Trinity Forum Conversations

By The Trinity Forum

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Description

Trinity Forum Conversations is a podcast exploring the big questions in life by looking to the best of the Christian intellectual tradition and elevating the voices, both ancient and modern, who grapple with these questions and direct our hearts to the Author of the answers. We invite you to join us in one of the great joys of life: a conversation among friends on the things that matter most.

Episode Date
Neurobiology and the Soul with Curt Thompson and Jeffrey Dudiak
3097

Neurobiology and the Soul
What is the connection between our mind and our soul? New discoveries in neuroscience reveal that love can literally change our minds — that our relationships and interactions with others help shape our brains – which in turn, shape our relationships and behaviors. The link between our habits and spiritual practices and the renewing of our mind may be far more direct than once supposed.


Friendship Shapes our Soul

On Friday, June 24th we hosted an Online Conversation with psychiatrist Curt Thompson and The King’s University philosophy professor Jeffrey Dudiak to discuss the convergence of what brain research and spiritual practices reveal about the formation and development of our mind, heart, and soul. These longtime friends shared how their relationship has been used by God to repair and shape their lives in fascinating and unexpected ways.


This Conversation is part of our Discovery and Doxology series in partnership with BioLogos and Church of the Advent bringing together leading scientists, theologians, and scholars to discuss the relationship between science and faith.


Learn more about Curt Thompson and Jeff Dudiak.

 

Authors and books mentioned in the conversation:

The Chronicles of Narnia, by C.S. Lewis 

John Wood

Makoto Fujimura

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

 

Related Trinity Forum Readings:

Brave New World, Aldous Huxley

God's Grandeur: The Poems of Gerard Manley Hopkins

Babbet’s Feast, by Isak Dinesen

 

Related Conversations:
Faith in an Empirical World: an Online Conversation with Ard Louis and Tremper Longman
Suffering, Healing, and Meaning, with Philip Yancey and Julia Wattacheril
Understanding Transhumanism with Rosalind Picard and Richard Mouw 

To listen to this or any of our episodes in full, visit ttf.org/podcast and to join the Trinity Forum Society and help make content like this possible, visit ttf.org/join.

 

Special thanks to Ned Bustard for the artwork and Andrew Peterson for the music.

Jul 13, 2022
Science, Faith, and the Pursuit of Truth
2486

Science, Faith, and the Pursuit of Truth

What does it mean to pursue truth — and how do we know what we know? Science and religion have often been assumed to offer either contradictory or unrelated forms of knowledge, with any intersection between them presumed to be a conflict.


Such assumptions have grown more contentious in recent years in a world awash in misinformation and epistemic battles. How do science and faith relate in pursuing truth? What might each have to say to the other? And how might such a conversation enhance our understanding of knowledge itself?

 

On Friday, March 25 2022, The Trinity Forum hosted a conversation with Elaine Howard Ecklund and Ted Davis to show how science and Christianity intersect in constructive, even beautiful ways.

 

This conversation is a part of our Discovery and Doxology series, and hosted in partnership with Biologos and Church of the Advent and made possible through the support of Templeton Religion Trust. This series brings together leading scientists, philosophers, and theologians to discuss the relationship between science and faith.

 

Learn more about Elaine Howard Ecklund and Ted Davis.

 

Authors and books mentioned in the conversation:

Christian View of Science and Scripture, Bernard Ramm

Richard Dawkins

Philo Judaeus

John Philoponus

Augustine of Hippo

Galileo Galilei

Ptolemy

Galen

Euclid

Sam Harris

A Brief Retrospect of the Eighteenth Century, Samuel Miller

Ken Ham

Francis Collins

Albert Einstein

Peter Medewar

Thomas Henry Huxley

 

Related Trinity Forum Readings:

Brave New World, Aldous Huxley

God's Grandeur: The Poems of Gerard Manley Hopkins 

Related Conversations:
Faith in an Empirical World: an Online Conversation with Ard Louis and Tremper Longman
Neurobiology and the Soul with Curt Thompson and Jeffrey Dudiak
Suffering, Healing, and Meaning, with Philip Yancey and Julia Wattacheril
Understanding Transhumanism with Rosalind Picard and Richard Mouw

 

To listen to this or any of our episodes in full, visit ttf.org/podcast and to join the Trinity Forum Society and help make content like this possible, visit ttf.org/join.

 

Special thanks to Ned Bustard for the artwork and Andrew Peterson for the music.

Jul 06, 2022
Understanding Transhumanism
2706

Understanding Transhumanism

Rapid developments in artificial intelligence and other emerging technologies can add confusion to the existential questions of who we are and why we are here. Through this conversation, Mouw and Picard explore the potential benefits and cautions of these technologies and thoughtfully examine the philosophical foundation of transhumanism.

 

This conversation is a part of our Discovery and Doxology series, and hosted in partnership with Biologos and Church of the Advent and made possible through the support of Templeton Religion Trust. This series brings together leading scientists, philosophers, and theologians to discuss the relationship between science and faith.

 

Learn more about Rosalind Picard and Richard Mouw.

 

Authors and books mentioned in the conversation:

Raymond Kurzweil

Brave New World, by Alduous Huxley

Uncommon Decency: Christian Civility and Uncivil World, Pluralisms and Horizons, He Shines in All That’s Fair, Praying at Burger King, Calvinism in the Las Vegas Airport: Making Connections in Today's World, all by Richard Mouw

BF Skinner

The Concept of Mind, by Gilbert Ryle

Hubert Dreyfus

Friedrich Nietzsche

He Jiankui

Neil Postman

John McCarthy

 

Related Trinity Forum Readings:

Brave New World, Aldous Huxley
God's Grandeur: The Poems of Gerard Manley Hopkins

 

Related Conversations:

Faith in an Empirical World: an Online Conversation with Ard Louis and Tremper Longman

Science, Faith, & the Pursuit of Truth with Elaine Howard Ecklund and Ted Davis

Neurobiology and the Soul with Curt Thompson and Jeffrey Dudiak

 

To listen to this or any of our episodes in full, visit ttf.org/podcast and to join the Trinity Forum Society and help make content like this possible, visit ttf.org/join.

 

Special thanks to Ned Bustard for the artwork and Andrew Peterson for the music.


Jun 29, 2022
Faith in an Empirical World
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Science and Faith in Conflict?

We live in an era where science and faith are widely believed to be in conflict. A spreading materialism asserts, even assumes, that only empirical knowledge is reliable, and denigrates ways of understanding reality beyond the quantitative. Others believe that the realms of science and religion are entirely separate — each with interesting things to say, but nothing to say to each other.


Wonder Can Lead to Worship

In this conversation, we offer a different hypothesis: that science and faith actually have things to say to each other and can enable us to better understand ourselves, our minds, our world, and its originator and designer.  In contemplating the complexity of our Cosmos, and the mystery of our self and soul, we may cultivate a new sense of wonder, awe, and even worship – a doxology amidst discovery.


This conversation is a part of our Discovery and Doxology series, and hosted in partnership with Biologos and Church of the Advent and made possible through the support of Templeton Religion Trust. This series brings together leading scientists, philosophers, and theologians to discuss the relationship between science and faith.


Learn more about Tremper Longman and Ard Louis.

 

Authors and books mentioned in the conversation:

Elaine Howard Ecklund

Isaac Newton

Sir Robert Boyle

James Clerk Maxwell

Simon Conway Morris

David Alcalde

Dietrich Bonhoeffer

Charles Colson

The Language of God, by Francis Collins

Deborah Haarsma

John Paul II

 

Related Trinity Forum Readings:

Brave New World, Aldous Huxley
God's Grandeur: The Poems of Gerard Manley Hopkins


Related Conversations:

Understanding Transhumanism

Science, Faith, & the Pursuit of Truth with Elaine Howard Ecklund and Ted Davis


To listen to this or any of our episodes in full, visit ttf.org/podcast and to join the Trinity Forum Society and help make content like this possible, visit ttf.org/join.

 

Special thanks to Ned Bustard for the artwork and Andrew Peterson for the music.

Jun 22, 2022
Discovery and Doxology: Conversations on Science and Faith
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Discovery and Doxology
This special podcast series is called Discovery and Doxology conversations on science and faith and is created in partnership with Templeton, Religion Trust, Biologos, and Church of the Advent.  The four conversations in this series features conversations between scientists, philosophers, and theologians helping us explore the relationship between science and faith.

Science and Faith in Conflict?
We live in a time when science and faith are often thought to be in conflict. The discipline of science is sometimes conflated, even within the scientific community, with a reductionistic materialism or scientism that asserts or even assumes that only empirical knowledge is reliable and dismisses ways of knowing what is real beyond the merely quantitative.

On the other hand, some people of faith fear that scientific findings are undermining of spiritual authority or Christian orthodoxy, and may even see discoveries and fields like vaccine creation, gene therapy, and artificial intelligence as a threat to the claims of Christianity. But as our conversations make clear, the mistrust between Christians and scientists hasn't always existed.

Scientific Discovery Leading to Worship of the Creator
Many of the greatest lights in the history of science understood their calling as one of making known the beauty and grandeur of God through a better understanding of the created order. They believed science and worship were connected by a shared love of truth and its author, and that discovery led to doxology.

The conversations that make up our discovery and doxology series explores these tensions and possibilities. It's our aim to introduce you to some of the brightest scientific and theological lights of our own generation and to help you think wisely and well about these questions. You can listen to any of these conversations in full at ttf.org.

Our sincere thanks to Ned Bustard for our podcast artwork and to Andrew Peterson for providing our music.

Jun 21, 2022
Reading Scripture with N.T. Wright
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In our final podcast episode of our special Lenten series, we're considering the meaning of the good news view through the lens of scripture, with an emphasis on Christ, passion and triumph. 

 

Reading Scripture with New Eyes

To help us explore the spiritual discipline of reading scripture, we’re returning to an evening conversation we hosted back in 2016 with Anglican Bishop, and New Testament scholar, N.T. Wright.


Since the very earliest days of the Christian Church, the reading of scripture has been foundational for Christian formation. Rather than prescribe a particular methodology of Bible reading this week, our invitation is simply to join us in reading each of the four gospel accounts of Jesus' last days, but to do so with a refreshed understanding of what Jesus meant when he spoke of the “good news.”


On Earth as it is in Heaven

As N.T. Wright makes clear, Jesus’ good news wasn't about giving advice, or founding a new religion, or even where a soul goes when the body dies. Jesus was inviting his hearers into a new way of understanding Israel's ancient story and the cosmic significance of its sudden fulfillment.

 

It's our hope that this conversation will help you read slowly, thoughtfully, and to consider and savor aspects of this good news that you may have missed before.

 

Thank you for journeying with us through Lent, and we wish you a very happy Easter.

 

Learn more about N.T. Wright.

 

Watch The Good News and the Good Life, with N.T. Wright and Richard Hayes.

 

Authors and books mentioned in the conversation:

Who is this Man? by John Ortberg

 

Related Trinity Forum Readings:

Devotions by John Donne and paraphrased by Philip Yancey

The Confessions of St. Augustine by Augustine of Hippo, Introduced by James K.A. Smith

Pilgrim at Tinker Creek by Annie Dillard

Pilgrim’s Progress by John Bunyan

God’s Grandeur: The Poems of Gerard Manley Hopkins

A Spiritual Pilgrimage by Malcolm Muggeridge

 

Related Conversations:

Liturgy of the Ordinary in Extraordinary Times with Tish Harrison Warren

Caring for Words in a Culture of Lies with Marilyn McEntyre

Invitation to Solitude and Silence with Ruth Haley Barton

On the Road with Saint Augustine with James K.A. Smith and Elizabeth Bruenig

The Habit Podcast, Episode 26: Tish Harrison Warren with Doug McKelvey

The Spiritual Practice of Remembering with Margaret Bendroth

 

To listen to this or any of our episodes in full, visit ttf.org, and to join the Trinity Forum Society and help make content like this possible, visit ttf.org/join.

 

Special thanks to Ned Bustard for the artwork and Andrew Peterson for the music.


Apr 13, 2022
Remembering with Margaret Bendroth
1212

We continue our Lenten podcast series by considering the spiritual practice of remembering with historian and author, Margaret Bendroth.


Remembering is a Scriptural Imperative

The promise of modernity was progress, and so our default orientation is often to the present and future and away from the past, which can be seen as either irrelevant or even benighted. But it is uncanny how often the Bible instructs us to remember the great story, to meditate upon it, ponder it, write it in our heart, dwell on it, and never forget.


In this conversation, Margaret Bendroth invites us to reflect on our own stories, to see our lives as the product of a long choosing linked to the generations that have come before. And then to be willing to examine our family and spiritual histories as part of knowing ourselves and our place in God's story.


Righteous Remembrance Means Extending Grace to our Ancestors

And while she acknowledges the potential for discomfort in looking back, Bendroth encourages us to a posture of “righteous remembrance,” extending the charity to our ancestors that we hope will be extended to us. In doing so, we open up the door to healing not only of our own past, but also to gain access to resources and wisdom from previous generations.


May this conversation inspire you to reflect on your own history and its place within the great story.


Learn more about Margareth Bendroth.

 

Authors and books mentioned in the conversation:

Miroslav Volf

 

Related Trinity Forum Readings:

Devotions by John Donne and paraphrased by Philip Yancey

The Confessions of St. Augustine by Augustine of Hippo, Introduced by James K.A. Smith

Pilgrim at Tinker Creek by Annie Dillard

Pilgrim’s Progress by John Bunyan

God’s Grandeur: The Poems of Gerard Manley Hopkins

A Spiritual Pilgrimage by Malcolm Muggeridge

 

Related Conversations:

Liturgy of the Ordinary in Extraordinary Times with Tish Harrison Warren

Caring for Words in a Culture of Lies with Marilyn McEntyre

Invitation to Solitude and Silence with Ruth Haley Barton

On the Road with Saint Augustine with James K.A. Smith and Elizabeth Bruenig

The Habit Podcast, Episode 26: Tish Harrison Warren with Doug McKelvey
The Spiritual Practice of Remembering with Margaret Bendroth


To listen to this or any of our episodes in full, visit ttf.org, and to join the Trinity Forum Society and help make content like this possible, visit ttf.org/join.

 

Special thanks to Ned Bustard for the artwork and Andrew Peterson for the music.

Apr 06, 2022
Writing as a Spiritual Practice with Jonathan Rogers, Tish Harrison Warren and Doug McKelvey
1111

On this episode of our special Lenten podcast series we explore the spiritual practice of writing by listening to a conversation between authors, Tish Harrison Warren, Doug McKelvey and Jonathan Rogers.


The Spiritual Practice of Writing 

As these three authors explore the craft of writing, what becomes clear is that the creativity and spiritual insight that marks their work is predicated on the discipline of showing up, to sit in the quiet with tools in hand and to attend to the wonder and mystery of their own lives. The very ordinary disciplines surrounding writing have become for these authors a liturgy by which they come into contact with the divine, writing things and expressing truths they didn't know that they knew.


The Habit: Conversations with Writers about Writing

This conversation originally appeared on the Habit Podcast, a production of the Rabbit Room podcast network, and a portion of it is used here with their generous permission and goodwill. To listen to more of the Habit visit Rabbitroom.com/podcast.


It's our hope that this conversation will inspire your own practice of writing during Lent and help you to enter into the mystery and grace of the Father's love.

 

Authors and books mentioned in the conversation:

Charlie Peacock

James Bryant Smith

Walker Percy

Jessica Hooten Wilson

 

Related Trinity Forum Readings:

Devotions by John Donne and paraphrased by Philip Yancey

The Confessions of St. Augustine by Augustine of Hippo, Introduced by James K.A. Smith

Pilgrim at Tinker Creek by Annie Dillard

Pilgrim’s Progress by John Bunyan

God’s Grandeur: The Poems of Gerard Manley Hopkins

A Spiritual Pilgrimage by Malcolm Muggeridge

 

Related Conversations:

Liturgy of the Ordinary in Extraordinary Times with Tish Harrison Warren

Caring for Words in a Culture of Lies with Marilyn McEntyre

Invitation to Solitude and Silence with Ruth Haley Barton

On the Road with Saint Augustine with James K.A. Smith and Elizabeth Bruenig

The Habit Podcast, Episode 26: Tish Harrison Warren with Doug McKelvey


To listen to this or any of our episodes in full, visit ttf.org, and to join the Trinity Forum Society and help make content like this possible, visit ttf.org/join.

 

Special thanks to Ned Bustard for the artwork and Andrew Peterson for the music.

Mar 30, 2022
Repentance with James K.A. Smith
689

Repentance and St. Augustine


We continue our Lenten podcast series by considering the spiritual practice of repentance with author, philosophy professor, and Trinity Forum Senior Fellow, James K.A. Smith. 


Few figures cast as long a shadow over church history as Saint Augustine of Hippo, regarded by many as second only to St. Paul in terms of his extraordinary contributions to theology and philosophy. For his part, James K.A. Smith takes a different approach, describing Augustine as an AA sponsor for the soul.


Disordered Desire and the Role of Repentance


In Augustine’s book, Confessions, he offers us a searingly honest glimpse into the human heart and it’s Augustine’s refusal to look away from his own disordered loves, but instead to confess and repent at the level of his deepest desires, that makes Confessions one of the most enduring works of Christian spiritual writing of all time.


Learn more about James K.A. Smith.


Watch the full Online Conversation and read the transcript.

 

Authors and books mentioned in the conversation:

Confessions by St. Augustine

On The Road With Saint Augustine by James. K.A. Smith

 

Related Trinity Forum Readings:

Devotions by John Donne and paraphrased by Philip Yancey

The Confessions of St. Augustine by Augustine of Hippo, Introduced by James K.A. Smith

Pilgrim at Tinker Creek by Annie Dillard

Pilgrim’s Progress by John Bunyan

God’s Grandeur: The Poems of Gerard Manley Hopkins

A Spiritual Pilgrimage by Malcolm Muggeridge.

 

Related Conversations:

Liturgy of the Ordinary in Extraordinary Times with Tish Harrison Warren

Caring for Words in a Culture of Lies with Marilyn McEntyre

Invitation to Solitude and Silence with Ruth Haley Barton

The Second Mountain with David Brooks

On the Road with Saint Augustine with James K.A. Smith and Elizabeth Bruenig


To listen to this or any of our episodes in full, visit ttf.org, and to join the Trinity Forum Society and help make content like this possible, visit ttf.org/join.

 

Special thanks to Ned Bustard for the artwork and Andrew Peterson for the music.

Mar 23, 2022
Generosity with Marilyn McEntyre
1128

Generosity with Marilyn McEntyre


We continue our Lenten podcast series this week by looking at the spiritual practice of generosity with professor, author, and poet, Marilyn McEntyre. Generosity, or to use more ancient language, charity or almsgiving, was a practice Christians historically emphasized during Lent. And while providing material support to those in need is certainly a vital part of charity and love of neighbor, in this episode, Marilyn challenges us to broaden our understanding of what generosity can mean.


Caring for our Words is Part of Caring for our Neighbor


The book of Proverbs teaches us that death and life are in the power of the tongue and, in this conversation, Dr. McEntyre argues that caring for language is inextricably bound up with our caring for others. It's our hope that the conversation which follows stretches your categories of generosity and caregiving this week, as we consider together what it means to attend to our language and to practice charity with our words.


To listen to this or any of our episodes in full, visit ttf.org, and to join the Trinity Forum Society and help make content like this possible, visit ttf.org/join.


Learn more about Dr. Marilyn McEntyre.


Watch the full Online Conversation and read the transcript.

 

Authors and books mentioned in the conversation:

Caring for Words in a Culture of Lies by Marilyn McEntyre

Jane Austen

David Brooks

 

Related Trinity Forum Readings:

Devotions by John Donne and paraphrased by Philip Yancey

The Confessions of St. Augustine by Augustine of Hippo, Introduced by James K.A. Smith

Pilgrim at Tinker Creek by Annie Dillard

Pilgrim’s Progress by John Bunyan

God’s Grandeur: The Poems of Gerard Manley Hopkins

A Spiritual Pilgrimage by Malcolm Muggeridge


 

Related Conversations:

Liturgy of the Ordinary in Extraordinary Times with Tish Harrison Warren

Caring for Words in a Culture of Lies with Marilyn McEntyre

Invitation to Solitude and Silence with Ruth Haley Barton

The Second Mountain with David Brooks

On the Road with Saint Augustine with James K.A. Smith and Elizabeth Bruenig

 

Special thanks to Ned Bustard for the artwork and Andrew Peterson for the music.

Mar 16, 2022
Silence and Solitude with Ruth Haley Barton
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Silence and Solitude

We continue our special Lenten podcast series with author and spiritual director, Ruth Haley Barton, and this brief introduction to the spiritual disciplines of silence and solitude. Ruth considers the unique gift these practices offer us, why they can be so challenging, and the way that these practices look different depending on your season of life. 


Where We Encounter God


"Solitude and silence in particular is where we encounter God, but it is also the place that's most challenging for us on so many different levels." - Ruth Haley Barton


We hope you're encouraged to start right where you are, even if that's just a minute or two of silence in the morning before the day begins, or at night to allow the sediment of the day to settle and to see more clearly what's most important.


Learn more about Ruth Haley Barton.

 

Watch the full Online Conversation and read the transcript.

 

Authors and books mentioned in the conversation:

Richard Rohr

Dallas Willard

 

Related Trinity Forum Readings:

Devotions by John Donne and paraphrased by Philip Yancey

The Confessions of St. Augustine by Augustine of Hippo, Introduced by James K.A. Smith

Pilgrim at Tinker Creek by Annie Dillard

Pilgrim’s Progress by John Bunyan

God’s Grandeur: The Poems of Gerard Manley Hopkins

A Spiritual Pilgrimage by Malcolm Muggeridge


Related Conversations:

Liturgy of the Ordinary in Extraordinary Times with Tish Harrison Warren

Caring for Words in a Culture of Lies with Marilyn McEntyre

Invitation to Solitude and Silence with Ruth Haley Barton

On the Road with Saint Augustine with James K.A. Smith and Elizabeth Bruenig

 

Listen to this or any of our conversations in full at ttf.org, and to join the Trinity Forum Society and help make content like this possible, visit https://ttf.org/join.

 

Special thanks to Ned Bustard for the artwork and Andrew Peterson for the music.

Mar 09, 2022
Formation and Habit with Tish Harrison Warren
697

Formation and Habit with Tish Harrison Warren

In our first Lenten podcast, we're turning to author and Anglican priest Tish Harrison Warren to help us frame our thinking about how we're formed spiritually and what the goal of formation is. Tish helps make us conscious of the habits, practices, and liturgies that are present and forming us in our everyday lives.

Practices are a Response to Love


She does a beautiful job of recasting spiritual disciplines not as an effort to make ourselves worthy of God's love, but as a response to God's declaration that we are already his beloved. We hope this conversation inspires you to consider anew the formative power of your habits, and to join us weekly in exploring spiritual disciplines, not out of obligation, but out of a deep and growing sense of your own belovedness before God.

To listen to this or any of our conversations in full, visit https://ttf.org, and to join the Trinity Forum Society to help make more content like this possible, visit https://ttf.org/join.

Learn more about Tish Harrison Warren.


Watch the full Online Conversation and read the transcript.


Authors and books mentioned in the conversation:
Liturgy of the Ordinary by Tish Harrison Warren
John Mark Comer

Related Trinity Forum Readings:

Devotions by John Donne and paraphrased by Philip Yancey

The Confessions of St. Augustine by Augustine of Hippo, Introduced by James K.A. Smith

Pilgrim at Tinker Creek by Annie Dillard

Pilgrim’s Progress by John Bunyan

God’s Grandeur: The Poems of Gerard Manley Hopkins

A Spiritual Pilgrimage by Malcolm Muggeridge

 

Related Conversations:

Liturgy of the Ordinary in Extraordinary Times with Tish Harrison Warren

Caring for Words in a Culture of Lies with Marilyn McEntyre

Invitation to Solitude and Silence with Ruth Haley Barton

On the Road with Saint Augustine with James K.A. Smith and Elizabeth Bruenig


Mar 02, 2022
Season 3 trailer: Lenten Spiritual Practices
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For 2000 years, Lent has been a season of spiritual preparation in which you reflect on Christ's temptation suffering and death. Beginning on Ash Wednesday and ending with Easter, the 40 days of lent have historically been a time for Christians to draw closer to God through prayer, fasting, repentance, and self-denial.

Of course, that's a hard sell in our time. Embracing spiritual disciplines has never been easy, but in a cultural context where denying ourselves our desires is seen not just as odd, but repressive, or even harmful, humbling ourselves through spiritual disciplines and walking in these ancient paths can seem more daunting than ever.

But far from being the exclusive province of medieval monks or cloistered mystics of some far away place and time, these disciplines are for everyone, and offer through embodied practices, a path to more deeply and joyfully following in the ways of Jesus. So this Lenten season, we ask you to join us as we explore seven different spiritual disciplines through this special podcast series.

Each week we'll release a new conversation that considers a practice to help you draw closer to God in mind, body and spirit. The point is not to master any particular spiritual discipline, but to simply start where you are. It's our hope that these conversations will inspire you to take a step into a new practice of learning to better know, love, and enjoy the Lord who died for us as we remember his passion, and anticipate the joy of his resurrection.

Listen to or watch any of our conversations in full at TTF.org, or to help support this podcast and our ongoing work, visit: TTF.org/join.

Special thanks to Ned Bustard for the artwork and Andrew Peterson for the music.

Mar 01, 2022
Waiting on the Word with Malcolm Guite
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On Friday, December 18, 2020, in partnership with Regent College, The Rabbit Room, and The C.S. Lewis Foundation we were delighted to host the renowned poet, singer-songwriter, and Anglican priest Malcom Guite for a conversation about his work of poetry, Waiting on the Word.


Learn more about Malcolm Guite.

 

Watch the full Online Conversation and read the transcript from December 2020.

 

Authors and books mentioned in the conversation:

Waiting on the Word, Malcolm Guite

As You Like It, Shakespeare

John Milton

Robert Louis Stevenson

C.S. Lewis

Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Christmas, by John Betjeman

North, by Seamus Heaney

St. John of the Cross

A Midsummer Night's Dream, Shakespeare

The Forge, by Seamus Heaney

O Sapientia, Malcolm Guite

Thomas Clarkson

George Herbert

The Apologist's Evening Prayer, C.S. Lewis

The Agonie, by George Herbert

John Donne

Gerard Manley Hopkins

Station Island XI, Seamus Heaney and St. John of the Cross

Adam Crothers

The Chronicles of Narnia, by C.S. Lewis

In the Bleak Midwinter, Christina Rossetti

In Drear Nighted December, by John Keats

Alfred, Lord Tennyson

William Wordsworth

Steve Bell

Jack Redford

T.S. Eliot

Hebrew Melodies, Lord Byron

Percy Bysshe Shelley

Geoffrey Chaucer

 

Related Trinity Forum Readings:

Devotions, by John Donne and paraphrased by Philip Yancey

God’s Grandeur: The Poems of Gerard Manley Hopkins

Four Quartets, by T.S. Eliot with an introduction by Makoto Fujimura

 

Related Conversations:

Lecture given by Malcolm for the C.S. Lewis Foundation

Laing Lectures given by Malcolm at Regent College

Steve Bell & Malcolm Guite: Live at the West End


 

Special thanks to Ned Bustard for the artwork and Andrew Peterson for the music.


Nov 30, 2021
Poetry & Beauty in Solitude with Dana Gioia
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On Friday, May 1 The Trinity Forum hosted from Former Chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, and Poet Laureate of California, Dana Gioia. Dana shared his unique insights about beauty, poetry, and solitude. Dana encourages us to use this time of quarantine to begin afresh.


Learn more about Dana Gioia.

 

Watch the full Online Conversation and read the transcript from May 2020.

 

Authors, artists, and books mentioned in the conversation:

T.S. Eliot

Wallace Stevens

Jacques Maritain

Thomas Acquinas

A Portrait of An Artist as a Young Man, by James Joyce

Georgia O'Keeffe

Étienne Mallarmé

Edgar Allen Poe

Friedrich Nietzsche
Horace

Catullus

Virgil

W.H. Auden

Philip Larkin

Robert Frost

Emily Dickinson

A.E. Stallings

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

John Greenleaf Whittier

King Lear, by William Shakespeare

The Idiot, by Fyodor Dostoevsky

C.S. Lewis

Immanuel Kant

Frederick Turner

Makoto Fujimura

 

Related Trinity Forum Readings:

God’s Grandeur: The Poems of Gerard Manley Hopkins with introduction by Dana Gioia

Bulletins From Immortality: Poems by Emily Dickinson

Devotions by John Donne (paraphrased by Philip Yancey)

Sacred & Profane Love, John Donne with an introduction by Dana Gioia

Four Quartets! By T.S. Eliot with an introduction by Mako Fujimura

 

Related Conversations:

Waiting on the Word with Malcolm Guite

Dana Gioia - Beauty

Poetry, Imagination, and Spiritual Formation” an Evening Conversation in with Dana Gioia, September 11, 2019

Why Poetry Matters” an Evening Conversation with Dana Gioia, April 20, 2016 

Why Beauty Matters: The Significance of Beauty in Art, Faith, and Politics” an Evening Conversation with Dana Gioia, April 1, 2014 

Poetry, Prayer, and Passion” an Evening Conversation with Dana Gioia, October 18, 2012

Art + Faith: A Theology of Making” an Online Conversation with Makoto Fujimura, January 29, 2021

Culture Care: Mending to Make New” an Online Conversation with Makoto Fujimura, August 7, 2020

Culture Care” an Evening Conversation in with Makoto Fujimura, September 19, 2017

Culture Care in a Fragmented Modern World” an Evening Conversation with Makoto Fujimura, November 4, 2016

Beauty in a Broken World” an Evening Conversation with Makoto Fujimura, March 31, 2016

 

Special thanks to Ned Bustard for the artwork and Andrew Peterson for the music.


Nov 30, 2021
Beauty, Music, and Spiritual Formation with Keith & Kristyn Getty
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On November 19th, 2019 the Trinity Forum, Regent College, and Reformed Theological Seminary hosted an Evening Conversation with modern hymn writers Keith and Kristyn Getty. They discussed “Beauty, Music, and Spiritual Formation” as the second in our series on Art, Faith, and Formation in which we aim to discuss the ways in which the literary, musical, and visual arts speak to spiritual hunger and shape our sense of beauty, truth, and purpose.


Learn more about the Gettys.

 

Watch our Evening Conversation.

 

Authors, artists, and books mentioned in the conversation:

Peter Kreeft

The Republic, by Plato

Damon of Athens

Sing: How Worship Transforms your Life, Family, and Church, by Keith and Kristyn Getty

Unwearied Praises: Exploring Christian Faith Through Classic Hymns, by Dr. Jeff Greenman

The Pedagogy of Praise, by Dr. Jeff Greenman

John Lennox

Lucy Shaw

Eugene Peters

J.I. Packer

Martin Luther

Leonard Bernstein

Amy Carmichael

Cecil Frances Alexander

Os Guinness

Charles Spurgeon

Lloyd Jones

D.L. Moody

 

Related Trinity Forum Readings:

Handel’s Messiah

 

Related Conversations:

Waiting on the Word with Malcolm Guite

Poetry & Beauty in Solitude with Dana Gioia

 

Special thanks to Ned Bustard for the artwork and Andrew Peterson for the music.

Nov 30, 2021
Hope and Healing for a Hurting Culture with Jonathan Haidt and Pete Wehner
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On February 19th, 2021, we were delighted to welcome social psychologist and bestselling author, Jonathan Haidt, along with widely published speechwriter and author, Peter Wehner. Wehner is a New York Times columnist, a contributing editor for The Atlantic, and a Trinity Forum Senior Fellow with a deep interest in healing our divided nation. Haidt has done extensive research examining the intuitive foundations of morality and how morality varies across cultures. His books address these topics and provide insights into how to cultivate meaningful, moral conversations across cultural divides.


We hope you enjoy this conversation on the impact of hyper-politicization and polarization, the temptations of illiberalism, the natural tendency towards bias and blind spots in our thinking, and the role of faith in bringing healing and hope to a hurting culture. Especially in our ongoing season of isolation and social restrictions, we hope this will inspire you to reach out and connect with those around you and think about how you can grow culture-shaping friendships and communities.

 

Learn more about Jonathan Haidt and Pete Wehner.

 

Watch the full Online Conversation and read the transcript from February 19, 2021.

 

Authors and books mentioned in the conversation:

The Happiness Hypothesis: Finding Modern Truth in Ancient Wisdom, by Jonathan Haidt

The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas Are Setting Up a Generation for Failure, by Jonathan Haidt and Greg Lukainoff

The Righteous Mind: Why Good People are Divided by Politics and Religion, by Jonathan Haidt

City of Man: Religion and Politics in a New Era, by Peter Wehner and Michael Gerson

The Death of Politics: How to Heal Our Frayed Republic After Trump, by Peter Wehner

A Time to Build: From Family and Community to Congress and the Campus, How Recommitting to Our Institutions Can Revive the American Dream, by Yuval Levin

Why We’re Polarized, by Ezra Klein

Blaise Pascal

John McWhorter

Francis Collins

C.S. Lewis

Owen Barfield

David Brooks

On Liberty, by John Stuart Mill

Ibram X. Kendi

Richard Reeves, Brookings Institution

How To Think: A Guide for the Perplexed, by Alan Jacobs

The Enigma of Reason, by Hugo Mercier and Dan Sperber

My Bright Abyss: Meditation of a Modern Believer, by Christian Wiman

 

Related Trinity Forum Readings:

Politics in the English Language, by George Orwell

Politics, Morality, and Civility, by Václav Havel

Democracy in America, by Alexis de Tocqueville

Brave New World, by Aldous Huxley

 

Related Conversations:

Rebuilding our Common Life, with Yuval Levin

 

Special thanks to Ned Bustard for the artwork and Andrew Peterson for the music.

Sep 29, 2021
The Lonely American: Rootedness and Reconciliation in a Riven Land with Ben Sasse and Russell Moore
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In this podcast, edited from an Evening Conversation in 2018 titled "The Lonely American: Rootedness and Reconciliation in a Riven Land" with Senator Ben Sasse and Russell Moore in Washington, DC, we discuss the growing problem of loneliness in the country — the ways in which our alienation from each other is destroying individual lives and the fabric of society — and what can be done about it.

 

Learn more about Senator Ben Sasse and Dr. Russell Moore.

 

Watch the full Evening Conversation from November 2018.

 

Authors and books mentioned in the conversation:

The Vanishing American Adult: Our Coming-of-Age Crisis--and How to Rebuild a Culture of Self-Reliance, by Ben Sasse

Them: Why We Hate Each Other--and How to Heal, by Ben Sasse

James K.A. Smith

Daniel Patrick Moynihan

Robert Putnam

Charles Murray

Ten Arguments for Deleting Your Social Media Accounts Right Now, by Jason Lanier

Marilynne Robinson

The Screwtape Letters, by C.S. Lewis

The Year of Our Lord 1943: Christian Humanism in an Age of Crisis, by Alan Jacobs

Elie Wiesel

 

Related Conversations:

Strong and Weak, with Andy Crouch

 

Special thanks to Ned Bustard for the artwork and Andrew Peterson for the music.

Sep 29, 2021
The Inklings, Creativity, and Community, with Diana Glyer
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On February 12th, 2021, we were delighted to welcome award-winning author and professor Diana Glyer. Glyer is intrigued by the creative process, particularly how creativity thrives within small groups and creative clusters. She has written extensively on the lives and work of C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, and their beloved community known as the Inklings.


We hope you enjoy this conversation on the importance of collaboration and the necessity of friendship to the creative process, and we hope you’ll be inspired to think imaginatively about how you can cultivate generative and culture-shaping friendships and communities.

 

Learn more about Diana Glyer.

 

Watch the full Online Conversation and read the transcript from February 12, 2021. 

 

Authors and books mentioned in the conversation:

The Company They Keep: C. S. Lewis and J. R. R. Tolkien as Writers in Community, by Diana Glyer

Bandersnatch: C.S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, and the Creative Collaboration of the Inklings, by Diana Glyer

The Lord of the Rings, by J.R.R. Tolkien

Charles Williams

C.S. Lewis

Shakespeare

Owen Barfield

Hugo Dyson

Out of the Silent Planet, by C.S. Lewis

Jerry Root

The Weight of Glory, by C.S. Lewis

 

Related Trinity Forum Readings:

On Friendship, by Cicero

The Golden Key, by George MacDonald

The Oracle of the Dog, by G.K. Chesterton

The Lost Tools of Learning, by Dorothy Sayers

 

Related Conversations:

Suffering, Friendship, and Courage: What Lewis & Tolkien Teach us about Resilience & Imagination, an Online Conversation with Joe Loconte

 

Special thanks to Ned Bustard for the artwork and Andrew Peterson for the music.

Sep 29, 2021
Speaking Peace & Seeking Reconciliation with David Bailey & Marilyn McEntyre
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On Friday, November 6th, 2021, we were delighted to partner again with our friends at Coracle to present Speaking Peace and Seeking Reconciliation in a Fractured Culture, an Online Conversation with David Bailey and Marilyn McEntyre. Recorded at the end of the election week, we spoke with David and Marilyn, exemplars of peace and reconciliation both in word and action, and discussed what we can do, as individuals and as the Church, to walk in the way of true shalom, love of neighbor, and truth telling.

 

Learn more about David Bailey and Dr. Marilyn McEntyre.

 

Watch the full Online Conversation and read the transcript from November 6, 2020. 

 

Authors and books mentioned in the conversation:

Arrabon: Learning Reconciliation Through Community & Worship Music, by David Bailey
Caring for Words in a Culture of Lies, by Marilyn McEntyre

Speaking Peace in a Climate of Conflict, by Marilyn McEntyre

Culture Making: Recovering Our Creative Calling, by Andy Crouch

Ezra Pound

The Peacemaker: A Biblical Guide to Resolving Personal Conflict, by Ken Sande

G.K. Chesterton

A Book of Uncommon Prayer: 100 Celebrations of the Miracle & Muddle of the Ordinary, by Brian Doyle

Oscar Romero

T.S. Eliot

Middlemarch, by George Eliot

 

Related Trinity Forum Readings:

Politics and the English Language, by George Orwell

Abraham Lincoln: The Spiritual Growth of a Public Man

Long Walk to Freedom, by Nelson Mandela

 

Related Conversations:

Caring for Words in a Culture of Lies, with Marilyn McEntyre

Creating Cultural Artifacts that Build New Legacies | David Bailey | TEDxRVA

Special thanks to Ned Bustard for the artwork and Andrew Peterson for the music.

Sep 29, 2021
Calling & Community in a Post-Pandemic World with Os Guinness & Pete Peterson
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On Friday, May 15th, 2020 we were delighted to welcome Trinity Forum founder, author, and social-critic, Os Guinness, and Dean of Pepperdine’s School of Public Policy, Pete Peterson, to discuss calling and community in the aftermath of this global crisis.


Learn more about Os Guinness, and Pete Peterson.


Watch the full Online Conversation and read the transcript from May 15, 2020.


Mentioned authors and books:

The Call, by Os Guinness

John Stott

A Treatise on Vocations, William Perkins

Patrick Deneen

Søren Kierkegaard

Dr. James Houston

Range, by Jeffrey Epstein

The City of God, by St. Augustine

Strong and Weak, by Andy Crouch

Related Trinity Forum Readings:

“William Wilberforce: A Man Who Changed His Times,” by John Pollock, A Trinity Forum Reading

“Why Work?” by Dorothy Sayers, A Trinity Forum Reading

“How Much Land Does a Man Need?” by Leo Tolstoy, A Trinity Forum Reading

“Letters from Vincent Van Gogh,” by Vincent Van Gogh, A Trinity Forum Reading


Related viewing:

Pete Peterson’s webinar on calling  

Our Evening Conversation with Andy Crouch on Strong and Weak

Trinity Forum Evening Conversations with Os Guinness:

https://www.ttf.org/?portfolio=evening-conversation-with-os-guinness

https://www.ttf.org/?portfolio=evening-conversation-with-os-guinness-on-celebrating-the-500th-anniversary-of-the-reformation

https://www.ttf.org/?portfolio=evening-conversation-with-os-guinness-february-4-2014

https://www.ttf.org/?portfolio=evening-conversation-with-os-guiness-september-5-2013

Entrepreneurs of Life



Aug 18, 2021
Living a Tech-Wise Life with Andy and Amy Crouch
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On Friday, June 11th, we were pleased to welcome author and cultural analyst, Andy Crouch, and his daughter, Amy Crouch, to discuss their book entitled My Tech-Wise Life: Growing Up and Making Choices in a World of Devices. In it they explore how to navigate the possibilities and pitfalls of technology and its influence in one’s life. Andy and Amy believe there is a wise path we can walk with our technology, a different and better way to imagine our lives together. We hope you enjoy this conversation.

 

Learn more about Andy Crouch and Amy Crouch.

 

Watch the full Online Conversation and read the transcript from June 11, 2021.

 

Authors and books mentioned in the conversation:

Annie Dillard

My Tech-Wise Life: Growing Up and Making Choices in a World of Devices

Culture Making: Recovering Our Creative Calling

Playing God: Redeeming the Gift of Power

Strong and Weak: Embracing a Life of Love, Risk and True Flourishing 

The Tech-Wise Family: Everyday Steps for Putting Technology in Its Proper Place

Marshal McLuhan

Neil Postman

Albert Borgman

Bowling Alone, by Robert Putnam

Augustine of Hippo

James K.A. Smith

 

 

Related Trinity Forum Readings:

Brave New World, a Trinity Forum Reading by Aldous Huxley

The Confessions of St. Augustine, a Trinity Forum Reading

On Happiness, a Trinity Forum Reading by Thomas Aquinas, introduced by Fr. Dominic Legge 


Related conversations:

Online Conversation with Andy Crouch on “Playing God: Redeeming the Gift of Power” in 2013.

Online Conversation with Andy Crouch on his book “Strong and Weak: Embracing a Life of Love, Risk and True Flourishing”  in 2016. 

 

Special thanks to Ned Bustard for the artwork and Andrew Peterson for the music.

Aug 18, 2021
Invitation to Solitude and Silence with Ruth Haley Barton
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On March 19, 2021 we were delighted to host Christian author, leader, and teacher, Ruth Haley Barton. Barton is founding President/CEO of the Transforming Center, a ministry dedicated to strengthening the souls of Christian leaders and the congregations and organizations they serve. Ruth is the author of numerous books and resources on the spiritual life, including Strengthening the Soul of Your Leadership and Sacred Rhythms. She reflects regularly on spirituality and leadership in her blog, Beyond Words, and on her podcast Strengthening the Soul of Your Leadership.


We hope you enjoy this conversation around her book, Invitation to Solitude and Silence: Experiencing God’s Transforming Presence. Our attention, Barton believes, has become a commodity that we must protect if we are to avoid being swept away by our distracted age. She invites listeners to engage in these ancient biblical practices to find the rest for our souls that Jesus promises. In this Lenten season, we hope this will inspire you to pursue God’s transforming presence in new ways and contemplatively sit in solitude and silence with the Author and Perfecter of our faith.

 

Learn more about Ruth Haley Barton.

 

Watch the full Online Conversation and read the transcript from March 19, 2021.

 

Related reading:

A Shocking Lack of Solitude, Cherie Harder

 

Authors and books mentioned in the conversation:

Blaise Pascal

John Milton

C.S. Lewis

Richard Rohr

Dallas Willard

Henry Nouwen

Shop Class as Soulcraft, by Matthew B. Crawford

Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel

Julian of Norwich

Invitation to Solitude and Silence: Experiencing God's Transforming Presence, by Ruth Haley Barton

 

Related Trinity Forum Readings:

Confessions | A Trinity Forum Reading by St. Augustine, introduced by James K.A. Smith.
Pilgrim at Tinker Creek | A Trinity Forum Reading by Annie Dillard, introduced by Tish Harrison Warren.
Devotions | A Trinity Forum Reading by John Donne, introduced and paraphrased by Philip Yancey.
The Long Loneliness | A Trinity Forum Reading by Dorothy Day, introduced by Anne and David Brooks.
Wrestling with God | A Trinity Forum Reading by Simone Weil, introduced by Alonzo McDonald.
The Pilgrim's Progress | A Trinity Forum Reading by John Bunyan, introduced by Alonzo McDonald.

 

Special thanks to Ned Bustard for the artwork and Andrew Peterson for the music.


Aug 18, 2021
Suffering, Healing, and Meaning, with Philip Yancey and Julia Wattacheril
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On Friday, April 23rd, 2021 we were delighted to launch a new series on “Discovery and Doxology” in partnership with BioLogos and Church of the Advent. This series brings together leading scientists and theologians to discuss the relationship between science and faith. In this, our first event in the series, we hosted author and theologian, Philip Yancey, and Dr. Julia Wattacheril, discussing suffering, healing, and meaning. Yancey and Wattacheril help us to think through the meaning of our personal and national pain and how knowing the God who suffers with us can redeem such suffering, even transform it.

 

This event was made possible through the support of a grant from Templeton Religion Trust. The opinions expressed in this program do not necessarily reflect the views of Templeton Religion Trust.

 

Learn more about Philip Yancey and Dr. Julia Wattacheril.

 

Watch the full Online Conversation and read the transcript from April 23, 2021.

 

Authors and books mentioned in the conversation:

The Jesus I Never Knew

Where Is God When It Hurts?

Disappointment with God

What's So Amazing about Grace?

A Companion in Crisis

C.S. Lewis

John Donne

Dr. Paul Brand

Time Magazine

N.T. Wright

G.K. Chesterton

Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

 

Related Trinity Forum Readings:

Devotions, a Trinity Forum Reading by John Donne and introduced and paraphrased by Philip Yancey

Wrestling with God, a Trinity Forum Reading by Simon Weil
 

The Purchase of a Soul, a Trinity Forum Reading by Victor Hugo

Man’s Search for Meaning, by Viktor Frankl 

 

 

Special thanks to Ned Bustard for the artwork and Andrew Peterson for the music!



Aug 18, 2021
Living a Second Mountain Life, with David Brooks
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This episode features a conversation that took place on May 28, 2019 at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. with New York Times columnist and author David Brooks on “The Second Mountain.” Brooks offers the fascinating argument that we are, paradoxically, most fulfilled, and even most ourselves, in the context of commitment to community, family, vocation, and faith. The Second Mountain is an examination of how putting commitment-making at the center of our lives can repair the social fabric of our communities and ourselves.

Watch the full Evening Conversation from May 14, 2021.

Authors and books mentioned in the conversation:

Jayber Crow, by Wendell Berry
Mere Christianity, by C.S. Lewis 
Alasdair MacIntyre 
Richard Rohr
Dorothy Day
John Stott
Vaclav Havel

Related Trinity Forum Readings:

David Brooks is an Op-Ed columnist for The New York Times a commentator on “PBS NewsHour,” NPR’s “All Things Considered” and NBC’s “Meet the Press.” He is the author of numerous books including “The Road to Character,” and “The Second Mountain.” Mr. Brooks also teaches at Yale University, and is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Special thanks to Ned Bustard for the artwork and Andrew Peterson for the music.

Jun 16, 2021
Jane Austen and the Liturgies of Ordinary Life, with Karen Swallow Prior
2469

This episode features a conversation we hosted on Friday, May 21st with author and Trinity Forum Senior Fellow Karen Swallow prior on Jane Austen and her novel approach to virtue. Speaking of Austen’s Christian faith, Prior says, “Hers was the restrained, quiet, and personal faith of her Anglican tradition. Her novels are less altar calls than liturgies of ordinary life.” Austen’s world may feel quite removed from ours, but her focus on such everyday liturgies illustrate the importance of the seemingly mundane and illuminate the path towards repaired and rightly ordered relationships. 

We hope you enjoy this conversation!

Learn more about Karen Swallow Prior 

Watch the full Evening Conversation and read the transcript from May 21st, 2021.

Authors and books mentioned in the conversation:

Pride and Prejudice, Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
Amusing Ourselves to Death, by Neil Postman
Praying with Jane, by Rachel Dodge  
Alasdair MacIntyre
William Shakespeare

Related Trinity Forum Readings:

Dr. Karen Swallow Prior is Professor of English at Liberty University, where she has won multiple teaching awards. She writes frequently on literature, culture, ethics, and ideas. Her writing appears at Christianity Today, The Atlantic, The Washington Post, First Things, Vox, Think Christian, The Gospel Coalition, Books and Culture and other places. She is the author of Booked: Literature in the Soul of Me, Fierce Convictions: The Extraordinary Life of Hannah More—Poet, Reformer, Abolitionist , and On Reading Well: Finding the Good Life through Great Literature, and her most recent work Sense and Sensibility: A Guide to Reading and Reflecting

Special thanks to Ned Bustard for the artwork and Andrew Peterson for the music!

Jun 16, 2021
Creativity for the Life of the World, with Sho Baraka
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This episode features a conversation we hosted on Friday, May 14th with artist and author Sho Baraka for a conversation around his new book He Saw That It Was Good: Reimagining Your Creative Life To Repair A Broken World. Baraka says, “The command to love—in all the fullness and justice of that word—is laid on all, from politician to painter. With every policy pushed, every stroke of the brush, we put forth what we believe about God and about good. With what we make, we affect the world. For better or for worse.” In this conversation we explore how our creative gifts and good works can contribute to the care and repair of our hurting world. We hope you enjoy!

Learn more about Sho Baraka 


Watch the full Evening Conversation and read the transcript from May 14, 2021.

Authors and books mentioned in the conversation:

100 Years of Solitude, by Gabriel García Márquez
Frederick Douglass
Flannery O’Connor 
G.K. Chesterton

Related Trinity Forum Readings:

Sho Baraka is a globally recognized recording artist, performer, culture curator, activist, and writer. His work combines his artistic platform with his academic history to contribute a unique perspective, elevating the contemporary conversation on faith, art, and culture. An alumnus of Tuskegee University and the University of North Texas, Baraka is a cofounder of Forth District and the AND Campaign, and he has served as an adjunct professor at Wake Forest School of Divinity. He was also an original member of influential hip-hop consortium 116 Clique, recording with Reach Records. Baraka lives in Atlanta with his wife Patreece and their three children.

 

Special thanks to Ned Bustard for the artwork and Andrew Peterson for the music!

Jun 16, 2021
A Theology of Making, with Makoto Fujimura
2668

This episode features a conversation  we originally hosted on Friday, January 29th with artist and author Makoto Fujimura on his recent book  Art + Faith: A Theology of Making. Mako says, “I now consider what I do in the studio to be theological work as much as aesthetic work. I experience God, my Maker, in the studio. I am immersed in the art of creating, and I have come to understand this dimension of life as the most profound way of grasping human experience and the nature of our existence in the world. I call it the “Theology of Making.”

We hope you enjoy this conversation exploring the theological work of creating.

Learn more about Makoto Fujimura.


Watch the full Evening Conversation and read the transcript from January 29th, 2021.


Thanks to Windrider Productions and The Rabbit Room for their partnership on the event with Mako on January 29.


Authors and books mentioned in the conversation:

William Blake
N.T. Wright
Esther Meek
The Gift, by Lewis Hyde
Bruce Herman
T.S. Eliot
Amanda Gorman
David Brooks
Richard Mouw

Learn more about Kintsugi.

Related Trinity Forum Readings and Resources:

Makoto Fujimura is a leading contemporary artist whose process driven, refractive “slow art” has been described by David Brooks of New York Times as “a small rebellion against the quickening of time”. In addition to his work as an artist Mako is an author whose works include Refractions: A Journey of Faith, Art, and Culture and his just released work Art + Faith: A Theology of Making. Mako is also a senior fellow of the Trinity forum. 

Special thanks to Ned Bustard for the artwork and Andrew Peterson for the music!

Jun 16, 2021
The Good News and the Good Life, with N.T. Wright and Richard Hays
2610

This conversation took place on February 24, 2016 at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. We welcomed scholars and theologians N.T. Wright and Richard B. Hays to discuss The Good News and The Good Life. In this eastertide season we hope this conversation will encourage and inspire us to live as resurrection people.


Learn more about Richard Hays and N.T. Wright.

Watch the full Evening Conversation and read the transcript from February 24, 2016.


Learn more about our partners: 

Duke Divinity School — https://divinity.duke.edu

Baylor University Press — https://www.baylorpress.com/

McDonald Agape Fund — https://www.mcdonaldagape.org/agape/mcdonald-agape-foundation.html


Authors and books mentioned in the conversation:


Who Is This Man, by John Ortberg

To Change the World, by James Davison Hunter

The Cost of Discipleship, by Dietrich Bonhoeffer


Related Trinity Forum Readings:

 

Richard Hayes is internationally recognized as one of the foremost biblical scholars bridging the disciplines between biblical criticism and literary studies. He served for many years, both as the Dean and the George Washington IB Professor of New Testament at Duke Divinity School. Prior to coming to Duke, he served on the faculty of Yale Divinity School and his many books include, 'The Faith of Jesus Christ,' 'Echos of Scripture and the Letters of Paul,' 'The Moral Vision of the New Testament,' which was selected by Christianity Today as one of the hundred most important books of the 20th century, 'The Art of Reading Scripture,' and most recently, 'Reading Backwards.'

 

He's also an ordained minister in the United Methodist Church and has preached in settings ranging from rural Oklahoma to Westminster Abbey, as well as serving on the editorial boards of numerous scholarly journals, he holds a PhD from Emory, an honorary doctorate from Gerta University, and degrees from Yale.

 

N.T. Wright is a theologian academic author and minister who has been called by such sources as Time and Newsweek as one of the world's leading New Testament scholars and the most formidable figure in the world of Christian thought. He serves as the research professor of New Testament, the University of St. Andrews in Scotland and previously taught New Testament at Cambridge, McGill and Oxford Universities for over 20 years, and then held various posts in the Church of England, most recently as the Bishop of Durham. Dr. Wright is the author of over 80 different books, including 'Simply Good News,' 'How God Became King,' 'Simply Jesus,' 'Surprised by Scripture,' and many others and holds honorary doctorates from over a dozen different universities.

Apr 28, 2021
Crisis and Christian Humanism, with Alan Jacobs
2716

On Friday, July 10th we welcomed distinguished professor, author, and scholar Alan Jacobs to discuss his ever-timely book The Year of Our Lord 1943: Christian Humanism in an Age of Crisis. In his book, Jacobs describes how after the second World War, five Christian intellectuals presented strikingly similar visions for the moral and spiritual renewal of their countries.

Jacques Maritain, T. S. Eliot, C. S. Lewis, W. H. Auden, and Simone Weil all believed the renewal of their respective societies in the aftermath of World War II would come through education that was grounded in a Christian understanding of the power and limitations of human beings. Alan helped us consider the ways our world is changing due to our current crisis, and look back to these Christian intellectuals and their vision for cultivating a flourishing society and rebuilding a shared sense of the common good after world-wide disruption. We hope you enjoy this conversation!

Watch the full Online Conversation and read the transcript here.


Learn more about Alan Jacobs.


Alan Jacobs’ Books:

Breaking Bread with the Dead: A Reader’s Guide to a more Tranquil Mind, The Year of our Lord 1943: Christian Humanism in an Age of Crisis, How to Think: A Survival Guide for a World at Odds, The Book of Common Prayer: A Biography.

 

Baylor University Great Texts Program


Authors and books mentioned in the conversation:

Education at the Crossroads by Jacques Maritain

The Abolition of Man by C.S. Lewis

Vocation and Society, a lecture given at Swarthmore College by W.H. Auden

Christianity and Culture by T.S. Elliot

Between Past and Future, by Hannah Arendt

Rationalism in Politics, by Michael Oakeshott

Roberts Coles - Harvard Professor.

Bleak House, by Charles Dickens

C.S. Lewis - “The Inner Ring,” “Membership,” Abolition of Man, That Hideous Strength.

Leszek Kolakowski

George Eliot 

Søren Kierkegaard


Related Trinity Forum Readings and Resources:

 

Alan Jacobs is a scholar, English literature, a writer, a literary critic. He's a distinguished professor of the humanities and the honors college at Baylor university and previously taught for nearly 30 years at Wheaton college in Illinois, a prolific author and a wide ranging thinker. He's written for such publications as The Atlantic, Harper's, Comment, The New Yorker, the Weekly Standard and the Hedgehog Review and has published more than 15 different books on a wide range of topics from literature, technology theology and cognitive psychology, including How to Think, The Book of Common Prayer, the book we're discussing today, The Year of our Lord 1943, which was named by the Wall Street Journal is one of their best books on politics for the year of 2018 and many more, including the forthcoming book, Breaking Bread with the Dead: A Reader's Guide to a more Tranquil Mind, which is available now.


Apr 28, 2021
Story, Culture, & the Common Good, with Marilynne Robinson
2269

On Friday, July 24th we were honored to host award-winning and much-beloved novelist and essayist, Marilynne Robinson for a wide-ranging conversation on the art of writing as a means of exploring truth and engaging the questions around learning to live well, to love others, and to create a home and community in an often fractious world. Robinson, known for her keen observations on humanity and religion has plumbed the depths of the human spirit in her novels, including the National Book Critics Circle Award-winning Lila, and the Pulitzer Prize-winning Gilead. We hope you enjoy this conversation on “Story, Culture, and the Common Good.”

Watch the full Online Conversation and read the transcript here.


Marilynne Robinson's Novels | Housekeeping, Gilead, Home, Lila

Article in Breaking Ground from our event.


Authors and books mentioned in the conversation:

Marcel Proust

Ralph Waldo Emmerson

Paul Harding

Walt Witman

William Faulkner

John Calvin

Jonathan Edwards

Moby Dick, by Herman Mellville

Piers Plowman, by William Langland


Related Trinity Forum Readings:

 

Marilynne Robinson is a novelist, essayist, and teacher, one of the most renowned and revered of living writers. Her novels Housekeeping, Gilead, Lila, and Home have been variously honored with the Pulitzer Prize, National Books Critics Circle Award (twice), a Hemingway Foundation Award, an Orange Prize, The Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction, and the Ambassador Book Award. She's also the author of many essays and non-fiction works, including her work, “Mother Country”, and her essay collections, “Death of Adam,” “Absence of Mind,” “When I was a Child I Read Books,” “The Givenness of Things,” and “What Are We Doing Here?”. She's the recipient of the National Humanities Medal and an elected fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In addition to her writing has spent over 20 years teaching at the Iowa Writers Workshop, as well as several universities.


Apr 28, 2021
Caring for Words in a Culture of Lies with Marilyn McEntyre
2847

On Friday, July 17, 2020 we welcomed writer, poet, and professor Marilyn McEntyre for an Online Conversation to discuss her provocative book, Caring for Words in a Culture of Lies. The book focuses on the morality, power, and importance of caring for language. She notes that caring for one another is not entirely separable from caring for words. Words are entrusted to us as equipment for our life together, to help us survive, guide, and nourish one another. If language is to retain its power to nourish and sustain our common life, we have to care for it the way good farmers care for the earth.



Authors mentioned in the conversation:


Books mentioned in the conversation:

BBC Radio Program - My Word

Related Trinity Forum Readings:

Special thanks to Ned Bustard for the artwork and Andrew Peterson for the music!

Feb 24, 2021
Believing a Truer Story, with Curt Thompson
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On Good Friday, April 10, 2020 The Trinity Forum hosted psychiatrist Curt Thompson for an Online Conversation to discuss his insights on suffering, shame, and isolation, which are felt acutely in the COVID-19 pandemic. Curt’s word for us in this time is to be of good cheer—our King is coming!


Dr. Curt Thompson is a psychiatrist, author and speaker who specializes in connecting our intrinsic desire to be known with the need to tell truer stories about ourselves — showing us how to form deep relationships, discover meaning and live integrated, creative lives. Curt Thompson’s books Anatomy of the Soul and The Soul of Shame speak to the innermost desires of our hearts and souls, bringing together a dialect of interpersonal neurobiology and a Christian anthropology to uncover the key to living life fully: being known. To do that, we need genuine relationships, which can only be found when we tell the whole truth about who we are — to ourselves and others.

Feb 24, 2021
Redeeming a Culture of Contempt, with Arthur Brooks
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On Friday, September 25 we had the privilege of hosting best-selling author, thought leader, and Harvard Business and Kennedy School professor Arthur Brooks for an Online Conversation on “Redeeming a Culture of Contempt.” In his book, Love Your Enemies Brooks blends cutting-edge behavioral research and ancient wisdom to offer a better way to bridge divides and mend relationships. Brooks helps us to think about practical ways we can choose to love those we disagree with—to will their good and be agents of redemption and reconciliation amidst a divisive time.


Learn more about Arthur Brooks


Watch the full video and read the transcript of our conversation with Arthur


Resources mentioned during the conversation:

Special thanks to Ned Bustard for the artwork and Andrew Peterson for the music!

Feb 24, 2021
Season 1 | Trailer
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Special thanks to Ned Bustard for the artwork and Andrew Peterson for the music!

Feb 17, 2021