Crimes of the Centuries

By Obsessed Network

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Subscribers: 681
Reviews: 1

JJ
 Feb 17, 2021
I've learned new details even about the cases I know. A great melding of history, true crime, and the justice system. I like the level of scholarship and journalism.

Description

Crime is so commonplace that it takes something particularly shocking to be labelled the “crime of the century.” Even so, there are a lot of cases that have earned the distinction. In each episode of Crimes of the Centuries, award-winning journalist Amber Hunt will examine a case that’s lesser known today but was huge when it happened. The cases explored span the centuries and each left a mark. Some made history by changing laws. Others were so shocking they changed society.

Episode Date
34: Satanic Panic and the McMartin Preschool Case
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Judy Johnson was horrified when her 3-year-old son told her he'd been abused by a teacher at his preschool. So, too, was her community. Soon, hundreds of parents throughout Manhattan Beach, California, heard horrifying tales from their children describing sexual abuse, animal torture and even murder in a case that epitomizes what came to be known as the "Satanic Panic" of the 1980s.

"Crimes of the Centuries" is a podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history.

Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod

Episode Sponsors:
Jul 26, 2021
33: The Murder of William Guldensuppe: The Headless Torso that Sparked a Media Furor
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When a group of kids cooling off along New York City's East River spotted a parcel in the water, they figured a passing freighter had dropped some goods. When they opened the package, however, they discovered a human torso, its arms still attached. So began a murder mystery that helped ignite a news war and forever altered how journalists covered crime in America.

"Crimes of the Centuries" is a podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history.

Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod

Episode Sponsors:
Jul 19, 2021
32: The Bath Massacre
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Andrew Kehoe really didn't like the new property taxes being leveled to pay for his community's fancy new school. This was well known throughout his hometown of Bath Township, Michigan. 

What residents didn't know was that his displeasure would turn to murderous rage that culminated on May 18, 1927. To date, the horror unleashed by Kehoe that day remains the deadliest school attack in American history.

"Crimes of the Centuries" is a podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history.

Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod

Episode Sponsors:
Jul 12, 2021
Roanoke: That Time 100 People Vanished for No Reason (from "Strange and Unexplained")
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Hey, COTC listeners! We're taking a break for the holiday this week, but we wanted to share an episode from another Obsessed Network show with you.  From "Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan," this episode tells the tale of the vanishing colony of Roanoke, who came to America in the 16th century and then mysteriously disappeared. Daisy explores all the bizarre elements of the story, but as a skeptic herself, also asks for the receipts on what might have actually happened.

If you enjoyed this episode, you can find and follow "Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan" wherever you get your podcasts.
Jul 05, 2021
31: Doris Duke's Dark Secret
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Tobacco heiress Doris Duke got upsetting news on Oct. 7, 1966. Her longtime friend and art curator, Eduardo Tirella wanted to end their work relationship. Within hours, Tirella was dead, having been hit by a car driven by Duke. 

Though the crash was quickly dismissed by police as an accident, Tirella's family always believed that the volatile billionaire had killed Tirella on purpose. If so, Duke managed to buy her way out of this crime of the century.

"Crimes of the Centuries" is a podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history.

Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod

Episode Sponsors:
Jun 28, 2021
30: Patty Hearst: Murder, Terror, and the Taking of an Heiress
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When the granddaughter of one of America's best-known publishing magnates was kidnapped in 1974, the news of course grabbed headlines. But that was nothing compared to the attention the case would receive after Patricia Hearst joined forces with her abductors. The group at the heart of the kidnapping was known as the Symbionese Liberation Army, a radical group of young adults considered to be the first domestic terrorist group to rise out of the political left.

"Crimes of the Centuries" is a podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history.

Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod

Episode Sponsors:
Jun 21, 2021
29: John Arthur Pender: The Pardoned Killer?
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The book The Man from the Train describes dozens of axe slayings in the late 18th and early 19th centuries, many of which authors Bill James and Rachel McCarthy James believe were committed by what would be the nation's most prolific serial killer. But a 1911 double homicide near Scappoose, Oregon, doesn't fit the mold.

On Sept. 3, 1911, someone entered a cabin and fatally shot Daisy Wehrman and her 4-year-old son Harold. Authorities quickly zeroed in on John Arthur Pender, who was eventually convicted and sentenced to death. Doubts would swirl about his guilt, however, leading some to lobby for Pender's pardon.

"Crimes of the Centuries" is a podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history.

Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod

Episode Sponsors:
Jun 14, 2021
28: The Villisca Murders
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The Moore house seemed awfully quiet one June morning in 1912, prompting neighbors to investigate. Inside, they discovered a horrific scene: All eight people who'd been inside -- a mother, father, their four children and two young guests -- had been brutally slain in their sleep. The case that followed would be one of the highest-profile, longest-lasting mysteries in the history of the Midwest -- a mystery that a pair of authors think they've finally solved.

"Crimes of the Centuries" is a podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history.

Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod

Episode Sponsors:
Jun 07, 2021
27: The Lindbergh Baby Kidnapping
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Charles Lindbergh became an American and worldwide hero after becoming the first person to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean in 1927.  But five years later, his world was upended when his toddler son was stolen from his nursery.  The ensuing investigation into the kidnapping would involved a host of characters, including an amateur detective named Jafsie and a mysterious man named Cemetery John.  Even the infamous gangster Al Capone volunteered his services to help.  In the end, would the world ever know what happened to the Lindbergh baby?

"Crimes of the Centuries" is a podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history.

Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod

Episode Sponsors:
May 24, 2021
26: Did Jeffrey MacDonald Kill His Family?
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The sight that greeted arriving medics in February 1970 was so upsetting that at least one had to rush from the scene to vomit. Inside of Army surgeon Jeffrey MacDonald's home were three dead bodies belonging to his two daughters and pregnant wife. MacDonald, too, was injured. But who really killed the Green Beret's family? Was it a quartet of acid-dropping hippies -- or MacDonald himself?

"Crimes of the Centuries" is a podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history.

Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod

Episode Sponsors:
May 17, 2021
Introducing "Murder in Alliance: Ep. 1 Dead in the Water"
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Hey, Crimes of the Centuries listeners! We're so excited to bring you the new show from the Obsessed Network, "Murder in Alliance." We've got the first episode here for you in this feed, and two more available right now wherever you get your podcasts.

Listen to the first three episodes and follow "Murder in Alliance" on your favorite podcast player HERE (https://lnk.to/98BXWuip).

In the podcast, investigative journalist Maggie Freleng reinvestigates the 1999 murder of Yvonne Layne. Though her ex-boyfriend David Thorne was convicted of the murder, evidence points to his innocence. Now, twenty years later, Maggie travels to Ohio to talk with people involved in the case, explore new leads, and try to identify who killed Yvonne.

Follow "Murder in Alliance" on Twitter and Instagram: @Murder_Alliance
May 13, 2021
25: Belle Gunness: Butcher of Men
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When an Indiana home caught fire and burned to the ground in 1908, townspeople mourned the poor mother and two children believed trapped inside. But then someone started to dig on the property, they realized that the woman of the house had a sinister secret. 

Belle Gunness had been luring would-be suitors to her farm and brutally slaying them in a scheme that lasted years.

"Crimes of the Centuries" is a podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history.

Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod

Episode Sponsors:
May 10, 2021
24: The Dark Tale of the Radium Girls
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In the early 20th century, one of the best jobs for a young woman to land in America involved a new discovery: radium. The substance discovered by Marie Curie could be tweaked and turned into glow-in-the-dark paint. 

But as the women working with the paint started falling ill, their employers began a calculated coverup that landed them in court -- and changed laws nationwide regarding the duty employers have to keep their workers safe.

"Crimes of the Centuries" is a podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history.

Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod

Episode Sponsors:
May 03, 2021
23: Jane Britton's Mysterious Murder
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Though 23-year-old Jane Britton had no enemies when she was violently killed in 1969, her case somehow had no shortage of suspects. Who killed the brilliant and feisty Harvard grad student — was it the brooding archeologist rumored to have had an affair with her, the bumbling professor who’d invited her to his apartment or the friend who would years later be suspected in another mysterious death? After decades of speculation, journalists obsessed with the story helped find the shocking answer.

"Crimes of the Centuries" is a podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history.

Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod

Episode Sponsors:
Apr 19, 2021
22: H.H. Holmes and His Macabre "Murder Castle"
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He was born Herman Webster Mudgett, a bright boy beloved by his teachers because of his kind demeanor and thirst for knowledge. Later, the world would know him as H.H. Holmes, a man so determined to murder that he designed a home in Chicago complete with torture chambers, trap doors and a crematorium. 

Holmes' tale not only shocked the world, but it forever tainted the legacy of Chicago's 1893 world fair that helped a madman lure an unknown number of victims.

"Crimes of the Centuries" is a podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history.

Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod

Episode Sponsors:
Apr 12, 2021
21: Fatty Arbuckle: Scandal in Hollywood
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The roaring '20s of last century were fueled in part by a new industry: filmmaking in Hollywood. Directors were rolling in dough, as were the silver screen's first stars. But in 1921, the future of cinema would forever be altered after internationally beloved comedian Roscoe 'Fatty' Arbuckle was charged in the death of a young starlet after attending a boozy Prohibition-era party in Arbuckle's hotel suite.

"Crimes of the Centuries" is a new podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history.

Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod

Episode Sponsors:
Apr 05, 2021
Introducing "Strange and Unexplained: Ep. 1 The Watcher House"
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Hey, Fam! We're so excited to bring you the new show from the Obsessed Network, "Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan." We've got the first episode here for you in this feed, and two more available right now wherever you get your podcasts.

Listen to the first three episodes and follow "Strange and Unexplained with Daisy Eagan" on your favorite podcast player HERE.

From Executive Producer Patrick Hinds and the Obsessed Network comes a new podcast about all the weird stuff happening around us.

Do you believe in ghosts? How about bigfoot? Do you think it’s strange and fascinating that a 4 year old in Oklahoma could look at a black and white picture of a man from the 1930s and say ‘that was me. Before.” And then provide actual, verifiable details of the man’s life? If so, “Strange and Unexplained With Daisy Eagan” is about to be your new favorite podcast.

Daisy is a Tony Award-winning actor, writer, and true crime fanatic. But she’s also a skeptic. Each week She looks at real stories of hauntings, disappearances, UFO encounters, the Bermuda Triangle, near death experiences, and anything else that feels just beyond what we can easily make sense of. She is your guide into the inexplicable details of these stories. But she’s also like, “show me the receipts.”
Apr 02, 2021
20: The Enduring Legacy of the Salem Witch Trials
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When two young girls began suffering from mysterious ailments in Salem, Massachusetts, in the late 17th century, townsfolk were baffled. The only explanation they could imagine was that the girls had been bewitched -- and over the next three months, no one in town would be safe from the label.

The notorious trials would go down in history as a cautionary tale about group hysteria, but its impact goes even deeper -- and still affects how our legal system works today.

"Crimes of the Centuries" is a new podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history.

Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod

Episode Sponsors:
Mar 29, 2021
19: The Murder of Marie Smith
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When a 9-year-old girl failed to return home from school in 1910 Asbury Park, N.J., a local reporter became convinced of a Black man's guilt -- putting that man's life in danger even before an arrest was made in the case. The confounding unraveling of the murder of Marie Smith would not only shock the small town and make headlines nationwide, but it would employ a new type of detective work that had rarely been attempted before -- or since.

As actress Rebecca Schaeffer rushed around her apartment to ready for the biggest audition of her career, a disturbed young man was pacing the street below, armed with a gun. Schaeffer's senseless death in 1989 would not only shock the nation, but it would also be the catalyst for the country's first anti-stalking laws.

"Crimes of the Centuries" is a new podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history.

Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod

Episode Sponsors:
Mar 15, 2021
18: Rebecca Schaeffer: The Slaying of a Starlet
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As actress Rebecca Schaeffer rushed around her apartment to ready for the biggest audition of her career, a disturbed young man was pacing the street below, armed with a gun. Schaeffer's senseless death in 1989 would not only shock the nation, but it would also be the catalyst for the country's first anti-stalking laws.

"Crimes of the Centuries" is a new podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history.

Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod

Episode Sponsors:


Mar 08, 2021
17: Daniel Sickles: Temporarily Insane?
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In 1859, two of Washington, D.C.'s highest-profile men were in love with the same woman -- and that love triangle would lead to the broad-daylight shooting of one of them just a stone's throw from the White House. The victim had been the first-born son of Francis Scott Key, author of the lyrics to America's national anthem. And his killer would be the first in the country to argue a defense of temporary insanity.

"Crimes of the Centuries" is a new podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history.

Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod

Episode Sponsors:
Mar 01, 2021
16: Richard Speck: Born to Raise Hell
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On July 14, 1966, Chicago residents awoke to horrific news: Eight young nurses had been brutally killed in their dorm-style housing overnight. The killer had lost count of his victims and left one survivor, and soon, the hunt for Illinois-born and Texas-raised felon Richard Speck was on. The case, which gave birth to the phrase "random mass murder," would "shatter our innocence," according to the lead prosecutor in the highly publicized trial. It remains one of the most horrific crimes in the annals of American true crime.

"Crimes of the Centuries" is a new podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history.

Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod

Episode Sponsors:
Feb 22, 2021
15: The Landmark Case of the Scottsboro Boys
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In 1932, a group of white men rushed to police to report a group of Black men had roughed them up on as they sneaked a ride on a train. Authorities soon descended and soon even more heinous allegations were lodged: Two women on the train said the group of nine young men had sexually assaulted them. Outraged citizens demanded justice. The rush to try the so-called "Scottsboro Boys" in Alabama led to legal landmark cases that are still cited today.

"Crimes of the Centuries" is a new podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history.

Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod

Episode Sponsors:
Feb 08, 2021
14: The Million-Dollar Kidnapping of Ginny Piper
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When wealthy Ginny Piper was kidnapped at gunpoint in broad daylight inside of her secluded Minnesota home, it put the nation on edge and sent her husband on a macabre scavenger hunt to save Ginny’s life. It also became a pet case for the FBI, which was trying to improve its reputation, but many would later argue that the agency only bungled things further by focusing on the wrong suspects. The Piper case would go down in history as one of the nation’s most baffling.

"Crimes of the Centuries" is a new podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history.

Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod

Episode Sponsors:


Feb 01, 2021
13: Edward Rulloff: The Genius Psychopath
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Edward Rulloff was a genius, speaking seven languages by the time he graduated high school -- no easy feat for someone from a poor farming family. But Rulloff was also arrogant, hot-headed and prone to violence. When his wife and infant daughter disappeared in 1844, Rulloff said they'd simply gone on a trip, though his in-laws were suspicious. Somehow, he managed time and again to slip through authorities' fingers -- once with the help of an undersheriff's son whom he'd smooth-talked into freeing him from jail. When Rulloff was finally caught, some argued that his life should be spared and his brain studied, and he went down in history as one of America's smartest and most slippery criminals.

"Crimes of the Centuries" is a new podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history.

Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod

Episode Sponsors:

Jan 25, 2021
12: The Tylenol Murders: Over-the-Counter Killers
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When 52-year-old Bruce Nickell suddenly dropped dead in Washington state, investigators at first thought he'd died of a heart attack. But then a second person collapsed, and police realized that the two victims had both taken the painkiller Excedrin. Suddenly, they realized they were dealing with a copycat of a case that had haunted federal investigators for nearly 15 years. 

In that earlier case, seven people died when someone randomly tampered with the over-the-counter painkiller to replace some of the powder inside capsules with enough cyanide to kill an entire family. Those deaths changed how medication is packaged nationwide and made it a federal crime to tamper with such products -- a legal change that years later came back to bite Nickell's killer. 
Jan 18, 2021
11: Sex, Lies, and Murder: Evelyn Nesbit, Stanford White, and Harry Thaw
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It was one of the most salacious stories the country had ever heard: A famous architect had been gunned down in front of an audience of hundreds by a man who said he was defending his wife's honor. It so happened the wife was the world's first supermodel. The love triangle among architect Stanford White, model and showgirl Evelyn Nesbit and millionaire unhinged man Harry Kendell Thaw reached its climax on June 24, 1906. With hundreds of witnesses, the case was never a whodunit. Rather, it was a gripping tale of sex, lies, and murder. The story made such headlines nationwide that, for the first time in American history, the jury had to be sequestered.

"Crimes of the Centuries" is a new podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history.

Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod
Jan 11, 2021
10: The Torture Chamber of Delphine LaLaurie
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A fire broke out in a stately New Orleans mansion in 1834, leading neighbors to rush to the homeowners' aid. What they discovered inside, however, made them realize that the charming and cultured woman of the house had been hiding a horrifying secret: In an upstairs apartment, enslaved people were weighed down by chains, starved to emaciation and barely recognizable as humans. The case of Delphine LaLaurie and her unfathomable cruelty would outrage the nation and beyond.

"Crimes of the Centuries" is a new podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history.

Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod
Jan 04, 2021
9: Charley Ross: America's First Kidnapping for Ransom
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After 4-year-old Charley Ross vanished in a carriage with two men who'd offered him candy and fireworks, police at first told his father to wait it out. Surely the men had no bad intentions. Then came the first ransom letter. And another. And another. In 1874, the Charley Ross case marked the first time in American history that a child had been stolen for money. The case terrified parents, made kidnapping a crime and served as macabre inspiration for future criminals.

"Crimes of the Centuries" is a new podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history.

Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod
Dec 21, 2020
8: Kitty Genovese: A Murder with 38 Witnesses
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As a 28-year-old woman screamed for help on an otherwise quiet New York City street, neighbors roused from sleep ... and then largely did nothing. The 1964 murder of Kitty Genovese would soon represent apathy in America and spark the creation of a centralized phone number that ultimately changed how the entire nation reported emergencies. While Kitty's case will go down in history as a driving force that launched 9-1-1, the nuances of the crime -- and people's reactions to it -- have been misunderstood for decades.

"Crimes of the Centuries" is a new podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history.

Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod
Dec 14, 2020
7: The Mysterious Beheading of Pearl Bryan
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When a headless woman's remains were discovered near Cincinnati in 1896, police had a problem. Long before DNA and fingerprinting, the lack of a head made it tough to identify the victim. Thanks to a sharp-eyed shoemaker, a new kind of detective work was born: The woman was ID'd thanks to a pair of distinctive shoes on the corpse's feet. Pearl Bryan was a 22-year-old Indiana woman who'd recently learned she was pregnant. Her lover, a Cincinnati man named Scott Jackson, suggested she come to town so they could figure out their next steps. After police discovered the "who," they then had to piece together the "how."

"Crimes of the Centuries" is a new podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history.

Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod
Dec 07, 2020
6: Bob Berdella: The Serial Killer Known as the Kansas City Butcher
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To his neighbors, Bob Berdella was a proactive citizen who helped launch a neighborhood watch group. Sure, he was a bit condescending, but he seemed to have a big heart, using his Kansas City home as a safe haven for young men in trouble. But then, in 1988, a young man jumped from a second-story window of Berdella's house wearing nothing but a dog collar, prompting police to scour the innocuous-looking home on Charlotte Street. What they uncovered would lead to the quaint home being labeled a "House of Horrors," and to a case that both shocked the nation and changed state law. 

"Crimes of the Centuries" is a new podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history.

Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod
Nov 30, 2020
5: Prohibition Murderers: The Karpis/Barker Gang
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Thanks to Prohibition, criminal gangs were a dime a dozen in the 1920s and '30s, but the Karpis/Barker Gang became one of the era's longest lived, highest profile, and most consequential. During the Depression, their exploits not only burnished the reputation of the FBI and its director J. Edgar Hoover, but also inadvertently triggered the end to rampant corruption in St. Paul Minnesota. 

While its body count was hefty -- and included lawmen like a sheriff gunned down in cold blood -- its enduring reputation hinges on its supposed matriarch, Ma Barker, who would go on to be depicted in movies and TV shows as a gun-toting criminal mastermind. There's no question three of her sons, and plenty of their friends, were stone-cold killers, but was Ma really pulling all the strings?

"Crimes of the Centuries" is a new podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history.

Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod
Nov 16, 2020
4: Nannie Doss: The Murderous Giggling Granny
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When widower Sam Doss was rushed to the hospital with abdominal pains in 1954, his doctor was flummoxed by his life-threatening yet mysterious illness. But Doss got better and came home -- then died the next day. That's what prompted police to look at his matronly, sweet-talking new wife, Nannie. 

Born Nannie Hazle, it turned out this missus had left a trail of dead husbands behind her -- not to mention several relatives, all of whom died of sudden and inexplicable illnesses. By the time Nannie was done confessing, she'd earned nicknames like The Giggling Grandma and The Black Widow.

"Crimes of the Centuries" is a new podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history.

Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod
Nov 09, 2020
3: Elma Sands: The Manhattan Well Murder
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When a 22-year-old woman living with relatives in a boarding house disappeared on Dec. 22, 1799, her loved ones didn't immediately worry. But when she still hadn't returned days later, all eyes turned to her lover -- whom she'd supposedly been set to marry the last time she was seen alive. Levi Weeks came from a family with money, so his rich brother did something that was unheard of at this point in American history: He hired fancy lawyers. And that's how Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr ended up on the same side defending a man against murder charges in 1800. 

The case, referenced in Lin Manuel Miranda's award-winning musical "Hamilton," marks two firsts: The defense panel was America's first legal Dream Team, and the Weeks' case was the first recorded murder trial in the country's history.

"Crimes of the Centuries" is a new podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history.

Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod
Nov 02, 2020
2: Leopold & Loeb: Jazz Age Killers
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On May 21, 1924, 19-year-old Nathan Leopold and 18-year-old Richard Loeb convinced a younger boy, 14 year old Bobby Franks, to get in a car with them. We think Leopold was driving with Loeb in the backseat. 14 year old Bobby sat in the passenger seat. From behind, Loeb struck the younger boy several times in the head with a chisel, and then dragged him into the backseat where he eventually died. 

Leopold and Loeb were wealthy kids who thought they were smarter than everybody else. And they committed this murder to prove it. They believed that they were so intellectually gifted that they could plan and execute a crime so perfect that they would never be caught. They were wrong, of course. And the details of this story and their plan are so terrifying and haunting that it changed the way people raised their kids and thought about psychology.

"Crimes of the Centuries" is a new podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history.  
Oct 26, 2020
1: The Murder of Mary Phagan
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At 3:00 am on April 27th, 1913, the body of 13 year old Mary Phagan was found in the basement of the factory where she worked in Atlanta, Georgia. Her dress was up around her waist and a strip from her petticoat had been torn off and wrapped around her neck. Her face was blackened and scratched, and her head was bruised and battered. Almost immediately, the murder, and the mystery surrounding who would do such a horrible, brutal thing to a child went the 1913 equivalent of viral.

When authorities finally landed on a suspect, their evidence was flimsy at best. The trial was a media spectacle and the outcome not only embedded this story in American history, but also sparked child labor laws.

"Crimes of the Centuries" is a new podcast from the Obsessed Network exploring forgotten crimes from times past that made a mark and helped change history. 

Follow us on Instagram and Twitter: @centuriespod
Oct 26, 2020
PREVIEW: Crimes of the Centuries
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Crime is so commonplace that it takes something particularly shocking to be labelled the “crime of the century.” Even so, there are a lot of cases that have earned the distinction. In each episode of Crimes of the Centuries, award-winning journalist Amber Hunt will examine a case that’s lesser known today but was huge when it happened. The cases explored span the centuries and each left a mark. Some made history by changing laws. Others were so shocking they changed society.

Full episodes of "Crimes of the Centuries" premiere on October 26, 2020.
Oct 13, 2020