Not Just the Tudors

By History Hit

Listen to a podcast, please open Podcast Republic app. Available on Google Play Store.


Category: History

Open in Apple Podcasts


Open RSS feed


Open Website


Rate for this podcast

Subscribers: 435
Reviews: 7

Michael Caplan
 Dec 11, 2021
A beautifully presented podcast. I love the way Suzannah Lipscomb looks to broaden the discussion to include a reflection on the nature of Historical scholarship.

One of the Best
 Dec 7, 2021
This is a wonderful podcast. I love to get a feeling of how people lived in the past. The fullness of the info gives me the best idea of that. better than any novel, non-fiction book or even film that I've read or seen. Love it!


 Nov 13, 2021

TC
 Nov 5, 2021
So interesting, really good insightful history


 Oct 14, 2021

Description

Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks about everything from the Aztecs to witches, Velázquez to Shakespeare, Mughal India to the Mayflower. Not, in other words, just the Tudors, but most definitely also the Tudors.

Each episode Suzannah is joined by historians and experts to reveal incredible stories about one of the most fascinating periods in history.  You can also subscribe to our Tudor Tuesday newsletter, here >


Episode Date
The Death of Henry VIII
00:38:13

475 years ago, on 28 January 1547, King Henry VIII died at the age of 55. Just hours before his passing, his last will and testament had been read, stamped, and sealed. Historians have disagreed ever since about its authenticity and validity, and the circumstances of its creation, making Henry's will one of English history's most contested documents, 


In this explainer episode of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb offers her own illuminating interpretation of the aftermath of Henry VIII's death, the mystery of his will and how misplaced trust can undermine the best-laid plans of a powerful monarch.


Keep up to date with everything early modern, from Henry VIII to the Sistine Chapel with our Tudor Tuesday newsletter > 


If you would like to learn more about history, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit >


To download, go to Android > or Apple store >

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 27, 2022
Henry VIII and the Sport of Jousting
00:43:05

In the world of King Henry VIII, the paramount place to demonstrate physical strength and manly courage was the joust - and Henry excelled at it.


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to historian Dr. Emma Levitt to find out more about what jousting was, why Henry liked it so much, how it was scored, what it cost - and the culture of honour, manhood and physical chivalry that it embodied. 


Keep up to date with everything early modern, from Henry VIII to the Sistine Chapel with our Tudor Tuesday newsletter >


If you would like to learn more about history, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit >


To download, go to Android > or Apple store >

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 24, 2022
Kate Mosse: The Art of Writing Historical Fiction
00:48:15

Kate Mosse is the multimillion-selling author of the Languedoc Trilogy - Labyrinth, Sepulchre and Citadel. With her new novel The City of Tears, the second in her series The Burning Chambers, just out in paperback, she tells the story of a family’s fight to stay together and survive against the backdrop of the French Wars of Religion and the St. Bartholomew's Day Massacre of 1572.


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Kate Mosse about how she goes about writing historical fiction, researching the events of the past, imagining the characters who lived through them and, most particularly, conjuring up the places she finds inspiring - but as they used to be.


Keep up to date with everything early modern, from Henry VIII to the Sistine Chapel with our Tudor Tuesday newsletter: Subscribe here 


If you would like to learn more about history, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit >


To download, go to Android > or Apple store >

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 20, 2022
Cardinal Wolsey: His Rise and Fall
00:51:45

No advisor was more important to King Henry VIII than Cardinal Thomas Wolsey. He captured Henry's attention with his brilliance and became his most trusted confidant. But when the King wanted to divorce Catherine of Aragon, not even the eloquent Wolsey could convince the Pope to agree. 


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Wolsey's biographer Professor Glenn Richardson, about the man who was responsible for building Henry VIII's reputation as England's most impressive king but ended up being accused of treason.


Keep up to date with everything early modern, from Henry VIII to the Sistine Chapel with our Tudor Tuesday newsletter: Subscribe here >:


If you would like to learn more about history, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit >


To download, go to Android > or Apple store >

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 17, 2022
Elizabeth I and Mary, Queen of Scots: Rival Queens
00:41:52

Elizabeth I and Mary, Queen of Scots were cousins who never met - but their fates were intertwined. As their nations were engulfed in religious turmoil and civil wars raged on the continent, these two powerful women struggled for control of the British Isles.  


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb goes to the British Library in London to meet curator Andrea Clarke and visit a stunning exhibition on the rival Queens, which uses original documents and extraordinary objects to show how paranoia turned sisterly affection to suspicion.


Keep up to date with everything early modern, from Henry VIII to the Sistine Chapel with our Tudor Tuesday newsletter: Subscribe here >


If you would like to learn more about history, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit >


To download, go to Android > or Apple store >

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 13, 2022
1492: The Year the Spanish Monarchy Changed the World
00:33:21

2022 marks the 530th anniversary of 1492 - the year in which Ferdinand of Aragon and Isabella of Castille ended centuries of Muslim rule in Spain, expelled the country's Jews, and signed a contract with one Christopher Columbus who set set sail to find the Indies - and the rest is history.


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Isabella's biographer Giles Tremlett about her and Ferdinand's pursuit of piety, purity and power and their role in the momentous events of 1492.


Keep up to date with everything early modern, from Henry VIII to the Sistine Chapel with our Tudor Tuesday newsletter: Subscribe here 


If you would like to learn more about history, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit >


To download, go to Android > or Apple store >

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 10, 2022
The Laughing Cavalier and the Man who Painted Him
00:34:19

One of the most famous paintings in London is The Laughing Cavalier of 1624 by Franz Hals, the great portrait artist of the Dutch Golden Age whose fame has been somewhat eclipsed by Vermeer and Rembrandt. In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb heads off to the Wallace Collection in London to see The Laughing Cavalier - alongside an exquisite, small selection of Hals' male portraits - and to discuss them with curator Lelia Packer.  There is also analysis by contemporary artist Grayson Perry, who features in the exhibition's multimedia guide, created in collaboration with Imagineear. The guide, free with every exhibition ticket, brings the individual portraits to life through rich commentary provided by Perry and other experts.


Keep up to date with everything early modern, from Henry VIII to the Sistine Chapel with our Tudor Tuesday newsletter: Subscribe here > 


If you would like to learn more about history, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit > To download, go to Android or Apple store.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 06, 2022
2022: A Year of Major Anniversaries
00:51:15

Happy New Year from Not Just the Tudors! But what, looking back, can we look forward to in 2022? Our first episode of the year anticipates 12 months filled with fascinating historical exhibitions and important anniversaries - from the raising from the seabed of the Mary Rose 40 years ago in 1982 to the 500th anniversary since the first recorded circumnavigation of the globe, with many more world-shaking events in between. Join Professor Suzannah Lipscomb for everything you ever wanted to know about the coming year.


If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit.

To download, go to Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.historyhit&hl=en_GB&gl=US or Apple store: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/history-hit/id1303668247


Keep up to date with everything early modern, from Henry VIII to the Sistine Chapel with our Tudor Tuesday newsletter: Subscribe here 

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 03, 2022
A Happy Tudor New Year
00:51:42

For the Tudors, Christmas Day was not traditionally the date when gifts were given. The Twelve Days of Christmas begin on 25 December and end at Epiphany, 6 January - also known as Twelfth Night. In Tudor times, all 12 were feast days, but 1 January was the day when presents were unwrapped.


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb dives into how Christmas and New Year were marked by the Tudors and Stuarts, and what kind of gifts they gave, with Dr. Felicity Heal, author of The Power of Gifts: Gift Exchange in Early Modern England.


If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit: https://access.historyhit.com/checkout/subscribe/purchase

To download, go to Android:https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.historyhit&hl=en_GB&gl=US or Apple Store: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/history-hit/id1303668247


Keep up to date with everything early modern, from Henry VIII to the Sistine Chapel with our Tudor Tuesday newsletter: Subscribe here: https://www.historyhit.com/sign-up-to-history-hit/?utm_source=timelinenewsletter&utm_medium=podcast&utm_campaign=Timeline+Podcast+Campaign


 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 30, 2021
The Biggest Finds of 2021: Review of the Year
00:41:26

In this special end of the year edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb takes a look back at 2021 and the major events and achievements that have changed the way we understand the Tudors - but not just the Tudors!


Suzannah picks out her five favourite new books from the last 12 months, as well as surveying some of the extraordinary archaeological discoveries that have brought to light previously unknown artefacts, and the painstaking academic research which has increased our knowledge of the period.


If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit.

To download, go to Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.historyhit&hl=en_GB&gl=US or Apple store: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/history-hit/id1303668247


Keep up to date with everything early modern, from Henry VIII to the Sistine Chapel with our Tudor Tuesday newsletter: Subscribe here

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 27, 2021
Tudor Ghosts and Angels: Spirits of Christmas Past
00:54:48

To this day, the presence of angels is synonymous with the Christmas story and the momentous events associated with the Nativity. For the Tudors and Stuarts, widespread belief in angels brought a touch of the miraculous to life, but so too did ghosts, although it was sometimes hard to distinguish them from angels - or demons.


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb summons up the spirits of times past with historian Dr Laura Sangha, an expert in the beliefs associated with the supernatural in the early modern period.


If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit.

To download, go to Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.historyhit&hl=en_GB&gl=US or Apple store: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/history-hit/id1303668247


Keep up to date with everything early modern, from Henry VIII to the Sistine Chapel with our Tudor Tuesday newsletter: Subscribe here 


Keep up to date with everything early modern, from Henry VIII to the Sistine Chapel. Subscribe to our Tudor Tuesday newsletter, here >

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 23, 2021
The Witches of Iceland
00:38:47

In Iceland in the 17th century, witchcraft accusations, trials and convictions occurred later than in the rest of Europe. But also unusual was the fact that 91% of "witches" executed in Iceland were men. In a country where the weather and rural life was harsh - and traditional superstitions and folk medicine still held sway - the imposed Lutheran influence of Danish rule led to hysteria and a wave of sad and shocking cases.


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb finds out more with scholar Dr. Ólína Kjerulf Þorvarðardóttir, a former Member of Iceland's Althing Parliament.


If you'd like to learn more, we have hundreds of history documentaries, ad-free podcasts and audiobooks at History Hit.

To download, go to Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.historyhit&hl=en_GB&gl=US or Apple store: https://apps.apple.com/gb/app/history-hit/id1303668247


Keep up to date with everything early modern, from Henry VIII to the Sistine Chapel with our Tudor Tuesday newsletter: Subscribe here 

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 20, 2021
Tudor Box Set Binge: Shekhar Kapur's Elizabeth
00:32:01

If you are planning your television viewing over the holidays, especially if you are looking forward to bingeing on the best Tudor dramas and classic film depictions of the era, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb has a few personal recommendations of movies and TV series for you to re-discover this festive season. 


And in the second part of the podcast, she casts an eye over the 1998 Shekhar Kapur film Elizabeth, which starred an Oscar-nominated Cate Blanchett as the eponymous monarch.  It was undoubtedly dazzling to look at, but how did the film stand up as historical fact?


Keep up to date with everything early modern, from Henry VIII to the Sistine Chapel with our Tudor Tuesday newsletter: Subscribe here

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 16, 2021
Dürer: The Great Renaissance Artist and His World
00:38:53

Albrecht Dürer was the greatest German artist to come out of the Renaissance, whose high quality woodcuts revolutionised the potential of the medium. A spectacular exhibition at the National Gallery in London - the first major UK show of his work in nearly 20 years - charts Dürer's extensive travels to the Alps, Italy, Venice and the Netherlands, exploring how his journeys fuelled his curiosity and creativity, and increased his fame and influence across the continent. 


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb goes to the National Gallery and is joined by curator Dr. Susan Foister to tour the show and find out more about Dürer, the world he encountered and how he depicted it.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 13, 2021
True Crime on the Elizabethan Stage
00:41:18

The true crime genre - stories of actual murders and other crimes that are then fictionalised - is not a new phenomenon. More than four centuries ago, a series of plays based on real life cases appeared on the London stage. It was a short-lived craze generated by the insatiable early modern appetite for the "three Ms" - melodrama, moralizing and misogyny. 


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to author Charles Nicholl about the little known phenomenon of Elizabethan true crime, which even influenced the works of William Shakespeare.


Keep up to date with everything early modern, from Henry VIII to the Sistine Chapel with our Tudor Tuesday newsletter: Subscribe here

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 09, 2021
Writing True Crime: The Murder of Rizzio
00:34:58

On 9 March 1566, David Rizzio - close friend and private secretary to Mary, Queen of Scots - was stabbed dozens of times in front of the pregnant Queen at the instigation of her husband, Lord Darnley in an apparent bid to destroy both her and her unborn heir so that Darnley himself could rule Scotland. He had also made a bargain with his allies in return for restoring their lands and titles.


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to crime novelist Denise Mina about her re-telling of this tale of sex, seduction, secrets and lies, looking at history through a modern lens and exploring the lengths to which men - and women - will go for love and power.


Keep up to date with everything early modern, from Henry VIII to the Sistine Chapel with our Tudor Tuesday newsletter: Subscribe here

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 06, 2021
Black Tudors: England's Other Countrymen
00:49:04

Our image of the Tudor era remains overwhelmingly white. But the black presence in England was much greater than has previously been recognised, and Tudor conceptions of race were far more complex than we have been led to believe.  


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Dr. Onyeka Nubia whose original research shows that Tudors from many walks of life regularly interacted with people of African descent, both at home and abroad - findings that cast a new light on the Tudor age and our own attitudes towards race relations in history.


Keep up to date with everything early modern, from Henry VIII to the Sistine Chapel with our Tudor Tuesday newsletter: Subscribe here

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 02, 2021
Who Really Ruled Tudor England?
00:55:24

Was Henry VIII as all-powerful and tyrannical as we have come to believe? Is the scheming of Thomas Cromwell portrayed in Wolf Hall close to the truth? What were the roles of the clergy, or parliament, or the land-owning gentry, in supporting or influencing the sweeping changes that rocked England during the period?


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Professor George Bernard. He has been picking apart the conventional view of Tudor society, the work of influential past historians, and the roles of a Machiavellian monarch, the church and individuals, to ask where did the power really lie? And did they really have a choice?


Keep up to date with everything early modern, from Henry VIII to the Sistine Chapel with our Tudor Tuesday newsletter: Subscribe here

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 29, 2021
The First Gun Crime in London
00:25:07

Early in the morning of Sunday 13 November 1536, a London merchant named Robert Pakington was shot dead crossing Cheapside as he walked to church. It was the first gun crime in London's history. But who pulled the trigger? In a time of religious turmoil, was Pakington's murder perhaps provoked by his outspoken criticism of the clergy?


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb speaks to historian and writer Derek Wilson, whose novel  The First Horseman launched a series exploring true, unsolved Tudor crimes.


If you’re enjoying this podcast and looking for more fascinating Tudor content, then subscribe to our Tudor Tuesday newsletter, here >

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 25, 2021
Henry VIII's Wives on Stage: Six - The Musical
00:32:31

Since its first outing at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival in 2017, the stage musical Six has become a worldwide theatre sensation. In it, the six wives of Henry VIII are re-imagined as a girl band, competing to decide who will lead the group based on how much they suffered while married to Henry.


Six was created by two Cambridge undergrads, Toby Marlow and Lucy Moss, while they were studying for their final exams. In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to them, to discover the story of how they brought Henry VIII's six wives out from under their husband's shadow and gave each of them their moment in the spotlight.


Keep up to date with everything early modern, from Henry VIII to the Sistine Chapel with our Tudor Tuesday newsletter: Subscribe here

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 22, 2021
A Tudor Scandal: Did Thomas Seymour Groom Elizabeth Tudor?
00:49:48

In 1547, the 14-year-old future Queen Elizabeth I is living with her step-mother Queen Catherine Parr and her new husband Thomas Seymour, uncle to Elizabeth's half-brother King Edward VI. But when Seymour begins an overt flirtation with Elizabeth, she is sent away by Catherine. Later, when Seymour is arrested for treason, Elizabeth and Seymour's relationship comes under close scrutiny.


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Dr. Elizabeth Norton about this harrowing and potentially damaging episode from the early life of the Virgin Queen.


Sign up to receive History Hit's Tudor Tuesday newsletter, here >

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 18, 2021
The Making of Oliver Cromwell
00:46:46

Oliver Cromwell - the only commoner to have become Britain's head of state - has puzzled biographers for centuries. He was a complex character, courageous but at the same time devious and self-serving. But the Cromwell who comes through in his own speeches and writings does not give us the full picture.

 

In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Professor Ronald Hutton about his remarkable new book which reveals a Cromwell who was both genuine in his faith and deliberate in his dishonesty.


You can also subscribe to our Tudor Tuesday newsletter, here >

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 15, 2021
The Last Witches
00:56:22

In 1682, three impoverished women from Bideford in Devon were hanged, becoming the last people to be executed for witchcraft in England. The evidence against them was flimsy and their conviction was secured against a background of a baying mob mentality. Yet their story has endured, and their names were chanted as recently as the 1980s, as both inspiration and incantation, by women peace activists at Greenham Common.


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to John Callow, whose new book The Last Witches of England demonstrates how the case of the Bideford witches sheds light upon the turbulent religious, political, class and social tensions of the 17th century.  


Keep up to date with everything early modern, from Henry VIII to the Sistine Chapel with our Tudor Tuesday newsletter: Subscribe here

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 11, 2021
Devil-Land: England Under Siege 1588-1688
00:37:45

In the 17th century, England was known as "Devil-Land" - a diabolical country torn apart by seditious rebellion, religious extremism and royal collapse. Dr. Clare Jackson has written a dazzling, original account of English history's most turbulent and radical era telling the story of a nation in a state of near continual crisis.  


Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Dr. Jackson about England between 1588 and 1688 which was, in many ways, an unstable state, rocked by devastating events from the Gunpowder Plot to the Great Fire of London.


Sign up to receive History Hit's Tudor Tuesday newsletter, here >

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 08, 2021
The Ottoman Renaissance
00:44:09

The Ottoman Empire has long been seen as the Islamic-Asian opposite of the Christian-European West. But the reality was very different: the Ottomans played an integral role in European history. Their multiethnic, multilingual, and multi-religious domain reached deep into the heart of the continent, connecting the East and West as never before.  


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Professor Marc David Baer about the extraordinary Ottomans, how their rulers saw themselves as the New Romans, how they fascinated Henry VIII, and how a true picture of their power and influence upends our common concepts of the Renaissance.


Sign up to receive History Hit's Tudor Tuesday newsletter, here

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 04, 2021
Singing the News: Ballads in Mid-Tudor England
00:58:02

In an age before newspapers and mass media, how did the general public keep abreast of what was going on? How did they find out about the seismic changes going on at court, and in the religious life of the country?  


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Dr. Jenni Hyde, whose extensive research into the early modern period proves that the news was not only spread by word of mouth and pamphlets, it actually became the stuff of ballads and communal songs.


Sign up to receive History Hit's Tudor Tuesday newsletter, here >

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 01, 2021
Explainer: The Love Letters of Henry VIII to Anne Boleyn
00:39:59

In the Vatican Library, there survive 17 highly personal love letters, written in King Henry VIII's own hand to Anne Boleyn between 1527 and 1528. How the letters got there no one exactly knows - they were probably stolen from Anne to be used as evidence in Henry's divorce trial with Catherine of Aragon. 


In the second of her Explainer podcasts, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb explores these extraordinary letters that changed history. The podcast includes excerpts from History Hit's newly released audio book of the Love Letters of Henry VIII to Anne Boleyn, read by Matt Lewis, which can be listened to in full here >


Sign up to receive our Tudor Tuesday newsletter, here >

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 28, 2021
The Ruin of All Witches: Life and Death in the New World
00:56:46

On a remote Massachusetts plantation in 1651, an unpopular local brickmaker was blamed for a wave of animal ailments, children dying and vanishing property. The argumentative Hugh Parsons was accused of being a vengeful witch.  


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Professor Malcolm Gaskill about his research into this dark, real-life folktale of family tragedy, supernatural obsessions and social anxiety in the New World of the Puritans.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 25, 2021
The Massacre of the Huguenots
00:49:21

The royal wedding of Marguerite de Valois and Henri de Navarre on 18 August 1572, was designed to reconcile France’s Catholics and Protestants - or Huguenots. But six days later, the execution of Protestant leaders led to a massacre by Catholics of thousands more Protestants in Paris and across France. 


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb is joined by Dr. Sophie Nicholls - who is currently writing a popular history of the French Wars of Religion - to explore the events and tensions that led to one of the most frenzied and brutal outbreaks of religious violence in early modern history.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 21, 2021
The Spanish King of England
00:44:01

Philip II of Spain - the most powerful monarch of the early modern period - was married to Queen Mary Tudor from 1554 until her death in 1558. But Philip was not merely Mary's King Consort. Rather he was King of England, co-ruler with Mary. But Philip's character and central role in the English monarchy was forever blackened by anti-Catholic versions of Tudor history. 


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Professor Gonzalo Velasco Berenguer, whose ground-breaking research shows that the reign of Mary and Philip was much more than an anomalous glitch on England's journey towards Protestantism.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 18, 2021
How Catherine of Aragon Learnt to be Queen
00:59:06

The Spanish infanta Catalina of Aragon was raised to be a Queen, betrothed at the age of three to the heir apparent of the English throne, Arthur Prince of Wales. Eight years after Arthur's death, she became the first of Henry VIII's six wives. Catalina's mother - Queen Isabella I of Castile - was the most influential person in her life. Witness at an early age to the expulsion of Jews, the defeat of the Moors in Spain, and the triumphal return of Christopher Columbus, Catherine grew up to be a intelligent, highly literate, multi-lingual woman, devoted to her Catholic faith, and a popular, charismatic Queen.


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb discovers more about the early life of Catherine with two leading experts: Dr. Theresa Earenfight, Professor of History at Seattle University and author of a forthcoming biography of Catherine, and Emma Cahill Marron, whose dissertation is focused on the Queen's role as a patron of the arts in Tudor England. 

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 14, 2021
The Rebellions of 1549
00:53:01

In 1549, the Tudor establishment was rocked by a series of popular rebellions, born of deep discontent over the enclosure by wealthy landowners of common land, which were essential to ordinary people's livelihoods. In Norfolk, yeoman Robert Kett agreed to the rebels' demands and offered to lead them, storming and taking the city of Norwich - an act which prompted a brutal response from the full military might of the state.


In this episode of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Professor Andy Wood about the Norfolk insurrection - known as the Ketts Rebellion - and its long-term significance for the development of English society.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 11, 2021
The First Sexual Revolution
00:47:07

For most of western history, sex outside of marriage was forbidden by law, with adulterers even facing the death sentence. The church, the state and neighbours all put huge amounts of energy into catching sexual wrongdoers and seeing them punished. But between 1600 and 1800, this entire world-view was shattered by revolutionary new ideas - that consenting adults have the freedom to do what they like with their own bodies, and morality cannot be imposed by force.


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Professor Faramerz Dabhoiwala, author of The Origins of Sex, about his groundbreaking research into how the modern approach to sex came about.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 07, 2021
Lady Jane Grey
00:50:40

On a cold February morning in 1554, Lady Jane Grey was beheaded for high treason. Named as King Edward VI as his successor, Queen Jane had reigned for just 13 tumultuous days before being imprisoned in the Tower, condemned and executed.


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to author and historian Nicola Tallis who reveals the moving, human story of an intelligent, independent and courageous young woman, forced on to the English throne by the great power players in the Tudor court.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 04, 2021
Sir Thomas More
00:39:58

Who was Thomas More - Knight, Chancellor and Martyr? His life is paradoxical, with More regarded as both saint and persecutor, Humanist intellectual and bigoted zealot. His religious writings, with their - at times - violent attacks on what he regarded as heresy, have been hotly debated.  


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Professor Tom Betteridge. In his work, he has placed Thomas More in a broader cultural context and argues for a revision to the existing histories of the man and his reputation.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 30, 2021
The Gunpowder Plot's Tudor Origins
00:59:55

The Gunpowder Plot is one of the hinge events of British history - an act of terror the roots of which stretch back to the Tudor period and Henry VIII's break with Rome. It's a story of Holy War, divided loyalties and religious hatred. And it has never been more timely. 


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Suzannah Lipscomb talks gunpowder, treason and plot with historian and broadcaster Jessie Childs, author of the award-winning God’s Traitors

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 27, 2021
The King's Painter: Holbein and the Tudor Court
00:44:36

In the early 1530s, the painter Hans Holbein the Younger returns to London. His patronage by Anne Boleyn and the influential Thomas Cromwell leads to Holbein creating the full-length portrait of King Henry VIII that has dominated how we have visualised him ever since. 


In this second of a two-part Not Just the Tudors special, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb further explores Holbein's fascinating life and work with three of the world's foremost scholars of the artist - Jeanne Nuechterlein, Franny Moyle and Susan Foister. 

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 23, 2021
The King's Painter: Hans Holbein's Early Years
00:42:50

Hans Holbein the Younger is celebrated for his hyper-realistic, iconic portraits of Henry VIII, Thomas More, Thomas Cromwell, Anne of Cleves, Jane Seymour and an array of Tudor lords and ladies. But beyond these, Holbein was a humanist, satirist, political propagandist, book designer and religious artist.


In this first of a two-part Not Just the Tudors special exploring the life and work of this multi-faceted genius, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to three of the world's foremost Holbein scholars - Jeanne Nuechterlein, Franny Moyle and Susan Foister - about the early life of Tudor England's artistic giant. 

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 20, 2021
Clothing Tudor Queens
00:47:15

How did Tudor Queens clothe themselves? How did female fashion change over Henry VIII's reign? Did foreign Queens influence English fashion or adopt it? Did women wear underclothes?


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Professor Maria Hayward about everything there is to know about what Tudor women wore, and why.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 16, 2021
Islam and the Elizabethans
00:53:21

Elizabeth I's excommunication by the Pope in 1570 marked the beginning of an extraordinary - and little talked about - English alignment with Muslim powers that were fighting Catholic Spain in the Mediterranean. This engagement with, and awareness of, Islam found its way into scores of plays, including Shakespeare's Othello.


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Professor Jerry Brotton about England's fascinating relations with the Muslim world, which were far more extensive, and often more amicable, than we might think.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 13, 2021
Making Babies in the 17th Century
00:47:06

Making babies was a mysterious process for people in early modern England. Their ideas about conception, pregnancy, and childbirth tell us much about their attitudes towards gender and power at that time.


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Professor Mary Fissell. She has been delving into a wealth of popular sources - ballads, jokes, witchcraft pamphlets, Prayer Books and popular medical manuals - to produce the first account of how women's reproductive bodies were understood in the 17th century.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 09, 2021
Travels and Travails in the Ottoman Empire
00:36:13

In July 1596, Fynes Moryson - a Lincolnshire gentleman and travel writer - was struck down with grief when his younger brother died as they crossed the desert on their return from Jerusalem. Moryson described his journeys and devastating experiences two decades later in an account titled Itinerary, at once a personal memoir and a huge manual of travel advice.  


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Dr. Eva Johanna Holmberg, whose study of Moryson, his travels and his travails, sheds light on the lives and emotions of people in the early modern period.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 06, 2021
The Tudors in Love
00:41:16

The dramas of courtly love have captivated readers and dreamers for centuries. Yet they’re often dismissed as something that existed only in the legends of King Arthur and chivalric fantasy.


But in this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Sarah Gristwood tells Professor Suzannah Lipscomb how the Tudors actually re-enacted the roles of the devoted lovers and capricious mistresses first laid out in the romances of medieval literature - romantic obsessions that shaped the history of Britain.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 02, 2021
Emotions and the History of Witchcraft
00:47:54

Not all suspicions of witchcraft led to a formal accusation, and not all such accusations led to trials and execution. During the entire early modern period, the large, Lutheran duchy of Württemberg in southwestern Germany - where there were some 600 accusations - only 350 went to trial, 197 of which ended with burning at the stake. So what does this tell us about how people understood themselves and each other, the psychology and emotions of those accused, and how they tried to defend themselves? 


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Dr. Laura Kounine, who has been studying how the community, church, and agents of the law sought to identify witches, and the ways in which ordinary men and women fought for their lives in an attempt to avoid execution.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 30, 2021
Explainer: Henry VIII's Break with Rome
00:29:56

King Henry VIII was deeply religious and started out as a staunch supporter of the Pope and the Roman Catholic church. But everything changed when Henry's need to produce a male successor led to his wanting to divorce Catherine of Aragon and marry Anne Boleyn. 


In this first of an occasional series of Explainer podcasts, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb offers everything you ever wanted to know about one of the most famous and far-reaching episodes in British history.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 26, 2021
Awaiting the Apocalypse: The Münster Rebellion
00:33:37

Between February 1534 and June 1535, the German city of Münster was seized and ruled over by a radical group of Protestant Christians called Anabaptists who believed the Biblical Apocalypse was imminent. Their leader styled himself as a new King Solomon. He took 16 wives and - allegedly - personally executed those who opposed him. 


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Dr. Kat Hill about this extraordinary attempt to create the "New Jerusalem" and its inevitably disastrous outcome.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 23, 2021
Beauty Tips from the Renaissance
00:37:36

What was the 16th century ideal of beauty for women? Fat or thin? Blonde or brunette? Pale or tanned? How did women keep clean? Did they remove their body hair?


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb gets the lowdown from Jill Burke - Professor of Renaissance Visual and Material Cultures at the University of Edinburgh - on all the tips to become an authentic Renaissance Woman.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 19, 2021
"Bloody Mary" vs. "The Virgin Queen"
00:43:43

Queen Mary I has had a bad press over the centuries, her five-years on the throne overshadowed by her half-sister Elizabeth's 45-year reign. While Elizabeth I is often hailed as "Gloriana" - and one of the greatest ever Britons - "Bloody Mary" more often finds her way onto charts of the most evil women in history. Both childless, Mary is reviled as "barren" while Elizabeth is lauded as the "Virgin Queen".


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Professor Anna Whitelock who puts the case for a more balanced assessment of Mary I as a Queen who pioneered what female rule could look like.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 16, 2021
The Black Prince of Florence
00:45:51

In the cut-throat world of Renaissance Florence, Alessandro - the illegitimate son of a Duke and a mixed-race servant - attempts to reassert the Medicis’ faltering grip on the city state. But after just six years in power, Alessandro is murdered by his cousin while anticipating an adulterous liaison.


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Professor Catherine Fletcher, author of The Black Prince of Florence, about one man's spectacular rise to power against the odds, and his violent demise.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 12, 2021
Henry VIII: Defender of the Faith?
00:48:47

Five hundred years ago in 1521, the title 'Defender of the Faith' was bestowed by Pope Leo X upon King Henry VIII for his defence of the Catholic Church against the threat of Martin Luther. Why did he then break away from Rome and create religious divisions for centuries to come? A new online exhibition - drawn from the colletion of the Society of Antiquaries in London - offers a new perspective on the power Henry wielded, his personality and passions.


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb finds out more about this fascinating resource from its curator Dr. John Cooper. View the objects while listening to the podcast here: https://stories.sal.org.uk/henryviii/

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 09, 2021
The Witches of Lorraine
00:42:11

Between 1570 and 1630, there was intense persecution and thousands of executions of suspected witches in Lorraine, a small duchy on the borders of France and the Holy Roman Empire. In some cases, suspicious citizens waited decades to report their neighbours as witches. But why did they take so long to use the law to eliminate the supposedly dangerous figures who lived amongst them?


Robin Briggs - Emeritus Fellow at All Souls College Oxford - has delved into perhaps the richest surviving archive of witchcraft trials to be found in Europe. In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, he talks to Professor Suzannah Lipscomb about his conclusion that witchcraft was actually perceived as having strong therapeutic possibilities: once a person was identified as the cause of a sickness, they could be induced to take it off again. 

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 05, 2021
Beards Maketh the Man
00:36:13

For the Tudors and Elizabethans, a beard denoted masculinity while beardlessness indicated boyhood or effeminacy. How a man wore his beard - or not - said a lot about his power and position in society. 


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to theatre historian Dr. Eleanor Rycroft about her hirsute pursuits, analysing the depiction of beards in portraits and on stage, what their various colours, shapes and sizes meant, and what they tell us about gender attitudes in early modern England.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 02, 2021
A 17th Century Mexican Superstar Nun
00:41:22

Though she is relatively unknown outside of Mexico, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz - poet, playwright and nun - is an icon and national hero in her homeland. She even features on the 200 peso banknote. 


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Dr. Amy Fuller Morgan about the real Sor Juana - misrepresented and mythologised as a subversive upstart, even a martyr - who in fact had a privileged life and the support of the Church and court, and who carefully cultivated her own image and saintly reputation.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 29, 2021
Queen Catherine Howard: Henry VIII's Fifth Wife
00:52:27

Catherine Howard was Queen Consort - and fifth wife - to Henry VIII for just 16 months before he had her executed for treason for committing adultery. Since Victorian times, historians have labelled her as lewd and promiscuous, but there was an altogether more complex young woman behind the rumours.


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Gareth Russell, author of Young and Damned and Fair, a riveting account of Catherine's tragic marriage to an unstable King, and the tragedy of her life in a dangerous hothouse where the odds were stacked against her. 

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 26, 2021
Martin Luther's World and Legacy
00:48:47

A controversial figure during his lifetime, Martin Luther set in motion a revolution that split Christianity in the West and left an indelible mark on the world today. 


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to renowned Luther biographer Lyndal Roper to explore the man behind the carefully crafted image - misogynistic, anti-Semitic, occasionally self-doubting, religiously devout yet with a crude, scatological sense of humour.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 22, 2021
Rival Queens: Elizabeth I and Catherine de' Medici
00:46:06

The relationship between Elizabeth I and Catherine de' Medici - the two most powerful Queens of their time - is one of the most intriguing and captivating stories of the 16th century. 


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Dr. Estelle Paranque about her new book Blood, Fire and Gold, which explores how these two formidable women wielded and negotiated power, and were united only in their dislike of Mary, Queen of Scots.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 19, 2021
Early Modern Feminists
00:38:07

In this edition of Not Just The Tudors, Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Hannah Dawson, editor of The Penguin Book of Feminist Writing who draws upon poems, novels and memoirs to show that even in Tudor times, and earlier, there was not only insight that sexism existed, but women were articulating their struggle against patriarchal oppression.


 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 15, 2021
Sodomy and Sex Crimes in Early Modern France
00:54:10

In the 16th and 17th centuries and beyond, certain sexual acts were made capital crimes in England, France and other countries. The offence of "sodomy" embraced a wide range of acts including rape, child abuse and bestiality.  


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Dr. Tom Hamilton who has deeply researched the subject, shedding light on what the authorities and ordinary people at the time thought about sex. (This podcast contains some explicit language and descriptions.)

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 12, 2021
The Story of the Death of Anne Boleyn
00:41:24

The Story of the Death of Anne Boleyn is a long narrative poem written by the secretary to the French ambassador in London within two weeks of the Queen's execution. It was intended as a diplomatic dispatch, relating the astonishing news - in verse - of her demise, along with that of five alleged lovers. 


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Professor JoAnn DellaNeva, who has been researching a previously unstudied manuscript of the poem. Her translation sheds new light on a work which straddles the domains of literature and history, of chronicle and fiction.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 08, 2021
Treasures from the National Trust Collections
00:51:31

Dr Tarnya Cooper is the Curatorial and Collections Director at the National Trust. For her recent book, 125 Treasures from the Collections of the National Trust, she and 60 curators brought together the most extraordinary objects that can be found in National Trust properties around the country.


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Tarnya joins Suzannah Lipscomb with her pick of her 12 favourite items, from Cardinal Wolsey’s purse to a "spangled bed."

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 05, 2021
How Coffee and Tobacco Captivated Britain
00:41:52

When tobacco arrived in Britain in the 1560s, it was hailed as a "holy herb", a miracle cure to improve health and a catalyst for wit and creativity. The coming of coffee - "black as hell, strong as death, sweet as love" - in the mid-17th century, led to the establishment of coffee houses where debates flourished and innovations were born that helped to shape the modern world.


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Dr. Matthew Green - author of London: A Travel Guide Through Time - about how nicotine and caffeine changed the British way of life.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 01, 2021
John Heywood: The Tudor Satirist who Kept his Head
00:56:40

Playwright and musician John Heywood was a devout Catholic humanist and biting satirist - married to Sir Thomas More's niece - who managed to survive life as a courtier through the Catholic and Protestant regimes of Henry VIII, Edward VI, Mary I and Elizabeth I.


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Suzannah Lipscomb finds out more about this fascinating figure with Professor Greg Walker, author of the first full scholarly biography of John Heywood, whose life was a case study of the role of comedy in a period of religious and political extremism.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 28, 2021
Gold and Glory at Hampton Court
00:47:02

On 7 June 1520, Henry VIII of England and François I of France met at the Field of Cloth of Gold. For three weeks on English soil in Northern France, the two Kings - and the 12,000 who accompanied them - feasted, jousted, and made merry. This party without parallel was a peace summit between the two countries, arranged by Cardinal Thomas Wolsey. 


A new exhibition at Hampton Court, called Gold and Glory, explores this seminal event through paintings, objects, and manuscripts. In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Suzannah Lipscomb takes a tour around the exhibition with one of its curators, Dr. Alden Gregory.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 24, 2021
The Emperor: The extraordinary Charles V
00:47:41

Suzannah Lipscomb is joined by Professor Geoffrey Parker to explore the extraordinary life and career of Holy Roman Emperor Charles V (1500–1558), who ruled Spain, Germany, the Netherlands, and much of Italy and Central and South America,


Prof. Parker has examined countless surviving written sources, interrogating every dimension of Charles’s long reign, to produce an epic, detailed and vivid life of a complex man and his rule over the world's first transatlantic empire.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 21, 2021
The Sun King in Love: Louis XIV and his Mistresses
00:51:07

Louis XIV ruled France for more than 72 years, the longest recorded reign of any monarch of any sovereign country in history. Despite the devotion of his wife Maria Theresa of Spain, Louis took a series of mistresses, a number of them "official", with whom he had numerous illegitimate children. Yet, for the last three decades of his life, after Maria Theresa's death, he settled down more loyally with the Marquise de Maintenon. In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Suzannah Lipscomb finds out more about the powerful and fascinating women behind the throne of the Sun King, with Dr Linda Kiernan Knowles.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 17, 2021
Mary, Queen of Scots
00:50:29

Mary, Queen of Scots, returned to the news headlines when the rosary she carried to her execution in 1587, was recently stolen from Arundel Castle. It's the latest chapter in the enduring story of this highly romanticised figure.  


Mary reigned over Scotland for just over 24 years between December 1542 until her forced abdication. Considered the legitimate sovereign of England by many Catholics, Mary was seen as a threat to Queen Elizabeth I. In this episode of Not Just the Tudors, Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Professor Kate Williams about Mary's tragic life, her disastrous marriages and the plots against Elizabeth that resulted in her execution.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 14, 2021
Japan's Edo Period and the "Floating World"
00:55:39

After a century of Civil War, changes in the way Japan was ruled from 1600 onwards meant that Europeans and Christianity made few inroads into Japanese society. Shogun Tokugawa organised Japan into a strict class system and its unique and brilliant culture flourished in isolation. In this episode of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb navigates the fascinating, floating world of Japan in the 17th century with Professor Timon Screech.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 10, 2021
Bloody Massacres and the Puritan Poet
00:40:14

In 1589, Anne Dowriche, the wife of a Puritan minister from Devon, wrote a long and gory poem about the bloody, ongoing conflict between Catholics and Huguenots in France. Dowriche's The French Historie was one of the few sixteenth century books written entirely by a woman. She was also almost alone as a woman in publicly commenting on contemporary political events and speaking up against tyranny.


In this episode of Not Just the Tudors, Suzannah Lipscomb talks to historian Dr. Joanne Paul about Dowriche, who was also one of the first English writers to draw on Machiavelli, and whose works possibly inspired both Marlowe and Shakespeare.  

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 07, 2021
The "Spectacle of Suffering": A 16th Century Executioner
00:41:55

The German executioner Meister Frantz Schmidt kept a fascinating journal of all the executions, torture and punishments he administered between 1573 and 1618. In this episode of Not Just the Tudors, Suzannah Lipscomb is joined by Joel Harrington to talk about Schmidt - who showed himself to be an executioner with a conscience - and further explore public capital punishment in the 16th century, described by historians as the "spectacle of suffering." Contains graphic descriptions of punishments.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 03, 2021
The Dissolution of the Monasteries
00:37:02

Ordered by King Henry VIII and carried out by Thomas Cromwell, the dissolution of the monasteries was the greatest land re-distribution in England since the Norman Conquest, and the largest windfall of cash to the crown in history. Between 1536 and 1540, 800 religious houses were dissolved leading to nothing less than the wholesale destruction of monasticism.


In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Suzannah Lipscomb talks to writer and historian Mathew Lyons about the dissolution and its far-reaching consequences - on pregnant women, the poor and the libraries of England. 

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 31, 2021
The Renaissance Lute
00:46:48

The lute, with its double strings and beautiful decorative detail is a familiar feature of Renaissance paintings. In the sixteenth century, lute music was highly prized in the courts of Europe and lutenists earned handsome sums.


In this episode of Not Just the Tudors, Suzannah Lipscomb talks to leading lutenist and musicologist Dr. Lynda Sayce, to explore and hear the lute, how it evolved in different countries, and its cultural importance.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 27, 2021
Origins of the English in India
00:46:10

In the late 16th century, a group of London merchants petitioned Queen Elizabeth I to allow them to build English trade in Asia. She granted a charter in 1600 to support the English East India Company for 15 years, which King James I later turned into rights and perpetuity. In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Suzannah Lipscomb talks to historian Dr David Veevers from Queen Mary University of London about his exciting research into the origins of the English - later British - East India Company, which casts a new light on the story of the British in India, especially how the later dominance of the Empire was by no means guaranteed in its earliest days.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 24, 2021
Anne Boleyn Special: New Discoveries
00:43:52

Anne Boleyn has been trending on Twitter after it was announced that secret inscriptions were found hidden in the Book of Hours that she took to her execution. They were discovered by Kate McCaffrey who talks to Suzannah in this special to mark the 485th anniversary of Anne Boleyn's death, on 19 May 1536.


Also in this episode, Suzannah goes to Anne's childhood home of Hever Castle in Kent to meet Dr.Owen Emmerson and delves deep into Anne’s family background with Dr. Lauren MacKay.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 20, 2021
Anne Boleyn Special: Life and Afterlives
00:50:33

In the first of two special podcasts to mark the 485th anniversary of Anne Boleyn's death, Suzannah Lipscomb is joined by a panel of experts to discuss the enduring fascination with Anne's life and demise.


Exploring the different perceptions of Anne and her re-creation through her many afterlives are authors Claire Ridgway and Natalie Grueninger, historian Dr. Stephanie Russo and art historian Roland Hui.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 17, 2021
17th Century Female Spies
00:41:53

If you think that the female spy is a 20th century phenomenon, be it Mata Hari, Mrs Zigzag or Eve Polastri, think again! Accounts of numerous 17th century 'she-intelligencers' have lain undiscovered in archives for centuries. And these remarkable women were much more than the honey-trap accomplices of a Stuart-era George Smiley. In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Suzannah Lipscomb is joined by Nadine Akkerman, author of Invisible Agents: Women and Espionage in Seventeenth-Century Britain to talk about her fascinating quest to unearth the plots and conspiracies involving women spies that have been forgotten by history.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 13, 2021
Banqueting like a Tudor
00:33:28

The Tudors loved a good banquet, to show off their wealth and social status. Guests were plied with the most superb food, made from the most expensive ingredients and displayed in the most outrageous way. Professor Suzannah Lipscomb meets Brigitte Webster to find out more about what the Tudors served at their banquets, how these feasts influenced the habits of the time, and how the availability of sugar - which was thought of as a medicine - transformed their lives (and their dental health!)

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 10, 2021
The Aztecs: Human Sacrifice, Birth, and Sex
00:51:09

What we know about the Aztecs of Mexico often comes from the accounts of their Spanish conquerors. But the Aztec culture was far more sophisticated than the European invaders chose to portray. In this edition of Not Just the Tudors, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Dr Caroline Dodds Pennock about the real reasons behind Aztec ritual sacrifice and cannibalism, and their com beliefs about the afterlife, childbirth, gender roles and sexual norms.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 06, 2021
John Lyly: The Queer Shakespeare
00:40:16

John Lyly's name may not be so familiar. He was a playwright and poet writing at the same time as Shakespeare and, in his day, was more famous than the Bard himself. Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Dr Andy Kesson about Lyly's radical and, frankly, queer works: his plays in which Queen Elizabeth was compared - at court! - to the lesbian poet Sappho, and in which the marriage of two girls dressed as boys is approved by Venus, goddess of love. Why has Lyly been forgotten? And why might he just be the alternative Shakespeare for our times?

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 03, 2021
Bridewell: The Palace that became a Prison
00:41:44

In the heart of Shakespeare's London, there was a palace that had become a prison: Bridewell. Professor Duncan Salkeld has explored the records of this notorious destination for the poor and the indigent, vagrants, prostitutes, and the idle. In this episodes of Not Just the Tudors, he shares with Professor Suzannah Lipscomb his fascinating findings about the wayward and the unruly . These include 'Black Luce', a brothel madam probably of African heritage, who has been suggested as a candidate for the 'dark lady' of Shakespeare's sonnets.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 29, 2021
An Early Modern Teenage Werewolf
00:34:06

The witch-hunts of sixteenth and seventeenth century Europe are well-known. But did you know that some 300 people were convicted of being werewolves? In this revelatory podcast with Dr. Jan Machielsen, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb travels back to 1603 to find out more about the moving case of Jean Grenier, a self-confessed teenage werewolf from the Basque region of France. Who was he? And what were the tragic circumstances that led to his conviction?

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 29, 2021
Velazquez and the Spanish Court
00:49:59

Professor Suzannah Lipscomb talks to Laura Cumming - author and art critic for The Observer - about Velázquez, arguably the greatest genius of Spanish painting. They particularly discuss one of the world's most remarkable paintings - Las Meninas ('The Ladies in Waiting'), how the artist rose through the stifling, gilded court of Philip IV, and the way in which Velázquez dignified everyone he painted - from the King himself through to some of the most vulnerable members of his court.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 29, 2021
Henry VIII's Billionaire Wardrobe
00:43:14

Venetian ambassador Sebastian Giustinian described Henry VIII as the 'best dressed sovereign in the world'. The King spent the equivalent of £2 million a year on clothes. In this episode with Professor Maria Hayward, Professor Suzannah Lipscomb gets to grips with the sumptuous garments, the fabrics (and exaggerated codpieces) that made up the Tudor king's wonderous wardrobe.

 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 29, 2021