The Poor Prole’s Almanac

By The Poor Prole’s Alamanac

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Subscribers: 145
Reviews: 2


 Jul 24, 2022


 Jan 3, 2022

Description

Climate Change got you down? Worried about the fact that *everything* seems to be getting worse? Wondering how we got to this point in the first place, and what can we do to build a more resilient future? We take a look at historical pastoral & agricultural societies to see what worked and what didn’t, as well as what resources we have today to make better decisions to build equitable systems. We don’t just discuss ecology and history but also take a leftist perspective on prepping, foraging, homesteading, weapons, community-building, and basically anything that needs discussing during late-stage capitalism.

Episode Date
The Future of Wild Buffalo with Buffalo Field Campaign
34:47
In this episode we're joined by James Holt, the Executive Director of the Buffalo Field Campaign, a non-profit focused on restoring the rights of the wild buffalo to manage the landscape similarly to how it has in the past. What's the difference between bison, beefalo & buffalo, and what exactly is the problem with how Yellowstone Park is managing them currently? We talk about these subjects and explore the role non-indigenous people have in both restoring the buffalo and hunting them.   To learn more about the Buffalo Field Campaign, visit their website at www.buffalofieldcampaign.org or visit them on social media @buffalofieldcampaign  

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

Aug 08, 2022
Fossil-Free Farming & Food as a Public Work with Maseualkualli Farms
45:55
In this episode, we're joined by Panteleon from Maseualkualli Farms, a small fossil-free farm in northeast Kansas. We discuss the importance of relearning to farm without petrochemicals and petrofuels, building community, and the Florentine Codex-- a text that outlines traditional indigenous land stewardship as recorded by the Spanish upon their arrival.   We also chat about food apartheid and the concept of food as a public work.  Check out their farm at: https://www.masefarm.org/ and on social media at @Maseualkuallifarms  

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

Aug 01, 2022
Indigenous Stories with Joe Yates of Molly of Denali
26:58

In this episode, we're joined by writer & producer Joe Yates, who is part of the Yawk'laanaas tribe. We discuss the PBS award-winning show 'Molly of Denali', the importance of TV that reflects very complicated realities around representation and finding common threads across audiences. If you're not familiar with the show 'Molly of Denali', it is an animated children's show created by Dorothea Gillim and Kathy Waugh. The series is the first American nationally distributed children's show to feature an Alaska Native as the lead character.

 

You can learn more about Joe's work at alaskanfilms.com

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

Jul 25, 2022
The Decolonizing Diet with Dr. Martin Reinhardt
46:30

We're joined in this episode by Dr. Martin Reinhardt to discuss a unique project focused on what decolonized foods look like & how these diets impact health. When foods aren't easily available at the grocery store, how does that change your relationship with your food, and what are the health effects of these dietary changes.

The Decolonizing Diet Project (DDP) was an exploratory study of the relationship between people and indigenous foods of the Great Lakes Region. Very few studies have ever been conducted on this subject matter, and studies that examine the physical, cultural, and legal/political dimensions are practically non-existent.

This research program is being led by Dr. Martin Reinhardt, Assistant Professor – Center for Native American Studies at Northern Michigan University and is being supported by the USFS and Cedar Tree Institute.

 

The results can be found at:  https://na.eventscloud.com/file_uploads/0c98117111bd526196a14015c8f3489f_Reinhardt_Day3_1020am.pdf

 

The Decolonizing Diet book is available at the Northern Michigan University bookstore:

https://nmu.bncollege.com/c/Decolonizing-Diet-Project-Cookbook/p/MBS_2042696_used

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

Jul 18, 2022
Community Skillsharing with the Cempazúchitl Collective
30:01

In this episode, we're joined by Jacqueline form the Cempazúchitl Collective to discuss street medic training for communities in their communities, as well as the variety of care that we should be thinking about as we prepare for more government crackdowns on dissent.

 

Check out their work at: https://linktr.ee/cempazuchitl

Folks can donate to their work anytime through venmo: @BIPOCskillshares

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

Jul 11, 2022
Reclaiming Ancestral Farming with Ancestral Acres of Seeding Sovereignty
30:46

Food scarcity is prevalent within every city in the U.S. The pandemic, systemic oppression and escalating climate change have exacerbated existing needs. One solution to food scarcity is food sovereignty and community health. In 2021 Seeding Sovereignty embarked on our first-ever farming adventure, Ancestral Acres Farm & Garden on Tiwa Territory in Albuquerque, New Mexico!

In this episode, we're joined by Mayam from Ancestral Acres, land steward and program director, to discuss finding place and time in restoring landscapes for the benefit of human and non-human inhabitants.

You can check out Ancestral Acres at: https://seedingsovereignty.org/aafg

You can learn more about Seeding Sovereignty's various projects at: https://seedingsovereignty.org/

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

Jul 04, 2022
Beyond Land Acknowledgements with Redbud Resource Group
35:34

In this episode, we're joined by Taylor Pennewell from Redbud Resource Group to discuss the complex web of conversations around the concept of land acknowledgements, landback and sovereignty for indigenous people across North America. What does this look like in practice, what are the shortfalls around the way we do land acknowledgements today, and where do we go from here?

 

To learn more about Redbud Resource Group, visit: https://www.redbudresourcegroup.org/ or find Redbud Resource Group across social medias.

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

 

Jun 27, 2022
Community Resilience with Linda Black Elk & Ruth Plenty Sweetgrass-She Kills
41:09

In this episode, we're joined by Linda Black Elk & Ruth Plenty Sweetgrass-She Kills to discuss food sovereignty, seed rematriation, food systems collapse, and how social media plays into these conversations. What does the future hold for our food systems and how do we move forward from the current state of colonialism?

 

Linda Black Elk (Catawba) is an ethnobotanist specializing in traditional foods and medicines of the Great Plains. She is currently the Director of Food Sovereignty at United Tribes Technical College in Bismarck, ND, and is the mother to three Lakota sons. She can be found on Facebook at Linda Black Elk, or on Instagram @Linda.Black.Elk

 

Ruth Plenty Sweetgrass-She Kills (Hidatsa, Mandan, Dakota, and Nakota) is the Food Sovereignty Director at the Nueta Hidatsa Sahnish College.

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

 

Jun 20, 2022
Reclaiming Indigenous Foodways with NATIFS
48:09

In this episode, we're joined with Mandu from NATIFS, North American Traditional Indigenous Food Systems, to discuss food sovereignty and the future of indigenous foodways and the concept of culture and food as dynamic and evolving.

North American Traditional Indigenous Food Systems (NāTIFS), founded by James Beard award winners The Sioux Chef, is dedicated to addressing the economic and health crises affecting Native communities by re-establishing Native foodways. We imagine a new North American food system that generates wealth and improves health in Native communities through food-related enterprises.

NāTIFS has opened the Indigenous Food Lab in the Midtown Global Market on historic Lake Street in Minneapolis. The Indigenous Food Lab is a professional Indigenous kitchen and training center covering all aspects of food service; research and development; Indigenous food identification, gathering, cultivation, and preparation; and all components of starting and running a successful culinary business based around Native traditions and Indigenous foods.

Reclamation of ancestral education is a critical part of reversing the damage of colonialism and forced assimilation, and food is at the heart of this reclamation. NāTIFS will drive sustainable economic empowerment and prosperity into tribal areas through a reimagined North American food system that also addresses the health impacts of injustice.

 

Check out NATIFS at NATIFS.org or @Natives_org on Instagram

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

 

Jun 13, 2022
The 2023 Farm Bill with GC Resolve
55:51

In this episode, we're joined by the team at GC Resolve to discuss the 2023 farm bill, and why it's such a big deal. What can consumers do to impact how the farm bill is written?

 

This conversation tackles some of the issues around how the farm bills are structured and geared, and how despite constant conversations around the idea of supporting small farmers, little is done to actually support small farmers in the way farm insurance is structured, just for one example.

 

Check out GC Resolve at: https://www.gcresolve.com/

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

 

 

Jun 06, 2022
A Brief History of Corn
56:19

For our 100th episode, we decided to tackle the long and convoluted history of corn, specifically corn in the post-1492 world. Corn's rise to becoming the cornerstone of the diet for most of humanity involves a lot of moving pieces, from its early history of being bred to a perfect confluence of events that allowed corn to continue growing past the point of anything anyone would have ever expected.

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

 

 

Sources: 

https://scholarworks.uark.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1227&context=jflp

https://ensia.com/voices/its-time-to-rethink-americas-corn-system/?viewAll=1

https://grist.org/food/our-crazy-farm-subsidies-explained/

https://www.iowacorn.org/media-page/corn-facts

https://www.usda.gov/media/blog/2019/07/29/corn-americas-largest-crop-2019#:~:text=The%20rest%20of%20the%20corn,and%20bio%2Ddegradable%20packing%20materials.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/wonk/wp/2015/07/14/how-corn-made-its-way-into-just-about-everything-we-eat/

https://12ft.io/proxy?q=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.washingtonpost.com%2Flifestyle%2Ffood%2Fin-defense-of-corn-the-worlds-most-important-food-crop%2F2015%2F07%2F12%2F78d86530-25a8-11e5-b77f-eb13a215f593_story.html%3Fitid%3Dlk_inline_manual_10

https://www.cell.com/current-biology/pdf/S0960-9822(13)00507-1.pdf

https://www.sheffield.ac.uk/news/nr/c4-photosynthesis-food-security-1.569044#:~:text=Plants%20using%20C4%20photosynthesis%20grow,according%20to%20a%20new%20study.

Smil, Vaclav (2004). Enriching the Earth: Fritz Haber, Carl Bosch, and the Transformation of World Food Production (1st ed.). Cambridge, MA: MIT. ISBN 9780262693134.

Ritter, Steven K. (18 August 2008). "The Haber-Bosch Reaction: An Early Chemical Impact On Sustainability". Chemical & Engineering News. 86 (33).

https://12ft.io/proxy?q=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.washingtonpost.com%2Flifestyle%2Ffood%2Fin-defense-of-corn-the-worlds-most-important-food-crop%2F2015%2F07%2F12%2F78d86530-25a8-11e5-b77f-eb13a215f593_story.html%3Fitid%3Dlk_inline_manual_10

https://www.ers.usda.gov/webdocs/publications/41988/50849_aib485.pdf

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n4gViMBiJqc&t=67s

May 30, 2022
A Brief History of the Alliance for A Green Revolution in Africa part 2
37:19

In this episode, we dive into the non-profit world that dictates African agricultural policy. What is AGRA, where did it come from, who is funding it, and how are they doing it? In the second part, we take a look at some of the more sinister actions to control food production in Africa and the responses from some of the indigenous farmers.

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

 

Sources:

https://agra.org/our-story/

https://www.alliancemagazine.org/feature/the-farmers-voice-in-agricultural-development/

https://ecdpm.org/wp-content/uploads/DP240-Financing-the-African-Union-on-mindsets-and-money.pdf

https://www.die-gdi.de/uploads/media/BP_04.2011.pdf

https://www.mathematica.org/blogs/uncovering-insights-about-agricultural-transformation-in-africa

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1759-5436.2011.00238.x

https://www.iatp.org/agra-still-failing-africas-farmers

https://safcei.org/press-release-african-faith-communities-tell-gates-foundation-big-farming-is-no-solution-for-africa/

https://www.iatp.org/blog/202010/agricultural-revolution-gates-foundation-leading-africa-failure

https://www.aljazeera.com/opinions/2021/10/9/african-agriculture-without-its-farmers

https://grain.org/en/article/6690-how-the-gates-foundation-is-driving-the-food-system-in-the-wrong-direction

https://news.mongabay.com/2022/03/donors-must-rethink-africas-flagging-green-revolution-new-evaluation-shows-commentary/#:~:text=A%20critical%20new%20donor%2Dfunded,security%20for%209%20million%20smallholders.%E2%80%9D

https://www.pambazuka.org/governance/au%E2%80%99s-dependency-donors-big-shame

May 25, 2022
A Brief History of the Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa part 1
37:05
In this episode, we dive into the non-profit world that dictates African agricultural policy. What is AGRA, where did it come from, who is funding it, and how are they doing it? In the first part, we detangle the investors and non-profits driving this change to see who is really behind these continental policy changes and how they are able to gather so much power.

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

 

  Sources: https://agra.org/our-story/ https://www.alliancemagazine.org/feature/the-farmers-voice-in-agricultural-development/ https://ecdpm.org/wp-content/uploads/DP240-Financing-the-African-Union-on-mindsets-and-money.pdf https://www.die-gdi.de/uploads/media/BP_04.2011.pdf https://www.mathematica.org/blogs/uncovering-insights-about-agricultural-transformation-in-africa https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1759-5436.2011.00238.x https://www.iatp.org/agra-still-failing-africas-farmers https://safcei.org/press-release-african-faith-communities-tell-gates-foundation-big-farming-is-no-solution-for-africa/ https://www.iatp.org/blog/202010/agricultural-revolution-gates-foundation-leading-africa-failure https://www.aljazeera.com/opinions/2021/10/9/african-agriculture-without-its-farmers https://grain.org/en/article/6690-how-the-gates-foundation-is-driving-the-food-system-in-the-wrong-direction https://news.mongabay.com/2022/03/donors-must-rethink-africas-flagging-green-revolution-new-evaluation-shows-commentary/#:~:text=A%20critical%20new%20donor%2Dfunded,security%20for%209%20million%20smallholders.%E2%80%9D https://www.pambazuka.org/governance/au%E2%80%99s-dependency-donors-big-shame
May 23, 2022
A Brief History of Foraging Laws in the United States
51:01

Curious about what's *actually* illegal around foraging, and more importantly, why it is? We dive into a long and convoluted history and series of laws which have left foraging law as a tool to be used by state organizations as they see fit.

 

Foraging rights were in fact long protected in the United States early on in the nation's beginnings, but were slowly eroded away as a number of policies took hold around marginalized people, as well as the rise of urbanization and industrialism in the 19th century. Tune in for the story of its evolution to its current, chaotic state!

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

 

Sources:

https://ir.lawnet.fordham.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2740&context=ulj

 

https://www.sierraclub.org/sierra/wild-food-for-all

 

https://theconversation.com/american-environmentalisms-racist-roots-have-shaped-global-thinking-about-conservation-143783

May 16, 2022
A Brief History of Prohibition
58:56

In this episode, we talk about the history of prohibition and how politicians and tacticians pushed through an overwhelmingly unpopular law making alcohol sales illegal. We chat about what overlaps we see with contemporary wedge issues, and the power of a dedicated but small voting block who leveraged rural/urban divides, racism, and xenophobia to change the course of history!

 

 

Sources:

 

https://prohibition.themobmuseum.org/the-history/the-road-to-prohibition/why-prohibition-happened/

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/01/17/opinion/prohibition-anniversary-100.html

America walks into a bar : a spirited history of taverns and saloons, speakeasies, and grog shops

by Sismondo, Christine

https://newrepublic.com/article/158356/woodrow-wilson-racism-princeton-university

https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2017/02/segregation-invented/517158/

https://library.cqpress.com/cqresearcher/document.php?id=cqresrre1927042300

May 09, 2022
A Brief History of Hydrogen Power
49:53

In this episode, Matt joins us to talk about the fundamentals of hydrogen power, the history of hydrogen power, power storage, ducks (not the good kind), Elon Musk, and climate change. If you've ever wondered how many gallons of gas it takes to move cargo boats 1 shaq length, you'll be in for a treat!

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

May 02, 2022
A Brief History of Cannabis
36:55

In the first episode of our new series "A Brief History of", we're joined by comedian Nash Flynn (@ItsNashFlynn) & our video editor Matt to talk about the history of Cannabis. Where did it come from, how did it spread, and what did Deepthroat have to do with it?

Shoutout to Dom, our editor, for not quitting after editing this masterpiece. 

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

Apr 20, 2022
Post-Truth Publishing with AK Press
42:12

We chat with Christen & Char from AK Press about publishing, printing, and left media as a whole, and what it's like to work in a cooperative modeled business. What does the future around publishing look like given the internet & conglomerates monopolizing the publishing industry? What can we learn from the post-truth era, and what impacts does it have on how the left can organize and use post-truth to its advantage?

 

AK Press is one of the oldest worker run, collectively managed publishers and distributors in the US. To order books from them, visit www.akpress.org and find them across social medias!

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

Apr 18, 2022
The Media Industrial Complex with Cool Zone Media
31:11

Garrison from Cool Zone Media, the podcast network home for It Could Happen Here, Behind the Bastards, and more, joins us to talk about climate collapse, activism, and working within capitalism to push anti-capitalist projects.

To check out Cool Zone Media, visit them on social media at @CoolZoneMedia

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

Apr 16, 2022
News in a New World with It’s Going Down
47:49
The folks from It's Going Down join us to talk about organizing, movement building, news infrastructure, and we go down memory lane to talk about organizing pre-social media. If you're not familiar with It's Going Down, they are a digital community center for anarchist, anti-fascist, autonomous anti-capitalist and anti-colonial movements across so-called North America. Their mission is to provide a resilient platform to publicize and promote revolutionary theory and action.   You can find them on social media at @Itsgoingdown and their website is www.itsgoingdown.org    

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

Apr 14, 2022
Left in History- Live from Ukraine with Charles McBryde
45:18
We chat with organizer Charles McBryde, live from an undisclosed location in Ukraine, about what's going on in the country, what we can learn from the challenges faced, particularly from global propaganda machines, and what lessons we can bring home.   To support Charles's work getting medical supplies to citizens in need, visit: https://missionkharkiv.com/   For Charles's social medias, find him @CharlesMcBryde  

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

Apr 12, 2022
The Future of Left TV with MeansTV
31:48
We're joined by Naomi from MeansTV to talk about what the future of visual media looks like in an era of decentralized streaming services and cheaper access to content development.   To check out MeansTV, visit them on social media or subscribe at https://means.tv  

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

   
Apr 11, 2022
Modern Maya Milpa with Dr. Anabel Ford & Maya Farmers
01:01:41
We chat with Dr. Anabel Ford, an American archaeologist specializing in the study of Mesoamerica, with a focus on the lowland Maya of Belize and Guatemala. She is recognized for her discovery of the ancient Maya city El Pilar. We chat about the role of the modern Milpa in contemporary society and the future they hold. We are also joined by Torres Master (Forest Gardener), Amor Obando (Master Forest Horticulturalist), Cynthia Ellis Topsey (Community Outreach Activist), and. Norden Martinez (Urban Forest Gardener).   To see and support Dr. Ford's work, please visit: https://exploringsolutionspast.org/   To buy Dr. Ford's book "The Maya Forest Garden: Eight Millennia of Sustainable Cultivation of the Tropical Woodlands" visit: https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/maya-forest-garden-anabel-ford/1120805401

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

       
Apr 10, 2022
The Maya Milpa System Part 2
46:10

In the second part of our 2-part series, we look at the periphery of the milpa, and how milpa systems have long-ranging implications for the regional biome. We discuss how the milpa exists today within Chiapas and how it has evolved!

 

Sources:

Climate-Smart Adaptations and Government Extension Partnerships for Sustainable Milpa Farming Systems in Mayan Communities of Southern Belize Kristin Drexler

Falkowski, T. B., Chankin, A., Diemont, S. A. W., & Pedian, R. W. (2019). More than just corn and calories: a comprehensive assessment of the yield and nutritional content of a traditional Lacandon Maya milpa. Food Security. doi:10.1007/s12571-019-00901-6

Diemont, S. A. W., Martin, J. F., & Levy-Tacher, S. I. (2005). Emergy Evaluation of Lacandon Maya Indigenous Swidden Agroforestry in Chiapas, Mexico. Agroforestry Systems, 66(1), 23–42. doi:10.1007/s10457-005-6073-2

Drucker, P., & Fox, J. W. (1982). Swidden Didn’ Make All That Midden: The Search for Ancient Mayan Agronomies. Journal of Anthropological Research, 38(2), 179–193. doi:10.1086/jar.38.2.3629596

Maya Forest Garden: Eight Millennia of Sustainable Cultivation of the Tropical Woodlands

Anabel Ford, Ronald Nigh

Falkowski, T. B., Chankin, A., & Diemont, S. A. W. (2019). Successional changes in vegetation and litter structure in traditional Lacandon Maya agroforests. Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems, 1–21. doi:10.1080/21683565.2019.1649784

The Maya milpa: fire and the legacy of living soil Ronald Nigh1* and Stewart AW Diemont2

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

     
Apr 05, 2022
The Maya Milpa System Part 1
42:52

 

In the first part of our 2-part series, we're jumping into the history of central america, how that impacted traditional land stewardship systems, and specifically what the early stages of swidden milpa agriculture looks like!  We discuss how the milpa exists today within the Lacandon and how it has evolved!

 

 

Sources:

Climate-Smart Adaptations and Government Extension Partnerships for Sustainable Milpa Farming Systems in Mayan Communities of Southern Belize Kristin Drexler

Falkowski, T. B., Chankin, A., Diemont, S. A. W., & Pedian, R. W. (2019). More than just corn and calories: a comprehensive assessment of the yield and nutritional content of a traditional Lacandon Maya milpa. Food Security. doi:10.1007/s12571-019-00901-6

Diemont, S. A. W., Martin, J. F., & Levy-Tacher, S. I. (2005). Emergy Evaluation of Lacandon Maya Indigenous Swidden Agroforestry in Chiapas, Mexico. Agroforestry Systems, 66(1), 23–42. doi:10.1007/s10457-005-6073-2

Drucker, P., & Fox, J. W. (1982). Swidden Didn’ Make All That Midden: The Search for Ancient Mayan Agronomies. Journal of Anthropological Research, 38(2), 179–193. doi:10.1086/jar.38.2.3629596

Maya Forest Garden: Eight Millennia of Sustainable Cultivation of the Tropical Woodlands

Anabel Ford, Ronald Nigh

Falkowski, T. B., Chankin, A., & Diemont, S. A. W. (2019). Successional changes in vegetation and litter structure in traditional Lacandon Maya agroforests. Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems, 1–21. doi:10.1080/21683565.2019.1649784

The Maya milpa: fire and the legacy of living soil Ronald Nigh1* and Stewart AW Diemont2

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

     
Apr 04, 2022
DIY Plant Domestication with Aaron Parker
37:03
In this episode, we chat with Edgewood Nursery's and Propaganda by the Seed's Aaron Parker about plant domestication, food systems, and climate collapse. What does it mean to domesticate crops, what should we be looking for in the process, and how accessible is breeding to the average person?   Check out Edgewood nursery at: https://edgewood-nursery.com/ Check out the Propaganda by the Seed podcast wherever you get your podcasts!  

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

Mar 28, 2022
The Eastern Agricultural Complex & The Adena
45:00

In this episode, we chat about the history of the Eastern Agricultural Complex, the collection of tribes that encapsulated the Adena, heterarchy, plant domestication, and bison.

 

Sources:

 

Mueller, N. G. (2018). The earliest occurrence of a newly described domesticate in Eastern North America: Adena/Hopewell communities and agricultural innovation. Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, 49, 39–50. doi:10.1016/j.jaa.2017.12.001

David W. Zeanah FORAGING MODELS AND EASTERN AGRICULTURAL COMPLEX

EARLY WOODLAND PLANT USE AND GARDENING: EVIDENCE FROM AN ADENA HAMLET IN SOUTHEASTERN OHIO.January 2003. Midcontinental journal of archaeology, MCJA 28(2):175-194 DOI:10.2307/20708198 Dee Anne Wymer, Elliot Abrams

Domestication, crop breeding, and genetic modifcation are fundamentally diferent processes: implications for seed sovereignty and agrobiodiversity Natalie G. Mueller1  · Andrew Flachs

Experimental Cultivation of Eastern North America's Lost Crops: Insights into Agricultural Practice and Yield Potential Journal of Ethnobiology 39(4):549 DOI:10.2993/0278-0771-39.4.549 Natalie Mueller

Bison, anthropogenic fire, and the origins of agriculture in eastern North America Natalie G Mueller,1 Robert N Spengler III,2 Ashley Glenn3 and Kunsang Lama

Mueller, N. G. (2018). The earliest occurrence of a newly described domesticate in Eastern North America: Adena/Hopewell communities and agricultural innovation. Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, 49, 39–50. doi:10.1016/j.jaa.2017.12.001

Mapping the Adena-Hopewell Landscape in the Middle Ohio Valley, USA: Multi-Scalar Approaches to LiDAR-Derived Imagery from Central Kentucky Edward R. Henry1,2 & Carl R. Shields3 & Tristram R. Kidder4,5

Ritual dispositions, enclosures, and the passing of time: A biographical perspective on the Winchester Farm earthwork in Central Kentucky, USA Edward R. Henry a,b,* , Natalie G. Mueller c , Mica B. Jones c

Exaptation Traits for Megafaunal Mutualisms as a Factor in Plant Domestication Robert N. Spengler 1 *, Michael Petraglia1,2,3, Patrick Roberts 1 , Kseniia Ashastina1 , Logan Kistler 2 , Natalie G. Mueller 4 and Nicole Boivin

Food production in the Early Woodland: macrobotanical remains as evidence for farming along the riverbank in eastern Tennessee Jessie L. Johanson, Kandace D. Hollenbach & Howard J. Cyr

: Elic M. Weitzel, Brian F. Codding, Stephen B. Carmody & David W. Zeanah (2020): Food Production and Domestication Produced Both Cooperative and Competitive Social Dynamics in Eastern North America, Environmental Archaeology, DOI: 10.1080/14614103.2020.1737394

The organization of dissonance in Adena-Hopewell societies of eastern North America January 2016 World Archaeology 48(1):87-109 DOI:10.1080/00438243.2015.1132175

 

 

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Mar 21, 2022
Gastrocolonialism & Dayak Resistance with Dr. Sophie Chao
36:04

We talk with Dr. Sophie Chao from the University of Sydney's Department of Anthropology to talk about the evolution of indigenous resistance within Indonesia. What has made indigenous resistance in this region more effective than in many other places in the world, and what can we learn from it elsewhere? Further, how is food used as a tool for colonialism-- what Dr. Chao describes as gastrocolonialism.

Dr. Sophie Chao's research investigates the intersections of capitalism, ecology, Indigeneity, health, and justice in the Pacific region. Sophie Chao previously worked for Indigenous rights organization Forest Peoples Programme in Indonesia. Her current DECRA project explores the diverse perceptions, practices, and knowledges surrounding human-kangaroo relations in Australia. For more information, please visit www.morethanhumanworlds.com.

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

Mar 14, 2022
Dayak Forest Farming
57:00
In this episode, we dive into the long and complex history of Dayak swidden agriculture. What is the history of this practice, what does it look like to manage annual agricultural practices over a short window in a space for perennials, how has it evolved, and what place does it have in the modern world?   Sources: Crevello, S. (2004). Dayak Land Use Systems and Indigenous Knowledge. Journal of Human Ecology, 16(1), 69–73. doi:10.1080/09709274.2004.1190571   Siahaya, M. E., Hutauruk, T. R., Aponno, H. S. E. S., Hatulesila, J. W., & Mardhanie, A. B. (2016). Traditional ecological knowledge on shifting cultivation and forest management in East Borneo, Indonesia. International Journal of Biodiversity Science, Ecosystem Services & Management, 12(1-2), 14–23. doi:10.1080/21513732.2016.1169559   Stacy Marie Crevello. Local land use on Borneo: applications of indigenous knowledge systems and natural resource utilization among the Benuaq Dayak of Kalimantan, Indonesia   https://digitalcommons.lsu.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=2301&context=gradschool_dissertations  

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

 
Mar 07, 2022
An American Dehesa with Dr. Lynn Huntsinger
56:08
In this episode, we dive into UC Berkeley's Dr. Huntsinger's work cross-pollinating knowledge between the Spanish Dehesa and the arid regions of California. Is grazing good or bad in these environments, and what role does the oak tree play in both of these unique ecologies?   For more of Dr. Huntsinger's work, visit the website for the Huntsinger Lab: https://nature.berkeley.edu/huntsingerlab-wp/  

 

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Feb 28, 2022
An Acorn for Every Pig; Spanish Dehesa Pastoralism
54:31
In this episode, we explore the dynamics of the Spanish Dehesa, its evolution, the role politics has played in its development, and some of the cooperative models that have developed around its production in small communities!   Sources: Mediterranean Oak Woodland Working Landscapes: Dehesas of Spain and Ranchlands of California, Lynn Huntsinger, et al   The Spanish dehesa. A traditional Mediterranean silvopastoral system linking production and nature conservation L. Olea  and A. San Miguel-Ayanz   Bioecological function as an added value of agrosilvopastoral ecosystems. Case study in a Spanish dehesa, Marco Criado et al, Tobias Plieninger, Lukas Flinzberger, et al   Dehesas as high nature value farming systems: a social-ecological synthesis of drivers, pressures, state, impacts, and responses, Maria Hetman et al   Iberian pigs and dehesa: an agroforestry system, Vicente Rodríguez-Estévez   The Mesolithic in the northwest of the Iberian Peninsula (Galicia, Spain): The state of art, Eduardo Ramil Rego, et al   Acorn production in Spanish holm oak woodlands, Guillermo Gea-Izquierdo   Ecosystem services supplied by Mediterranean Basin ecosystems, Berta Martín-López et al Oggioni, S. D., Ochoa-Hueso, R., & Peco, B. (2020). Livestock grazing abandonment reduces soil microbial activity and carbon storage in a Mediterranean Dehesa. Applied Soil Ecology, 153, 103588.  

 

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Feb 21, 2022
The New Earthbound Almanac!
16:55

In a shift away from our typical content, we have a quick, casual chat with our friends over at the Earthbound Almanac about the upcoming release!

 

Learn more about the Earthbound Almanac at:

https://www.instagram.com/lobeliacommons/?hl=en

Feb 17, 2022
Find Yourself with Lucy O’Hagan
43:52
In this episode, we talk with Lucy O'Hagan of Wild Awake about settler-colonialism, ancestral skills, and decolonization in Ireland. Our conversation threads together rewilding and rekindling relationships with places through traditional practices and rituals.     Check out Lucy's work at: www.WildAwake.ie IG: @WildAwakeIreland  

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

Feb 14, 2022
Foodways of Indigenous Ireland
57:26
In this episode, we dive into the complex history of Ireland's land management over the past 6,000 years, and the complex relationship between hunter gatherers and farming communities, paired with a massive climate shift and population decline. What can we learn from traditional land management techniques that are relevant to the world we live in today?   Sources:   "Climate change and hunter gatherers in Ireland: problems, potentials and pressing research questions", Graeme Warren   "Food Production, Processing and Foodways in Neolithic Ireland, Environmental Archaeology", Meriel McClatchie, Rick Schulting, Rowan McLaughlin, Sue Colledge, Amy Bogaard, Phil Barratt & Nicki Whitehouse (2019)   "Neolithic farming in north-western Europe: archaeobotanical evidence from Ireland", M. McClatchie a,*, A. Bogaard b , S. Colledge c , N.J. Whitehouse a , R.J. Schulting b , P. Barratt a , T.R. McLaughlin   "The potential role of humans in structuring the wooded landscapes of Mesolithic Ireland: a review of data and discussion of approaches" Graeme Warren, Steve Davis, Meriel McClatchie, Rob Sands   "The Vanishing World of The Islandman", Nic Craith, M. (2020).   "Tracing environmental, climatic and social change in Neolithic Ireland", Meriel McClatchie and Aaron Potito Source: Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy: Archaeology, Culture, History, Literature , 2020, Vol. 120C (2020)   "Cattle in ancient and modern Ireland: farming practices, environment and economy", Michael O'Connell, Fergus Kelly, James H. McAdam   "Fergus Kelly, Early Irish farming", McLeod, N. (1998).  

 

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Feb 07, 2022
Shaping an Eco-Agricultural Future with Dr. Bryan Dale
44:21

In this episode, we chat with Dr. Bryan Dale about agroecology & all aspects of it; how do we make a better future through envisioning what a better future should look like? We talk about the power of Utopia and inroads into right-wing communities through fair labor practices with La Via Campesina. How do we pair all of these complex ideas and projects into other important conversations around land back and food sovereignty?

 

Check out Dr. Bryan's work:

https://www.bryandale.ca/

The report "Visions of Food Systems to Come" https://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/projects/feedingcity/wp-content/uploads/sites/31/2021/04/Visions-of-the-Food-System-to-Come_Version-1.0.pdf

The Feeding the City Lab: https://www.utsc.utoronto.ca/projects/feedingcity/

 

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Jan 31, 2022
A Natural Earth with Farmer Rishi
41:23
We chat with Farmer Rishi of the Sarvodaya Institute about urban agriculture and its limitations. We also talk about the bigger picture about reconnecting with landscapes and what constitutes landscapes themselves-- how do we define nature, and why is that important?   Check out Farmer Rishi's work: https://sarvodayainstitute.org/ Instagram: @FarmerRishi  

 

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Jan 24, 2022
Finding Place with Peter Michael Bauer Part 2
42:09

In this episode, we talk with author and podcast host Peter Michael Bauer about rewilding, rebuilding our relationship with our local ecology, and our role as white people on colonized lands, especially when we want to rekindle these relationships with nature?

 

Check out the North American Rewilding Conference at http://www.rewilding.com/

 

Peter's book & classes are available at: 

https://www.rewildportland.com

 

Peter's social media on Instagram is @PeterMichaelBauer

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

Jan 17, 2022
Finding Place with Peter Michael Bauer Part 1
46:48

In this episode, we talk with author and podcast host Peter Michael Bauer about rewilding, rebuilding our relationship with our local ecology, and our role as white people on colonized lands, especially when we want to rekindle these relationships with nature?

 

Check out the North American Rewilding Conference at http://www.rewilding.com/

 

Peter's book & classes are available at: 

https://www.rewildportland.com

 

Peter's social media on Instagram is @PeterMichaelBauer

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

Jan 17, 2022
Local Natural Farming with Nigel Palmer
45:26

In this episode, we chat with farmer and author Nigel Palmer about KNF, JADAM, and sourcing local ingredients. How do we re-localize these practices that make sense, and what other tools are we not fully utilizing?

 

Nigel's book& classes are available at: 

https://www.nigel-palmer.com/

 

Nigel's social media on Instagram is @regenerativegrowersguide

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

 

Jan 09, 2022
Modern Natural Farming with Microbes by Marco
39:36
In this episode, we chat with Microbes by Marco (@Marco_is_growing)  about pairing KNF with JADAM, harvesting local minerals, and how to rethink what it means to create local food!    Check out Marco on IG at @Marco_is_growing and @VirgininiaGrown Also check out his work at: www.microbesbymarco.com    

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

Jan 06, 2022
JADAM
52:11

In this episode, we explore the JADAM, the concept of working with nature and all of the good and bad to develop healthy, holistic ecosystems using the materials on site at low cost.

 

 

Sources:

"JADAM Organic Farming: high yields by no-tillage, make all-natural pesticide, the way to Ultra-Low-Cost agriculture" Youngsang Cho

http://pubs.cahnrs.wsu.edu/publications/wp-content/uploads/sites/2/publications/fs195e.pdf

 

https://ati.da.gov.ph/ati-13/news/06182019-0622/jadam-technology-new-all-natural-method-organic-farming

 

https://ohioline.osu.edu/factsheet/anr-36

 

 

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Jan 03, 2022
Biotic Korean Natural Farming
58:11

In this episode, we dive into the biological components of Korean Natural Farming, discuss the reasons for the wide use of brown sugar, spend way too much time talking about lactobacillus acid, and discuss how complex systems science reinforces core concepts of Indigenous Micro Organisms (IMO).

 

Sources: Beck, Matthew Et Al "Lactobacillus fermented plant extracts provided to yearling ewes improves their lambs’ antioxidant status at weaning" September 2021 Animal Feed Science and Technology  Garg, Neelima"ENZYMATIC ANALYSIS OF LACTIC ACID FERMENTED ANIMAL FEED PREPARED FROM DIFFERENT FRUIT AND VEGETABLE WASTE" December 2018, Conference: INTERNATIONAL Lakstina, Jana Et Al "The Novel Solution for Acid Whey Permeate Application in Animal Feeding", December 2020, Rural Sustainability Research  Sarenkova, Inga "THE EFFECT OF CONCENTRATED WHEY SOLIDS ON LACTOBIONIC ACID PRODUCTION BY PSEUDOMONAS TAETROLENS", May 2019, DOI:10.22616/FoodBalt.2019.030 Sarenkova, Inga "The current status and future perspectives of lactobionic acid production : a review" December 2018 DOI:10.22616/rrd.24.2018.037, Conference: Research for Rural Development, 2018 Jan, Umair "Characterization of Soil Microorganism from Humus and Indigenous Microorganism Amendments" September 2020 Mycobiology 48(5) DOI: 10.1080/12298093.2020.1816154 Núria Daranas,Gemma Roselló,Jordi Cabrefiga,Irene Donati,Jesús Francés,Esther Badosa,Francesco Spinelli,Emilio Montesinos,Anna Bonaterra "Biological control of bacterial plant diseases with Lactobacillus plantarum strains selected for their broad-spectrum activity" 26 November 2018, https://doi.org/10.1111/aab.12476  

 

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Dec 27, 2021
Abiotic Korean Natural Farming
42:02

In this episode, we frame up a multi-episode conversation about Korean Natural Farming-- its history, its application, and most importantly the science behind the utility of using minerals on any site. How does making minerals bioavailable work, and why is it so necessary to do these things today, despite having farmed for thousands of years without them?

 

 

Sources: 

 

Krishnamoorthy, R., Alshatwi, A. A., Subbarayan, S., Vadivel, B., Periyasamy, V. S., Al-Shuniaber, M. A., & Athinarayanan, J. (2018). Impact of farm-made liquid organic nutrients jevamirtham and fish amino acid on growth and nutritional status in different season of Abelmoschus esculentus—a self-sustainable field trial. Organic Agriculture. doi:10.1007/s13165-018-0205-2 

 

https://pubs.usgs.gov/pp/1270/

 

Wang, Rui, Yangbing, Qi, Wu, Juan, Shukla, M.K. Influence of the application of irrigated water-soluble calcium fertilizer on wine grape properties

 

O. Nur Faezah, S.A. Nurul Najihah, J.J. Nakasha and M.Y. Suhaili Fish amino acid application to improve growth performance and yield of Chinese Kale (Brassica oleracea)

 

Johari, N. S., Asilah, A. M., Zalina, I., Fazhana, I., Ab-Latif, Z., Shaibatul’ Islamiah, C. M., Tang, J. R.  Effects Of Fish Amino Acid (Faa) Application on Growth and Development of Okra (Abelmoschus Esculentus) at Different Sampling Times  

Leinweber, Peter, Hagermann, Philip, Kebelmann, Lutz. Bone Char As a Novel Phosphorus Fertilizer

 

Waheed, Marium, Sadiq Butt, Masood Eggshell Calcium: A Cheap Alternative to Expensive Supplements

 

http://organic.da.gov.ph/images/IECs/FAA2.pdf

 

 

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Dec 20, 2021
A Forgotten Fodder with Shana Hanson Part 2
35:09

In this episode, we chat with 3 Streams Farm's Shana Hanson about the diversity of uses of harvesting leaves and needles to feed livestock. What's the history of these practices and why is it so hard to learn about it? 

 

Check out Shana's work at 3 Streams Farm:

https://3streamsfarmbelfastme.blogspot.com/p/tree-fodder-info.html

If you'd like to support Shana's research, reach out at shanahanson@gmail.com

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

 

 

Dec 13, 2021
A Forgotten Fodder with Shana Hanson part 1
37:37

In this episode, we chat with 3 Streams Farm's Shana Hanson about the diversity of uses of harvesting leaves and needles to feed livestock. What's the history of these practices and why is it so hard to learn about it? 

 

Check out Shana's work at 3 Streams Farm:

https://3streamsfarmbelfastme.blogspot.com/p/tree-fodder-info.html

If you'd like to support Shana's research, reach out at shanahanson@gmail.com

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

 

 

 

Dec 13, 2021
Tree Fodder
55:40

In this episode, we build off of the previous episodes on pollarding, coppicing, and silvopasture to discuss the utilization of leaves and needles as feed. What's the history of this practice, how does it integrate into a silvopasture system, and how does it relate with coppicing and pollarding?

 

Sources:

"Fodder Tree Leaves", Uzman Bashir CheemaJaved Iqbal Sultan 

"Silvopasture: A Guide to Managing Grazing Animals, Forage Crops, and Trees in a Temperate Farm Ecosystem", Steve Gabriel

https://www.stipulae.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Fodder-Trees.pdf

https://littleavalonfarm.com/making-tree-hay-for-winter-feed/

https://www.ancienttreeforum.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/A-study-of-practical-pollarding-techniques-in-northern.pdf

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCeabXelBI4X61nNYlxvCvIg

 

 

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Dec 06, 2021
A Living History; Coppicing with Mark Krawczyk Part 2
39:02
Part 2: We chat with mark Krawczyk, the author of the forthcoming book "Coppice Agroforestry: Tending Trees for Product, Profit, and Woodland Ecology", which I've been waiting for the past half decade, but is slated for early 2022.  We discuss the role of coppicing in the modern world, tending to landscapes within the scope of what their capacity is, and much more! Check out Mark's work at: http://www.coppiceagroforestry.com/ https://www.keylinevermont.com/ http://www.rivenwoodcrafts.com/

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

Nov 29, 2021
A Living History; Coppicing with Mark Krawczyk Part 1
41:24
We chat with mark Krawczyk, the author of the forthcoming book "Coppice Agroforestry: Tending Trees for Product, Profit, and Woodland Ecology", which I've been waiting for the past half decade, but is slated for early 2022.  We discuss the role of coppicing in the modern world, tending to landscapes within the scope of what their capacity is, and much more! Check out Mark's work at: http://www.coppiceagroforestry.com/ https://www.keylinevermont.com/ http://www.rivenwoodcrafts.com/

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

Nov 29, 2021
Nip it in the Bud: Coppicing & Pollarding
49:48

In this episode, we chat extensively about the history of coppicing, the benefits of coppicing, and the application of coppicing-- as well as pollarding!

Sources:

Brett McLeod, "The Woodland Homestead: How to Make Your Land More Productive and Live More Self-Sufficiently in the Woods" William Bryant Logan, "Sprout Lands: Tending the Endless Gift of Trees" Rebecca Oaks, "Coppicing & Coppice Crafts: A Comprehensive Guide" Raymond Tabor, "A Guide to Coppicing"

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

Nov 24, 2021
Letting the Forest Speak with Steve Gabriel
42:28
In this episode, we chat with farmer, author & educator Steve Gabriel, who manages Wellspring Forest Farm. Our conversation starts around the practice of relearning forest farming & silvopasture and digs into really complex discussion of managing stolen lands, and our role as white people in stewarding landscapes and doing more than just land acknowledgements. How do we look to the past as a guide for the future without appropriation and within the context of climate change?   http://www.wellspringforestfarm.com/  

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

 

Nov 22, 2021
Putting Livestock in the Forest
01:01:53

This episode brings together the concepts of silvopasture with multispecies grazing and we can examine how stacking all of the various facets of tree fodder, grazing multiple species, fruit & nut drops, and other biomass harvesting options create a complex system which reinforces its resilience in the face of climate change.

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

 

Sources:

Steve Gabriel "Silvopasture"

Brett McCleod "The Woodland Homestead: How to Make Your Land More Productive and Live More Self-Sufficiently in the Woods"

J. Russell Smith "Tree Crops: A Permanent Agriculture"

 

Nov 15, 2021
Decolonizing Grazing with Joshua Muñoz-Jiménez of Resylien
49:59

In this episode, we chat with Joshua about multispecies grazing, mob grazing, and what it means to decolonize grazing and regenerative agriculture both in theory and in practice. Further, we chat about indigenous farming practices both here in North America and in the global south, and how regenerative agriculture comes with different baggage in each region.

 

Check out Resylien at: https://www.resylien.com/

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

 

 

Nov 08, 2021
Multispecies Grazing
49:57

In this episode, we talk about the framework of grazing, and why certain environments demand more aggressive grazing patterns, specifically around brittle ecological regions, and the role of having different types of grazers in managing these environments.

 

Sources:  Mark Shepard, 'Restoration Agriculture'

Allan Savory, 'Holistic Management'

Sarah Flack, 'The Art & Science of Grazing'

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

 

 

Oct 31, 2021
Putting Pasture in the Forest with Brett Chedzoy pt 2
42:52

In this episode, we talk about putting silvopasture into practice within an already existing forest setting. Brett Chedzoy of Angus Glen Farms chats with us about his experiences bringing pasture into the forest and the work he does with Cornell's agricultural extension school around the field of silvopasture.

 

You can check out Brett's farm at http://www.angusglenfarm.com/ and the silvopasture network at http://silvopasture.ning.com/

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

 

 

Oct 30, 2021
Putting Pasture in the Forest with Brett Chedzoy Pt. 1
42:18

In this episode, we talk about putting silvopasture into practice within an already existing forest setting. Brett Chedzoy of Angus Glen Farms chats with us about his experiences bringing pasture into the forest and the work he does with Cornell's agricultural extension school around the field of silvopasture.

 

You can check out Brett's farm at http://www.angusglenfarm.com/ and the silvopasture network at http://silvopasture.ning.com/

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

 

 

Oct 28, 2021
Silvopasture Part 1
57:32

We're back into the agricultural content! In this episode, we start framing up a dialogue on what is silvopasture, how do we understand layering our trees in this environment in relation to livestock, and how does local ecology set the boundaries of what these systems should look like?

 

Sources:

Steve Gabriel, "Silvopasture"

Mark Shepard "Restoration Agriculture"

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

Oct 25, 2021
Failing Communities with Quaker Preacher Scot Miller
01:01:19

We chat with R. Scot Miller, author of "Gospel of the Absurd", a theological primer concerned with messianic and feminist care-ethics, about outreach and the overlaps of Quakerism and Anarchy. Why does modern religion fail our communities, and how can it be used as a tool to empower community in the future?

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

Oct 18, 2021
Rewilding Scotland with Cathy Mayne
43:52

In this episode, we chat with Cathy Mayne, ecologist at Mountain Environment Services, about the current state of the Scottish Highlands, and the triangulated relationship between ecology in the context of time, humans, and climate change.  What do we do with ecological biomes where we can't go back to the past because of climactic change?

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

 

 

Oct 11, 2021
Forest Adaption with Dr. Inés Ibáñez
33:52

We chat with the University of Michigan's Dr. Inés Ibáñez about forest ecology and our role in sustaining these ecosystems during climate change. We chat about invasives, what it looks like to view the forests of the future, and the role everyday people have in protecting these spaces.

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

 

Oct 04, 2021
Native Plant Migration Patterns with Dr. Robert Warren
43:28

What do ants, the Cherokee, and Honey Locusts have in common? We chat with Dr. Robert Warren of the Warren lab of SUNY Buffalo about climate change & human-managed landscapes.

 

To see his research, check out: http://scholar.buffalostate.edu/warrenrj/

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

 

Sep 27, 2021
Resuscitating Ancient Woodlands with Peter Etheridge
51:00

We chat with ecologist Peter Etheridge about saving ancient forests, the role of humans in landscapes, and finding common ground with non-leftists in ecological spaces.

 

Check out Pete's work at http://greenwood-ecology.co.uk/

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

Sep 22, 2021
Rewilding with ecologist Mark Wardle
01:02:03

We chat with Mark Wardle about rewilding projects going on across the UK, lessons from 3 decades working in ecology restoration, ancient farming practices and the loss of ancestral knowledge. What is the role of these traditional practices in the future?

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

 

Sep 19, 2021
Anarchy is Ecology with Peter Gelderloos
56:15

The relationship between ecology and anarchy is often considered a specific niche of anarchist thought. In this conversation, we talk about the need for anarchy to be centered on ecology and agro-ecology. How do we build resilient networks under capitalism that are centered around foodways and supporting our ecology?

 

Peter Gelderloos is an anarchist, author, and activist. His untitled book will be released this fall, and you can follow him on twitter at https://twitter.com/petergelderloos

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

Sep 13, 2021
Tom Wessels- Looking to the Past for Our Future
44:46

We talk with ecologist and author Tom Wessels about complex systems science, climate change, and hope for the future. What does it look like if we mimic nature in our economy?

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

Sep 05, 2021
Public Mourning & Loss in Climate Change
01:06:51

We chat with Patrick Farnsworth from the podcast Last Born in the Wilderness about climate change, fascism, and grief.

 

Check out Patrick's work at https://www.lastborninthewilderness.com/ 

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

Aug 30, 2021
Armed Proles with Armed Margins
56:51

We talk to Mitch from Armed Margins & the Red Dot District Podcast about their work to help marginalized communities learn to defend themselves, organize, and ultimately work towards self-determination. What does this look like in practice, and how can you get involved?

 

To learn more, check out Armed Margins at https://www.armedmargins.com/

Check out the Red Dot District Podcast wherever you get your podcasts!

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

Aug 23, 2021
Collapse in Real Time with Margaret Killjoy
01:12:14

We chat with Margaret Killjoy, author, podcaster, prepper, and activist about the leftist prepper space and talking about how our preps evolve based on material conditions. 

 

Check out her work at: https://linktr.ee/margaretkilljoy

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

Aug 16, 2021
The Right to Make it Work; John Deere Hacking
44:09

We chat with Morgan Swanson of the John Deere Cal Poly Tractor Hacking Project about the role of hackers in moving innovation forward, the future of computer-laden infrastructure, and the future of farming.

 

Check out Morgan's work at:

https://tractorhacking.github.io/

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

Aug 09, 2021
Open-Source Biohacking w/4 Thieves Vinegar Collective
01:02:55

We chat with Michael from 4 Thieves Vinegar Collective about medicine and self-determination, autonomous zones, hacking in some very loose understandings of the word, and the role of open-source projects in an interconnected world.

 

Check out 4 Thieves Vinegar Collective:

https://fourthievesvinegar.org/

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

Aug 02, 2021
The New Guilded Age W/The Brooklyn Lace Guild
55:30

We chat with Elena Kanagy-Loux & Kara Quinteros of the Brooklyn Lace Guild to discuss the return of artisan crafts, the terminology and culture surrounding those crafts, and their place in an industrialized world.

 

Learn more about the Brooklyn Lace Guild:

https://www.brooklynlaceguild.com/

https://www.instagram.com/brooklynlaceguild/

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

 

Jul 25, 2021
The Return of Craft with Alex Langlands
01:01:54

In this episode, we chat with Alex Langlands, former star of the BBC Historic Farms Series', including Wartime Farms, Victorian Farms, Medieval Farms, Edwardian Farms, and Tales from the Green Valley. Alex is also the author of Craeft; An Inquiry Into the Origins and True Meaning of Traditional Crafts.

 

We talk about the role of Crafts as a method to reintegrate humanity into nature and to build better relationships with our ecology.

 

To check out his work, visit his Youtube Channel Shedcrafter:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zZ4HLEEoVLs&feature=youtu.be

His book is also available wherever you get your books.

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

Jul 19, 2021
Reclaiming Public Research
42:36

In this episode, we chat with Ramesh, an administrator from the Facebook group 'Ask for PDFs from People with Institutional Access' and we discuss self-organization, the academic research model, and 21st century colonialism.

 

Check out the group at: https://www.facebook.com/groups/850609558335839

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

 

Jul 12, 2021
Saving Alexandria with Project Gutenberg's Dr. Greg Newby
01:05:46

In this episode, we chat with Executive Director of Project Gutenberg, Dr. Greg Newby. We talk about the role of open access to knowledge and how copyright has played into a complicated mess that inhibits artistic development.

To learn more, check out Project Gutenberg at https://www.gutenberg.org/

The Distributed Proofreaders volunteer page can be found at https://www.pgdp.net/c/

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

 

Jul 04, 2021
The Apothecary's Garden, Revisiting Medicinal Plants
01:07:57

We chat with Dr. Greg Susla of the Pry Civil War Garden at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine about the role of plants in medicine, as well as the history of plant-based medicine, and the challenges that come from it.

 

The National Museum of Civil War Medicine's Pry Garden website can be found at https://www.civilwarmed.org/pry-garden/

 

To see Greg's work, check out https://www.civilwarmed.org/pry-garden/

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

 

Jun 27, 2021
Eating Colonizers w/Jackson Landers
01:03:56

In this episode we talk about invasive species and their relationship with climate change, globalism, and ecology. We also talk about our favorite edible invasives.

 

For more of Jackson's work, check out his two books "Eating Aliens" and "The Beginners Guide to Hunting Deer for Food"

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

 

Jun 21, 2021
Complex Food Systems with Dr. Dan Rubenstein
01:04:37

We chat with Princeton's Dr. Dan Rubenstein and we talk about the science behind holistic grazing and the role of horizontal, cooperative-models can provide a resilient framework for food systems as climate change further tests our global food systems.

 

You can support this project at patreon.com/poorprolesalmanac or visit us at poorproles.com

 

 

Jun 13, 2021
Collaborative Plant Breeding w/The Experimental Farm Network
58:28

We chat with Nathan Kleinman of the Experimental Farm Network and talk about what food sovereignty means, making plant breeding accessible, and relearning the lost art of localizing our food systems.

 

For more information, visit:

https://www.experimentalfarmnetwork.org/

Jun 07, 2021
Building Community with scott crow
01:08:59

In this episode, we chat with author, activist, organizer, speaker, and producer scott crow about building dual power and developing a sense of community. We discuss the challenges of the activist community, creating spaces, and the role of politics in prepping.

 

Check out his work:

https://www.scottcrow.org/

https://www.emergencyhearts.com/

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patreon at https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

 

May 28, 2021
The Conversazione
12:13

This is the intro to our new interview series, where we tie all of the components of the series together and some of our thoughts about the series after wrapping it up!

May 27, 2021
Returning to Permaculture; Re-Centering Indigenous Ecology & Foodways
23:31

In the final episode of the series, we reflect on how indigenous agriculture reflects and doesn't reflect the framework of permaculture. How have we seen in previous episodes examples of new foodways that can show us a path forward from where we currently exist?

May 12, 2021
Manoomin is Life; The Anishanaabe, Foodways, & Decolonization
38:38

We spend some time talking about what colonization looked like for the Anishanaabe, how colonization destroys foodways, and what decolonization looks like as a model for others to move forward.

 

Sources:

Stories that Nourish: Minnesota, Anishinaabe Wild Rice Narratives Amelia V. Katanski

https://sci-hub.se/10.17953/aicrj.41.3.katanski

  Our Knowledge Is Not Primitive: Decolonizing Botanical Anishinaabe Teachings

Wendy Makoons Geniusz, Annmarie Geniusz

 

 

“Both the Honor and the Profit”: Anishinaabe Warriors, Soldiers, and Veterans from Pontiac’s War through the Civil War

Michelle K. Cassidy

May 03, 2021
Arid Agriculture & the Communalism of the Turkana
49:53

In this episode, we explore the evolution of the indigenous people of Lake Turkana. We look at how their subsistence farming evolved with a rapidly shifting climate and how both the ecology benefits from human involvement & how a unique collectivist and individualist community format allows for the community to quickly change practices to meet the unpredictable landscape. We wrap it up talking about the damages of colonialism on these resilient communities.

 

Sources:

Usufruct Rights to Trees: The Role of Ekwar in Dryland Central Turkana, Kenya Edmund G. C. Barrow

https://sci-hub.se/https://www.jstor.org/stable/4602963?seq=1

 

Impacts of shifting agriculture on a floodplain woodland regeneration in dryland, Kenya

G. Oba, N.C. Stenseth, & R.B. Weladji

sci-hub.se/10.1016/S0167-8809(01)00355-3

Land Use, Ecology, and Socio-economic Changes in a Pastoral Production System

M. Okoti, J.C. Ng'ethe, W.N. Ekaya, & D. M. Mbuvi

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09709274.2004.11905720

 

Holocene occupation of the Mount Porr strand plain in southern Lake Turkana, Kenya

David Wright, S.L. Forman

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/David_Wright/publication/281536573_Holocene_occupation_of_the_Mount_Porr_strand_plain_in_southern_Lake_Turkana_Kenya/links/55f7f62a08aeafc8ac080dfe.pdf

 

Indigenous management systems as a basis for community forestry in Tanzania 

George C. Kajembe

https://library.wur.nl/WebQuery/wurpubs/fulltext/117147

 

The value of traditional knowledge in present-day soil conservation practice: the example of West Pokot and Turkana

Edmund Geoffrey Barrow

file:///C:/Users/Andy/Downloads/SoilConPokot-Turkana1986-208.pdf

 

Ethnobotany of the Turkana: Use of Plants by a Pastoral People and Their Livestock in Kenya

W. T. W. Morgan

https://www.jstor.org/stable/4254252?seq=1

 

Apr 21, 2021
(R)Evolutionary Agroforestry in the Western Ghats
41:59

We chat about the ecological and agricultural history of the Southern tip of India and how the indigenous farming practices have evolved over 4,000 years to meet the changing climate!

 

 

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/225745850_Agroforestry_in_the_Western_Ghats_of_peninsular_India_and_the_satoyama_landscapes_of_Japan_A_comparison_of_two_sustainable_land_use_systems

Agroforestry in the Western Ghats of peninsular India and the satoyama landscapes of Japan: A comparison of two sustainable land use systems, B. Mohan Kumar

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/225976587_Growth_and_ecological_impacts_of_traditional_agroforestry_tree_species_in_Central_Himalaya_India

Growth and ecological impacts of traditional agroforestry tree species in Central Himalaya, India, Rakesh K Maikhuri

http://tropecol.com/pdf/open/PDF_44_1/44107.pdf

 

The tree behind the forest: ecological and economic importance of traditional agroforestry systems and multiple uses of trees in India DENIS DEPOMMIER

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1023/A:1006486912126

Acacia nilotica trees in rice fields: A traditional agroforestry system in central India

http://isasat.org/Vol-ii,issue-i/AARJ_2_1_3_Viswanath.pdf

Synergistic impacts of anthropogenic fires and aridity on plant diversity in the Western Ghats: Implications for management of ancient social-ecological systems, Charuta Kulkarni  

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/345993867_Synergistic_impacts_of_anthropogenic_fires_and_aridity_on_plant_diversity_in_the_Western_Ghats_Implications_for_management_of_ancient_social-ecological_systems

Apr 06, 2021
The Satoyama Landscape- A History of Rebirth in Japan
01:00:47

In this episode we discuss the complex history and indigenous farming practices in Japan. We also spend some time chatting about Japan's solutions to its collapsing ecology, and their shortfalls.

 

 

Sources:

Satoyama: The Traditional Rural Landscape of Japan, A. Tsunekawa, I. Washitani, K. Takeuchi, M. Yokohari, R.D. Brown Create Citation   Deconstructing satoyama – The socio-ecological landscape in Japan,  Mochamad Indrawan

 

Satoyama, Traditional Farming Landscape in Japan, Compared to Scandinavia, Björn E. Berglund   Agroforestry in the Western Ghats of peninsular India and the satoyama landscapes of Japan: a comparison of two sustainable land use systems, B. Mohan Kumar & K. Takeuchi 

 

The biocultural link: isolated trees and hedges in Satoyama landscapes indicate a strong connection between biodiversity and local cultural features, Katsue Fukamachi

 

Rebuilding the relationship between people and nature: the Satoyama Initiative, Kazuhiko Takeuchi
Mar 16, 2021
Norwegian Farm Collectives & the Art of Coppice
01:16:26

In this episode, we're chatting about a forgotten history of Norwegian indigenous farming practices and their abundant relationship with an unforgiving environment.

 

Works Cited:

A study of practical pollarding techniques in northern Europe- Helen Read

https://www.ancienttreeforum.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/05/A-study-of-practical-pollarding-techniques-in-northern.pdf

 

The old Norwegian peasant community: Investigations undertaken by the institute for comparative research in human culture, Oslo- Andreas Holmsen 

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/03585522.1956.10411481

 

Human-influenced vegetation types and landscape elements in the cultural landscapes of inner Sogn, western Norway- I. AustadL. HaugeT. HelleA. SkogenA. Timberlid

https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/Human-influenced-vegetation-types-and-landscape-in-Austad-Hauge/cf6b9a4a32544fd6f4de8c84785217e937d1c83c

 

 

Traditional land use of the boreal forest landscape: Examples from Lierne, Nord-Trøndelag, Norway-

1 Altmetric Land use and biodiversity Traditional land use of the boreal forest landscape: Examples from Lierne, Nord-Trøndelag, Norway Bolette Bele https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00291951.2012.760002     Regeneration of Ostrya carpinifolia scop. forest after coppicing: Modelling of changes in species diversity and composition- Andrea Catorci https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Andrea-Catorci/publication/287750973_Regeneration_of_Ostrya_carpinifolia_scop_forest_after_coppicing_Modelling_of_changes_in_species_diversity_and_composition/links/572a50e008ae057b0a078f36/Regeneration-of-Ostrya-carpinifolia-scop-forest-after-coppicing-Modelling-of-changes-in-species-diversity-and-composition.pdf  

 

Towards a refined understanding of the use of coastal zones in the Mesolithic: New investigations on human–environment interactions in Telemark, southeastern Norway- teinar Solheim

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/322222762_Towards_a_refined_understanding_of_the_use_of_coastal_zones_in_the_Mesolithic_New_investigations_on_human-environment_interactions_in_Telemark_southeastern_Norway

 

Remodelling the neolithic in Southern Norway: Another attack on a traditional problem- Lisa G. Bostwick Bjerck

https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/00293652.1988.9965464

 

 

Mar 08, 2021
Malik Yakini & Community-Led Urban Farming in Detroit
01:12:33

In this episode, we review a quick history of urban farming in Detroit and interview Malik Yakini, the Executive Director of the Detroit Black Community Food Security Network & D-Town Farms. We chat about the role of dual power systems to challenge capitalism and the role of self-determination in making meaningful change in communities. Interview starts around 22 minutes!

Feb 25, 2021
Havana: Models of Decentralized Urban Farming & Resiliency
01:04:10

In this episode, we're looking out how Cuba utilized both its massive state power and the creativity and bold thinking of its citizens to create decentralized urban farms after the collapse of the Soviet bloc. What can we learn about decentralized food systems and how can it be applied here in the case of collapse?

 

 

Sources:

https://www.cubaagriculture.com/agriculture-today.htm

https://d1wqtxts1xzle7.cloudfront.net/36257629/the_urban_agriculture_of_havana.pdf?1421186242=&response-content-disposition=inline%3B+filename%3DThe_Urban_Agriculture_of_Havana.pdf&Expires=1610388059&Signature=cfYv5vuo9B~0~xnc7S3381ZDKFHpoWave4qc9ycca5RExKTGZlRWW3-a6nNMQ9zF13acafRgdB2zDujqeLHT3DcY49Y8rMGxYu0g5iwB4mwrslvZn1bqOUv76TAhthNd7AeHJXh7twSqjoApwssBwmGq6xHklRmb8qwXmmOG~4uveDPLRRVslHCNboCSHE6XSFVmjXHYbblQCUXRAYmhBMZ25WZ9w~K2Sw0JLIb1fvE-nDfe~E69MqXHU80FMZYqkYTugcl-hdZspTDwjU5mLj-flQf6ngPJ4qSRLB0ysSvSNcFlF3VmWQOe40s6VshmNhfTV7F9NVp7eAQl~Nnbcg__&Key-Pair-Id=APKAJLOHF5GGSLRBV4ZA

 

https://sagemagazine.org/urban-farm-fed-cities-lessons-from-cubas-organoponicos/

 

http://www.danangtimes.vn/Portals/0/Docs/310103714-urban_agriculture.pdf

https://www.geotab.com/press-release/greenest-cities-in-america/#:~:text=According%20to%20the%20results%20of,by%20Portland%20(856URBAN AGRICULTURE IN THE CITY OF HAVANA: A POPULAR RESPONSE TO A CRISIS%20ft2).

 

https://www.geotab.com/press-release/greenest-cities-in-america/#:~:text=According%20to%20the%20results%20of,by%20Portland%20(856%20ft2).

https://wits.worldbank.org/CountryProfile/en/Country/WLD/Year/LTST/TradeFlow/Import/Partner/by-country/Product/16-24_FoodProd#:~:text=In%202018%2C%20the%20top%20countries,%2C%20France%2C%20Netherlands%20and%20Italy

 

https://web.archive.org/web/20061010120813/http://www.communitysolution.org/cubareviews.html

Feb 15, 2021
What's Wrong with Permaculture, Anyway? The Prole Models Miniseries
01:15:32

The first episode of our new miniseries entitled "The Prole Models", we decide to get into the tough content of the complex history of permaculture, the problems with its history, the evolution of permaculture in modern agriculture, and how it can frame up some of the questions regarding land back, indigenous culture, and the role of white people in this potential solution to the problem of climate change.

 

Sources:

https://www.kcet.org/shows/tending-nature/the-indigenous-science-of-permaculture 

https://www.treehugger.com/permaculture-doesnt-work-says-plant-biologist-4856091

https://www.lillklobbpermaculture.com/2018/06/30/a-response-to-curtis-stones-what-permaculture-got-wrong%E2%80%8A-%E2%80%8Adispelling-five-common-myths/

https://medium.com/@urbanfarmercstone/what-permaculture-got-wrong-dispelling-five-common-myths-e904d570db70

https://medium.com/permaculturewomen/permaculture-on-the-edge-d69cad1b6ce0

https://www.resilience.org/stories/2016-02-19/decolonizing-permaculture/

Feb 05, 2021
Designing Food Systems with Scales of Permanence
54:13

We're bringing everything we've covered in the agriculture content together and using PA Yeomans Scale of Permanence to design a site for agro-ecological abundance!

 

Sources:

Yeomans, P.A. (1954). The Keyline Plan

Jan 26, 2021
The ReImagining Miniseries: The Troubles- Ireland, Civil War & Identity with Nash Flynn
01:37:32

We're taking a look at the Irish civil war and the conditions that led up to it and its conclusion with comedian and historian, Nash Flynn. What parallels do we see playing out here in the United States, and what can we learn from the efforts of the IRA?

 

Note: Michael Collins died in a shootout stemming from a car ambush, not a car bomb.

 

Sources: 

Tim Pat Coogan, The Troubles: Irelands Ordeal and the Search for Peace

Kevin Toolis, Rebel Hearts: Journeys Within the IRA's Soul

Charles Rivers Editors compilation, The Partition of Ireland and the Troubles: The History of Northern Ireland from the Irish Civil War to the Good Friday Agreement

Jan 18, 2021
Our First History- Reading the Landscape
49:04

As farmers and stewards of the land, we must center our understanding of growing food based on the ecology around us. In this episode, we're discussing the ways you can use some basic understanding of ecology to understand both the history of the landscape in terms of activities such as previous farming as well as the site's unique characteristics as told by indicator species. 

 

Sources:

Tom Wessels "Reading the Forested Landscape"

May Watts "Reading the Landscape of America"

Jan 06, 2021
The ReImagining Miniseries: Syria, Neoliberalism, & Balkanization
01:31:56
Dec 21, 2020
The ReImagining Miniseries: Make Rojava Regenerative Again
01:16:42

Having discussed Bookchin's vision last episode, this episode we're diving into The Internationalist Commune of Rojava's book "Make Rojava Green Again" to see how Bookchin's work plays out in reality. We focus specifically in the area of technology, agriculture, and ecology, drawing from complex systems theory and envision what the future looks like for this autonomous zone.

 

Sources: "Make Rojava Green Again", The Internationalist Commune of Rojava

https://makerojavagreenagain.org/2019/10/11/ecology-in-times-of-war/

 

Remastered 7/12/21

 

Dec 14, 2020
The ReImagining Miniseries: Bookchin, Technology, and Ecology
01:04:41

We're discussing "Towards a Liberatory Technology" and "Ecology and Revolutionary Thought" and how they reinforce the key functions of complex systems theory as a framework for a post-collapse society. What are some of the key takeaways about building a new world from the shell of the old?

 

Sources: Murray Bookchin, "Post-Scarcity Anarchism"

 

Remastered 7/12/21

Dec 07, 2020
Keyline Systems
56:10

Arguably the most complicated and challenging subject in modern permaculture projects, water management through Yeomans keyline design theory is the subject of this episode. We try to break down this complex, dense subject in an accessible way to provide a framework you can use on your plot of land.

 

Sources:

Yeomans, PA 1993, Water for Every Farm: Yeomans Keyline Plan

"What we learned from the Dust Bowl: Lessons in Science, Policy, and Adaptation" https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4015056/

 

Nov 30, 2020
The ReImagining Miniseries: Zapatistas; Indigenous Community Building & Anarchy
01:09:46

One of the most widely recognized movements for stateless government, the Zapatistas have a complex story to tell. We focus on why the EZLN has thrived over 25 years, looking at the symbiotic relationship between community history and anarchist theory embedded within a comprehensive direct-democracy, both politically & economically. What can we learn from how they organized that we can bring home to create autonomous zones?

 

Sources:

Klein, Hilary "Companeras"

Hayden, Tom "The Zapatistas Reader"

http://upsidedownworld.org/archives/mexico/political-economy-from-the-perspective-of-the-zapatista-communities/

https://web.archive.org/web/20171019083103/http://www.mexicosolidarity.org/programs/alternativeeconomy/zapatismo/en

https://www.sevenstories.com/books/3034-companeras

 

Remastered 7/12/21

Nov 15, 2020
Swale Systems
50:25

In this episode, we're talking about the role of swale systems, their pros and cons, as well as some understanding of how to size swales based on your property.

 

Sources: 

Ben Falk, "The Resilient Farm and Homestead: An Innovative Permaculture and Whole Systems Design Approach"

Oregon State University online ECampus 

Colorado Stormwater Center

 

Support this project by visiting poorproles.com and checking out our Patreon link.

 

Remastered 9/19/21

Nov 09, 2020
Election Predictions from August 2020
38:58

This bonus content we did for our Patreons regarding the election. Despite massive changes in the dynamics in the election, I'd say it's still within a margin of error of what we predicted. We'll see how it plays out over the next few months, but we figured we'd give you fantastic folx the opportunity to hear our take.

Nov 03, 2020
Amazing Graze Part 3: Goodness Graze-ious
57:45

Part three of the Grazing Miniseries. We're talking about fencing systems, how to calculate AUs to size out paddocks based on rotation frequency, and assessing dry matter.

 

To support this project, please visit poorproles.com and click on the Patreon link.

 

Remastered 9/19/21

Nov 02, 2020
Amazing Graze Part 2: Re-Cow-nting Tradition
39:27

Part 2 of our discussion of Amazing Graze talking about grazing systems, pasture management, and developing paddocks for future grazing sites.  We chat about how an understanding of both soil biology and forest development can impact our process in developing future pastures and in pasture management.

 

Support this project at poorproles.com and visit the Patreon link.

Remastered 9/19/21

Oct 20, 2020
Amazing Graze
53:04

The first of a 3-part series on grazing systems. This episode is focused on building pasture with a dive on foraging plants for your grazers as well as soil restoration.

 

Sources: https://extension.umaine.edu/publications/2279e/

Dale Strickler's "Managing Pasture: A Complete Guide to Building Healthy Pasture for Grass-Based Meat & Dairy Animals"

 

 

To support this project, please visit us at poorproles.com or patreon.com/poorprolesalmanac

 

Remastered 9/19/21

Oct 11, 2020
The ReImagining Miniseries: What is Work & The Bread Book
01:20:40

In this episode we take a look at Peter Kropotkin's "The Conquest of Bread" to define what is work and what does work look like in a post-collapse society?

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

 

Remastered 7/11/21

Sep 29, 2020
The Hands-On Miniseries: Practical Prepping for Practical People
48:54

This miniseries is focused on building practical, hands-on skills through basic knowledge sharing for prepping and other homesteading type skills to build sustainable communities through hands-on skills. This episode focuses on the basic functions and facets of prepping, from food storage to mental health.

 

You can support this project by visiting us at Patreon.com/poorprolesalmanac

Sep 20, 2020
The ReImagining Miniseries: Community Self-Defense
47:19

In this episode we review the collection of essays collected by scott crow titled "Setting Sights: Histories and Reflections on Community Armed Self-Defense" released by PM Press, and we discuss the framework and historical conditions which led to successful armed self-defense of marginalized communities in disaster.

Purchase the book here: https://www.pmpress.org/index.php?l=product_detail&p=886 and you can follow scott crow on Twitter at @scott_crow

 

You can also support this project at patreon.com/poorprolesalmanac

 

Episode remastered 7/11/21

Sep 14, 2020
Fruit Tree Guilds, Permaculture, and Science-based Ag
49:18

In this episode, we discuss the concept of fruit tree guilds, orchard floor management, and the details that go into deciding which plants to use underneath your fruit trees. Further, we critique both permaculture methodologies for companion planting and guilds, as well as the science, or lackthereof behind them.

 

Sources:

"Lignin Controls on Soil Ecosystem Services: Implications for Biotechnological Advances in Biofuel Crops" Shamim Gul, Sandra F. Yanna, & Joann K. Whalen

https://www.novapublishers.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/978-1-63117-452-0_ch14.pdf

"Companion planting with French marigolds protects tomato plants from glasshouse whiteflies through the emission of airborne limonene" Marta Ferreira Maia and Sarah J Moore

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3059459/

 

 

You can support this project at patreon.com/poorprolesalmanac or visit us at poorproles.com

 

ReMastered 9/19/21

Sep 03, 2020
Fruit Tree Management
43:39

Everyone's first thought about prepping is food, and their next thought is about long-term food sustainability. Fruit trees are great for that, so let's talk about what it means to manage an orchard.

 

Source(s):

Growing Fruit Trees: Novel Concepts and Practices for Successful Care and Management;  Jean-Marie Lespinasse   Cornell University Extension School  

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

 

ReMastered 9/18/21

Aug 23, 2020
The ReImagining Miniseries: The Urban Space
01:14:33

This episode we welcome Elliott to the podcast and we discuss Catherine Tumber's "Small, Gritty, and Green: The Promise of America's Smaller Industrial Cities in a Low-Carbon World"

 

You can support this project at patreon.com/poorprolesalmanac

 

Remastered on 7/11/21

Aug 19, 2020
Biomes and a Philosophical Dialogue on Nature
31:40

We're talking about what is a biome and how does it impact our ability to hunt, forage, and garden?

 

 

Remastered 9/18/21

 

Support this project at poorproles.com

Jul 24, 2020
Forest Ecology & Sustainability
38:25

What is Forest ecology, and how does the forest relate to sustainable practices? How can we use what nature has provided around us to create dynamic systems to support healthy human life? Let's chat about it.

 

Sources: 

 

Penn State's Extension program-- Forest & Wildlife Management

Tom Wessels-- "Reading the Forested Landscape"

 

Support us on patreon!

https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

 

Rerecorded 8/13/21

Jun 23, 2020
Some Thoughts on Homesteading and Prepping
12:01

A mini-episode where we discuss what our goals are with the series and a bit about our personal perspectives on how science, homesteading, prepping, and community building interconnect.

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

 

Re-recorded 8/6/21

May 27, 2020
Grains of Dirt, Ambivalent Nematodes
39:21

Part 2 in a deep dive on soil health through no-till systems, cover cropping, the loss of the manure cycling of historical farming, and new old research on intensive grazing practices to mimic nature. 

Sources:

Cornell Extension School's Soil 101 course

Jim Gerrish, "Management-intensive Grazing: The Grassroots of Grass Farming"

David R. Montgomery, "Growing a Revolution: Bringing Our Soil Back to Life"

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

 

Re-recorded 8/1/21

May 17, 2020
I'm a Soy-Boy, but by Soy I mean Soil
39:58

A deep dive into the complex web that is the soil system, as well as how that plays into complex systems theory and sustainable farming, permaculture, silvopasture, and food forests.

Sources: Dr. Elaine Ingham's research on complex soils

Fred Magdoff & Harold Van Es's "Building Soils for Better Crops"

Klaus J. Puettmann, David Coates, and Christian Messier's "Critique of Silviculture-- Managing for Complexity"

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

 

Remastered 7/16/21

May 12, 2020
Climate Change & Modeling Complex Systems Theory
47:54

In this episode, we discuss climate change from a different perspective, and tie complex systems science into our understanding of economics and how that can frame up an egalitarian, decentralized proposal for resilient communities in the face of ecological catastrophe.

We reference the following folks and talks, as well as some basic science textbooks as well:

Tom Wessels, "How Nature Models Sustainability"

Murray Bookchin, "The ecology of Freedom"

 

 

Support this podcast by becoming a Patron at: https://www.patreon.com/PoorProlesAlmanac

 

Re-recorded 7/8/21

May 07, 2020
The Poor Prole‘s Almanac Trailer
05:01

An intro of what we're here to talk about

May 07, 2020