Inside the Breakthrough - How Science Comes to Life

By SciMar with Dan Riskin

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Description

In Season 2 of the series we will share a new collection of surprising and unusual stories from the history of science. In each episode we will feature two seemingly unrelated stories from the past. Then, Dan Riskin will connect the dots between those stories and offer insight into how that history impacts modern medical research. We are learning from the past so we can understand the present, and inform the future. Along the way we will learn how a professor at Stanford turned mild mannered young men into cruel vicious prison guards, and how the Irish Potato Famine really had nothing to do with potatoes. We will ask questions such as: “Did we learn the wrong lesson from the sinking of the Titanic?” “How many people did Orson Wells actually fool?” and “What exactly is Maple Syrup Urine Disease?” In these ten episodes we will also follow along with SciMar as they take their breakthrough science into the testing phase. Will the things they discovered in a row of test tubes in the lab be repeatable in real people? And will that prove to be the final cure for type 2 diabetes? So, if you are intrigued by science, get excited about the process of discovery, and want to have the best stories at your next dinner party, this is the show for you. We promise a season full of guinea pigs, Corona beer, shipwrecks, and cobras. -- The series is produced by SciMar, a medical research company developing a new way to detect, treat and cure type 2 diabetes. Rather than insulin from the pancreas, they are focused on hepatalin, a hormone that comes from the liver. We will use historical stories to shine a light on where this modern company is headed.

Episode Date
Unintended Consequences
00:23:37

We’ve all heard the saying about “the best laid plans….” but there is a caveat to that. Not all unexpected consequences are bad. Sometimes something really amazing occurs unexpectedly.

This episode tells the story of Henry Molaison, better known as Patient HM, or “the most important brain in the history of neuroscience.” Henry didn’t set out to be a guiding light for the world of neuroanatomy. He just wanted a cure for his epilepsy. But what happened to him and the impact he had on the world is a story that needs to be told.

We will also hunt for cobras in India, and try to explain why that plan backfired.

Dr Seema Nagpal from Diabetes Canada will join us to explain the often unseen impact diabetes has on people, and to offer some thought on what the consequences of a cure might be.

These science stories from history help shed light on the modern research being done on Type 2 Diabetes. Specifically, we highlight the work of SciMar as they examine the hormone hepatalin and the effect it has on glucose levels in people who are living with type 2 diabetes. 

www.SciMar.ca

Nov 29, 2021
Double Blind
00:25:27

Join us for a wild ride through Vienna and Paris. We will hang out with Mozart, Marie Antoinette, and the incredible Dr Mesmer. We will drink cocktails and stay up way too late. All in an effort to answer the question: Is it possible that being blinded could help you see new things?

I’m not talking about literal blindness here, I mean when you intentionally deny yourself some key piece of information.

If you are hiring someone and are conducting interviews, would you make better decisions if the candidates were sitting behind a screen? Is a psychological study less valid if the participants already know what aspect of their behaviour you are measuring? And are there situations when the subjects and the experimenters have to be blinded?

These science stories from history help shed light on the modern research being done on Type 2 Diabetes. Specifically, we highlight the work of SciMar as they examine the hormone hepatalin and the effect it has on glucose levels in people who are living with type 2 diabetes. www.SciMar.ca

Nov 15, 2021
Tools for Testing
00:30:34

Sometimes great discoveries have to wait for the creation of the perfect tool.

What is the best screw ever invented? If you said the Phillips, you are wrong. The Phillips is the most popular screw type, but not the best. The standard slot screw is also very popular, but it isn’t the best either. The best screw type ever invented is the Robertson, and the story behind why it never became the biggest selling screw in the world is one you have to hear.

What is the difference between Latitude and Longitude? Why is one of them so easy to determine and the other virtually impossible? Well, it was impossible until they had the right tool. We will explain how a clock with a grasshopper inside made sailing the seven seas much safer.

These science stories from history help shed light on the modern research being done on Type 2 Diabetes. Specifically, we highlight the work of SciMar as they examine the hormone hepatalin and the effect it has on glucose levels in people who are living with type 2 diabetes. www.SciMar.ca

Nov 01, 2021
The Trouble With Trials
00:24:22

Ten years ago, in a hospital in London England a drug company conducted a clinical trial. That trial went horribly wrong. The lessons learned from that event have informed every pharmaceutical trial since then. We will hear from one of the men who took that experimental drug.

We will also look to history -- and uncover the origin of the first ever clinical trial. It was conducted on a sailing ship in the middle of the ocean. The lessons learned from that experiment saved thousands of lives over the next century.

And lastly we will look at what SciMar is currently testing and consider the long ranging impact those trials might have.

These science stories from history help shed light on the modern research being done on Type 2 Diabetes. Specifically, we highlight the work of SciMar as they examine the hormone hepatalin and the effect it has on glucose levels in people who are living with type 2 diabetes. www.SciMar.ca

Oct 18, 2021
What's in a Name?
00:21:04

Kick back and enjoy a cold Corona beer as we tell stories about the importance of names. From cameras to resumes to hormones, names matter.

George Eastman decided to name his company Kodak after playing a game of Anagrams with his mother. But the choice wasn’t an accident. It was a deliberately constructed name with a very clear intent.

Similarly the brewers of Corona beer didn’t pull that name from the top of their head, They had a very clear idea of who they were speaking to when they wrote that on the label. But did the outbreak of Coronavirus undo all that brand building?

And what would you name a newly discovered hormone that comes from the liver and is crucial for fighting type 2 diabetes? The people at SciMar decided on ‘hepatalin.’ And we will tell you why.

These science stories from history help shed light on the modern research being done on Type 2 Diabetes. Specifically, we highlight the work of SciMar as they examine the hormone hepatalin and the effect it has on glucose levels in people who are living with type 2 diabetes. www.SciMar.ca

Oct 04, 2021
Introducing Season 2
00:03:01

Dan Riskin invites you to listen to season 2 of Inside the Breakthrough - How Science Comes to Life. This innovative series combines stories of the distant past with modern updates to get a better understanding of how science works.

In season two we will explore the connections behind naming a new hormone, ridding a city of snakes, and battling Napoleon on the high seas.

Along the way we will learn how a professor at Stanford turned mild mannered young men into cruel vicious prison guards, and how the Irish Potato Famine really had nothing to do with potatoes.

We will ask questions such as: “Did we learn the wrong lesson from the sinking of the Titanic?” “Who pays for NASA’s rockets?” and “What can you learn from a man with no memory?” It’s a fun filled ride that also checks in with George Eastman, Dr James Lind, Marie Antoinette, Henry Ford, and some Australian guy that intentionally gave himself an ulcer.

The host Dan Riskin comes from Discovery Channel where he hosted the science news show “Daily Planet,” and wrote the book, “Mother Nature is Trying to Kill You.”

The show is produced by SciMar, a research group exploring a paradigm shift in the way we treat Type 2 Diabetes. www.SciMar.ca

Sep 20, 2021
Bonus Episode – How We Got Here
00:20:48

SciMar does more than produce a podcast. They are a real medical research company doing really amazing work in the field of type 2 diabetes. This episode tells the story of how they got here. ‘Here’ being: on the verge of a transformational breakthrough in metabolic health. It starts with a Eureka moment in a lab… travels to a biological science conference in Minnesota… and then spends a quiet week relaxing beside the lake in Jasper, Alberta. How does all that lead to a breakthrough in the way we diagnose and treat type 2 diabetes, AND an award-winning podcast? This is their story.

www.scimar.ca

Sep 01, 2021
Seeing It With Your Own Eyes
00:24:23
We made it! This is the final episode in season one… and it is a huge day for the medical research group SciMar. Some scientific discoveries are exciting because they reveal something that was previously unknown. But a lot of ‘discoveries’ are actually visual confirmation of a proven fact. Roald Amundsen already knew the South Pole was in the middle of Antarctica. He already knew it was covered in ice and would be very, very cold. But he still risked his life to go see it. Oceanographers already knew that colossal squids were prowling the dark recesses of the seas, but it was still a landmark day when one was captured alive. And for SciMar, they already knew that the HISS hormone could make people more insulin sensitive and healthier, but the day they can demonstrate conclusively that it does what they always believed it could do will still be one for the ages. These science stories from history shed light on the modern research being done on type 2 diabetes. Specifically we highlight the work of SciMar as they examine the hormone HISS - hepatic insulin-sensitizing substance - and the effect it has on glucose levels in people who are insulin resistant. www.SciMar.ca
May 31, 2021
Going Back to Square One
00:23:15
Starting a story at the beginning makes sense… but what if there is a mistake in that first sentence? Does it invalidate the rest of the story? What if your experiment is based on an assumption that later turns out to be false? And how can you protect your tower of discoveries from tumbling down? We start with an unbelievable story about New York City being buried in horse manure, and discover the solution is in Detroit. Then we witness how British doctors thought they had solved polio, but actually hadn’t. Finally Dr Wayne Lautt explains Looping Theory… and how that can mistake proof your experimental results. These science stories from history shed light on the modern research being done on Type 2 Diabetes. Specifically, we highlight the work of SciMar as they examine the hormone HISS - Hepatic Insulin Sensitizing Substance - and the effect it has on glucose levels in people who are insulin resistant. www.SciMar.ca
May 17, 2021
Why Giving It All Away Doesn’t Always Work
00:24:49
You’ve probably heard that Banting and Best gave away the patent for Insulin for one dollar. But why did they do that? And did it achieve what they wanted? We often associate being successful with being profitable. And for a lot of enterprises that is true. But what if your goal is to win the second world war, and you do, but you go bankrupt in the process… is that a ‘success?’ What if your goal is to save a lot of people’s lives, and the only way to do that is to also make a lot of money? Does that sound like a contradiction? The truth is the relationship between ‘social good,’ and ‘good business’ is messy. We dig deep into this idea of morality, profits and what it really means to ‘do the right thing.’ These science stories from history shed light on the modern research being done on Type 2 Diabetes. Specifically, we highlight the work of SciMar as they examine the hormone HISS - Hepatic Insulin Sensitizing Substance - and the effect it has on glucose levels in people who are insulin resistant. www.SciMar.ca
May 03, 2021
Generations: What Newton taught Einstein
00:29:37
How many astronomers does it take to discover a planet that doesn’t exist? The Answer: Generations. Depending on where you live, (and a thousand other variables) your life expectancy is probably between 75 and 85 years. Even at the high end, that’s not enough to solve all the world’s problems. That’s why most big questions can only be answered by multiple generations. We follow the story of a Roman temple that became an British Castle, and then an English jail. Then we follow the story of Neptune and Vulcan… two planets that were discovered by a dozen people over the course of two hundred years. Dr Wayne Lautt joins the show to share who his mentors and heroes are. These science stories from history shed light on the modern research being done on Type 2 Diabetes. Specifically we highlight the work of SciMar as they examine the hormone HISS - Hepatic Insulin Sensitizing Substance - and the effect it has on glucose levels in people who are insulin resistant. www.SciMar.ca
Apr 19, 2021
When Snake Oil Enters the Courtroom
00:20:32
What do you think of when you hear the term Snake Oil? Do you think of miracle vitamins with outlandish claims? Do you think of sneaky sales people trying to separate you from your money? Or do you think of actual snakes? The truth is, those are all true. Snake Oil is a complicated concept that includes shiffy profiteers, and an audience that is, if not ‘gullible,’ at least ‘susceptible.’ Joseph Sledge spent three decades in prison because of bad forensics, and when you learn how it played out in the courtroom… you’ll see that what he really fell victim to, was “Snake Oil.” The best defence against snake oil is science. These science stories from history shed light on the modern research being done on Type 2 Diabetes. Specifically, we highlight the work of SciMar as they examine the hormone HISS - Hepatic Insulin Sensitizing Substance - and the effect it has on glucose levels in people who are insulin resistant. www.SciMar.ca
Apr 05, 2021
Diversity, Leaded Gasoline, and Carjacking
00:27:52
The answers to life’s biggest questions will vary widely based on one simple variable: who you ask. If you do an experiment on men, you might get a different result than when you do it on women. Rich, poor, black, white, young, old… people are diverse and you learn more when you ask your questions of a diverse audience. Joseph Henrich figured out that a lot of experiments were being done on a very homogeneous group of people… he calls those people “WEIRD.” You’ll have to listen to find out why. Something else you might learn if you study a diverse group is that leaded gasoline leads to violent crime. There are a lot of steps in between those two ideas so buckle in for that ride. And lastly Dr Lautt of SciMar explains why so many researchers only use men as test subjects, and what the consequence of that is. These science stories from history shed light on the modern research being done on Type 2 Diabetes. Specifically, we highlight the work of SciMar as they examine the hormone HISS - Hepatic Insulin Sensitizing Substance - and the effect it has on glucose levels in people who are insulin resistant. www.SciMar.ca
Mar 22, 2021
Why Unpopular Science is Good Science
00:29:12
When someone tells you “that is a stupid idea,” how do you react? Do you reconsider your position? Do you dig your heels in and get defensive? Do you quit, or work harder? Being unpopular is a regular state of affairs for scientists. The nature of the work requires you to disrupt paradigms and make people uncomfortable. How a scientist reacts to that criticism is crucial to their success. Galileo got told he was wrong by the Pope himself. Seriously, the entire Catholic Church told him his idea that the Earth went around the Sun was flawed. But he stood his ground, and ended up in jail. Ignaz Semmelweis had a simpler idea -- that doctors should wash their hands. But that idea was met with opposition as well. He stood his ground and ended up in an asylum. Dr Wayne Lautt of SciMar has spent 30 years being told his ideas are unfounded. How should he react? What are the consequences of pushing back? These science stories from history shed light on the modern research being done on Type 2 Diabetes. Specifically we highlight the work of SciMar as they examine the hormone HISS - Hepatic Insulin Sensitizing Substance - and the effect it has on glucose levels in people who are insulin resistant. www.SciMar.ca
Mar 08, 2021
Ross Geller and Marie Curie are Outsiders
00:28:29
The TV show Friends was king of primetime for a decade and while all six characters were ‘friends’ one of them was not like the others: Ross. We look at why he was such a poor fit with this group and what that means for real life scientists. Marie Curie studied at the Sorbonne. She discovered Polonium and Radium. Eventually she became the first woman to win a Nobel Prize. All that makes her a unique character. We go to Poland to discover what else made her an outsider. Host Dan Riskin confronts his own reality as an Outsider while also drawing comfort from the realization that that distinction puts him in some esteemed company. And we visit with Dr Wayne Lautt from SciMar. He is disrupting a paradigm, changing the way we think about type 2 diabetes. Specifically, he is looking at the liver and hormone that comes from there, as something that can improve our sensitivity to insulin. www.SciMar.ca
Feb 22, 2021
How Bad Timing Killed the Electric Car
00:26:24
There was a time that the battle between Electric, Gasoline, and Steam powered cars was a dead heat. So why did gas win? Was it price? Or power? Speed, noise, marketing, or political influence? Or was it just Bad Timing? Reader’s Digest magazine told us about the invention of the LED 60 years ago. But those tiny lights that make your phone screen so clear didn’t transition immediately into everyday use. They have a long and muddled history. This story brings together Henry Ford, Thomas Edison, Charles Kettering, Nick Holonyak, and Dan Riskin’s Great Aunt Marney. These science stories from history shed light on the modern research being done on Type 2 Diabetes. Specifically, we highlight the work of SciMar as they examine the hormone HISS - Hepatic Insulin Sensitizing Substance - and the effect it has on glucose levels in people who are insulin resistant. www.SciMar.ca
Feb 08, 2021
Eureka! Before and After
00:25:01
When we tell science stories they usually have a long complicated build up, and finish with someone yelling Eureka. But is Eureka really the end? What if we look at it as the beginning? Or the middle? In this first episode, we meet Archimedes - a brilliant scientist from ancient Greece that is credited with the first use of the word “Eureka!” And we also travel to England for the story of Alexander Fleming and the discovery of penicillin. Lastly we meet Dr Wayne Lautt and hear about his Eureka moment. The series is hosted by Dan Riskin. He is formerly the host of Discovery Channel’s Daily Planet and also a contributor to The Nature of Things on CBC. Dan is also a highly regarded scientist in his own right. These science stories from history help shed light on the modern research being done on Type 2 Diabetes. Specifically, we highlight the work of SciMar as they examine the hormone HISS and the effect it has on glucose levels in people who are insulin resistant. www.SciMar.ca
Jan 25, 2021
Introducing, Inside the Breakthrough
00:02:28
Jan 05, 2021