associate Professor in the Division of Rheumatology, the Associate Vice Chair of Education, and the Program Director of the Jay Willis Hurst Internal Medicine Residency Program at Emory University's Department of Medicine. Dr. Law completed her medical school from Brown University. She completed her residency, chief residency, and rheumatology fellowship at Emory University. Over the past ten years, Dr. Law has established herself as a leader in medical education at Emory, having held multiple roles at the medical school, including small group advisor and Associate Director of the Third Year Medicine clerkship. She has won Emory's Dean's Teaching Award and the American College of Rheumatology Clinician Scholar Educator Award to name a few.

Most all of us will face exhaustion at some point in our training. But Dr. Karen Law shares that with the right mindset, and the proper support (enter: mentorship), we can avoid landing on the extreme end of that spectrum. Today, Dr. Law shares stories of mentors who made her feel safe, who made her feel seen, and who made her feel heard. She explains that throughout her career, like many others, she experienced varying levels of burnout. To Dr. Law, having the support from strong mentors who were able to simply listen to her and understand her feelings, was a guiding light out of that personal exhaustion. She has come to realize that while it's easy to get caught up in the details, we shouldn't lose sight of the ultimate goal: to continually develop our intellectual curiosity and love for patient care.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. We do not have to accept the belief that to be a physician is to be burned out. When we break past the stigma, shame and guilt of being burned out, and openly acknowledging our experience, we make this burnout the exception, not the rule, in residency.
2. Don’t delay your own diagnosis: If you’re asking yourself if you are burned out, it means it’s time to reach out to a mentor and start talking about these issues.
3. If you have intellectual curiosity, and love for patient care, you will find joy in whatever specialty you find yourself in.

Nov 04, 2020
Start by Painting Your Room with Dr. Elizabeth Paulk
22:50

Elizabeth Paulk, MD, is a Professor of Internal Medicine at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, and holds a distinguished professorship in palliative care. She is the Medical Director for Hospice and Palliative medicine at Parkland Memorial Hospital. She is also the Program Director of the Palliative Care Fellowship Program and an Associate Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency Program. Dr. Paulk completed her medical school from Emory University and her residency from University of Texas Southwestern. She has dedicated her career in palliative care and began Parkland Hospital’s first palliative care service, and then an outpatient palliative care clinic, one of the first of its kind. Dr. Paulk has been awarded with the UT Southwestern's President's Award for diversity and humanism in clinical care and is nationally recognized in palliative care for her kindness, creativity and pursuit of providing excellent palliative care.

The amount of responsibility we have as physicians can be overwhelming. But Dr. Elizabeth Paulk learned, after hearing Toni Morrison speak, that we have to “paint our room first”. Toni Morrison explained that one person cannot paint the whole world. It’s our job to paint our room first, and when we’re done with that, we can help our family paint the rest of the house. And after that, we can help our neighbors. Dr. Paulk shares how she painted her room first—and how we can do the same. Dr. Paulk knew she could make a difference starting right where she was, so she started a palliative care clinic at her hospital. From there, she branched out to other hospitals. Today, we’ll learn from Dr. Paulk how we can paint our rooms first, and then branch out, and paint the world together.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. As Toni Morrison puts it: Paint your own room first. We all want to change the world, but we have to start with where we are.
2. If you think you’re the only one who’s figured it out, you’re 100% wrong.
3. Have the humility to recognize there are things about you that need to change, but have the self-confidence to know that doesn’t make you a bad person.
4. When applying to residency programs, ask yourself: How will you fit into the spirit of this program?

Nov 03, 2020
The Golden Rule of Medicine with Dr. Deeb Salem
15:42

Deeb Salem, MD, FACP, FACC, FAHA, is the Chairman of the Department of Medicine at Tufts University School of Medicine. He has had a distinguished career as an academic cardiologist, serving as the Chief of Cardiology at Tufts from 1987 to 1995, and was then appointed as the Physician-in-Chief in 1999. Dr. Salem was the founding president of the New England Affiliate of the American Heart Association. His academic accomplishments include over 170 scientific publications. He's a recognized national expert in coronary artery disease, valvular heart disease, and congestive heart failure. He's a member of the National Medical Honor Society, Alpha Omega Alpha. Among Dr. Salem’s honors are the Distinguished Alumnus Award from the Boston University School of Medicine, the Distinguished Faculty Award from the Tufts University School of Medicine, and the Paul Dudley White Award and Distinguished Leadership Award from the American Heart Association.

Today, Dr. Salem shares his golden rule of medicine : To make sure a patient feels better after seeing you than they did before. And that comes from a combination of having a great patient-doctor relationship and being the most competent physician you can be. He emphasizes the role of passion in life as being the key ingredient that will keep us going at times we feel exhausted. And most importantly, to enjoy the ride.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Rather than shying away from hard work, match it with passion. The passion drives the hard work that leads to fulfillment—rather than burnout.
2. There is something more important than a good doctor-patient relationship alone: Competence. And: That the patient feels better after they see the physician than before.
3. Have fun along the way. Have a sense of humor, collect stories and experiences, and share them with others. Enjoy the ride, and pass it along to others, so we can all crack a smile when we most need it.

Nov 02, 2020
How to Reach the Summit with Dr. Richard Shellenberger
11:48

Richard Shellenberger, DO, is the Associate Program Director at St. Joseph Mercy Ann Arbor Hospital. Dr. Shellenberger completed his Medical school from Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine, and his residency in Internal Medicine from St. Joseph Mercy Hospital. From serving as the Chief Resident to his current role as an Associate Program Director, he has had a career devoted to mentorship and resident education. Dr. Shellenberger has received multiple awards for his contributions to medicine as an expert educator.

A career in medicine can be likened to climbing a mountain. But, Dr. Richard Shellenberger advises us against constantly looking out for the summit. Instead, take a look at where you are: Identify each step of your process, and master each small step along the way. Remember to enjoy the scenery on your journey. When we’re too focused on reaching the top—we miss out on the beauty of the adventure.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Don’t just look out for the summit: Take a look at each step of your process.  Focus on these steps, and master them as you go along. And don’t forget to enjoy the journey.
2. Look for mentors who can not only identify your strengths, but who can also identify your weaknesses and where you need to improve.
3. As a mentor, create a teaching climate to enable mentees to reach out to you. A cold environment might make students feel discouraged or intimidated. A warm teaching climate will make students feel safe, supported, and welcome.

Nov 02, 2020
Igniting Talent with Dr. Kimberly Manning
15:28

Kimberly Manning, MD is a Professor of Medicine and the Associate Vice Chair of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion for the Department of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. She additionally serves as a residency program director for the Transitional Year Residency Program at Emory. Dr. Manning is a recipient of numerous institutional and national teaching awards including Emory’s Papageorge Award and the ACGME’s Parker J. Palmer Courage to Teach Award in 2018. Dr. Manning is a prolific writer and authors a blog called “Reflections of a Grady Doctor” which was named as one of 4 medical blogs you should read by Oprah Magazine in 2010.

Dr. Kimberly Manning describes the untapped potential in a trainee as a “half-eaten sandwich sitting on a shelf”. She shares how her mentors helped her realize and unleash her potential as a writer. Today, we learn a few strategies for helping us reach our full potential as physicians. Dr. Manning is a strong believer in deliberate practice: Don’t just go through the motions, ask to be observed and be proactive in obtaining real-time feedback. She reminds us that mentors are people too: When we are engaging with them, ask “climate questions” (a phrase she credits to her colleague Dr. Richard Pittman) that shows engagement on a personal level (before jumping to business). And finally, she tells us that the best mentees do three things: Start, finish, and deliver.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. As trainees, we are full of untapped potential. A good mentor realizes the potential we don’t yet know exists in ourselves, and helps us cross that bridge.
2. Deliberate practice is key. It’s not just about going through the motions when we practice, it’s having a mentor who is able to watch us go through the motions, give us feedback, and help us grow.
3. Start with climate questions. Remember that your mentor is a person, and ask questions about them as humans before getting right to the medicine.
4. The best mentees do three things: Start, finish, and deliver.

Oct 30, 2020
Talent vs Skill with Dr. Jane O’Rorke
15:51

Jane O'Rorke, MD is a Professor of Internal Medicine at the University of Texas Health—San Antonio Long School of Medicine. Dr. O'Rorke completed her medical school from SUNY Downstate in Brooklyn and her residency from the University of Texas—San Antonio where she also served as a Chief Resident. She went on to complete a Faculty Development Fellowship at the University of North Carolina—Chapel Hill. Dr. O’Rorke has won numerous teaching awards including Southern Society of General Internal Medicine Clinician Educator-of-the-Year Award and the University of Texas Presidential Teaching Excellence Award.

When one of Dr. Jane O’Rorke’s students doesn’t know something, she encourages them to celebrate! As she explains, not knowing something is an opportunity to fill in knowledge gaps—and that is a good thing. Today, we learn how Dr. O’Rorke approaches learning (both for herself, and her students). She takes a personal interest in the people around her—because it makes her more invested in the work she does. And finally, she shares her personal development and how she has been proactive in working on developing certain skills even if they weren’t natural talents for her, emphasizing that if we put our mind to something we care about, we have the power to improve at anything.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Don’t accept that you either have talent, or you don’t. Recognize that skills are something we can develop like muscles, and there is nothing we can’t improve on.
2. The key to being a great teacher is as simple as taking an interest in your learners.
3. Embrace vulnerability. It’s difficult, but it’s the way to tap into wisdom, and avoid the pitfalls that people have experienced before us.

Oct 29, 2020
Dealing with the Hand You’re Dealt with Dr. Fred Buckhold
15:38

Fred Buckhold, MD, is the Program Director for the Internal Medicine Residency Program and an Associate Professor of Medicine at Saint. Louis University School of Medicine. Dr. Buckhold completed his training from Saint Louis University and has pursued his interest in hospital medicine and medical education. His research interests include reducing unnecessary care interventions and costs while maintaining quality patient outcomes, as well as enhancing residents and physicians use of the electronic medical record.

It’s not the hand you are dealt. It is what you do with that hand that matters. Today, Dr. Fred Buckhold teaches us that every setback is an opportunity to find a new solution, to overcome a new challenge, and to learn more about yourself. He believes that virtues like humility, hard work, and honesty are not gifts, rather can be developed if we deliberately work towards them. When it comes to mentorship, Dr. Buckhold believes the best mentees are the ones who meet a mentor halfway: They don’t ask a mentor to solve a problem, they ask what they can do to help a mentor solve that problem.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Hard work, humility, and honesty can be developed if we work toward it. They are not gifts, rather 'muscles' we can work on and build.
2. We should give the benefit of doubt to those who are ahead of us, even when they seem unreasonable at times with what we are capable of achieving. The truth is, we really don't 'realize' our potential until we 'realize' it.
3. Come with the solution to your mentor rather than the problem. A critical question is: What can I do to help you solve this problem?

Oct 29, 2020
Improving Patient-Centered Care with Dr. Robert C. Smith
20:40

Robert C. Smith, MD, MACP is University Distinguished Professor and a Professor of Medicine and Psychiatry at Michigan State University.  With many publications, awards, and strong grant support, he has been involved in teaching and research in patient-centered communication and in primary care mental health since 1985. Dr. Smith has been featured on The Today Show as well as interviewed and quoted in the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, the Los Angeles TimesElle, the Ladies Home JournalTime, and Newsweek. The topics have included training doctors to establish better doctor-patient relationships, chronic pain, unexplained physical symptoms, and mental health problems in medical settings. Dr. Smith and his colleagues have written one of the most popular interviewing textbooks, Smith’s Patient-Centered Interviewing: An Evidence-Based Method (3rd edition, McGraw Hill, 2012); the 4th edition, published July 2018, as well as a second textbook, Essentials of Psychiatry in Primary Care:  Behavioral Health in the Medical Setting.

Think back to the last time you were in the room with a patient. Were you listening for emotional information? If you need to strengthen this muscle, keep listening. Because today, Dr. Robert C. Smith teaches us the utter importance of stopping—and listening. As Dr. Smith explains, diseases are not just physical ailments: We must also recognize and address the psychological impacts of them as well. On that note, Dr. Smith also reiterates the necessity of a health work/life balance. As physicians, we need to develop interests outside medicine. We also need to find support from empathetic people (because we need to be listened to, too). Finding ways to reawaken our emotional intelligence and humanity will find its way back into the hospital—for the better.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. In order to develop a stronger learner-teacher relationship, the key is listening for emotional information. We must address the psychosocial components of disease, not just the disease itself. (Remember NURSE: Name it, Understand it , Respect it, Support it, and be Empathetic)
2. Maintain a healthy work/life balance: To prevent burnout, we must have other interests outside of work, and we must make time for ourselves.
3. Anticipate challenges. And when faced with those challenges, approach them with an open mind, and consider the psychological components and impacts of each situation.

Oct 28, 2020
The Secret to Loving Medicine with Dr. Kirana Gudi
23:20

Kirana Gudi, MD, is the Vice-Chair of Education and Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency Program at Weill Cornell Medicine, where she is an Assistant Professor in the Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine. Dr. Gudi received her medical training on the Weill Cornell campus, where she earned her MD, completed residency, and she served as a chief resident. She then pursued a fellowship in Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine. Dr. Gudi maintains an active outpatient pulmonary practice, attends on the inpatient pulmonary consult and ICU consult services, and is passionate about medicine and medical education.

Today, Dr. Kirana Gudi lets us in on her little secret: She has the best job in the world. She carries an infectious enthusiasm toward medicine, patient-care, and being an academician. We learn how important it is to pick the one subspecialty you love, no matter who tells you otherwise. She shares with us how leaps of faith, gaining new perspectives and vantage points, and relying on each other for support are what continually guide her toward meaning and fulfillment. There will be difficult days, and there will be challenges, but the opportunity to explore our love for medicine—and pass that love on to those that follow behind us—is a gift that spans generations to come.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. A life of no challenge is not success. Success is more about how you navigate through the challenges that life presents in front of you.
2. While the decisions are ultimately ours, we need the gift of perspective from a team of diverse mentors to take the most step forward.
3. "Just do it. The toothpicks will rearrange themselves" - from your mentor (ICU director) who encouraged you to take on a new opportunity to advance your career knowing that at the end, things work out.

Oct 28, 2020
The Mark of a True Leader with Dr. Robert Harrington
18:42

Robert Harrington, MD, is the Arthur L. Bloomfield Professor of Medicine and Chairman of the Department of Medicine at Stanford University.  Dr. Harrington was previously the Director of the Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI) at Duke University. He has authored more than 640 peer-reviewed manuscripts, reviews, book chapters, and editorials. Thomson Reuters lists him as one of the most cited investigators in clinical medicine from 2002-2014. He is a deputy editor of JAMA Cardiology and an editorial board member for the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.  He is a past President of the American Heart Association and is an elected member of the Association of American Physicians and the Association of University Cardiologists. Interested in innovative learning tools, including novel methods of communicating scientific information, Dr. Harrington hosts a regular podcast on www.theheart.org called The Bob Harrington Show.

When we think about serendipity and luck, it’s not so much that it happens at all, it’s if we have an open mind toward it. As Dr. Robert Harrington explains, good fortune comes to those who work hard. The hard work in his life has allowed for him to be receptive to the good fortune that has come his way. Dr. Harrington also talks about leadership: The mark of a good leader is not one who walks into a room to give orders. A true leader is the one who enters a room with the goal of building consensus, teamwork, and innovation. And lastly, he shares his experiences with mentorship and what he looks for in great mentees: the spark of passion and curiosity.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. The real quality of a leader is not marching in a room and giving orders, the real quality is building consensus, working with the team, and innovating.
2. There is a difference between hard luck and hard work. Hard work always bring good fortune, and chance favors the brave. Serendipity favors the receptive mind. It’s not whether or not serendipity occurs, it’s whether we are receptive to it.
3. The role of a mentor and mentee. The mentor is there to help us step back and see the bigger picture. The role of the mentee is to carry a spark of curiosity and passion that energizes the relationship.

Oct 27, 2020
A Mission Larger Than 'Me' with Dr. Paul Noble
14:13

Paul Noble, MD, is the Chair of the Department of Medicine and Director of the Women's Guild Lung Institute at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, California. Dr. Noble is a physician-scientist who has made significant research contributions to understanding the mechanisms and treatment of pulmonary fibrosis. Dr. Noble completed his medical school at NYU, trained in Internal Medicine and was a Chief Resident at UCSF, did his fellowship in pulmonary & critical care at the University of Colorado, and his research fellowship at the National Jewish Center in Denver. His professional career spans appointments at a number of prominent institutions including Johns Hopkins, Yale, and Duke where he served as Chief of the Division of Pulmonary Critical Care and Allergy, before joining Cedars Sinai.  An elected member of the American Society of Clinical Investigation and the American Association of Physicians, Dr. Noble has served as Deputy Editor of the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

Part of being a great physician is uncovering—and achieving—our true mission and purpose. Dr. Paul Noble shares his own mission: to make an impact on the world. He explains that the satisfaction he gets from medicine has always been less about him, and more about the patient. That medicine is a mission larger than himself. And when we start living this ideal, we’ll find a joy and satisfaction  that is “almost impossible to describe.” Dr. Noble also teaches us that when we discover what our true mission is, others will join us to propel us forward. As physicians, we have the power to make a positive impact on the world. And this impact is only intensified when we work as a team.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. The key to making an impact is not pursuing success for self. It’s about building a team, it is about the people around you.
2. Instead of asking someone to do something for you, ask them to be a part of making a difference to change the world. When we place our priority on the patient, we are will be joined and supported by great physicians and leaders to help us achieve that goal.
3. Always look for the truth. It may not be the answer you wanted—but it’s what matters most.

Oct 23, 2020
Being Your Own Best Advocate with Dr. Anne Curtis
15:22

Anne Curtis, MD, is the Charles and Mary Bauer Professor and Chair of the Department of Medicine at the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences and SUNY Distinguished Professor at the University at Buffalo. Dr. Curtis completed her medical school at Columbia University, her residency in internal medicine at the Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, and then she went on to Duke University to pursue fellowships in cardiovascular disease and clinical cardiac electrophysiology. Dr. Curtis maintains an active clinical practice, with a focus on cardiac electrophysiology, and she has been involved in the development of national guidelines for the treatment of atrial fibrillation and ventricular arrhythmias. She has been involved in clinical trials for over 25 years with over 300 publications, and she serves as an associate editor for the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. At a national level, she has held numerous leadership roles, including serving as the President of the Association of University Cardiologists, President of the Heart Rhythm Society, and Chairing the ACC's Clinical Electrophysiology Committee and the FDA's Circulatory System Devices Panel.

How can we become our own best advocate? Today, Dr. Anne Curtis explains that the best way to find more opportunities is to go after them with all the enthusiasm we’ve got. She shares stories throughout her career and recalls that she’s always felt highly motivated to work hard, get things done, and prove herself in a career in medicine. She advises us to take the opportunities we are presented with, even if they seem daunting at first. It is when we prove ourselves to our mentors and show them that we’re willing to do the work, that they build more trust in us—and offer us more and more opportunity. Dr. Curtis explains that—especially in these early years of training—our one job is to become good physicians. She leaves us with this: “If you want to do anything that involves patient care and research, you better be a darn good doctor.”

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Be your own best advocate. Opportunities may or may not come—it’s up to you to seek them out.
2. Find role models for potential. Look for the mentors that you can see yourself in, and realize that their potential also exists in you. When you follow in their footsteps, you’ll achieve greater and greater things.
3. The mark of a good mentee is when a supervisor trusts you when they’re not there. Develop trust and prove that you can handle things on your own, that you know what you’re doing, and that you’re willing to do things the right way.

Oct 20, 2020
Why Mentorship is Career Defining with Dr. Ronald Witteles
16:34

Ronald Witteles, MD, is a Professor of Cardiovascular Medicine, Co-Director of Stanford Amyloid Center and Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency Training Program at Stanford University Medical Center where he directs the training of more than 140 physicians each year. Dr. Witteles completed his medical school from University of Chicago, his residency in internal medicine from Stanford, where he pursued a fellowship in cardiology. Dr. Witteles specializes in the treatment of patients with heart failure with a focus in treating amyloidosis, sarcoidosis and cardiac complications of cancer therapy. He has published extensively on these topics and his articles have been cited as one of the most important heart failure articles of the year multiple times. Dr. Witteles is the recipient of a number of honors and awards including David Rytand Award for Excellence in Clinical Teaching, and was recently recognized as the 2020 Program Director of the Year at Stanford University for his exceptional leadership of the program during COVID-19 response.

It’s not just the decisions we make that change the course of our lives. It’s the people in our lives that influence those decisions. Today, Dr. Ronald Witteles shares with us the impact mentors have had on his own life and career decisions.  He reminds us that our training is time-bound: We can’t wait around hoping serendipity will get us to where we want to go. We need to be proactive in seeking out mentors that will help us explore our interests and guide us as we explore new avenues in our journey. He shares with us the key characteristic of a great physician: the refusal to accept mediocrity and be willing to put in the time and effort to go beyond.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Don't be afraid to spend time pursuing different activities - diversifying our time can add flavors of fulfillment to our life and create a safety net for us.
2. Mentorship is career defining. We need to be proactive in seeking mentors to really define the next stage of our career and get inspired.
3. 'Go beyond' - defining characteristic of a great doctor. It's a refusal to accept mediocrity.

Oct 19, 2020
The Key to Driving Change with Dr. Starr Steinhilber
18:23

Starr Steinhilber, MD, is the Medical Director of the Compliant Documentation Management Program, and the Co-Director of Patient Safety and Quality Improvement at Tinsley Harrison Internal Medicine Residency Program at the University of Alabama Birmingham. Dr. Steinhilber grew up in Montgomery, Alabama, and completed her medical school and internal medicine residency at University of Alabama—Birmingham. After a year as chief resident, she joined the UAB faculty in the department of general internal medicine where she has been a leader in increasing focus on patient safety and quality improvement. Dr. Steinhilber was recently awarded the Southern Society of General Internal Medicine's Clinician Educator of the Year Award, and the Dean's Excellence Teaching Award at UAB.

As physicians, it’s part of our nature to want to make an impact on the world. And part of our mission to see that through. Today, Dr. Starr Steinhilber believes that when it comes to making a difference, start small. When we make a small difference, we earn trust. Then, we’re given a longer leash to make a bigger change, earning even more trust. Dr. Steinhilber also explains the difference between a manager and a leader: We must manage before we lead. Her best advice for us is this: Do the work first, help others do the work, and then inspire the world from there. As for mentorship, Dr. Steinhilber recommends finding someone you want to emulate in your future, and observe the qualities they possess. And when it comes to sponsorship, the most successful mentees are the ones who say ‘Pick Me!’.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. We all want to drive change. The key to change is starting small. Don’t try to win over the whole hospital on day one. Make a small difference, earn respect, make a bigger difference, earn more respect, and so forth.
2. Rather than trying to be a leader inspiring change, start as a manager: Start by knowing the work, doing the work, and then inspiring the work.
3. Find a mentor by observing someone you want to be like in the future, and then making the connection.
4. The qualities of excellent mentees are following through, and being enthusiastic about as many opportunities as possible.

Oct 19, 2020
Learning, Earning, and Returning with Dr. Aftab Ahmad
17:09

Aftab Ahmad, MD is the Founding Program Director of Internal Medicine Residency at Orange Park Medical Center. Before transitioning into his current role, Dr. Ahmad has had a career devoted to leadership in medicine. After obtaining a Master of Business Administration focused on Health Care administration from Oakland University, he led the hospitalist program at the Providence Hospital. He then served as the Medical Director of Academic Internal Medicine Clinic at St. John Providence Hospital and Medical Center. 

What is the difference between ordinary and extraordinary? No, it’s not a trick question. Dr. Aftab Ahmad explains why doing the ‘extra’ work will always set you apart from the average physician. Today, we learn exactly what it takes. Feedback is the breakfast of champions, says Dr. Ahmad, and we should be asking for it daily from our mentors. Aside from that, we should be continually asking ourselves how we are returning our knowledge and skills to those who need it. And, that we should be putting more into the world than we are taking out of it.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Be aggressive and innovative in your approaches, but always remember to keep the patient's interest first.
2. The definition of success lies in the difference between ordinary and extraordinary: Do that extra work in order to get extraordinary results.
3. Develop a growth mindset, and understand how knowledge, skills, ability, and (most importantly) attitude work together.
4. We should be putting more into the world than we are taking out. At each and every stage you have the opportunity to guide and to help someone and therefore, look out for that person and help them.

Oct 16, 2020
Why Givers Succeed with Dr. Susan Lane
15:39

Susan Lane, MD, is the Vice-Chair for Education for the Department of Medicine and the Internal Medicine Residency Program Director at Stony Brook University School of Medicine. Dr. Lane received her bachelor's from Amherst College, completed her Medical school from the University of Connecticut School of Medicine, and her residency from Strong Memorial Hospital. She is active in healthcare policy and has served as the Chair of the Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine Health Policy Committee and is a member of the NY-ACP Health and Public Policy Committee. She was recently elected as the president of the Association of Program Directors of Internal Medicine for the upcoming year. Dr. Lane has been recognized nationally for her leadership and is a recipient of a number of awards including the prestigious Alpha Omega Alpha Fellow in Leadership Award.

There is power in helping others. Today, Dr. Susan Lane shares with us why the givers succeed and ultimately end up receiving more. We learn about Dr. Lane's personal mission—to leave the world better than she found it—and she encourages us to find and enhance our own unique gifts. If everybody used their unique gifts to help other people, says Dr. Lane, the world would be a much better place.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Don't wait to finish residency to start helping. Think about what is unique about you and use that to contribute in the lives of those around you.
2. Find a faculty member who is passionate about what you want to do and help them further their passion. The best way to get is to give!
3. Be proactive in seeking feedback and how to improve. More importantly, start developing the skill of giving yourself feedback, to develop the skill of self-regulation, so you can continue to learn even after residency.
4.  Don't be afraid to be yourself.

Oct 16, 2020
How to Deal with Conflicts with Dr. Christine Herb
13:33

Christine M. Herb, MD, is the Associate Program Director of Internal Medicine Residency and the Geriatrics Track Director at Allegheny Health Network. Dr. Herb completed medical school at Temple University School of Medicine and completed her residency training at the West Penn Hospital, where she also served as a Chief Resident. Dr. Herb completed her fellowship in geriatric medicine at the UPMC Presbyterian Program. Prior to being appointed as an Associate Program Director, she served as core faculty and the subspecialty education coordinator for geriatrics.

Put yourself in someone else’s shoes.” This is something you’ve probably heard since kindergarten—but it still applies today, especially in medicine. Today, with Dr. Christine M. Herb, we’ll learn how to put our defenses down and deal with conflict with an open mind. She explains how taking a step back can help de-escalate conflicts and tensions that may arise with colleagues or with patients. It’s the key to slowing down, and revisiting a situation with a new perspective.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Find a mentor you can be vulnerable with. Being comfortable enough to be vulnerable about your weaknesses will be the best way to enable your mentor to help you most effectively.
2. In times of conflict, step back. Don’t react to everything, and learn how to put your defenses down. Put yourself in someone else’s shoes.
3. Don’t look at your patient with a narrow mind of just treating his disease—you must explore all aspects of life of your patients.
4. Find something outside of medicine to fuel your energy everyday.

Oct 14, 2020
The Teddy Bear Principle with Dr. Andrew Thurston
14:51

Andrew Thurston is a Clinical Associate Professor of Medicine and the Medical Director of the Supportive and Palliative Care service at UPMC Mercy Hospital. He is board certified in Internal Medicine, as well as Hospice and Palliative Medicine, with clinical interests spanning both Geriatrics and Palliative Care. Dr. Thurston’s interests include the integration of medical humanities into clinical care and medical curriculum. Dr. Thurston frequently leads Reflective Reading exercises that use poetry, art, photography, and short fiction as a tool for reflecting on various issues in the medical field. He is a Co-Director of the Area of Concentration for the Humanities and Medical Ethics at the University of Pittsburgh, and Co-Director of the Narrative and Experience of Illness elective for third and fourth year medical students.

So, you’ve diagnosed the patient. And you’ve clocked time in the room with that patient. But ask yourself: Did you take the time to be present with that patient? To learn their story? To understand who they really are? Today, Dr. Andrew Thurston shares the importance of humanities in medicine: Self-care and self-reflection are at the center of his practice. Having a strong relationship with ourselves is the key to building strong relationships with mentors—and informing better patient care, says Dr. Thurston. He also advises us to find what gives us meaning in life—whether it be art, poetry, or music—and prioritize it. Taking care of ourselves emotionally, spiritually, and physically are the foundation of finding and maintaining fulfillment in medicine. (So, even when you’re thinking of skipping lunch again—don’t.)

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Building a strong relationship with a mentor requires having a strong relationship with yourself.
2. It’s most important to take the time to be present with the patient. Take the time to learn their story—it better informs the care of the patient. (It’s not just about diagnosing them.)
3. The smallest, overlooked things can make the biggest difference: Do not forget to eat during the day.

Oct 14, 2020
Reverse Mentorship with Dr. Thomas Fekete
18:29

Thomas Fekete, MD, is the Thomas M. Durant Professor & Chair of the Department of Medicine at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University. Dr. Fekete is a professor of Microbiology and Immunology. He is a member of Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society, a fellow and master of the American College of Physicians and Fellow of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. He serves as the Chair of the Board of the IDSA Foundation and Chair of the Board of College of Physicians of Philadelphia. He is the recipient of serveral teaching honors at Temple including the Lindback Award, Golden Apple Teaching Award, Russell and Pearl Moses Teaching Award, Outstanding Senior Educator Award, and Temple Great Teacher Award.

There is such a thing as reverse mentorship. And today, Dr. Thomas Fekete teaches us how we can use what we don't want to guide us toward what we do. While we are in pursuit of top mentors to help guide us towards excellence and success, Dr. Fekete reminds us to pay attention to those we might not want to learn from, too. If we come across someone we feel is a bad role model or teacher, we should observe that. Take notes, study it, and self-reflect on why we don’t want to follow that particular path. One day we may find ourselves in the position of being mentors and educators—and we can prevent mistakes and shortcomings by observing mentorship from all angles.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. It’s important to forgive yourself. Don’t aim for perfection, aim to find yourself.
2. Pay attention to ‘reverse mentorship’. Pay attention to who or what you don’t like, and learn from that to see what you want to avoid.
3. Don’t be afraid of making mistakes, being wrong is a gift. We learn more from mistakes than we do from being right all the time.

Oct 13, 2020
The Humanistic Pursuit of Medicine with Dr. Richard Hellman
13:59

Richard N. Hellman, MD, is a senior clinical nephrologist and an Associate Professor of Clinical Medicine at Indiana University School of Medicine, where he enjoys clinical teaching and mentoring of medical students, residents and renal fellows. His research interests include acute kidney injury, contrast nephropathy, hypertension, fluid and electrolyte disorders. Dr. Hellman received a BA in Economics from Roosevelt University, and an MD from the Baylor College of Medicine.  He did his internship in internal medicine at the Baylor College of Medicine and Residency in internal Medicine at the University of Texas San Antonio and a Fellowship in Nephrology at Washington University Barnes Hospital. After completing his fellowship, Dr. Hellman has practiced both in academic settings at the University of Minnesota and in a private practice, before coming to Indiana University where he has been on faculty for over 20 years. He is the recipient of several medical teaching awards including The Minnesota Medical Foundation Clinical teacher of the year and Fellowship Clinical Teacher of the Year Award at Indiana University.

The rapid advancement of technology in medicine is an ongoing conversation. And today, Dr. Richard Hellman is here to remind us that medicine itself is a humanistic pursuit. What he means by this: As physicians, we must be proactive in bringing more people into our lives and conversations. Genuine human connection is invaluable in this profession, and that is what garners trust and respect from our patients and colleagues. He also advises us to self-reflect: Understand our unique skills and interests and find our fit in medicine using what we’re good at. So we can enjoy the journey.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Know the difference between knowledge and approach. Mentors may not always be able to add to your existing knowledge, but will be invaluable in how to approach a problem.
2. Medicine is a humanistic pursuit. In a field where technology is rapidly advancing, we need to make proactive efforts to bring more people into our lives and our conversations.
3. Base decision making on who you are and what you enjoy doing. It will make the journey that much more enjoyable.

Oct 12, 2020
Wonder, Curiosity, and Gratitude with Dr. Rebecca Andrews
15:51

Rebecca Andrews, MD, is the Professor of Medicine, the Director of Ambulatory Education and the Associate Program Director for the categorical Internal Medicine Residency, and the Co-Chair of the Opioid Task Force at the University of Connecticut. She completed her medical school and residency from the University of Connecticut School of Medicine where she also served as the Chief Resident. Dr. Andrews has introduced several unique programs such as the office-based medicine track, a business of medicine course, and a women's health track for future primary care trainees. She is also currently serving as the Governor of the Connecticut Chapter for the American College of Physicians and is actively involved in various committees of the ACP. Her work in medicine has been recognized by many honors and awards, including the Laureate Award, the Richard Neubauer Advocate for Internal Medicine Award by the ACP, Best Doctors award by Hartford Magazine, Doctor of Excellence Award by Leaders in Healthcare, and many others.

Are you up for a gratitude challenge? Dr. Rebecca Andrews believes that practicing gratitude each day—and recognizing the power of wonder—is what keeps her present in a busy and sometimes taxing career in medicine. Today, we learn ways to organize (and multi-task) more efficiently, to avoid feeling overwhelmed. We learn why learning something new every day is a way to stay connected with the world—and with our colleagues. Most of all, though, spending more time being thankful for our lives and opportunities is the best way to keep us engaged and fulfilled in our careers.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Pause when you’re feeling overwhelmed: Make a list of your priorities and tackle them based on what is most important.
2. Recognize the power of wonder and curiosity—not just in medicine—but in everyday life.
3. Take on a gratitude challenge. Everyday, write down what you are grateful for, no matter how big or small. It will keep you engaged and fulfilled in your demanding career.

Oct 12, 2020
The ‘Umph’ in Triumph with Dr. Odaliz Abreu-Lanfranco
17:47

Odaliz Abreu-Lanfranco, MD, is the Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency Program at Henry Ford Health System in Detroit. After completing his training in Internal Medicine from St Raphael Hospital, Dr. Abreu Lanfranco pursued fellowships in Infectious Diseases and Transplant Infectious Diseases.  His clinical practice focuses on transgender health, HIV and transplant infectious diseases which has also been a focus of his research. He is passionate about mentorship and resident education and is leading one of the largest programs in Michigan at Henry Ford Hospital which is one of only 19 programs across the country that have been awarded the Education Innovations Project designation by the ACGME.

As you continue on your path in residency, one of your goals is to stand out from the crowd. Today, Dr. Abreu-Lanfranco explains that the residents he looks for are the ones who put the ‘umph’ in triumph. What he means by that: Developing and demonstrating a high emotional intelligence in medicine is a relatively new concept, but an extremely important one. As physicians, we must learn strategies for practicing empathy and open-mindedness, and being able to understand other people’s perspectives. We talk about how to better problem solve, how to connect with others and most importantly, when to talk—and when to listen.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Set goals and re-evaluate every three years. Am I on track? Did I deviate? How can I get back on track?
2. As students, we should strive to "add the 'umph' to triumph" by bringing a high level of enthusiasm and energy to our projects. Its this energy and hunger that attracts mentors to invest time in us.
3. The process of coaching is all about self-exploration where the coach asks the right questions so we can delve deep and find the answers within.

Oct 09, 2020
Anchoring Ourselves to Joy in Medicine with Dr. Richard Chung
16:33

Richard J. Chung, MD, is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Medicine at the Duke University School of Medicine. Dr. Chung earned his medical degree from Yale University and completed his medicine-pediatrics residency from Duke University School of Medicine. He then obtained a fellowship in adolescent and young adult medicine from Boston Children’s Hospital. Dr. Chung has had an illustrious career as a clinician as well as a researcher. He has led a number of research studies and has been the recipient of several grants and awards.

Every day is important, says Dr. Richard Chung. Even the average ones. Today, he teaches us the importance of finding the joy and intrinsic value of what we do as physicians. His guiding light has always stemmed from realizing what is most important to him—and letting the rest fall away. He teaches us about what makes the best mentee: It’s not just knowing answers to all the questions, it’s about having the intellectual curiosity to ask why things are the way they are. When we learn how to ask the right questions, we are activating in-depth understanding—and expediting our own learning.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. It is important to choose a career path that brings the most joy at the end of the day.
2. Take a holistic approach when choosing a mentor. See what they do privately as well as publicly.
3. Keep in the mind the value of each day and treat it as though it is special. Doing so will guard us against physical burnout and stress.

Oct 09, 2020
T-E-A-C-H with Dr. Todd Simon
18:51

Todd Simon, MD, is the Vice Chief and Associate Professor of Medicine and the Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency Program at the New York Presbyterian Brooklyn Methodist Hospital. He also serves as the Chief Academic Officer & the Designated Institutional Official. Dr. Simon completed his Medical school from The New York University School of Medicine and pursued residency in Internal Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital, where he was later appointed Co-Director of Ambulatory Education for the Department of Medicine. While at Mt. Sinai, he also earned a Masters Degree in Education from the University of Southern California. Before joining the New York Methodist Hospital, Dr. Simon served as Vice Chairman of Medicine and Residency Program Director at the Jersey City Medical Center. Dr. Simon is actively involved with APDIM, SGIM and ACP, and serves as a member of ACP’s Internal Medicine Scientific Program Committee.

How do you weigh the decisions you make? Today, Dr. Todd Simon teaches us about finding our “niche” in medicine—and how good mentors will help guide us toward it. He shares the virtue of enthusiasm. That it is infectious, and you will create more opportunities for yourself when you maintain this sense of positivity. And he talks about the one reason we should pursue any field in medicine: Because it’s what we love.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Self-reflection is extremely important to become good learners as well as good educators.
2. As a mentee, we should actively solicit feedback from our mentors - that enables us to be on the same page as our mentor and helps us progress in life.
3. To be successful, especially in medicine, find a niche. Something LOVE. Find the answer to what 'turns you on' academically.
4. Developing authentic and infectious enthusiasm is one of  the key traits of most successful people.

Oct 09, 2020
Humor & Humility with Dr. Fred Zar
15:11

Fred Zar, MD, is a Professor of Clinical Medicine, Director of Academic Affairs in the Department of Medicine and the Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency Program at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Dr. Zar completed his medical school at the University of Illinois College of Medicine, residency in Internal Medicine at Illinois Masonic Medical Center, and then pursued a fellowship in infectious diseases at the University of Illinois Hospital. Dr. Zar is a hospitalist focused on adult medicine and infectious diseases. He's committed to serving Chicago's diverse communities and educating the next generation of physicians.

Within moments of a conversation with Dr. Fred Zar, it’s hard not to see why he is so likeable. He’s known for having a welcoming manner and a great sense of humor. And today, he teaches us the power of humility—and being able to laugh at ourselves—in a profession as serious as medicine. Making mistakes is inevitable, so instead of hiding them, we can create a healthier environment for ourselves and those around us by developing a sense of humility. Aside from this, Dr. Zar believes strongly in a flat, non-hierarchical system. He explains how medicine has evolved over time, and that greater emphasis is being placed on equality and respect for physicians in all stages of their career. Finally, he reveals what stands out most to him in a mentee: It is those who have a mission driven approach, and those who prove their own resiliency and willingness to persevere.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. The secret to well-being in medicine is to stay humble about ourselves. Strive to have some fun and some humor in our serious profession.
2. Make an effort to see the world in a non-hierarchical way, something you learned from your father, who knew the names of everyone from the mailman to the CEO at his company.
3. The best mentees aren't the ones who are always successful, rather those that demonstrate the resilience to be able to keep going on despite the struggles.

Oct 09, 2020
Striking the Right Balance in Medicine with Dr. Keith Armitage 
16:33

Keith Armitage, MD, is a Professor of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University and Vice Chair for Education in the Department of Medicine at University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center. Dr. Armitage has been leading the Internal Medicine Residency Program at University Hospitals for over 25 years as the Program Director and is internationally recognized for his work to advance the field of resident education. He is a former President of the Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine and a recipient of the prestigious Parker J. Palmer Courage to Teach award by ACGME. Last year, he was awarded a Mastership in the American College of Physicians for his extraordinary career accomplishments.

There are many fine lines in medicine. As physicians, we need to walk those lines with both competence and grace. Today, Dr. Armitage talks about the fine line between being self-critical and having self-doubt. He explains that while it’s important to be self-critical to be able to reflect on our performance, we must not let doubt paralyze us from performance. When it comes to reaching out to mentors, he shares a fine line between being confident and feeling entitled. While we should not hesitate to reach out to faculty for advice as it is part of their duty, we must do so with respect and gratitude.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Being self-critical, to a degree, is a stimulus for growth. But you must also work through feelings of imposter syndrome to avoid feeling paralyzed by self-doubt.
2. There is a fine line with mentorship: You should feel both confident and grateful in your mentoring relationships, but never entitled.
3. Residency is very competency based—but there is another component that defines an excellent resident: Being able to enjoy the journey.

Oct 08, 2020
Leaning into Discomfort with Dr. John McPherson
17:34

John McPherson, MD is a Professor of Medicine and the Vice-Chair for Education at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. A California native, Dr. McPherson received his medical degree from UCLA following undergraduate studies at Princeton. He then completed his residency in Internal Medicine at Johns Hopkins and fellowships in cardiovascular medicine and interventional cardiology at the University of Virginia. As a clinical cardiologist, Dr. McPherson’s academic interests have focused on critical care cardiology and emerging interventional therapies. He is an author on more than 60 peer-reviewed publications. He also has a strong interest in medical education and is the Director of the Internal Medicine Residency Program at Vanderbilt. At a national level, he is a former member of the Educational Oversight Committee for the American College of Cardiology and the Education Committee of the Alliance for Academic Internal Medicine. 

Throughout our journey, we are bound to find ourselves in many uncomfortable situations. The key here, is to face it head on. Lean into the discomfort. Today, Dr. John McPherson explains why leaning into discomfort is the one sure way to help us grow. He encourages us to remain true and honest with ourselves—especially around others—but to also be flexible and open to new perspectives. He urges us to seek out diverse mentors, and to welcome different perspectives in our lives. When we remain open-minded, when we lean into discomfort—we will be amazed at what we’re capable of.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. When faced with life-decisions, we should ask ourselves some central questions: Is this in line with my passion? What do I really want to achieve?
2. Lean in to the discomfort and we will be amazed at what we are capable of.
3. The advice that your mentor gave you - "Don't worry alone" - simple but practical way to get rid of the worry altogether.

Oct 08, 2020
Making Mentorship Approachable with Dr. Harvir Singh Gambhir
13:42

Harvir Singh Gambhir, MD, is an Assistant Professor of Medicine and the Associate Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency Program at SUNY Upstate Medical University. Dr. Gambhir completed his medical school and residency in internal medicine from India.  He then came to the US and pursued residency in Internal Medicine from SUNY Upstate, where he also served as the Chief Resident, and joined as a faculty member thereafter. Dr. Gambhir has inspired learners at all levels with his dedication to both their intellectual growth and personal well-being. Recognized for his contributions to medicine, he was recently awarded the 2020 Gold Standard Award at the Upstate University.

According to Dr. Harvir Singh Gambhir, there are two keys to a successful mentorship: An approachable mentor, and an approachable mentee. Today, we’ll learn about bridging the gap of communication between teacher and student in effort to create more frequent—and more meaningful relationships. Dr. Gambhir also believes that openness to feedback is imperative, as is continuous discipline, and getting outside our comfort zone in order to grow.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. The two most important steps to creating a strong mentor-mentee relationship is in being approachable as a mentor and being fearless in approaching the mentor - as a mentee.

2. As a mentee, never hesitate to ask a question - be it clinical or non-clinical. By definition, the mentee's role is to seek answers to one's questions and learn from.

3. Situational awareness and making an effort to make the patient feel comfortable is one of the most important things when it comes to building a trustful relationship with our patients.

Oct 07, 2020
Keeping the Patient as Our North Star with Dr. Gregory Kane
20:47

Gregory Kane, MD, is the Chair of the Department of Medicine and the Jane & Leonard Korman Professor of Pulmonary Medicine at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. Dr. Kane received his medical degree from Jefferson Medical College, and completed his residency in Internal Medicine at Lankenau Hospital before returning to Jefferson for a fellowship in pulmonary and critical care medicine. Dr. Kane’s research focuses on asthma, sarcoidosis and bronchiectasis. He is an active member of various national bodies including the American Board of internal medicine, the Council of the Association of Program Directors in Internal medicine and the Alliance for Academic Internal medicine. Awards recognizing his commitment to humanism and professionalism include the Gold Humanism Award and the prestigious Parker J. Palmer Courage to Teach award from ACGME.

As Dr. Gregory Kane encounters new skills, strategies, or approaches - he tries them on like a new coat. And if they’re comfortable, he incorporates them into his armamentarium. Today, we take a deep dive into Dr. Kane’s armamentarium, and access the wisdom he has gathered over a lifetime of achievement. Key to everything he shares with us is a firm belief that no matter how many doors of opportunity we walk through, we must keep the patient—and the patient’s perspective—at the center of our mind.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Success lies in perseverance. Whatever problem you are faced with, persevere and overcome. Those who are the most successful maintain the attitude that they are capable of overcoming setbacks.
2. Observe the best practices of the faculty you admire, but develop your own script for what works best for you. Try new strategies and approaches like you would a new coat. Keep the ones that feel comfortable. Through this, you can create better versions of yourself.
3. No matter what door you walk through throughout the many stages of your career, keep the patient at the center. Their perspective should be your north star.

Oct 07, 2020
Celebrating Failure with Dr. Venkat Narayan
18:54

K.M. Venkat Narayan, MD, is the Ruth and OC Huber Chair of Global Health and Epidemiology at the Rollins School of Public Health, the Director of Emory Global Diabetes Research Center, and a professor of medicine at the Emory University School of Medicine. He is the former chief of the diabetes, epidemiology, and statistics branch at the US Center for Disease Control and Prevention. With over 500 publications, Dr. Narayan is noted for substantial multidisciplinary work in diabetes and noncommunicable diseases. He is the recipient of numerous awards including the American Diabetes Association’s Kelly West Award, the Danish Diabetes Academy Visiting Professor Award, and Emory University’s Mentor of the Year Award.

How do we really define success? According to Dr. K.M. Venkat Narayan, it is the ability to do what we are really interested in—and doing it well. Today, Dr. Narayan teaches us how we can best allocate our time to preserve mental energy, and to still feel accomplished in our work. We learn why it is imperative to think outside our areas of research alone. Studies in philosophy and literature became surprising aids to Dr. Narayan in his career, so he urges us to remember to think broadly, and to be creative thinkers in our work. He also reminds us to celebrate failure. Because if you haven’t failed, you haven’t tried.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Remember that breadth is just as important as depth. Develop an intellectual curiosity and have the mindset of thinking broadly. Many of the advances in medicine have come from observations outside of medicine.
2. Devote 1-2 hours on the most critical work of your day. Spend your most alert hours on those projects that are most significant in your life.
3. Celebrate failure. Remember that if you have not failed, you have not tried. Rather than being sad about failures, celebrate them and move forward.

Oct 06, 2020
Strategizing Success with Dr. Thomas McGinn
18:11

Thomas McGinn, MD, is the Chair and Professor of Medicine at the Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell. He serves as the Director and Professor at the Institute of Health Innovations & Outcomes Research at the Feinstein Institutes for Medical Research. Dr. McGinn also holds the office of Senior Vice President and Executive Director of Medicine Service Line at Northwell Health. Teaching trainees at multiple levels, Dr. McGinn is a huge proponent of mentorship, continually mentoring students, residents, and faculty at Northwell and beyond. He strongly supports the innovative ideas and research stemming from the talented young minds of tomorrow’s healthcare leaders. He has been the recipient of several NIH-funded grants and effectively executed numerous research studies. He has authored and published more than one hundred research papers. Dr. McGinn is also the author of the clinical prediction rules chapter of the JAMA series Users’ Guides to Medical Literature.

First step: Get clear on what your goals are. After that? Recognize the opportunities that lead you closer to your goals—and let go of the rest. Dr. Thomas McGinn believes in strategizing when it comes to success: With every opportunity that comes our way, there is a cost to consider. Hard work, says Dr. McGinn, does not magically equal success. Instead, we must plan ahead, especially in academic careers. Success is also derived from supporting—and celebrating—the joy that comes from helping others achieve their full potential.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Being proactive in reaching out to your mentors, that is the key to a successful mentor/mentee relationship.
2. Having a cost effective approach in taking up opportunities and know when to say no to which opportunity.
3. Be cognitively strategic about your own personal success. Hard work alone will not suffice.

Oct 06, 2020
Creativity, Curiosity, and Collaboration with Dr. Vineeth John
17:20

Vineeth John, MD, MBA, is Professor and Vice Chair for Education in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the McGovern Medical School at UTHealth. John is also the Director of the Geriatric Psychiatry Section and is actively involved in various educational initiatives directed towards enhancing domain expertise among psychiatry residents. He received his medical training from Christian Medical College in Vellore, India and completed his residency in general adult psychiatry at Tufts-New England Medical Center and fellowship in geriatric psychiatry at the University of Miami-Jackson Memorial Hospital. In addition, he holds an MBA from the University of Pittsburgh Katz School of Business. Over the past decade, he has been studying the effect of disruptive styles of leadership in organizations and presenting his research at national and international conferences.

Today, we learn about the three C’s: Curiosity, Creativity, and Collaboration. Dr. Vineeth John shares a systematic approach to inspiring more creativity in medicine: It begins with finding our flow state, and is enhanced by finding creative partners that make up for our personal deficits. He also believes that strong mentorship has good Chemistry (Ok…there are four C’s) in which mentors often see their reflection in their mentees and mentees often aspire to become like their mentors.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Reference the three C’s: Curiosity, Creativity, and Collaboration - these are essential ingredients for success in life.
2. Creativity can be enhanced by identifying your own flow state, and finding a creativity partner they can keep you in that state.
3. Mentorship requires chemistry: A strong mentoring relationship is where a mentor sees his reflection in the mentee, and the mentee senses that their mentor is who they would want to become more like. When we find that match, we should not second guess ourselves.

Oct 06, 2020
Finding Moments of Self-Reflection with Dr. Kathryn Jobbins
17:48

Kathryn Jobbins, MD, is an Assistant Professor of Medicine and the Associate Program Director of Internal Medicine Residency at the University of Massachusetts Medical School-Baystate. Dr. Jobbins completed her Medical school and  Residency in Internal Medicine at Baystate Medical Center, Springfield, MA where she also served as the Chief Resident. She also did a residency in surgery at The Cleveland Clinic—South Pointe Hospital. Dr. Jobbins has a strong interest in Resident education and leadership. She has also been the recipient of the Early Career Leadership Award by the American College of Physicians and the Kevin T. Hinchey Resident Teaching Award at the Baystate Medical Center.

How can we be successful if we don’t even give ourselves space to fail? That is the question Dr. Kathryn Jobbins asks of us. Today, we explore what it means to break past limiting beliefs of not feeling good enough. And she encourages us to change our thinking: We can do anything we put our minds to with hard work and determination. At the same time, she urges us to be compassionate towards ourselves, to self-reflect often, and to slow down when we need to. Our role as physicians is imperative: We care for patients, and we seek to impact the world in a positive way. In order to continue on the path of health and success, we must take steps in our personal lives to avoid burnout, because we cannot adequately care for others if we are not taking care of ourselves.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Believe in yourself that you can do anything that you put your mind into with hard work and with a growth mindset.
2. Self-reflection is one of the most important tools to help us grow as humans.
3. Be realistic and practical in setting your goals - work hard but be kind to yourself.

Oct 05, 2020
Extending Mentorship Beyond Professionalism with Dr. Stephen Knohl
20:56

Stephen Knohl, MD, is a Professor of Medicine, Residency Program Director of Internal Medicine and Vice Chair of Education at SUNY Upstate Medical University. Dr. Knohl completed his medical school and residency in internal medicine and then pursued a fellowship in Nephrology from SUNY Upstate. Dr. Knohl’s research interests include Genetic Hypercalciurias, Nephrolithiasis and Bone Disease in CKD. He is passionate about teaching communication skills to his residents, and has developed a program called 'Learning to T.A.L.K.' (Treat All Like Kin) to teach medical residents to be more effective communicators, and ultimately better physicians.

It’s okay not to know. That is what makes us human. But according to Dr. Stephen Knohl, it’s not okay not to know the second time we’re asked. That is what defines character. Today, we learn about the strengths we have by learning to be introspective. When we are passionate about our career, we must prove it by devoting ourselves to filling in our knowledge gaps, being humble about feedback, and being willing to course correct throughout our career.  Dr. Knohl also shares his unique perspective on mentorship: Mentorship should exist on a personal and professional level, but it is the mentors responsibility to take it to a personal level.  A strong mentorship should take the initiative to show their mentees that they are invested in them personally. Because after all, we’re human. And in order to solve problems and cure disease in medicine, we must bring our whole selves to the equation.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. You must learn how to prioritize your career in order to achieve a healthy work/life balance. Study hard, but find things that make you whole, and do things that are enriching.
2. In finding a great mentor, look for a “twinkle” and trust your gut. Mentorship should extend beyond your professional self, and strong mentors will connect and invest in you personally.
3. When we approach patients, we should think of ourselves as actors: We need to be prepared for every situation, and we need to put the patient first.

Oct 02, 2020
Mistakes are Great Mentors with Dr. Joseph Loscalzo
17:23

Joseph Loscalzo, MD, PhD, MA, is the Hersey Professor of the Theory and Practice of Medicine and Soma Weiss MD Distinguished Chair in Medicine at Harvard Medical School,  Chairman of the Department of Medicine and Physician-in-Chief at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Dr. Loscalzo completed his MD from the University of Pennsylvania and training in internal medicine and cardiology from Brigham and Women’s Hospital. He has authored over 1,000 scientific publications, has authored or edited 51 books, and holds 32 patents for his work in the field of nitric oxide, redox biology and vascular biology. Dr. Loscalzo has been awarded the George W. Thorn Award for Excellence in Teaching at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, the Distinguished Scientist Award and the Paul Dudley White Award from the American Heart Association and the MERIT Award from the NIH to name a few. Dr. Loscalzo is the former Editor-in-Chief of Circulation, currently the editor at large at the New England Journal of Medicine and a current senior editor of Harrison’s Principles of Internal Medicine.

Mentors are not just found in people, mentorship is a mindset, a learning mindset. Today, Dr. Joseph Loscalzo shares how he has found mentors not only in those physicians whom he has aspired to become like, but also in the mistakes he has made. And while these mentors may be more anonymized than the rest, they are absolutely as important as the personal interactions. He reminds us of a statement by Winston Churchill “Success is not final, failure is not fatal. It’s the courage to continue that counts”. And so rather than trying to avoid failure and become successful at every step, he encourages us to embrace challenges, because it is those challenges that we encounter which will foster our growth in every stage of our career.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. It’s the challenges that help us grow. It’s the times we aren’t as successful that make an impression. And we should seek comfort in facing failures and learning from them.
2. Mentors are not just people, mentorship is a mindset: A learning mindset. Our advisors, peers, students and even our mistakes can be mentors on our journey.
3. Shared success is more important than solo success and has a longer lasting effect because of its propagating features. Collaborate together to succeed.

Oct 02, 2020
The Destigmatization of Physician Burnout with Dr. Sarah Sofka
18:07

Sarah Sofka, MD, FACP, is an Associate Professor and Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency Program at West Virginia University. She completed her medical school and residency from West Virginia University. Dr. Sofka has a career devoted to mentorship from her role as Chief Resident during residency, to Associate Program Director, and now as Program Director. Dr. Sofka also chairs the GME Wellness Committee which focuses on preventing resident burnout and promoting wellness. She has received numerous awards for excellence in medicine throughout her career.

When deciding between residency programs, consider the following: Does it seem like a supportive program? Is it flexible? Could you take vacation when you need it? Today, Dr. Sarah Sofka stresses the importance of self-care. She teaches us about creating an environment that is conducive to our success—and our well-being. It is important to make decisions on where you feel at home, and where you are able to look after yourself. Because although it is better to give than to receive, we cannot adequately care for our patients if we are not looking after ourselves.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. When choosing a career path, find what you like most, and where you feel at home.
2. Be humble: Don’t be afraid to admit when you’re wrong even as you reach an advanced stage in your career.
3. What defines a successful leader is knowing what your shortcomings are and being able to reflect on those and eventually improve.
4. You have to be open to constructive feedback as a way of making you better, and ultimately contributing to your success.

Sep 28, 2020
Trusting Yourself with Dr. Jane Liebschutz
14:32

Jane Liebschutz, MD, is the UPMC Endowed Chair of Translational Medicine and Research, the Chief of the Division of General Internal Medicine, a Professor of Medicine with Tenure, and the Director of the Center for Research on Health Care at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. Dr. Liebschutz is a primary care internist whose clinical practice focuses on the care of underserved populations, with a special interest in caring for patients who have experienced the triad of trauma, pain, and substance misuse. Her research focuses on violence, mental health, and intervention to combat the current crisis in opioid use disorders. Dr. Liebschutz has a strong interest in faculty development and physician workforce diversity and she is dedicated to promoting, mentoring, and supporting underrepresented minority trainees. Dr. Liebschutz also directs a physician wellness initiative and has conducted research in the field of physician burnout.

Dr. Jane Liebschutz puts it best: If you’ve made it this far in medicine, you are already a success. Today, she encourages us to trust ourselves: Everything is going to work out, even when we’re feeling uncertain about the future. She teaches us a few things about mindfulness and preventing burnout, keeping an open mind around both colleagues and patients, and how to enhance our own strengths—and leverage them.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. If you’ve made it this far in medicine, you’re already a success. Instead of having anxiety about the future, rely on your past successes to motivate you for more success in the future.
2. Keep an open mind. When you realize that not everyone thinks the way you do, you can have more open and honest conversations, and develop new perspectives.
3. Instead of fixing your weaknesses, a mentor should help you identify and enhance your areas of strength.

 

Sep 28, 2020
Learning Something New Every Day with Dr. Jaspal Gujral
15:01

Jaspal Gujral, MD, serves as the Founding Director of the Anticoagulation Clinic and as a Professor of Medicine at Augusta University. He graduated from Maulana Azad Medical College, India,  and served in the Indian Army Medical Corps. He then worked in North Africa before moving to the UK to work in the United Kingdom National Health Service. He also obtained a diploma in internal medicine from the Royal College of Physicians, United Kingdom and then pursued another residency in Internal Medicine from SUNY Buffalo followed by a clinical research fellowship in diabetes from Leicester University, UK. Dr Gujral has extensive experience in research. He has been part of various landmark studies in the UK as well as the US. He is an editor and reviewer for various clinical journals nationally and internationally.

One habit to pick up now (and never put down again): Take a few minutes to learn one new thing every day. Dr. Jaspal Gujral attributes his competency to this simple habit, and believes that success comes from being unstoppable when it comes to learning. He advises students in any stage of their journey to be persistent and self-motivated. At the same time, he recommends being humble at all costs. And to know when to say no. As he puts it best: Find what interests you, and try to do that. Don’t try to do everything.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. The key to competency, and ultimately to success: Learn something new every day.
2. When you’re with your patient, don’t be in a hurry. Listen to them and allow them to tell their story before arriving at a diagnosis. This helps us become more efficient in diagnosis making skills and charting out treatment plans.
3. When you’re with your patient, don’t be in a hurry. Listen to them and allow them to tell their story before arriving at a diagnosis. This helps us become more efficient in diagnosis making skills and charting out treatment plans.

Sep 25, 2020
What Makes a Strong Team with Dr. Monika Safford
25:50

Monika Safford, MD is currently a Professor and the Chief of the division of General Internal Medicine at Weill Cornell Medicine. She received her medical degree from Weill Cornell and completed her residency in internal medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. She previously served at the University of Alabama at Birmingham as the inaugural endowed professor of diabetes prevention and outcomes research, Assistant Dean for Continuing Medical Education, Associate Director of the Center for Outcomes and Effectiveness Research and Education. With more than 260 papers published in top tier journals, she's an expert researcher and has received various grants including a recently awarded $10 million grant by the NIH. She has chaired many national committees, and has been the recipient of many national honors and awards for her contributions to medicine.

Strong mentorship cannot exist without a strong sense of teamwork. Today, Dr. Monika Safford explains collaboration with others allows us optimize our own strengths, and fill in the gaps to overcome our weaknesses. And that finding out our weaknesses—and where we need help—comes from honest self-reflection and feedback. We have the power to strengthen the bond of mentors and mentees by growing a network of teamwork within our hospitals. And with a strong sense of teamwork, comes more innovation, insight, and care.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Follow your inner voice. Have an open mind and be open to innovation. This will guide you through most of the challenges that you come across.
2. Take time for self-reflection. Be honest with yourself and what you do. Hold yourself accountable and identify your weaknesses and strengths.
3. Work in teams. Your goal should be to put together a team to overcome individual weaknesses so as to maximize the expertise of each individual.
4. Do not be afraid to fail. Take time and reflection to learn from your mistakes.

Sep 25, 2020
Reinventing Yourself with Dr. Robert Wachter
18:12

Robert Wachter, MD, is the Chair of the Department of Medicine at University of California—San Francisco. He is the Holly Smith Distinguished Professor in Science and Medicine as well as the Benioff Endowed Chair in Hospital Medicine. Dr. Wachter has authored six books and over 250 articles, and he is a frequent contributor to the New York Times and Wall Street Journal. Dr. Wachter considered to be the father of the hospitalist field, which is one of the fastest growing specialties in modern medicine. He also coined the term, ‘hospitalist’ in 1996. Dr. Wachter is a past President of the Society of Hospital Medicine and a past Chair of the American Board of Internal Medicine. In 2004, he received the John M. Eisenberg Award, the nation's top honor in patient safety. Modern Healthcare magazine has ranked him as one of the 50 most influential physician executives in the US thirteen times, and he was number #1 on this list in 2015. Dr. Wachter’s book, The Digital Doctor: Hope, Hype and Harm at the Dawn of Medicine’s Computer Age was a New York Times science bestseller.

One of the things we often learn as young physicians is to say “No”. Today, one of the most influential physicians in America, Dr. Robert Wachter, explains that most people who have been successful in the early part of their careers have learned to say “Yes”. And say “Yes” a lot. These early career physicians have not been afraid to try new things, maximizing the number of experiences and their 'shots on goal'. Sometimes they fail, but more often than not, end up finding their passion in areas they may have never realized. So make a commitment today: The next opportunity that comes your way, start with a “Yes” and reinvent yourself!

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Don’t be afraid to reinvent yourself continually throughout your career.
2. Be proactive in sending a signal to your mentor that you are looking to be pushed, and that you are not just here for a pat on the back.
3. You find your passion by saying yes more than no. By acting rather than just thinking. When we say yes to new opportunities, we engage in more experiences, and better learn what it is we like and don’t like.

Sep 24, 2020
Being Fearless with Dr. Stephanie Call
16:45

Stephanie Call, MD, is the Associate Chair for Education and a Professor of Medicine at Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, and recently started a new Internal medicine Residency Program at Mountain Area Health Education Center in North Carolina. Dr. Call is widely recognized for her work in graduate medical education, faculty/resident development in teaching, physician wellness and curriculum development/assessment. She has been awarded the Distinguished Medical Educator Award from the Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine, the Faculty Teaching Excellence Award from the Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine and the Gold Foundation Baldwin Award.

Dr. Stephanie Call is fearless when it comes to change. Because she’s realized that change is simply an opportunity for growth. And when we dare to be fearless, the rewards are insurmountable. She believes mentors play a crucial role in supporting us in our endeavors, as long as we hold up our end of the bargain by saying “yes” to opportunity—even when it scares us. She reminds us that everything is less daunting when we break things down into one step at a time. And especially when we remind ourselves that each step we take is a step forward—toward growth.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Change and failure both present new learning opportunities. And fearlessness is the essential prerequisite for embracing change.
2. When you make a decision, ask three critical questions: How important is this for me? Does this align with my core values? Is this environment conducive to my health?
3. The role of the mentor is to identify talent, and support them. The role of the mentee is to be willing to take risks, to be fearless, and to say yes to new opportunities.

Sep 23, 2020
Overcoming the Obstacles that Stand in Your Way with Dr. Michele Meltzer
16:46

Michele Meltzer, MD, is currently the Associate Professor of medicine at Thomas Jefferson University. Dr. Meltzer earned her medical school degree from Drexel University College of Medicine and completed her residency from the Presbyterian Medical Center, Philadelphia. She then completed her fellowship from Temple University Hospital, Philadelphia. She also earned a Masters in Bioethics from the University of Pennsylvania. Dr Meltzer has also founded a nonprofit called Rheumatology for All - a continuing medical education course aimed at increasing access to rheumatology care in resource poor areas.

Obstacles are inevitable. Dr. Michele Meltzer knows this best, as she’s built a career based on perseverance. And today, she empowers us to put our personal obstacles in perspective—and she shares strategies for tackling them head on. Dr. Meltzer believes that our journey begins when we define what success means to us. And then, to chase after it. Along the way, she urges us to listen open-mindedly to our patients,  to create more inclusive environments in medicine, and to slow down and enjoy the journey. Because when we’re able to relax—we find that we can get more done.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. You can overcome obstacles to get to where you want to go. I love your perseverance and how you encourage others to do the same.
2. Listen to patients. Hear their concerns and act on what they have said. Be proactive in learning their names and details about their lives.
3. Know what you want to do and go for it. Define what success looks like for you.

Sep 23, 2020
Success and Kindness with Dr. Melissa Briones
13:55

Melissa Briones, MD, is the Associate Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency Program and a Rheumatologist at Loyola University. Dr. Briones was born and raised in the Chicago suburbs and attended Loyola's Stritch School of Medicine. She then stayed at Loyola to complete her Internal Medicine Residency, Chief Residency, and Rheumatology Fellowship training. She devotes much of her time as associate program director to recruiting efforts along with helping to oversee the research curriculum. Dr. Briones particularly enjoys curriculum development and teaching and is especially interested in helping residents successfully prepare for the ABIM exam. She also loves teaching medical students and serves as the Clerkship Director for the fourth year medical student subinternship wards rotation.

Where do kindness and success intersect? Today, Dr. Melissa Briones makes an excellent point about the changing definition of success: As we evolve, we might find that success becomes less about personal gain, and more about enriching the lives of others. And when we realize that kindness most often means putting others first—we realize that success and kindness work in tandem. Dr. Briones also advises us that adapting organized habits and good time management skills are important to start now. And that lessons in compassion are of the most valuable to us as physicians. She leaves us with this: Patients will never know your board scores, but within thirty seconds they will know whether they feel comfortable putting their health in your hands.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. When it comes to asking for help, don’t wait: Start that process now. We need to generate the experience of asking for help and receiving it so the positive cycle continues.
2. Kindness and success are more similar than we think. When our definition of success becomes more about helping others, and we realize kindness is about putting others’ first, we are able to see those two as being equal.
3. Stay humble. As a physician, you will make mistakes. But if you weren’t humble when you made them, it will really stick.

Sep 23, 2020
Navigating Complexity with Dr. Daniel Wolpaw
16:13

Daniel Wolpaw, MD, is a Professor of Medicine, a Senior Consultant for Educational Innovation,  and Co-Director of the Junior Faculty Development Program at Penn State. He has a number of publications in the areas of health systems science, the humanities including communication and doctor-patient relationship. His areas of interest include curriculum development, critical and systems thinking, adaptive expertise, professional identity formation, and the use of literature to encourage mindfulness and humanistic care.

Patients are far more complex than the symptoms they have. As physicians, it is our role to connect with patients for who they are. To embrace their complexities. To embrace lack of certainty and lack of agreement. Today, Dr. Daniel Wolpaw reminds us that as physicians, we not only have to understand a vast amount of complex knowledge, but also work with complex personalities of our patients and our colleagues. When we start to critically think through our challenges, be open minded and humble, we can navigate this complexity.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. We must learn to navigate a lack of certainty and lack of agreement, which is why creative problem solving is an important skill as a physician.
2. Be willing to work through the discomfort of being challenged. That will open the doors for mentors to speed up our progress.
3. We are not just treating diseases, we are dealing with people. Make the effort to connect with the patient in the room before jumping to medical history.

Sep 22, 2020
Committing to Enthusiasm in Medicine with Dr. Steven Berk
26:31

Steven Lee Berk, MD, is the Dean of the School of Medicine and Executive Vice President for Clinical Affairs at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center at Lubbock. Dr. Berk graduated from Boston University School of Medicine and completed his Internal Medicine residency and Infectious Disease fellowship at Boston City Hospital. He is the author or co-author of over 150 peer-reviewed publications and four textbooks. Dr. Berk has served on the NIH Special Advisory Panel on the evaluation of vaccines against infections in the elderly, on the editorial board of the Journal of the American Geriatric Society, and as a reviewer for most Internal Medicine and Infectious Disease journals. He has served on the Board of Directors Nominating Committee for the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and chaired the AAMC community-based deans subcommittee for eight years.

It is inevitable throughout our journey in medicine that we will find role models that inspire us each day. But how do we discern what kind of physician makes the best role model? Today, Dr. Steven Berk explains that the best physicians to emulate are the ones who are highly skilled in bedside manner. Physicians who are present with their patient, spend time with that patient, and then share their experience and knowledge with upcoming students and residents are the kinds of doctors we should be seeking out and learning from. He also explains how important it is to foster emotional intelligence in the field of medicine. And in order to do that, we must work toward creating classrooms and environments that encourage diversity. And we must commit to spending time with—and learning from—different backgrounds, different cultures, and different ideas.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Develop qualities of staying calm and clear headed, no matter how stressful the situation.
2. Gratitude is one of the key qualities of a good mentor and student, and this will keep us on the right path.
3. Be committed to patient care. The more committed to patient care you are, it will make overcoming challenges more manageable.
4. Continue to build enthusiasm in medicine: Remember why we started, and keep that passion alive throughout your years. At the end of the day, keep a holistic eye on our profession.

Read more about Dr Berk’s memoir of being kidnapped and how the principles from his medical training helped him successfully navigate the crisis. It’s a compelling read for all, especially medical students and residents.

Get your copy here: https://www.amazon.com/Anatomy-Kidnapping-Steven-L-Berk/dp/0896726932

Sep 22, 2020
The Mentorship Mindset with Dr. Danielle Jones
15:44

Danielle Jones, MD is an Associate Professor of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. She is the Medical Director of the Musculoskeletal Procedure Clinic at Grady Memorial Hospital. Additionally, Dr. Jones is an Associate Program Director for Emory's Internal Medicine Residency program with a primary focus on ambulatory education. Dr. Jones is a member of Emory’s Academy of Medical Educators and also directs Emory’s Primary Care Consortium. Dr. Jones is a huge proponent of mentorship and sponsorships, continually mentoring students, residents, and faculty at Emory and beyond. Dr. Jones has won numerous awards as an educator, including multiple learner-nominated awards, the Southern Society of General Internal Medicine Clinician Educator of the Year Award, the Emory Department of Medicine’s Silver Pear Mentorship Award, and most recently, the Emory School of Medicine Mentoring Award. Dr. Jones is an active member of both the Association of Program Directors in Internal Medicine and SGIM, serves as co-chair of the SGIM Education Committee.

We all like to hear we’re doing a great job. But the truth is praise alone doesn’t make us better. Dr. Danielle Jones shares that we have to approach mentorship with a growth mindset, in which we seek and absorb the critical feedback we are given. Otherwise it doesn’t help us. It is imperative we are intentional about our mentoring relationships and thoughtful in setting specific goals and expectations. This mindset will take us to new heights.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Mentorship is a comprehensive solution—it’s not piecemeal.
2. When it comes to mentorship, be proactive. If we’re not, we see the leaky pipeline—where successful people fall through the cracks.
3. Maintain a growth mindset: We’re not here to get a pat on the back, we’re here to find out what we can do better, and how we can improve daily.

Sep 22, 2020
Honoring Our Commitments with Dr. Niti Madan
15:00

Niti Madan, MD, is currently a Professor of nephrology at UC Davis Medical Health Center. Dr Madan attended medical school at Punjab University, India, and then pursued residency at Southern Illinois University School of Medicine. She then obtained a fellowship in nephrology at the University of Texas at Houston. Dr Madan's research interests include: Glomerulonephritis, Hypertension, Critical Care Nephrology and Mindfulness in Nephrology.

Do you really know how to make a commitment? Today, Dr. Niti Madan tells us exactly what that entails. She explains that we must learn how to honor our commitments. Whatever path we choose in life, we must commit to doing that the best we can. Truly honoring our commitments means devoting our practice to showing our best in whatever we do. Prove to yourself and others that you are willing to grow, evolve, and reach excellence. When you run into roadblocks, look for the guidance of your mentors: A strong mentor can help identify your potential, and push you toward your highest goals.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Be persistent. Pursue your goals, whether this means becoming an academician or mentor.
2. Choose the right mentors. Know the types of people you want to emulate.
3. Stay committed. Be honest with yourself, your commitments, your mentors, your patients, and especially yourself.
4. Stay positive. Be mindful of the things that you do and the people around you.

Sep 21, 2020
The Importance of Setting Goals for Your Career with Dr. Edward L. Barnes
17:00

Edward L. Barnes, MD is currently an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at the University of North Carolina. Dr Barnes completed his residency in internal medicine at the University of North Carolina, where he also served as a chief resident. He completed his gastroenterology fellowship at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. While training in Boston, he earned Master of Public Health degree from the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health. Dr. Barnes then returned to the University of North Carolina to complete an Advanced Fellowship in Inflammatory Bowel Diseases. He specializes in the care of patients with inflammatory bowel disease, and has contributed multiple articles and reviews in this area.

What gets you up in the morning? Furthermore, what wakes you up in the middle of the night? Today, Dr. Edward Barnes shares why balancing your time combined with your passion is a winning combination for success. To avoid burnout, we must adapt strong time management skills early on in the game. On top of that, we must place importance on career paths that fit who we are—so we’re not forcing ourselves into something that isn’t in alignment with ourselves. He urges us to think with an open mind, embrace rejection as part of the process, and get comfortable with “prioritizing things in your bucket of tasks”.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Find a career that fits who you are.
2. Find that one thing that excites you to wake up every morning or in the middle of the night. Approach each opportunity with an open mind and think outside the box.
3. Know how to prioritize things in your bucket of tasks. Find the right balance and know when to prioritize what and anticipate that there will be moments in your life when you will have to shift around the things in your bucket.
4. Find the match between your goals and the mentors in your life.

Sep 21, 2020
Thinking Strategically About Mentorship with Dr. Yael Schenker
16:33

Dr. Yael Schenker is an Associate Professor in the Department of Medicine and Director of the Palliative Research Center at University of Pittsburgh where she mentors numerous medical students, residents, fellows and junior faculty in clinical and research settings. Dr. Schenker completed her medical school, residency and fellowship in general internal medicine from the University of California, San Francisco. Since joining University of Pittsburgh, Dr. Schenker has collaborated on numerous palliative care research projects with a primary focus in understanding and improving provision of palliative care in oncology. She has published widely on topics including surrogate decision making, informed consent, healthcare advertising and language barriers.

One of the most important tenets of good mentorship is practicing good communication. Be clear and upfront about what the expectations are of the relationship, says Dr. Yael Schenker. And when we seek out mentorship—look for the people who will support us and who we are comfortable being honest with. Beyond just communication with our mentors, she also encourages us to stay in communication with the world outside of the hospital. Understanding what problems humans actually care about is a way to find inspiration for our research. Lastly, be kind to yourself, especially in the face of failure.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Know your why. When you know your why it gives you the stimulus and energy to pursue your passions.
2. Medicine is not a solo enterprise. It is a team sport. You need others around you who will build you up and provide you with encouragement.
3. Be kind to yourself in the face of failure. Try to look at situations from a productive perspective instead of growing frustrated and anxious.

Sep 21, 2020
Creating an Environment of Encouragement with Dr. Jeffrey Berger
18:34

Dr. Jeffrey Berger is an Associate Professor of Medicine and Surgery (on tenure track) with appointments in Cardiology, Hematology, and Vascular Surgery, and Director of Cardiovascular Thrombosis at New York University School of Medicine. During his training, he received a Master’s degree in clinical research from the NIH K30 program at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. He completed fellowships in Cardiology at Duke University, Cardiovascular Research training at Duke Clinical Research Institute, and Vascular Medicine and Thrombosis and Hemostasis at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Berger has been the recipient of several grants, honors and awards, including the American Heart Association's Fellow Faculty award, amongst many others. He has also established an independent NIH-funded research program, investigating the role of platelet activity and thrombotic biomarkers in cardiovascular disease.

How can we develop a more positive environment in medicine? For starters, says Dr. Jeffrey Berger, is finding ways to bring out the best in those around us. On top of that, Dr. Berger believes hard work, perseverance, and curiosity are the key principles for success. Today, he teaches us how to construct the mindset we need to persevere in medicine—and how to help others succeed along the way, too.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Ask yourself the questions you want to answer and do not pursue meaningless paths in life. Ask yourself how you can make fresh contributions to your field that few others are making.
2. Be different. Do not conform to a specific mold but be willing to go places, do stuff, and try things others might not attempt.
3. Create an environment of encouragement. Do your best to bring out the best in those around you.
4. Persevere through difficult seasons. Be curious and willing to try hard, fail, and then try again.

Sep 18, 2020
The World is Flat with Dr. Javed Butler
17:46

Javed Butler, MD, is a Professor and Chairman of The Department of Medicine at The University of Mississippi. Prior to joining the University of Mississippi, he was the Director of the Division of Cardiovascular Medicine and the Co-Director of the Heart Institute at Stony Brook University in New York. Dr. Butler served as the Director for Heart Failure Research at Emory University and Director of the Heart and Heart-Lung transplant programs at Vanderbilt University prior to that. After completing his medical school in Pakistan, Dr. Butler completed his residency from Yale University and fellowships from Vanderbilt University and Harvard University. He also completed his Masters in Public Health degree from Harvard University and an MBA from Emory University. He serves on several national committees for the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association and the National Institutes of Health, and was recently elected as a member of the prestigious Association of University Cardiologists. Dr. Butler is the recipient of the Simon Dack Award by the American College of Cardiology and the Time, Feeling and Focus Award by the American Heart Association.

What if we told you the world was, indeed, flat? Okay, fine. It’s round. However: Dr. Javed Butler encourages us to adopt a mindset that everyone is equal, regardless of where they fall in the institutional hierarchy, and that we have a duty to treat every person with dignity and respect. Today, he offers sage advice as we continue on this path in medicine: Align our best opportunity with our best interest, and though it's important to recognize what we enjoy, it's even more critical we identify and avoid what we don’t enjoy doing. Lastly, he encourages us to be truthful with our mentors and think about helping our mentors achieve their mission as we learn from them.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. View the world as flat. No one is above anyone else and we need to treat every person with dignity and respect. We are all equal.
2. Use the “meaningfulness equation” to align the best opportunity in the market with your best interest.
3. Do not be afraid to reach out to mentors. We should enter into these relationships with the mindset of helping them achieve their mission and learning in that process.

Sep 18, 2020
Living a Life of Gratitude with Dr. Daniel Cabrera
12:35

Daniel Cabrera, MD, MPH is the Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine, the Assistant Residency Program Director for Internal Medicine and Assistant Student Clerkship Director for Diversity and Inclusion at the Harborview Medical Center and the University of Washington Medical Center-Montlake. He completed his medical school and residency from the University of Wisconsin. He also obtained a MPH from the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. He is a strong proponent of health equity and strives to provide high-quality care to diverse patients.

Everyone has a story. And as Dr. Daniel Cabrera explains, getting to spend time with patients, learning their story, and helping them through their most vulnerable moments is the biggest privilege we have as physicians. Today, he talks about practicing gratitude in every day life. He explains the endless pursuit of curiosity in search of understanding ourselves and our patients more deeply. Lastly, he advises us to pursue our goals—but to remain flexible, in case life has other plans for us. Living by these principles will ensure a more enjoyable—and more rewarding—career and life.

Pearls of Wisdom:

  1. Do not forget where you have come from. Everyone has a story and there are invaluable lessons we can learn from our individual journeys that can be applied the ways we care for others.
  2. Never stop being curious. Always seek to better understand your patients and your particular field of study.
  3. Strive for balance in your work, family, and areas of recreation.
  4. Pursue your goals. Be flexible and willing to adapt but know what you want to do and go for it.
  5. Live with a sense of gratitude.
Sep 17, 2020
Making the Journey More Enjoyable with Dr. David Hatem
16:05

David Hatem, MD, is a Professor of Medicine at the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester, Massachusetts. He completed his medical school at Tufts University in Boston, and his residency at the Michael Reese Hospital and Medical Center in Chicago. His early interests in faculty development and teaching the Medical interview evolved into applying the principles of the provider patient relationship to the student teacher relationship.  He is the founding Co-Director of the Learning Communities program at the University of Massachusetts Medical School.

A career in medicine is not only a challenge clinically, but it’s an incredible personal challenge as well. Today, Dr. David Hatem explains that the path we’re on should be looked at as a “project of self”, where we are the subject. The support we get from strong mentoring relationships is what makes this personal challenge more enjoyable (although it doesn’t reduce the work). He reminds us that the key to finding joy is to continue to develop our personal interests alongside our clinical knowledge and integrate our passions with the needs of our institution, so one day we may leave a legacy behind.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Finding meaning in the work you do is the antidote to burnout. So ask yourself: Is the work you are doing giving meaning?
2. Approach mentorship with the perspective of self. This path is a project of self, and we are the subject. And in order to be successful, we have to be open about our difficulties.
3. Figure out what you’re good at, what you’re passionate about, and what your institution needs: Merge these together, and you could develop something that becomes a legacy.

Sep 17, 2020
Ongoing Self-Discovery with Dr. Jada Bussey Jones
15:36

Dr. Jada Bussey-Jones is the Chief of General Medicine and Geriatrics at Emory University, Professor of Medicine and Vice-Chair of Diversity Equity and Inclusion in the Department of Medicine, and the Director for Education for Emory’s Urban Health Initiative, where she has a strong interest in minority health and healthcare disparities. In addition to her local work, Dr. Jones is involved with several regional and national organizations, including serving as the chair of the National Disparities Education Task Force for the Society of General Internal Medicine. Her work has been recognized with several awards, including the American Business Women's Association Award for Community Service, Emory's Nanette Wenger Service Award, and the Society of General Medicine National Award for Mentorship in Education.

Self-discovery is not something Dr. Jada Bussey-Jones takes lightly. Today, the Chief of General Medicine and Geriatrics at Emory University’s Grady Memorial Hospital shares her story: She is a Black woman, a descendant of slaves, and a first generation college student. She found that fostering strong relationships with a diverse group of mentors is what kept her afloat after feeling lost in clinical training. Yet, she realized that the onus of mentoring falls on the mentee: As students, we have a responsibility to define our objectives for a mentoring relationship. We must be proactive about setting expectations and scheduling sessions with our mentors. And above all, we must place high value on identifying our passion and setting our own goals. So, as young physicians forging our path, let self-discovery be our guide. Lets get clear on what we really want, and use the tremendous power of mentorship to propel ourselves forward to newer heights.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Service learning is important. Your role as a physician is broader than just the clinical encounter.
2. There is tremendous power in mentorship. Through being mentored by others, you are able to pursue a journey of continual self-discovery.
3. Be proactive. Pursue mentors and seek to get on their schedule. Work to meet with them on a regular basis.

Sep 15, 2020
Building a Team of Mentors with Dr. Carla Spagnoletti
18:44

Carla Spagnoletti, MD is a Professor of Medicine at the University of Pittsburgh. She is the Director of the Academic Clinician-Educators Scholars Fellowship in General Medicine and the Director of the Masters & Certificate Programs in Medical Education at the Institute for Clinical Research Education. Her research focuses on patient-doctor communication, the patient experience, and professional development. She has received national awards from the Society of General Internal Medicine for her scholarship and mentorship in medical education and for her leadership accomplishments.

You wouldn’t get on a bike without training wheels on your first go—so why get into medicine without mentors supporting you for the journey? Reaching out to mentors can feel uncomfortable. We don’t want to burden anyone, and we sometimes feel intimidated. However, Dr. Carla Spagnoletti explains that building a strong team of mentors is an essential building block to a successful career in medicine. Today, we learn why it’s so important to admit when we need help—and why it can be detrimental when we don’t. We learn how to keep our career path moving in a forward direction. It’s a constant pursuit of embracing vulnerability, taking risks, getting feedback, and growth—but the journey will be most fruitful when we are supported by those around us.  Most importantly, Dr. Spagnoletti recommends evaluating where you are now. Figure out the gaps you need to fill. And remember: It’s never too early to start.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Build a team of mentors, whether they be peers or seniors. Networking may be uncomfortable and you may face rejection, but it is key to developing yourself.
2. Set goals proactively at the beginning of each rotation, but be even more proactive about eliciting feedback from those you are learning from and working with.
3. As physicians we need to not only elicit medical history but also help our patients process the emotions that come with the illness.

Sep 14, 2020
Adopting a Growth Mindset with Dr. John Ratelle
16:47

John Ratelle, MD, is an Attending Physician in Hospital Medicine at Mayo Clinic and the Associate Program Director in the Internal Medicine Residency Program, where he focuses on systems-based practice. Dr. Ratelle has been extensively involved in resident education and mentorship from being a chief resident of his residency program to pursuing research in medical education, quality improvement and patient safety, and interprofessional teamwork. He has been recognized for Excellence in Clinical Teaching through many awards including Teacher of the Year in 2019 and the Laureate Award at Mayo. Dr. Ratelle is a member of the Gold Humanism Honor Society.

No one wants to be the person in the room that just doesn’t “get it”. But, if we’re able to embrace our weaknesses—and use feedback as an impetus for growth and change—now we are in the growth mindset. Dr. John Ratelle encourages us to be willing to try, even if we fail. Today, we learn ‘to lean in’ and embrace those activities that we shy away from. And have the willingness to be vulnerable and admit our limitations with our mentors. This will set the stage for exponential growth as physicians—and as human beings.
 

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Develop a growth mindset. Be open to failure and use it as a stimulus for change.
2. Identify your area of weakness. Ask yourself tough questions “What is the hardest part of my day? What don’t I look forward to? And what's my action plan for it?”
3. Be open and honest with your mentors. Know that this is something they will generally appreciate and embrace.

Sep 11, 2020
How to Prevent Burnout with Dr. Stacey Rose
17:03

Dr. Stacey Rose is the Assistant Dean of Clinical Curriculum and Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases at the Baylor College of Medicine. As a physician leader, educator, and mentor, Dr. Rose has received many national honors and awards from bodies such as the American College of Physicians and the ACGME. She is committed to improving medical education through curriculum development, as well as improving physician wellness.

As a physician-in-training (and beyond), burnout happens often. But of succumbing to it, why not implement new strategies for recognizing—and preventing it? Today, Dr. Stacey Rose offers her strategies for combating burnout. She advises us to celebrate success: however large or small. Find not just one mentor, but build a network: The mentor you turn to for career advice may not be the one you turn to for managing work/life balance. And remember: your work as a physician always goes back to the patient. Taking time to learn the “human side” of patients—not just their diagnoses—will help you stay focused on what matters most (and it will energize you, too).

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Celebrate successes, however large or small. This will lower the risks of burnout.
2. Find a mentor. Do not be shy to reach out! Build a network of mentors who can speak to different areas of your life.
3. Remember that everything is about the patient, regardless if it is administrative or clinical.
4. Do not be afraid to make mistakes. Seek to minimize them but simply focus on doing your best every single day.

Sep 11, 2020
Vulnerability is Strength with Dr. Richard Pittman
14:45

Richard Pittman, MD, is an Associate Professor in the Division of General Internal Medicine and Geriatrics at the Emory School of Medicine. Dr. Pittman was trained at the University of Mississippi, completed his residency at UT Southwestern, and then spent 16 months in Swaziland for HIV care before joining Emory University. Dr. Pittman's interests in technology began as a hobby, but have grown to serving as an EPIC Physician Champion at the Grady Memorial Hospital at Emory. He has delivered numerous presentations about the use of technology, more specifically on the use of mobile technology in healthcare. Dr. Pittman was recently awarded the Dean's Teaching Award at Emory for his dedication to teaching medical students.

Vulnerability is a strength, not a weakness. Dr. Richard Pittman encourages us today to be open with our mentors about our challenges. It takes courage to be open and forthright with those who lead us, but the reward is great. As Dr. Pittman puts it: The mentor’s role is to help us improve…so why not take some risks? Honest feedback is another component : It takes strength to listen to, and adhere to constructive criticism from others, but it is yet another tool to grow exponentially and reach new heights of success.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Give back some of the control to the patient, and use that to improve the outcomes of the clinical encounter. Simply put: Treat patients how we would want to be treated - inspired by Dr. Jeffery Wiese.
2. Vulnerability is a sign of courage, not weakness - inspired by Brene Brown.
3. The path to become an expert requires deliberate practice, with continuous critiquing and constructive criticism - inspired by Anders Ericsson.

Sep 10, 2020
Discovering our Personal Why with Dr. Eileen Moser
16:33

Dr. Eileen Moser is the Associate Dean for Medical Education and a Professor of Medicine at Penn State College of Medicine. As the Associate Dean, she oversees the curriculum for more than 600 medical students at the college. Dr. Moser completed her education and training in internal medicine and geriatrics at Rutgers University in New Jersey. She has held multiple positions through undergraduate, graduate and postgraduate medical education. Dr. Moser is passionate about mentorship and education as reflected through her research, which touches on important topics of high-value care and leading behavioral change during medical education. She is a member of many state and national committees, including the American College of Physician, where she serves on the Board of Regents and on the Board of Trustees on the Pennsylvania Medical Society.

What’s your ‘Why?’ If you find yourself unable to answer the question, it might be time to do some deep self-reflection. Dr. Eileen Moser explains that what is inside us is what drives us. And our purpose is personal to us: It cannot be created; only discovered. And once we know what our ‘Why’ is, we can only then figure out our ‘What’. Creating a personal vision statement requires a lot of thought and equal action. Along the journey, we are advised to look at hard moments as gifts that give us character. To rest and be confident in who we are when we know we’re trying our best. And, to understand that success is more than just your title—it has much more to do with the impact you make on the world. Today, Dr. Moser shows us the way.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Success is about doing something good. It’s not about titles and achievements.
2. Distill the why, the what, and the how into your mission statement, vision statement, and SMART goals.
3. It’s going to be okay! You should be smart and take action, but after doing your best, rest and be confident in who you are.

Sep 10, 2020
Finding the Art in Medicine with Dr. Christopher Jackson
16:52

Christopher Jackson, MD, is an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Department of Medicine at the University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center. He is passionate about resident education and is the Associate Program Director for Curriculum and Education in the Internal Medicine Program and also is part of medical student education as the Assistant Clerkship Director for Internal Medicine. Dr. Jackson is part of the core faculty of the Center for Health System Improvement. He is the recipient of many awards and recognitions, including the Doctor Gibbons Outstanding Residents in Endocrinology Award, the Arthur Investigator Award for Research, and he has multiple publications in many high impact journals. His research interests include evidence-based practice, clinical reasoning, and the use of podcasts in graduate medical education.

How do art and medicine intersect? Dr. Christopher Jackson has devoted his career to fulfilling his passion for both art and science, and with him, we’ll learn how we can discover the art in medicine. As Dr. Jackson explains, finding ways to form a deeper connection with patients in order to gain their trust is the first step. Understanding that the patient is more than their medical history is when we realize that we are artists, not just scientists. Today, we are reminded not to worry when our path is not linear—it’s about the journey, not the destination. We are also reminded that it’s okay not to know the answer to everything: The real growth is in making the commitment to uncover what it is that we do not yet know.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Don’t be concerned if your path is not linear. Continue to focus on finding meaning and purpose; rather than hitting linear goals.
2. Medicine is not just science. And as physicians, we are not just scientists—we are also artists. And the greatest opportunity lies in the patient encounter. Look deeper into your patient’s social history to find areas where you can connect and bond—this will create stepping stones for trust.
3. Be humble. It’s perfectly okay to admit when you don’t know something. The real growth occurs when you make the commitment to figure out what you don’t know. This will earn you more trust with the patient, as well.

 

Sep 09, 2020
Being Ready When the Door Opens with Dr. Robert Bacallao
14:03

Robert Bacallao, MD, is a Professor of Medicine and an Adjunct Professor of Anatomy, Cell Biology & Physiology at the Indiana University School of Medicine. Dr. Bacallao completed his training from the University of Illinois and completed his fellowship in Nephrology from UCLA. Dr. Bacallao is widely regarded for his research on polycystic kidney disease, and has published extensively on its pathogenesis. He is the founder of Apoptocys, a company which aims to bring novel therapy interventions to people with ADPKD. He is involved in medical student, resident, and fellow training as a faculty member at Indiana University.

As a physician, hard work is par for the course. But as Dr. Bacallao reminds us, the hard work is what sets you up for success when the door of opportunity opens. Today, we learn what it means to prepare for greatness. We learn about the power of the helping hand: We don’t often get to where we’re going alone. We are also reminded that arrogance blocks communication between us and our patients, therefore it is key to set our ego aside. We also need to find ways to break out of our shell and learn outside of medicine. It will give us new ways to communicate with, and understand the patient in the room.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Understand the power of the helping hand. Our careers are formed as a result of the blessings of many people in our life.
2. Hard work allows you to be prepared when the door opens. You have to be standing at the net with the racket.
3. Get out of your shell. We need to look outside of medicine in order to broaden our thinking. This is instrumental in understanding the lives of our patients.

Sep 09, 2020
The Ability to See Both Sides with Dr. Richard Kovacs
15:38

Dr. Richard Kovacs is the current President of the American College of Cardiology and the Q.E. and Sally Russell Professor of Cardiology at Indiana University School of Medicine. He trained at Indiana University, where he was the chief medical resident and chief cardiology fellow. He is a clinical cardiology leader for Indiana University Health Physicians where he is responsible for the coordination of patient care activities across all the hospitals served by the IU faculty cardiologists.  Dr. Kovac’s research focuses on quality measurement, drug safety, and sports cardiology. Dr. Kovacs was a Co-Chair of the committee that revised the AHA/ACC Eligibility and Disqualification Recommendations for Competitive Athletes with Cardiovascular Abnormalities. As a sports fanatic himself, he oversees the cardiovascular evaluation of players at the Annual NFL Scouting Combine in Indianapolis. There is a saying in Indiana that it’s a mighty thin pancake that doesn’t have two sides. 

There is a saying in Indiana that it’s a mighty thin pancake that doesn’t have two sides. Today, Dr. Richard Kovacs shares the value of humility, inquisitiveness, and the ability to see both sides of a debate. He advises us to be humble, to accept failure when it occurs, and to not be too self-congratulatory when it comes to success. Dr. Kovacs reminds us that we never truly do anything alone, and it is wise to value the insights and criticism from those we work closely with, those we respect, and those who know us the best. And, there is perhaps one thing never to forget as a physician who’s been in the field for a day, or a decade: The patient is the most important person in the room.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Always remember that you are part of a team. Ask yourself - is there anything that I can do completely by myself in the hospital?
2. Successful mentors are accessible, in fact they have a limitless capacity for mentoring. Never have second thoughts when approaching a mentor and asking for advice.
3. Be humble. Do not get caught up in personal accolades and accomplishments. Stay grounded in who you are and where you came from.

Sep 08, 2020
Approaching Medicine with Zest and Vigor with Dr. Debra Leizman
14:08

Debra Leizman, MD, FACP, is the Director of Medical Student Education at University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center, and an Associate Professor of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine. Her focus areas are medical student education and clinical practice. She is also the Director of the Internal Medicine Core Clerkship for University Hospitals, and serves as Clinical Director of the CWRU Medical Science Training Program (MSTP), organizing and directing MD-PhD clinical training. Dr. Leizman is a University Hospitals Distinguished Physician and has served as Faculty Advisor for the CWRU Internal Medicine Medical Student Interest Group for more than 20 years. Her research interests include medical student and resident education, patient safety, and quality issues. 

Do you take on each new day with “zest”? If your answer is “I...think…so?”, keep listening. Today, Dr. Debra Leizman offers her best practices for bringing zest, vigor, and positivity into our roles as physicians. We learn how success and fulfillment work in tandem: When we do right by the patient, fulfillment is the byproduct. And when we make our top priority providing outstanding care to our patients, the hard stuff has a way of working itself out. And finally, we learn that what matters at the end of the day is not how many papers we’ve written, it’s about being surrounded by those we love. So during your next shift, take the time to talk to your peers. Spend a few extra minutes learning your patient's story. See others as human beings, and learn from them.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Find ways to bring zest, vigor, and positivity into your role as a physician.
2. Success and fulfillment go hand in hand. When we do what is right for the patient, fulfillment follows.
3. For mentees: take advantage of the open door policy. For mentors: see the mentee as a human being before you see them as a student.

Sep 08, 2020
From Great to Incredible with Dr. Rahma Warsame
18:18

Rahma Warsame, MD, is a Consultant in the Division of Hematology and an Assistant Professor of Medicine at Mayo Clinic. Dr. Warsame’s research focuses on amyloidosis and multiple myeloma. She is also interested in investigating existing health care delivery systems to improve patient-reported outcomes and quality of life. She is working on incorporating patient perspectives systematically and efficiently into clinical practice and determining its effect on clinical outcomes with the goal of developing a system which can provide patients with truly individualized care.

Knowledge can be acquired. Success and hard work can be learned. But kindness is essential for going from a great—to an incredible—physician. Today, Dr. Rahma Warsame outlines her simple (yet effective) practices for becoming excellent. She defines what “hard work” actually means and tells us how to get there. She relies on three simple rules: Never be late, never lie, and never be lazy. Dr. Rahma also shares touching stories of family, and a mentor who turned into a lifelong friend—and she helps us understand why sometimes, our greatest limiting factor has nothing to do with medicine.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Kindness begets kindness. And kindness is what helps you transition from greatness to excellence.
2. Never be late, never lie, and never be lazy.
3. Mid-cycle feedback is essential for mentorship. Don’t wait for the evaluation to come to you. Constantly asking yourself and others what you can do to improve is the engine of growth.

Sep 04, 2020
Shaping Our Vision with Dr. Stacy Higgins
14:36

Stacy Higgins, MD, is a Professor of Medicine and Director, Primary Care Internal Medicine Residency Program at Emory University. Over the last 20 years, Dr. Higgins has pursued her passion for leadership in medical education and has led research on a variety of topics including humanism, reflective learning, mentorship and diversity. She founded the Women’s Clinic within the Grady Primary Care Center and the International Medical Clinics which provide care to underserved populations. She is the recipient of a number of prestigious awards including the American College of Physicians (ACP) W. Lester Henry Award for Diversity and Access to Care and Emory University’s prestigious Papageorge Distinguished Teaching Award.

It’s one thing to reflect on your own performance as a physician. It’s another step entirely to commit to improving the next day, and the next day, and the next. Today, Dr. Stacy Higgins encourages us to become reflective learners—and to continually ask ourselves how we can improve. On top of this, she recommends finding our passion and putting it to good use: Not only will find fulfillment, but those around us will gain more value from what we do. And she reassures us not to worry if we don’t have it “all figured out” before approaching a mentor. The role of the mentor is to help us put the pieces together and shape our vision.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Be a reflective learner. Ask yourself daily - what did I do today? How will it change what I am going to do tomorrow?
2. Discover your true passion. Everybody has something that they're really passionate about. Work hard to discover what that is and then make it meaningful to the institution you are at.
3. You don't have to have a perfect vision in order to sit down and talk with a mentor. The role of a mentor is to help you sort that out. Don't delay mentorship.

Sep 04, 2020
Building Trust with Dr. Amit Dayal
15:05

Amit Dayal, MD, is an Associate Professor of Medicine and an Associate Program Director of Internal Medicine Residency Program at Loyola University. He joined the staff at Hines VA Medical Center and the faculty at Loyola in 2006. He has been actively involved in medical education and has developed several novel programs during his tenure. Dr. Dayal has served as Medical Clerkship Site Director since 2009 and was recently recognized as the M3 Attending of the Year. Dr. Dayal is a Canadian, Chicago White Sox/Bears fan, but most importantly a husband and the father of two girls.

Earning the trust of your patients takes more than just a diagnosis. Today, Dr. Amit Dayal shares a few key strategies for building trust with our patients - Don’t walk into the room with an agenda. Hear the patient out, let them express their needs first. Talk with them, not at them. And be willing to say “I don’t know”. Patients want to be seen , heard, and respected. Above all, we must remember the white coat we wear is a privilege. Recognizing this fact will help us lead with more sincerity and integrity.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Mentors see value in things that may not seem immediately visible to us. That is the difference between logic and wisdom.
2. Don’t walk in with an agenda. Don’t talk at the patient, talk with the patient. Be willing to say “I don’t know”.
3. The white coat we don is a privilege. The earlier we recognize its value and importance, the more sincere we will become with our profession.

Sep 03, 2020
Mentors Want Us To Succeed with Dr. Lauren Shapiro
17:18

Dr. Lauren Shapiro is the Program Director for the Internal Medicine Residency Program at Montefiore Hospital. Her areas of interest include resident wellness, social determinants of health, clinical reasoning, and above all, resident education. Dr. Shapiro is originally from southern New Jersey and obtained her undergraduate degree in biology from Rutgers. After receiving her medical degree from the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, she completed her residency at Montefiore in Primary Care/Social Internal Medicine. She has been recognised for her teaching with the Montefiore Residency Teaching Award and induction into the Davidoff Society for Outstanding Achievement in Teaching of Medical Students. She is passionate about providing excellent medical care, especially to the most underserved and vulnerable patient populations.

Do you ever hesitate before reaching out to a potential mentor? Are you intimidated, or worried you are “bothering them”? Dr. Lauren Shapiro encourages us to undo that belief and know that mentors want to help us succeed and help us grow. Today, Dr. Shapiro teaches us ways to foster and maintain fruitful relationships with our educators, how to steer towards our true passions, and to remember why we started in the first place.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Be intentional in reaching out to mentors. Press beyond your doubts and make an extra effort to connect. Be persistent, even if this means reaching out several times.
2. Do not be afraid when you are confronted with a challenge. Ask for help on the front end, rather than waiting to fail and needing to ask for help down the road.
3. Do not forget the fundamentals during difficult times. Remember that our job is to care for people and leave them better than they were before they came in contact with us.

Sep 03, 2020
How to Lead the System with Dr. Robert Morrison
10:54

Robert Morrison, MD is a Professor of Medicine at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center. Dr. Morrison received his medical degree from Indiana University School of Medicine in Indiana, IN. He completed his internship and residency in internal medicine at Fitzsimons Army Medical Center in Colorado. Dr. Morrison went on to complete his fellowship in infectious diseases at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, DC. Dr. Morrison’s career spans from serving in the US Army for 20 years and as the chief of medicine and program director for an army training hospital, to his current role as a clinician educator in the Department of Medicine at the University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center.

What happens when we view ourselves as the leaders of the system—as opposed to working for it? Dr. Robert Morrison believes this is an antidote for physician burnout, and encourages us to shift our perspective. “We have got to be the leaders. The system won’t lead us,” says Dr. Morrison. He also reminds us of the importance of doing the right thing: The right thing for the patient is the right thing for everyone else, always. It is important to align the factors of healthcare to benefit the patient—without ever sacrificing their needs. In the words of Sir William Osler “We begin with the patient, stay with the patient, and end with the patient.”

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Everything begins and ends with the patient. In the words of Sir William Osler, “We begin with the patient, stay with the patient, and end with the patient.”
2. We can better avoid burnout when we view ourselves as leading the system, rather than working for it.
3. If we want to do the right thing, sometimes we need to think outside the box and align the needs of the institution and businessmen without sacrificing the needs of our patients.

Sep 02, 2020
Becoming a Mentor of Mentors with Dr. Robert Centor
15:43

Robert Centor, MD, is a Professor Emeritus of Medicine at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and Chair-Emeritus of the ACP Board of Regents. He has served as Dean of Huntsville Regional Medical Campus as well as Chief of the Division of General Internal Medicine at UAB. Dr. Centor has held many prestigious positions in national organizations and has been the president for The Society for Medical Decision Making, The Association of Chiefs of General Internal Medicine and The Society of General Internal Medicine. He has over 100 publications including his widely read publication from which the “Centor Score” was developed to identify the likelihood of a bacterial infection in an adult with sore throat.

There’s a Yiddish word called Kvell. It refers to the special pride you get when your offspring achieves something great. Dr. Robert Centor—referred to by many as the Ultimate Mentor—shares what it means to be a good mentor, and a good mentee. He firmly believes the mark of a good mentor is not one that seeks more fame and recognition. Today, we are urged to focus on our strengths rather than aim to fix all of our weaknesses first. And that we never truly know something until we’re able to explain it to others. And, to pay it forward whenever possible. Dr. Centor leaves us with this advice: When you are looking for a good mentor (or mentors), look for the people that encourage you, support you, and sincerely want you to succeed. A good mentor knows that when a mentee is successful, it makes the whole team stronger.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Build on your strengths and work with others in areas of weakness.
2. Pass on what you have received to others. Seek to pay it forward wherever and whenever you can.
3. Good mentors have KVELL (A Yiddish word for special pride in success of your mentee). They are not looking for more fame or recognition, only that you succeed.

 

Sep 01, 2020
Loving Your Patients with Dr. Jillian Catalanotti
17:43

 

Dr. Jillian Catalanotti is the Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency Program and Associate Professor of Medicine and of Health Policy & Management at The George Washington University (GW). She is responsible for 110 residents in two programs and 55 fellows in 12 fellowship programs. Dr. Catalanotti has co-designed and co-directs the Underserved Medicine and Public Health concentration, a two-year longitudinal program for residents with a special interest in working with underserved populations. She was recently awarded the Walter J. McDonald Award for Early Career Physicians from the American College of Physicians. She is on many national committees and has a number of publications on improving medical education. 

Ask yourself honestly: Do you love your patients? Today, Dr. Jillian Catalanotti reminds us that even though we may feel fulfilled after long-yet-rewarding days spent in the hospital, our patients aren’t the ones who want to be there. She encourages us to take the time to learn the stories of the patients we care for. To remember they are daughters, sons, sisters and brothers of other people—and to treat them as such. Dr. Catalanotti also urges us to practice honest self-reflection. To ask ourselves: What could we have done better today? And finally, she reminds us to break past the intimidation we may feel around “larger than life” mentors. Be proactive. Reach out. These mentors are there for us for a reason.

 

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Love your patients as much as you love medicine.
2. Get to know your patients, not only by name, but as individuals. Learn who they are, what they like, and what they value.
3. Do not be intimidated when reaching out to mentors who are farther along their career path. They are going to be much more helpful than you might think.
4. Be proactive in learning whether in the wards when interacting with patients or at home when studying a topic.

Aug 31, 2020
Embracing the Uncomfortable with Dr. Thomas Radomski
17:39

Thomas Radomski, MD is an Associate Professor of Medicine and Clinical & Translational Science within the Division of General Internal Medicine and Center for Pharmaceutical Policy and Prescribing at the University of Pittsburgh. He is also the Director of Academic Programs and Clinical Research for the Institute of Clinical Research Education, where he oversees all master’s and certificate level programs in clinical research training, and co-directs a course on strategic leadership in academic medicine. As a practicing general internist and health services researcher, Dr. Radomski’s research focuses on ways to accurately measure and reduce the delivery of low value care and how the receipt of care across multiple healthcare systems influences health services, utilization, outcomes, and value. His research has been published in many internationally acclaimed journals, and he is also the Immediate Past President of the Society of General Internal Medicine, mid-atlantic region. 

It’s time to get comfortable—with being uncomfortable. Today, Dr. Thomas Radomski teaches us that embracing—and working through—difficult moments is what facilitates the greatest level of growth within ourselves. He also reminds us that even when we’re not thinking about it—we are leaders. He advises us to take ownership of ourselves and how we care for our patients. To recognize what our unique attributes are, and to ask ourselves how we can take advantage of them. And, that handling rejection is just part of the process. Learning to be open and receptive to criticism, and continually aiming to improve ourselves, is the key to success.

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Leadership is more about introspection, than demonstration. We should strive to come back to the basics and ask questions such as: Who am I? What are my strengths? Do I have the right people around me to support me in my weak areas?
2. Embrace discomfort. Do your best to avoid living with the regret that you could have done more.
3. Love your patients and make an extra effort to get to know them on a personal basis.

Aug 28, 2020
Being Confident but Not Cocky with Dr. Jennifer Christner
14:50

Dr. Jennifer Christner is the Dean of School of Medicine at the Baylor College of Medicine. Over the last 20 years, she has been devoted to leadership and mentorship of physicians across a number of prestigious universities, from an Associate Pediatric Residency Director at the University of Toledo to an Assistant Dean at the University of Michigan to the Associate Dean at SUNY Upstate. She has pursued her interests in improving quality in medical education and medical education research. As a testament to her passion for students and teaching, she has been awarded teacher of the year multiple times.

Today, Dr. Christner teaches us how to strike the balance between being confident yet not cocky. How to recognize our talents and celebrate our successes, but to also never get too big for ourselves. And, she reminds us that sometimes the biggest lessons don’t just come from our mentors, but unexpectedly from those around us. So, take the time to get to know not only your patients, but the cafeteria staff, the maintenance workers, and all those around you that make the experience possible. And most important, learn the names of everyone around you, it will go a long way! 

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Learn how to advocate for yourself. Do not beat yourself down and allow other people to dictate the narrative of your life. No one is going to look out for you better than yourself.
2. Be confident, but not cocky. Know the difference between the two and manage that tension well.
3. Know the names of those around you. These relationships will be invaluable in many practical ways.

Aug 27, 2020
Embracing a Life of Service with Dr. Alia Chisty
11:55

Dr. Alia Chisty is the Program Director of the Internal Medicine Residency Program and an Associate Professor of Medicine at Penn State Health Milton Hershey Medical Center. After completing her medical school from Stony Brook University in New York, Dr. Chisty completed her residency in internal medicine from Yale-New Haven Medical Center in Connecticut. Dr. Chisty is extensively involved in resident education and mentorship and has numerous publications related to designing curriculum to improve resident medical education.

As physicians, the expectations of day-to-day life often leaves us feeling bogged down. But what if we could learn to look at responsibility differently, and leverage it to create a more fulfilling life? Today, Dr. Alia Chisty teaches us how to bring deeper meaning to the work we do. How to recognise our privilege and use it to help others. With Dr. Chisty, we learn what it means to embrace a life of service. She leaves us with one question: What is our true mission? 

Pearls of Wisdom:

1. Embrace a life of service. It is a privilege to be a physician and when we stop thinking about me and start thinking about them, life becomes better.
2. Adopt a pay it forward mentality. Help others because you have experienced help yourself.
3. Believe in yourself. There is a reason we got to where we are at. We must stay on this path and we can achieve whatever is necessary to bring success and fulfilment.

Aug 26, 2020
Asking To Be 'Coached Hard’ with Dr. Eleftherios Mylonakis
10:05

Eleftherios Mylonakis, MD, PhD, FIDSA, is the Charles CJ Carpenter Professor of Infectious Diseases at the Brown University. He is also the Chief of Infectious Diseases at Rhode Island Hospital and the Miriam Hospital and the Director of the COBRE Center for Antimicrobial Resistance and Therapeutic Discovery. He has eight patents, has edited five books, and has published more than four hundred articles in peer reviewed literature.

Pearls of Wisdom:

  • Focus on being a good doctor and let the titles follow our work
  • Rather than trying to think about the whole path that lies ahead, focus on the next steps. Because when we shine the torch five feet, the next five feet will be visible
  • Go and be proactive in reaching out to mentors, especially those who are not afraid to be honest with us
Aug 19, 2020
Seizing Opportunities, Staying Humble, and Making a Positive Impact: Dr. Susan Hingle’s Words of Wisdom
20:04

Today we had the honor of speaking with Dr. Susan T. Hingle, who is one of the most influential and reputable doctors in her field. Dr. Hingle is a general intern and Professor of Medicine and Associate Dean as well as Director of Faculty Development for the Center of Human and Organizational Potential at the SIU School of Medicine. Dr. Hingle is also a fellow with the prestigious Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine Program.

In this episode, Dr. Hingle offers priceless advice on right intention, seizing opportunities, mentorship, affecting positive change, and other key tips for reaching mastery in the field of medicine.

Thanks for joining us for this wonderful opportunity to learn from one of the best mentors available. Enjoy!  

Talking Points:

  • How to seize opportunities and carry through successfully 
  • Being effective in forming mentorship relationships 
  • The value of relationships on the path to success
  • Using reflection to make rapid improvements 
  • Dr. Hingle’s work empowering women physicians: “If you have a platform, use it.” 
  • Self-care for physicians 
  • Why humility is a core characteristic of successful physicians 
  • The most important thing to remember: “It’s a true gift to be a doctor.”
Jul 01, 2020
Dr. Viswanath Vasudevan on Clinical Reasoning as the Path of Effective Care
18:41

For this episode we are joined by Dr. Viswanath Vasudevan, who is the Program Director, Resident, and Medical Director of the Sleep Center at The Brooklyn Hospital Center. Dr. Vasudevan’s expertise on clinical reasoning really shines through in this interview. Dr. Vasudevan’s perspective reveals some of the key systemic issues that physicians are facing in their training and clinical contexts, and Dr. Vasudevan also gives us the medicine for how to personally adapt to avoid the pitfalls and be the most effective physicians possible. 

Thank you for being a part of this quest for knowledge and betterment in medicine.

Talking Points: 

  • Introspection, self-reflection, and apprenticeship 
  • Combining bedside learning with textbook knowledge 
  • Mastering clinical reasoning through critical thinking and problem solving 
  • The necessity for clinical reasoning amidst the economic crisis of healthcare 
  • The dangers of unnecessary diagnostic studies 
  • The most important characteristics of successful residents
  • How residents can be active in finding their ideal mentors and how to establish those relationships
  • Why patient satisfaction is the most important thing 
  • How to make patients your greatest teachers
Jun 17, 2020