History Extra podcast

By Immediate Media

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Subscribers: 5625
Reviews: 11

Balmusico
 Oct 27, 2021
Always interesting

dave
 May 18, 2021
good

Tristan John
 Nov 30, 2020
Great fun


 Sep 23, 2020


 Aug 1, 2020

Description

The latest news from the team behind BBC History Magazine - a popular History magazine. To find out more, visit www.historyextra.com

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Episode Date
Surgical history: everything you wanted to know
57:57
Why was a transfusion of lamb’s blood believed to cure epilepsy? What surgical procedures could you get in ancient Egypt? And were medieval surgical practitioners really a help to patients – or a hindrance? Speaking with Emily Briffett, Paul Craddock unravels the long history of surgery, from its ancient roots right up to recent developments that have changed the practice forever, including antiseptics, antibiotics and lessons learned from farmers and embroiderers.

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Nov 27, 2022
Cuban Missile Crisis TRAILER
2:34

On 16 October 1962, US President John F Kennedy was made aware of the presence of Soviet nuclear missiles in Cuba, just 90 miles away from the shores of the United States. The 13 October days that followed were some of the most dangerous in modern history, as the world stood on the brink of mutually assured nuclear destruction.

 

This HistoryExtra podcast series marks the 60th anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis, exploring the long roots of the nuclear standoff, and the perspectives of the nations and figures at its centre. 

 

Episodes will be released in this feed weekly. 

 



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Nov 26, 2022
American psychiatry: a tortured history
35:59

From the earliest asylums that sold themselves as restorative “retreats”, to the damaging vogue for lobotomies and electric shock therapy, psychiatry in America has gone through many iterations since its origins in the 18th century. Andrew Scull, author of Desperate Remedies, speaks to Rhiannon Davies about the discipline’s complex history.

(Ad) Andrew Scull is the author of Desperate Remedies: Psychiatry’s Turbulent Quest to Cure Mental Illness (Belknap Press, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FDesperate-Remedies-Psychiatrys-Turbulent-Illness%2Fdp%2F0674265106"



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Nov 25, 2022
The Mary Rose | 6. protecting the wreck
39:06
When the Mary Rose was first pulled from the Solent, you could be forgiven for thinking that what had been salvaged was just a “pile of old wood”. But, over the years, incredible developments in conservation and analysis have revealed the wreck to be a precious historical resource, allowing us to discover more than we could have imagined. In this final episode, Emily Briffett speaks to Christopher Dobbs, Professor Eleanor Schofield and Dr Alex Hildred to understand the complex conservation processes behind keeping the wreck alive.

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Nov 24, 2022
Spiritualism, fairies, and Arthur Conan-Doyle
23:48
Historians Fiona Snailham and Anna Maria Barry reveal why the creator of Sherlock Holmes was so obsessed with contacting the dead. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, they discuss the rise of spiritualism in Britain, Harry Houdini’s crusade to unmask fraudulent mediums, and why Arthur Conan-Doyle believed that fairies had been caught on camera.

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Nov 23, 2022
Desk killers: the psychology of committing crimes against humanity
57:27

Author Dan Gretton discusses his book I You We Them, which examines the psychology of individuals who organised and implemented some of the worst crimes against humanity, from the Holocaust to human rights violations in Nigeria. In conversation with Rachel Dinning, he introduces the concept of the ‘desk killer’ – a perpetrator who is responsible for murder without taking an active role in the killing.

(Ad) Dan Gretton is the author of I You We Them: Journeys Beyond Evil: The Desk Killer in History and Today (William Heinemann, 2019). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/You-We-Them-Journeys-Beyond/dp/0434023477/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-Histboty



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Nov 22, 2022
Mary, Queen of Scots: The Scottish years
32:44

Mary, Queen of Scots became queen when she was only six days old, but her reign had collapsed by the time she was 24. Speaking to Rhiannon Davies, Rosemary Goring explores the queen’s tumultuous Scottish years, examining her reign through her connections to various locations in Scotland, from grand palaces to dank battlefields.

(Ad) Rosemary Goring is the author of Homecoming: The Scottish Years of Mary, Queen of Scots (Birlinn, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Men-Without-Country-Exploration-Rebellion/dp/1761150707/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histipad



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Nov 21, 2022
World Cup history: everything you wanted to know
1:01:04
Throughout its 92-year existence, the FIFA Men’s World Cup has delivered its fair share of iconic moments – and controversies. But how did the competition originally begin? Who were its first heavyweights? And what does a dog named Pickles have to do with it? On the eve of the 2022 tournament in Qatar, Jon Bauckham caught up with Professor Matthew Taylor to answer your questions about the history of the football competition and how it has impacted on the “beautiful game” overall.

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Nov 20, 2022
Crassus: Rome’s richest man
37:56

Author Peter Stothard explores the eventful life of Marcus Licinius Crassus, an enormously wealthy politician and general, who rivalled Julius Caesar and Pompey the Great in late Republican Rome. In conversation with Rob Attar, Peter explores Crassus’s rise to wealth and influence, his key role in defeating the Spartacus Revolt, and the disastrous military campaign that ended in his humiliating death.

(Ad) Peter Stothard is the author of Crassus: The First Tycoon (Yale University Press, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Crassus-First-Tycoon-Ancient-Lives/dp/0300256604/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-Histboty



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Nov 18, 2022
The Mary Rose | 5. the mysterious men on-board
40:25
Imagine yourself standing on-board the Mary Rose, surrounded by the crew – how do you picture the men around you? If you look at their faces, what do you see? In this episode, we’ll be introducing you to some of the crew who served on the Tudor warship. Speaking with Hannah Matthews, Dr Alex Hildred and Dr Onyeka Nubia, Emily Briffett investigates the secrets their bones have held for almost four and a half centuries.

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Nov 17, 2022
Global stories of museum artefacts
34:24

As part of our series of conversations with winners of the 2022 Dan David Prize, Dr Mirjam Brusius speaks with Helen Carr about her research into the global stories of museum artefacts, and how they can be better communicated to visitors.


The Dan David Prize is the world's largest history prize, which recognizes outstanding historical scholarship. Find out more at dandavidprize.org.



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Nov 16, 2022
Victorian visions of the future
28:24

When the Victorians imagined the 21st century, they pictured a world powered by the wonders of electricity, with smartly dressed men in impeccable suits whizzing around on flying machines, getting their food delivered electronically, dialling in to the opera, and even whisking their wives off for a romantic honeymoon in space. Iwan Rhys Morus speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about the 19th century’s grand ambitions in the realms of science and technology, and Victorian visions of innovations – both real and imagined – that would shape the future in their own image.

(Ad) Iwan Rhys Morus is the author of How the Victorians Took Us to the Moon (Icon, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/How-Victorians-Took-Moon-Nineteenth-Century/dp/1785789287/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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Nov 15, 2022
Queens in the Age of Chivalry
44:44


The 14th century was an era of high drama in England – from the toppling of two kings and the Hundred Years’ War to the Black Death and Peasants’ Revolt. Speaking with Emily Briffett, bestselling historical author Alison Weir charts the dramatic lives and tangled legacies of five queen consorts during the turbulent ‘Age of Chivalry’.

Read more on the debate surrounding Edward I’s murder here: https://www.historyextra.com/period/medieval/the-big-debate-was-edward-ii-really-murdered/?utm_source=acast&utm_medium=acast.com&utm_campaign=Bitly

(Ad) Alison Weir is the author of Queens of the Age of Chivalry (Vintage, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fqueens-of-the-age-of-chivalry%2Falison-weir%2F9781910702116



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Nov 14, 2022
The Crimean War: everything you wanted to know
55:48
The Crimean War of 1853-6 saw Russia clash with an alliance of forces including Britain, France and the Ottoman empire. But what were the causes of the conflict? Why does it still exert such a hold on the Russian imagination today? And how important a role did Florence Nightingale really play? Speaking with Matt Elton, Professor Andrew Lambert answers listener questions about the 19th-century conflict and the ways in which it shaped decades of European history.

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Nov 13, 2022
Writing the history of the modern monarchy
28:28
Recent years have seen a flurry of historical dramas and documentaries surrounding the modern monarchy, with historians and commentators debating whether or not they offer a fair depiction of the royal family – and whether or not it matters. But, how do scholars go about researching the full story of what happened during the Queen’s long reign? In conversation with Matt Elton, Professor Philip Murphy offers his views on why telling the recent history of Britain’s monarchy is so complicated.

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Nov 12, 2022
The Mary Rose | 4. inside the Tudor treasure trove
43:04
When the Mary Rose was rescued from the seafloor, it wasn’t just a large timber hull that was salvaged – more than 19,000 historical objects were dredged from the depths alongside it. These artefacts don’t just offer a window onto life aboard a 16th-century warship, they also tell a much greater story about the Tudor era. In this episode, we’re cracking open the treasure chest and peering inside, as Emily Briffett heads to the Mary Rose Museum to find out more from experts Hannah Matthews, Dr Alex Hildred and Christopher Dobbs.

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Nov 11, 2022
A whistle-stop tour around the world in AD 1500
38:29
To mark HistoryExtra’s 1500th episode, Jerry Brotton takes Ellie Cawthorne on a whistle-stop tour around the world in AD 1500, from the powerful dynasties of Eurasia and the rich culture of Ming dynasty China to the melting pot of Constantinople. They discuss the shifting balance of power in Africa at the start of the 16th century, explore the origins of European slavery and colonialism, and reveal how the Americas stood on the precipice of a great transformation.

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Nov 10, 2022
Are period dramas damaging history?
43:41
How important is it for period dramas to accurately reflect the past? What ethical issues are raised by actors playing fictionalised versions of real people? And does the media depict historians and archaeologists fairly? Speaking with Matt Elton, historians Nicola Tallis and Fern Riddell discuss issues surrounding accuracy and morality raised by recent historical films and television shows including The Crown, The Lost King and Dahmer – Monster: The Jeffrey Dahmer Story.

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Nov 09, 2022
Pharaohs' pants & knightly toilet troubles: teaching history to kids
43:45

How exactly do you get children interested in history? Public historian Greg Jenner discusses his new children’s book You Are History, and explains to David Musgrove how you can build bridges to the past by exploring the weird and wonderful history behind relatable and everyday topics – from brushing your teeth to going to the toilet.

(Ad) Greg Jenner is the author of You Are History: From the Alarm Clock to the Toilet, the Amazing History of the Things You Use Every Day (Walker Books, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/You-Are-History-Toilet-Amazing/dp/1406395676/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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Nov 08, 2022
Medieval excommunication: eternal damnation or no big deal?
42:33
In Christian-dominated medieval Europe, what did it mean to be excommunicated? How much of an earth-shattering punishment was it, and what can excommunications tell us about the attitudes of people in the Middle Ages? In today’s episode, Dr Felicity Hill of the University of St Andrews explains all to David Musgrove.

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Nov 07, 2022
The gunpowder plot: everything you wanted to know
36:25
What drove a group of plotters to attempt to blow up the king on 5 November 1605? To what extent did the conspiracy sour relations between Protestants and Catholics? And why do we continue to be so fascinated by this extraordinary episode today? Speaking with Spencer Mizen, John Cooper answers listener questions about the gunpowder plot.

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Nov 06, 2022
How is Tutankhamun’s legacy shaped by colonialism?
35:55

Professor Christina Riggs talks to Kev Lochun about the legacy of ancient Egyptian pharaoh Tutankhamun. She looks beyond the glittering treasures of his tomb to discover how the young pharaoh became a cultural ambassador for a nation – and how colonialism, empire and politics all influenced the tale of Tutmania.

(Ad) Christina Riggs is the author of Treasured: How Tutankhamun Shaped a Century (Atlantic Books, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Treasured-How-Tutankhamun-Shaped-Century/dp/1838950516/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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Nov 04, 2022
The Mary Rose | 3. the fatal final moments
44:07
As Henry VIII stood along the walls of Southsea Castle on 19 July 1545, the air was hot and still. Yet, England was on the brink of disaster, as an enormous French fleet had arrived with revenge on their minds. In this episode, we’re zeroing in on the pivotal moment when the Mary Rose met its ignominious end at the battle of the Solent. Emily Briffett speaks to Hannah Matthews, Dr Dominic Fontana and Dr Tracy Borman to find out what caused the Tudor warship to sink on what should have been a short, easy voyage.

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Nov 03, 2022
History & science: the big questions
26:33
What can modern scientists learn from historians? Dr Lindsey Fitzharris, Professor Sasha Hadley, Professor Sanjoy Bhattacharya and Professor Alice Roberts explore the often surprising connections between the two disciplines in a panel discussion chaired by Professor Alice Roberts and recorded live at the Royal Society, in association with the Wolfson History Prize.

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Nov 02, 2022
How the Allies plucked victory from the jaws of defeat
41:14

The Second World War saw Allied forces evolve from serial losers to a war-winning machine. Comedian and history buff Al Murray talks to Spencer Mizen about 10 commanders – from Bernard Montgomery to George Patton and Omar Bradley to Orde Wingate – whose experiences chart that transformation.

(Ad) Al Murray is the author of Command: How the Allies Learned to Win the Second World War (Headline, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Command-Allies-Learned-Second-World/dp/1472284593/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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Nov 01, 2022
Halloween monsters: everything you wanted to know
32:53
How did witches transition from terrifying old crones to symbols of female empowerment? Was Count Dracula inspired by a real person? And why do ghosts wear white sheets? To explore the long history of all things that go bump in the night, Professor Owen Davies tackles listener questions with Ellie Cawthorne, on the unearthly history and evolving mythology of our most popular Halloween monsters – from forgotten monsters of the past, to the first photograph of a ghost.

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Oct 31, 2022
Halloween traditions: everything you wanted to know
29:28
How did a Catholic religious celebration transform into a spooky, supernatural festivity? Why were turnips and swedes replaced by pumpkins? And what happened on ‘mischief night’? Speaking with Ellie Cawthorne, Professor Owen Davies uncovers the historical origins of popular traditions surrounding 31 October – from the malicious and downright dangerous beginnings of trick or treating to the ethereal inspirations for Jack-o’-lanterns.

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Oct 29, 2022
Christianity: a success story from the start?
37:13

Christianity has been one of the dominant forces in European history, but according to historian Peter Heather, its rise to prominence wasn’t inevitable. In conversation with Emily Briffett, Peter confronts the idea of Christianity being a monolithic and consistently successful religion, and charts the changes it underwent between the late Roman and high medieval periods that allowed it to flourish.

(Ad) Peter Heather is the author of Christendom: The Triumph of a Religion (Allen Lane, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Christendom-Triumph-Religion-Peter-Heather/dp/0241215919/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-Histboty



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Oct 27, 2022
The Mary Rose | 2. the Tudor heyday of Henry VIII’s warship
36:20
The Mary Rose had a long life before its fighting days were brought to an abrupt end as it sank to the bottom of the Solent. Rewinding back almost 500 years, Emily Briffett speaks to Dr Tracy Borman and Dr Dominic Fontana to revisit the Mary Rose in its heyday – from the first shots fired, through the political crises of the early 16th century, right up to its downfall.

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Oct 26, 2022
A family history of the world
35:05

Bestselling historian Simon Sebag Montefiore discusses his major new book, which tells the entire history of the world through the prism of families. In conversation with Rob Attar, he delves into the stories of several significant dynasties – from ancient Egypt to the Trumps – and reveals how family life affects political power.

(Ad) Simon Sebag Montefiore is the author of The World: A Family History (Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/World-History-Simon-Sebag-Montefiore/dp/0297869671/ref=asc_df_0297869671/?tag=googshopuk-21&linkCode=df0&hvadid=570354289872&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=9113833251221401608&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=1006715&hvtargid=pla-1655926963413&psc=1&th=1&psc=1&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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Oct 25, 2022
Cuba & the USA: an intertwined history
58:40

Ada Ferrer discusses her Cundill History Prize-nominated book, Cuba: An American History. In her account spanning five centuries, Ferrer takes Elinor Evans from the island’s colonisation by Europeans and its crucial location during the Golden Age of Sail, to its complex economic and political relationship with the United States.

(Ad) Ada Ferrer is the author of Cuba: An American History (Scribner, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Cuba-American-Dr-Ada-Ferrer/dp/1501154559/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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Oct 24, 2022
Chaos, ruin & renewal: Germany in 1945
18:35

At the bitter, drawn-out conclusion of the Second World War in 1945, Germany stood in ruins – both literally and psychologically. Cities had been reduced to rubble, millions were dead or displaced and there was a governmental power vacuum. Speaking with Ellie Cawthorne, Cundill History Prize-nominated author Harald Jähner reveals how the country began to rebuild itself following the chaos of war.


(Ad) Harald Jähner is the author of Aftermath: Life in the Fallout of the Third Reich (Ebury, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Faftermath%2Fharald-jahner%2Fshaun-whiteside%2F9780753557884



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Oct 23, 2022
Sci-fi history: everything you wanted to know
57:10
Why has the idea of a “utopia” been so compelling over the centuries? What major cultural shifts have been reflected by the sci-fi genre? And why have generations of sci-fi authors been so obsessed with politics, ecology and biology? Professor Roger Luckhurst answers listener questions on how sci-fi has imagined the future by reflecting the concerns of the past – from the pioneering work of authors including Mary Shelley and HG Wells right up to modern day.

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Oct 22, 2022
The Cuban Missile Crisis Series Trailer
2:42

On 16 October 1962, US President John F Kennedy was made aware of the presence of Soviet nuclear missiles in Cuba, just 90 miles away from the shores of the United States. The 13 October days that followed were some of the most dangerous in modern history, as the world stood on the brink of mutually assured nuclear destruction.


This new HistoryExtra podcast series marks the 60th anniversary of the Cuban Missile Crisis, exploring the long roots of the nuclear standoff, and the perspectives of the nations and figures at its centre.


To gain early, ad-free access to weekly episodes from 29 October, sign up to our premium subscription channel HistoryExtra Plus: https://apple.co/3fagZQB


Episodes will be released weekly on this feed from 1 December.



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Oct 22, 2022
Chaucer’s disputed legacy: new discoveries
33:35

Geoffrey Chaucer is one of the most famous figures in English literature, and remains widely lauded for his major works such as The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde. However, a dark shadow looms over Chaucer’s story: a possible case of sexual assault. Dr Euan Roger of The National Archives and Prof Sebastian Sobecki of the University of Toronto, have just published some new findings that provide us with a new take on this – David Musgrove caught up with Euan to discover more. 

 

Find out more about the open access material in the Chaucer review at https://scholarlypublishingcollective.org/psup/chaucer

 

 



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Oct 21, 2022
The Soviet invasion of Afghanistan: war without end
49:29

When Soviet forces mounted an invasion of Afghanistan in December 1979, they entered a nation already in the grips of a complex civil war. Speaking to Matt Elton, Elisabeth Leake reveals how the invasion and ensuing occupation would go on to shape not only modern Afghanistan but also the course of the Cold War and subsequent international relations.

(Ad) Elisabeth Leake is the author of Afghan Crucible: The Soviet Invasion and the Making of Modern Afghanistan (Oxford University Press, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Afghan-Crucible-Soviet-Invasion-Afghanistan/dp/0198846010/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histipad



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Oct 20, 2022
The Mary Rose | 1. raising the wreck
36:53
Forty years ago, when the Mary Rose was raised from the seabed on 11 October 1982, it was a momentous occasion, met with global broadcasts and cheers from excited bystanders. This daring feat of underwater archaeology was the culmination of over 17 years of hard work by a huge team of divers, archaeologists and scientists. But how did they manage to rescue this long-lost ship from the seafloor? In this first episode of our new series, Christopher Dobbs and Dr Alex Hildred tell Emily Briffett about the extraordinary search for the Tudor shipwreck and delve into the challenges of underwater excavation.

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Oct 19, 2022
Spectacles of death: public executions in London
27:52
From grisly medieval punishments to the justice doled out to celebrity criminals in the Victorian era, public executions were a spectacle that shaped the landscape of London for centuries. Curator Beverley Cook tells Ellie Cawthorne about a new Museum of London Docklands exhibition that delves into this history, examining some notorious criminal cases, and highlighting historical objects that shine a light on executions that took place in the capital, from artworks and ballad sheets to relics grabbed from the gallows.

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Oct 18, 2022
Berlin’s turbulent 20th century
47:25

Sinclair McKay traces the history of the German city through the lives of its inhabitants, and how they weathered the tumult of the 20th century – from the wild hedonism of the Weimar years cut short by Nazism, to the fall of the famed wall that divided East and West.

(Ad) Sinclair McKay is the author of Berlin: Life and Loss in the City That Shaped the Century (Penguin, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histipad&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fberlin%2Fsinclair-mckay%2F9780241503171



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Oct 17, 2022
A mutineer in the family
32:13

In 1789, a group of mutinous sailors seized control of HMS Bounty from its captain William Bligh in dramatic fashion. A new book by Harrison Christian explores the life of the author’s direct ancestor Fletcher Christian, who famously led the mutiny. Speaking with Rob Attar, Christian explains why the crew decided to overpower Bligh, during their Pacific voyage, and tells the extraordinary story of their blood-soaked colony on Pitcairn Island.

(Ad) Harrison Christian is the author of Men Without Country: The True Story of Exploration and Rebellion in the South Seas (Ultimo, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Men-Without-Country-Exploration-Rebellion/dp/1761150707/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histipad



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Oct 16, 2022
The Bank of England: everything you wanted to know
48:57
Why was the Bank of England created? Did it power the Industrial Revolution? And when did it become known as the “Old Lady”? As the Bank continues to hit the headlines in the UK, Professor Anne Murphy guides us through the 300-year history of one of Britain’s most important institutions.

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Oct 15, 2022
Empire: the big historical questions
48:35
There has been an absolute sea change in the study of empire in recent years. But what are the challenges of grappling with often difficult imperial history, and how does it shape our view of the world today? Professor Toby Green, Dr Sudhir Hazareesingh and Professor Olivette Otele explore these pressing questions in a panel discussion chaired by Sir David Cannadine and recorded live at the V&A museum, in association with the Wolfson History Prize.

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Oct 14, 2022
1066: the pope and the conqueror
25:02

On the anniversary of the battle of Hastings, Daniel Armstrong speaks to David Musgrove about the truth behind the story that Pope Alexander II granted a papal banner to William of Normandy in advance of his invasion of England in 1066.





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Oct 13, 2022
Why Bond and the Beatles ruled the sixties
35:22

The 5th October 1962 was a big bang moment for modern British culture. John Higgs takes Spencer Mizen back to the momentous day when the Beatles’ first single, Love Me Do, was released and the first James Bond film, Dr No, debuted in British cinemas, to explore what the meteoric rise of these two cultural giants reveals about Britain in the early 1960s.

(Ad) John Higgs is the author of Love and Let Die: Bond, the Beatles and the British Psyche (Orion, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histipad&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fact-of-oblivion%2Frobert-harris%2F2928377088361crid%3D2QB83NOYQD92C%26keywords%3Diwan%2Bmorgan%2BFDR%26qid%3D1662116942%26sprefix%3Diwan%2Bmorgan%2Bfdr%2Caps%2C98%26sr%3D8-1



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Oct 12, 2022
Ian McEwan on writing historical novels
34:55

How responsible are novelists for shaping public understanding of the past? And how can books recreate the sentiments of a bygone era? In conversation with Emily Briffett, award-winning author Ian McEwan considers the inspirations behind writing books set in the past and discusses his new novel, Lessons, which spans many of the major historical events of the 20th century.

(Ad) Ian McEwan is the author of Lessons: A Novel (Vintage Publishing, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-Histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Flessons%2Fian-mcewan%2F9781787333970



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Oct 11, 2022
The Congo-Océan railroad’s deadly history
48:54

One of the deadliest construction projects in history, the Congo-Océan railroad likely caused as many as 23,000 African deaths. Unofficial estimates are much higher, and the exact number will never be known. Historian JP Daughton speaks to Elinor Evans about his new book on the arduous 13-year project led by French colonisers in equatorial Africa, in the wake of the First World War.

(Ad) JP Daughton is the author of In the Forest of No Joy: The Congo-Océan Railroad and the Tragedy of French Colonialism (W. W. Norton & Company, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Forest-No-Joy-Congo-Oc%C3%A9an-Colonialism/dp/0393541010/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-Histboty



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Oct 10, 2022
15 minutes of fame: rediscovering forgotten figures
44:09
To wrap up our ‘15 minutes of fame’ series, public historian and broadcaster Helen Carr hosts a panel discussion with historians Fern Riddell, Caroline Dodds Pennock and Rana Mitter to tackle some big questions surrounding who gets remembered by history and how we can illuminate the stories of forgotten figures today.

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Oct 09, 2022
Black British history: everything you wanted to know
41:23
How far back does the story of black people in Britain stretch? Who was Cheddar Man? And what evidence do we have of black people in the medieval and Tudor eras? Historian Hannah Cusworth answers your top questions about black British history, in conversation with Charlotte Hodgman.

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Oct 08, 2022
Richard III returns
49:56

Ten years after the remains of Richard III were unearthed, and as The Lost King arrives in UK cinemas, archaeologist and author Mike Pitts reflects on the astonishing discovery of the “king in the car park”, which made headlines across the globe. Speaking with Rob Attar, he reveals how the dramatic breakthrough was made and what Richard’s remains can tell us about his life and death.

(Ad) Mike Pitts is the author of Digging for Richard III: The Search for the Lost King (Thames & Hudson, 2014). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Digging-Richard-III-Archaeology-Found/dp/0500292027/ref=sr_1_1?crid=CJRVNH9F7GI6&keywords=mike+pitts+richard+iii&qid=1663938750&sprefix=%2Caps%2C57&sr=8-1&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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Oct 06, 2022
Robert Harris on the manhunt for Charles I’s killers
29:29

Charles II was determined to seek revenge on the men who killed his father. During the Restoration period the regicides fled across the globe and were hunted down by the king’s allies, to be gruesomely executed for their part in Charles I’s death. Historical novelist Robert Harris tells Rhiannon Davies about his new book, Act of Oblivion, which follows the hunt for two Cromwellian colonels who signed the king’s death warrant.


(Ad) Robert Harris is the author of Act of Oblivion (Cornerstone, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Act-Oblivion-Robert-Harris/dp/1529151767/ref=sr_1_1?crid=2PEOB1OF8A1FW&keywords=robert+harris+act+of+oblivion&qid=1665044977&qu=eyJxc2MiOiIxLjkyIiwicXNhIjoiMS4zMiIsInFzcCI6IjEuMzEifQ%3D%3D&sprefix=robert+harris+act+of+%2Caps%2C60&sr=8-1&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-Histboty



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Oct 05, 2022
Anti-Chinese prejudice: from gold rushes to exclusion laws
24:23

In the 19th century, the promise of gold brought Chinese immigrants to the west in unprecedented numbers. But before long, friction emerged on the gold fields. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, Mae Ngai explores how gold rushes helped shape racist attitudes towards Chinese people in the west, culminating in exclusionary immigration policies and shaping the course of international relations between China and the west.

(Ad) Mae Ngai is the author of The Chinese Question: The Gold Rushes and Global Politics (W. W. Norton & Company, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-Histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FChinese-Question-Rushes-Global-Politics%2Fdp%2F0393634167



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Oct 04, 2022
WW2’s most daring raid
44:24

Journalist and author Giles Whittell tells the story of the 1942 St Nazaire Raid, which saw hundreds of British commandos launch an audacious attack on German-occupied France. In conversation with Rob Attar, he explains why Britain chose to embark on such a risky operation and why he believes the raid was a success, despite the loss of lives.

(Ad) Giles Whittell is the author of The Greatest Raid: St Nazaire, 1942: The Heroic Story of Operation Chariot (Viking, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Greatest-Raid-Nazaire-Operation-Chariot/dp/0241508576/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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Oct 03, 2022
15 minutes of fame: Babur, dynasty founder and diarist
15:37
It’s the HistoryExtra podcast’s 15th birthday, and to celebrate, we’ve asked 15 historians to nominate a figure from history they think deserves their ‘15 minutes of fame’. In this episode, Professor Margaret MacMillan nominates Babur. Speaking with Matt Elton, she considers the life and legacy of the 15th-century leader, who founded the Mughal empire – and kept a renowned diary.

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Oct 02, 2022
The Knights Templar: everything you wanted to know
55:43
Who joined the Knights Templar? When not waging war, what did they get up to on a day-to-day basis? And how did they become associated with the Holy Grail? In this “Everything you wanted to know” episode, Emily Briffett speaks with Helen Nicholson to uncover the answers to your top questions about the crusading military order.

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Oct 01, 2022
Clash of cultures: how interpreters bridged the gap between Britain and China
33:03
Henrietta Harrison discusses her Cundill Prize-shortlisted book on the interpreters who took on the dangerous task of communicating between the British empire and Qing China. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, she explores the extraordinary life stories of two key translators, and reveals how their work shaped the course of British-Chinese relations in the 18th and 19th centuries.

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Sep 29, 2022
What can one woman reveal about Jewish life in medieval England?
38:37
What can the life of one woman reveal about the experience of Jews in medieval England? Following the unveiling of a statue of Licoricia of Winchester earlier this year, Professor Miri Rubin, Dr Dean Irwin and Dr Toni Griffiths piece together the story of this powerful Jewish businesswoman who was at the heart of medieval England’s financial affairs. Speaking to Emily Briffett, they reveal what Licoricia’s extraordinary story can tell us about religious coexistence in the middle ages.

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Sep 28, 2022
The Napoleon of Fleet Street
31:19

Historian Andrew Roberts discusses his new biography of Lord Northcliffe, the early 20th-century press baron who dominated the British media and had the power to bring down prime ministers. In conversation with Rob Attar, Roberts reveals how Northcliffe forged his media empire and helped Britain triumph in the First World War, while also discussing his many flaws and turbulent private life.

(Ad) Andrew Roberts is the author of The Chief: The Life of Lord Northcliffe, Britain's Greatest Press Baron. Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Chief-Life-Lord-Northcliffe/dp/1398508691/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histipad



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Sep 27, 2022
Should mummies be on display?
36:11

Is it strange that we go to museums to look at dead bodies? Angela Stienne’s book Mummified explores some of the ethical issues around displaying ancient Egyptian human remains. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, she explains how many Egyptian mummies ended up in European museums, and delves into current debates over how they should be displayed and treated.

(Ad) Angela Stienne is the author of Mummified: The Stories Behind Egyptian Mummies in Museums (Manchester University Press, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histipad&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fmummified%2Fangela-stienne%2F9781526161895awaid%3D3787%26utm_source%3Dredbrain%26utm_medium%3Dshopping%26utm_campaign%3Dcss%26gclid%3DCj0KCQjw_7KXBhCoARIsAPdPTfgFwOWVKWBWnP_4RDSeIkU0zxWo4ytsAPfY4qWPbSPI78gotJA0d58aArJuEALw_wcB



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Sep 26, 2022
15 minutes of fame: Hannah Humphrey, entrepreneurial Georgian printseller
19:46

It’s the HistoryExtra podcast’s 15th birthday, and to celebrate, we’ve asked 15 historians to nominate a figure from history they think deserves their ‘15 minutes of fame’. In this episode, Dr Hannah Greig nominates 18th-century printseller Hannah Humphrey. Speaking with Elinor Evans, she reveals how Humphrey worked with leading caricature artist James Gillray and built a successful business in her own right.





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Sep 25, 2022
The CIA: everything you wanted to know
55:47

Why was the CIA formed? Who were the key players in the agency’s history? And what was its most significant scandal? Seventy five years on since the United States’ Central Intelligence Agency was formed, Professor Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones takes on listener questions on the history of the CIA for our ‘Everything you wanted to know’ series.

(Ad) Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones is the author of A Question of Standing: The History of the CIA (Oxford University Press, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histipad&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fa-question-of-standing%2Frhodri-jeffreys-jones%2F9780192847966



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Sep 24, 2022
The end of Roman Britain: families, ancestors and DNA
41:04

The use of ancient DNA analysis looks set to revolutionise our understanding of the end of Roman Britain. In this episode, we are joined by Professor Duncan Sayer to discuss a major new ancient DNA project and what it can tell us about the origins and family networks of people in post-Roman Britain.




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Sep 23, 2022
Love, marriage & wallpaper: the artistic lives of Jane and William Morris
45:56

Victorian designer William Morris is remembered for his distinctive nature-inspired designs, many of which still grace wallpapers and furniture fabrics today. Less well-known is his wife, Jane – though she had significant artistic influence as a collaborator and artist in her own right. Susanne Fagence Cooper speaks to Elinor Evans about her new joint biography which explores the couple’s creative partnership.

(Ad) Suzanne Fagence Cooper is the author of How We Might Live: At Home with Jane and William Morris (Quercus, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Might-Live-Suzanne-Fagence-Cooper/dp/1529409489/?tag=bbchistory045



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Sep 22, 2022
Tutankhamun | 7. the contested legacy of an icon
29:08

In the 100 years since his tomb was discovered, Tutankhamun has become the icon of ancient Egypt – a muse for fashionistas and movie-makers, a pop culture staple and a political rallying cry. But what deeper meanings do his glitzy treasures have for us today? In the final episode of our series on the boy king, Ellie Cawthorne speaks to Professor Elizabeth Frood and Dr Heba Abd el Gawad to uncover how the way we think about Tutankhamun today exposes thorny issues about the treatment of Egyptian heritage, and whether it can even distort our view of Egyptian history.





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Sep 21, 2022
African and Caribbean people in Britain: a 2,000-year history
30:45

The story of African and Caribbean people in Britain goes back to before the Roman empire. Rhiannon Davies spoke to Professor Hakim Adi to discover how their lives and stories have shaped Britain’s history, from the African Roman emperor Septimius Severus to the abolition of the slave trade and the arrival of HMS Empire Windrush in 1948.

(Ad) Hakim Adi is the author of African and Caribbean People in Britain: A History (Penguin, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/African-Caribbean-People-Britain-History/dp/0241583829/ref=sr_1_1?crid=NJLXJA5IV566&keywords=hakim+adi+african+people+in+britain&qid=1662116735&sprefix=hakim+adi+african+people+in+britain%2Caps%2C63&sr=8-1&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histipad



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Sep 20, 2022
Dangerous ideas & scandalous lives: Germany’s first Romantics
35:56

At the turn of the 19th century, a small university town in Germany became the beating heart of an intellectual revolution. From philosophers and poets to scientists and playwrights, Jena attracted some of Europe’s brightest minds. Andrea Wulf tells Ellie Cawthorne about how the scandalous lives of these thinkers were as controversial as their ground-breaking ideas.

(Ad) Andrea Wulf is the author of Magnificent Rebels: The First Romantics and the Invention of the Self (John Murray, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histipad&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.penguinrandomhouse.com%2Fbooks%2F609881%2Fmagnificent



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Sep 19, 2022
15 minutes of fame: Kleisthenes, father of Athenian democracy
23:55

It’s the HistoryExtra podcast’s 15th birthday, and to celebrate, we’ve asked 15 historians to nominate a figure from history they think deserves their ‘15 minutes of fame’. In this episode, Professor Michael Scott nominates Kleisthenes. He tells Kev Lochun about how this sixth-century BC aristocrat came to be regarded as the father of Athenian democracy.





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Sep 18, 2022
Royal funerals: everything you wanted to know
26:30

Where did traditional royal funerary practices come from? When did lying in state begin? And will the funeral of Queen Elizabeth II set any new precedents? In this special edition of our ‘Everything you wanted to know’ series, Tracy Borman answers questions on the history of royal funerals. 




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Sep 17, 2022
Dan Jones on writing historical fiction
32:58

After making his name as a medieval historian, Dan Jones has turned his hand to historical fiction. His debut novel, Essex Dogs, follows ten hardened mercenaries through the 1346 Crecy campaign. In this episode, Dan speaks to Rhiannon Davies about the secrets of writing great battle scenes, the challenges of relying on medieval sources, and how a dinner with Game of Thrones author George RR Martin inspired him to pick up the pen.

(Ad) Dan Jones is the author of Essex Dogs (Head of Zeus, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Essex-Dogs-Trilogy/dp/1838937919/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histipad



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Sep 15, 2022
Tutankhamun | 6. secrets of the pharaoh's mummy
37:31

There’s no more instantly recognisable symbol of ancient Egypt than a mummy. And, of course, the mummy of Tutankhamun is the most famous of all. But what can we learn from looking at the mummified body of an ancient boy king? In episode 6 of our series on Tutankhamun, Ellie Cawthorne and Dr Chris Naunton explore what the ancient Egyptians believed happened after death, delve into ancient mummification processes and follow Tutankhamun’s mummy on his somewhat unexpected adventures in the afterlife. 





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Sep 14, 2022
Escape from Colditz
37:05

Bestselling author and historian Ben Macintyre joins us to discuss one of the most infamous German prisoner of war camps of the Second World War. In conversation with Rob Attar he describes some of the most ingenious escape attempts from the hilltop castle, but also reveals how the prisoner experience encompassed boredom, racism and class conflict. 

(Ad) Ben Macintyre is the author of Colditz: Prisoners of the Castle (Peguin Books, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histipad&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fcolditz%2Fben-macintyre%2F2928377088279

 



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Sep 13, 2022
Winter is coming: the Anglo-Saxon year
39:40

How did the Anglo-Saxons think about changing seasons? Did they have the same months and use the same calendar as we do? What were the main festivals they celebrated, and why was winter such an important period for Anglo-Saxon poets? Eleanor Parker, author of Winters in the World: A Journey through the Anglo-Saxon Year, reveals more in conversation with David Musgrove.

(Ad) Eleanor Parker is the author of Winters in the World: A Journey Through the Anglo-Saxon Year (Reaktion, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histipad&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fwinters-in-the-world%2Feleanor-parker%2F9781789146721



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Sep 12, 2022
15 minutes of fame: Aina Forbes Bonetta, Queen Victoria’s Yoruba goddaughter
16:25

It’s the HistoryExtra podcast’s 15th birthday, and to celebrate, we’ve asked 15 historians to nominate a figure from history they think deserves their ‘15 minutes of fame’. In this episode, Hannah Cusworth nominates Aina Forbes Bonetta, also known as Sara. A Yoruba girl transported from West Africa, Aina became a goddaughter of Queen Victoria. Hannah speaks to Elinor Evans about what her story tells us much about the connections between West Africa and Britain during the Victorian era.





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Sep 11, 2022
Roman women: everything you wanted to know
47:45
Could a Roman woman lead an army? What was it like to give birth in the ancient world? And how could women gain financial independence in the Roman empire? In our latest ‘Everything you wanted to know’ episode, Professor Kate Cooper answers your questions on the experiences of women in the Roman world.

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Sep 10, 2022
The Mary Rose | TRAILER
2:32

What can a long-lost shipwreck reveal about Tudor England? In our new HistoryExtra podcast series, we’ll be marking the fortieth anniversary of the raising of the Mary Rose by delving back into its fascinating history, and uncovering the secrets this Tudor shipwreck has hidden out of reach for more than four centuries. We’ll reveal why the discovery of the Mary Rose has been so influential in shaping – and challenging – our understanding of the Tudor era, from the heat of naval battle to the manoeuvres of royal politicking, and explore what we can learn from the treasures found in the murky depths.


Episodes will be released weekly in this feed from Thursday 20 October. To gain early, ad-free access to episodes now, sign up to our premium subscription channel HistoryExtra Plus at https://apple.co/3QvTePK



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Sep 09, 2022
Author, adventurer, archaeologist: Agatha Christie’s action-packed life
45:10

Agatha Christie is known as the queen of crime fiction. But, as Lucy Worsley reveals, her life contained almost as much drama and mystery as her novels. Speaking to Rhiannon Davies, she reveals how Christie was a thoroughly modern woman for her time, and explains how her 80 books reflect the tumultuous transformations Britain went through during her lifetime.

(Ad) Lucy Worsley is the author of Agatha Christie: A Very Elusive Woman (Hodder & Stoughton, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histipad&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fagatha-christie%2Flucy-worsley%2F%2F9781399714921%3Fawaid%3D3787%26utm_source%3Dredbrain%26utm_medium%3Dshopping%26utm_campaign%3Dcss%26gclid%3DCj0KCQjw_7KXBhCoARIsAPdPTfgFwOWVKWBWnP_4RDSeIkU0zxWo4ytsAPfY4qWPbSPI78gotJA0d58aArJuEALw_wcB



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Sep 08, 2022
Tutankhamun | 5. Treasures of the tomb
34:47

When Howard Carter cracked open Tutankhamun’s tomb in 1922, he marvelled at the “wonderful things” he had discovered. But what exactly were these “wonderful things” and what can they tell us about the boy king, and the time he lived in? In episode 5 of our series on Tutankhamun, Professor Toby Wilkinson takes Ellie Cawthorne on a tour of the tomb and the treasures found within – from golden sandals and glittering jewels to royal loincloths and ancient buffet items.





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Sep 07, 2022
The Holocaust: a 21st-century view
58:21
How has our understanding of the Holocaust changed over the decades? Professors Mary Fulbrook, Richard J Evans and Rebecca Clifford explore this question in a panel discussion recorded in association with the Wolfson History Prize. In conversation with Rob Attar they discuss some of the latest areas of research and the impact of films, TV and other forms popular history on how we think about the Nazi genocide of the Jews.

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Sep 06, 2022
Russia’s national past: unpicking history from propaganda
37:06

In order to understand modern Russia, historian Orlando Figes argues, you need to understand the country’s view of its own past. From Putin’s historical justifications for invading Ukraine to debates about Russia’s foundation story, Figes tells Ellie Cawthorne how Russia has reflected on – and weaponised – its own history.

(Ad) Orlando Figes is the author of The Story of Russia (Bloomsbury, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histipad&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fauthor%2Forlando-figes%2F51835



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Sep 06, 2022
15 minutes of fame: Malintzin, Aztec interpreter
15:54

It’s the HistoryExtra podcast’s 15th birthday, and to celebrate, we’ve asked 15 historians to nominate a figure from history they think deserves their ‘15 minutes of fame’. In this episode, Dr Caroline Dodds Pennock nominates Malintzin. Speaking with Jon Bauckham, she discusses the life and legacy of this indigenous American woman who acted as Hernando Cortés’ translator during his conquest of the Aztec empire.





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Sep 04, 2022
Ellis Island: everything you wanted to know
48:53

Between the 1890s and 1920s, an estimated 12-13 million immigrants arrived in the United States via a vast processing centre on an island just off New York. But who were those immigrants? What did they have to do to be admitted to the country? Did many people get turned away? And did officials really change immigrants’ surnames to make them sound more “American”? Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, Professor Vincent Cannato answers listener questions on Ellis Island for our latest Everything you wanted to know episode. 

 

(Ad) Vincent Cannato is the author of American Passage: The History of Ellis Island (HarperCollins, 2009). Buy it now from Amazon: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histipad&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fberlin%2Fsinclair-mckay%2F9780241503171



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Sep 03, 2022
HistoryExtra Plus - Summer Listening Trailer
1:03

Would you like to make the most of the summer holidays with more fascinating historical conversations? Then subscribe to our premium podcast channel HistoryExtra Plus to get exclusive early access to our Summer Listening List – a specially curated selection of episodes on topics on everything ranging from medieval kings and political sabotage to Alexander the Great and Victorian seances.


For just £1.99 a month you’ll also get ad-free access to specially curated collections – on everything from the Middle Ages and Vikings to the Tudors and WW2, as well as early access to our series, including all episodes of our newest series on Tutankhamun. Plus, you can access all of our regular episodes ad-free! Just search for HistoryExtra Plus on Apple Podcasts or follow the link in this episode’s description to subscribe.


https://apple.co/3AHdBDF





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Sep 03, 2022
How nomads changed the world
35:14

 Nomads have altered the shape of human history in many ways, but as societies that didn’t tend to leave a written record, their stories are often overlooked. Anthony Sattin seeks to rectify that, sharing stories of significant travelling communities with David Musgrove. 

 

(Ad) Anthony Sattin is the author of Nomads: The Wanderers who Shaped our World (John Murray, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Nomads-Anthony-Sattin/dp/1473677793/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histipad

 



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Sep 01, 2022
Tutankhamun | 4. The mystery of Nefertiti
38:36

The striking bust of Nefertiti has captivated people since its discovery in 1912. But who was this queen? How powerful was she? And how was she related to Tutankhamun? In episode 4 of our series on the boy king, Ellie Cawthorne speaks to Professor Aidan Dodson and Professor Joyce Tyldesley to try and unravel some of the mysteries surrounding the woman who may have been Tutankhamun’s mother. Or stepmother. Or grandmother…





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Aug 31, 2022
Return of the Viking raiders
46:03
Across the eighth and ninth centuries, Britain and Ireland were targeted by a series of brutal Vikings raids. But that wasn’t the end of the story. In the 11th century, they were in the firing line once again – as further Viking naval expeditions were launched from Scandinavia. Medieval historian Dr Caitlin Ellis speaks to David Musgrove about this second wave of attacks.

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Aug 30, 2022
The big questions of religious history
47:48

Why is being a historian of religion such a dangerous endeavour today? Is it easier to study the history of a religion if you are an adherent or an outsider? And how can learning about religious history help shape the world today? Professors Carole Hillenbrand, Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad and Peter Marshall grapple with some of the most pressing issues in religious history, in a panel discussion hosted by Professor Diarmaid MacCulloch and recorded in association with the Wolfson History Prize. 




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Aug 29, 2022
15 minutes of fame: Franz Nopcsa, Hungarian adventurer and palaeontologist
16:17
It’s the HistoryExtra podcast’s 15th birthday! To celebrate, we’ve asked 15 historians to nominate a figure from history they think deserves their ‘15 minutes of fame’. In this episode, Tom Holland nominates Franz Nopsca. Speaking with Rob Attar, he recounts the story of the early 20th-century Hungarian palaeontologist, adventurer and specialist in Albanian studies.

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Aug 28, 2022
Troy: everything you wanted to know
54:15
The story of the Trojan War – featuring the daring Achilles, beautiful Helen and one very deceptive horse – is a classic of western literature. But did this famous war ever really happen? And was Troy even a real place? On today’s ‘Everything you wanted to know’ episode, Professor Paul Cartledge answers listener questions on these ancient mysteries. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, he discusses the discovery of archaeological remains believed to be Troy, and why Homer’s Iliad may not be the most reliable historical source.

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Aug 28, 2022
Castles: from mighty fortresses to fantastical palaces
35:51

John Goodall examines how the castle’s role has evolved through time – from medieval fortresses and prisons to regal residences and tourist hotspots. Speaking with Emily Briffett, he explains how these iconic landmarks have reflected society throughout their long history and shaped the way we think about the past.

(Ad) John Goodall is the author of The Castle: A History (Yale University Press, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Aug 26, 2022
Tutankhamun | 3. Life & death of a boy king
44:02

Tutankhamun is the most famous pharaoh of all, but what do we actually know about his short life and reign? In episode three of our series on the boy king, Ellie Cawthorne speaks to Professor Aidan Dodson and Dr Chris Naunton about the defining events of Tutankhamun’s reign, before taking a look at his family, health and lavish lifestyle. They also investigate the young pharaoh’s premature death, delving into theories of murder, malaria and death by hippopotamus.





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Aug 25, 2022
Glass men & killer doubles: a history of delusions
34:24

From ancient people who believed they were made of butter, to French Terror survivors who were convinced they’d been guillotined and given the wrong head back, people have suffered from delusions for centuries. Rhiannon Davies spoke to Victoria Shepherd about why delusions have plagued us for so long, and what they can tell us about times of historical trauma.





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Aug 24, 2022
The BBC at 100: what can history tell us about its future?
43:48

In the final instalment of our series marking the BBC’s centenary, David Hendy explores what the corporation’s history can tell us about its future. He spoke to Matt Elton about the challenges that the corporation has faced in the 21st century – and what looking back at its past can tell us about its future.

(Ad) David Hendy is the author of The BBC: A People’s History (Profile Books, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Aug 23, 2022
15 minutes of fame: St Hadrian of Canterbury, medieval African theologian
21:41

It’s the HistoryExtra podcast’s 15th birthday, and to celebrate, we’ve asked 15 historians to nominate a figure from history they think deserves their ‘15 minutes of fame’. In this episode, Professor Michael Wood nominates St Hadrian of Canterbury. Speaking with Spencer Mizen, he hails the achievements of this seventh-century scholar who helped turn early medieval England into a cultural powerhouse.





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Aug 21, 2022
Robin Hood: everything you wanted to know
44:46

There are few better-known folktales than the story of a gentlemanly outlaw roaming the forest with his band of merry men, robbing the rich to give to the poor. But where did the legend of Robin Hood come from? How come early versions of the story were much more grisly? And would the outlaw archer really have worn green tights? Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, Dr Sean McGlynn answers listener questions on Robin Hood for our latest Everything you wanted to know episode.

(Ad) Sean McGlynn is the author of Robin Hood: A True Legend (2018). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Robin-Hood-Legend-Sean-McGlynn/dp/1790242533/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=shepherd/9780861540914#:~:text=From%20fourteenth%2Dcentury%20England%20to,'&text=*%20Foreword%20Reviews%20*-,'In%20this%20bewitching%20debut%2C%20Shepherd%20adapts%20her%20BBC%20Radio%204,strange%20account%20of%20delusions...&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histipad



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Aug 21, 2022
How one woman liberated a notorious US slave jail
35:43

Kristen Green uncovers the life and legacy of Mary Lumpkin, an enslaved women trapped within the US domestic slave trade. Speaking to Emily Briffett, Kristen explains how Mary fought for her children’s freedom, liberated the infamous “Devil’s Half Acre” and ultimately founded one of the first historically black colleges and universities in the US.

(Ad) Kristen Green is the author of The Devil's Half Acre: The Untold Story of How One Woman Liberated the South's Most Notorious Slave Jail (Seal Press, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

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Aug 19, 2022
Tutankhamun | 2. Egypt in the era of the boy king
42:10

Tutankhamun’s reign took place during one of ancient Egypt’s most fascinating and turbulent periods – the 18th Dynasty. In episode two of our new series on the boy king, we travel back more than 3,000 years to uncover what was happening in Egypt when Tutankhamun came to the throne. Ellie Cawthorne speaks to expert historians Guy de la Bédoyère and Professor Joyce Tyldesley to uncover stories of immense power and eye-watering wealth, instability, corruption and religious revolution.





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Aug 18, 2022
Lost languages & travelling communities: unexpected medieval histories
32:24

As part of our series of conversations with winners of the 2022 Dan David Prize, Dr Kristina Richardson tells Helen Carr about her research into little-studied travelling communities of the medieval Middle East – and what this can tell us about the lives of marginalised groups at the time. She discusses uncovering lost languages, and reveals how one itinerant medieval Middle Eastern community was highly advanced in printing on paper long before it was adopted in Europe. 


The Dan David Prize is the world's largest history prize, which recognizes outstanding historical scholarship. Find out more at dandavidprize.org. 





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Aug 17, 2022
Countryside campaigners: four women who fought for our green spaces
49:30

Professor Matthew Kelly tells David Musgrove the story of four women who helped to protect and preserve the English countryside from the 1870s through to the 1970s, battling for public access to natural spaces.

(Ad) Matthew Kelly is the author of The Women Who Saved the English Countryside (Yale University Press, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Aug 16, 2022
15 minutes of fame: Charley Wilson, working-class trans man
15:02

It’s the HistoryExtra podcast’s 15th birthday, and to celebrate, we’ve asked 15 historians to nominate a figure from history they think deserves their ‘15 minutes of fame’. In this episode, Dr Fern Riddell nominates Victorian-era transgender man Charley Wilson. Speaking with Elinor Evans, she reveals why his story is important today.




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Aug 15, 2022
Hollywood history: everything you wanted to know
45:52

What are the most impactful films in Hollywood history? What made the golden age of film so golden? And how important were Hollywood movies in projecting American values to the wider world? In conversation with Spencer Mizen, Mark Glancy answers listener questions on a cultural powerhouse, from silent movies and glamorous stars to the blockbusters of the late 20th century.

(Ad) Mark Glancy is the author of Cary Grant, the Making of a Hollywood Legend (OUP, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Making-Hollywood-Legend-CULTURAL-BIOGRAPHIES/dp/0190053135/ref=sr_1_1?crid=2Q8BCYY1041O&keywords=mark+glancy+cary+grant&qid=1659704177&s=audible&sprefix=mark+glancy+cary+grant%2Caudible%2C48&sr=1-1-catcorr&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histipad



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Aug 14, 2022
The Sahara: a green and pleasant land
34:25

The Sahara is known as one of the world’s hottest and driest environments, but during his explorations of the desert over the past 60 years, Martin Williams has discovered evidence of a green and pleasant history. He explains to Spencer Mizen how the area was once home to lakes, rivers, humans and hippos.

(Ad) Martin Williams is the author of When the Sahara Was Green: How Our Greatest Desert Came to Be (Princeton University Press, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/When-Sahara-Was-Green-Greatest/dp/0691201625/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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Aug 12, 2022
Tutankhamun | 1. Unearthing the boy king’s lost tomb
41:45

One hundred years ago, in 1922, Egyptologist Howard Carter made one of the most spectacular discoveries in the history of archaeology, when he unearthed the tomb of Tutankhamun in Egypt’s Valley of the Kings. In the first episode in our new series on the life, death and legacy of the iconic pharaoh, Toby Wilkinson and Okasha El Daly tell Ellie Cawthorne about the hunt for the boy king’s tomb – which had lain undisturbed for more than 3,000 years – and the controversies sparked by the discovery.


https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/history-extra-plus-specials/id1569637306?itsct=podcast_box&itscg=30200&ls=1





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Aug 11, 2022
Is Queen Henrietta Maria’s rotten reputation deserved?
41:10

As the wife of Charles I, Henrietta Maria was in the firing line of the parliamentary propaganda machine. The Stuart queen was known as the “popish brat of France”, a “whore” and “the wife who wore the britches”. But does she deserve this rotten reputation? Emily Briffett spoke to Leanda de Lisle to bust some myths surrounding the reviled queen.

(Ad) Leanda de Lisle is the author of Henrietta Maria: Conspirator, Warrior, Phoenix Queen (Chatto & Windus, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fhenrietta-maria%2Fleanda-de-lisle%2F9781784742966



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Aug 10, 2022
Measurement: an unexpected history
45:24

From weight and distance, to calorie-counting and calculating the depths of space, throughout history, humans have loved to measure things. Speaking to Elinor Evans, James Vincent – author of Beyond Measure – uncovers some fascinating and unexpected stories from the history of measurement.

(Ad) James Vincent is the author of Beyond Measure: The Hidden History of Measurement (Faber & Faber, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Beyond-Measure-Hidden-History-Measurement/dp/0571354211/ref=asc_df_0571354211/?tag=googshopuk-21&linkCode=df0&hvadid=570229818468&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=5898554147373027881&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=1006715&hvtargid=pla-1601293199965&psc=1&th=1&psc=1&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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Aug 09, 2022
15 minutes of fame: Alice Kinloch, Pan-African activist
15:34
It’s the HistoryExtra podcast’s 15th birthday! To celebrate, we’ve asked 15 historians to nominate a figure from history they think deserves their ‘15 minutes of fame’. In this episode, Professor Hakim Adi nominates Alice Kinloch. Speaking with Rhiannon Davies, he describes how this impassioned South African political campaigner travelled around Britain, and was determined to reveal the brutality of the diamond mining industry in South Africa.

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Aug 08, 2022
First World War poets: everything you wanted to know
38:05
How much has our view of the First World War – one of mud, trenches and futility – been shaped by the work of a handful of poets? How did the British public respond to poems criticising the war effort? And why have some war poets been remembered, while others have been forgotten? In our latest ‘Everything you wanted to know’ episode, the University of Exeter’s Professor Catriona Pennell answers listener questions on First World War poetry – and argues that we should broaden our horizons beyond Wilfred Owen and Siegfried Sassoon.

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Aug 07, 2022
Stalingrad: a soldier’s testimony
49:35

Author Iain MacGregor reveals how the unpublished memoirs of a German officer shed fascinating new light on the battle of Stalingrad. Speaking with Rob Attar, Iain explains how Fritz Roske’s accounts add to our knowledge of this key turning point in the Second World War.

(Ad) Iain MacGregor is the author of The Lighthouse of Stalingrad: The Hidden Truth at the Centre of WWII's Greatest Battle (Constable, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-lighthouse-of-stalingrad%2Fiain-macgregor%2F%2F9781472135216%3Fawaid%3D3787%26utm_source%3Dredbrain%26utm_medium%3Dshopping%26utm_campaign%3Dcss%26gclid%3DCj0KCQjwtvqVBhCVARIsAFUxcRs02iKPy14nNqOjTzHMtcPcBtZr9eIXWJChbj7_PsJRirx3UmFeRgEaAt36EALw_wcB



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Aug 05, 2022
Medieval monks: a day in the life
37:07

Danièle Cybulskie charts a day in the life of a medieval monk, from morning rituals and mealtime misbehaviour to daily chores and worldly reflection. Speaking with Emily Briffett, she explores what such an austere and structured lifestyle might be able to teach us today – and how monastic priorities about health and wellbeing weren’t too different from our own.

(Ad) Danièle Cybulskie is the author of How to Live Like a Monk: Medieval Wisdom for Modern Life (Abbeville Press, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Aug 04, 2022
Gone with the Wind: how a 1936 novel explains modern America
43:45

Professor Sarah Churchwell discusses her new book The Wrath to Come, which re-examines the controversial legacy of Margaret Mitchell’s immensely popular 1936 novel Gone With The Wind. Speaking with Rachel Dinning, she considers what it can tell us about American history and culture today, from the mythmaking that sprung up following the Civil War to the origins of modern debates over racism and the far right in the United States.

(Ad) Sarah Churchwell is the author of The Wrath to Come: Gone with the Wind and the Lies America Tells (Apollo, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-wrath-to-come%2Fsarah-churchwell%2F9781789542981



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Aug 03, 2022
Treason: from Anne Boleyn to Lord Haw Haw
42:13
Professor Mark Cornwell charts the history of treason in Britain. He tells Kev Lochun how a handful of high profile cases – from Anne Boleyn and the gunpowder plotters to Lord Haw Haw – can shed light on the evolving nature of individual rights versus the power of the state.

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Aug 02, 2022
15 minutes of fame: St Wilfrid, quarrelsome church reformer
20:16
It’s the HistoryExtra podcast’s 15th birthday! To celebrate, we’ve asked 15 historians to nominate a figure from history they think deserves their ‘15 minutes of fame’. In this episode, Dr Marc Morris nominates St Wilfrid. Speaking with Emily Briffett, he reveals the extraordinary life of the early medieval saint and religious reformer.

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Aug 01, 2022
Gold rushes: everything you wanted to know
50:01
Stephen Tuffnell answers listener questions on the series of gold rushes that captivated the imaginations of hordes of prospectors in the 19th century. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, he explores what drew people to remote gold fields, what life was like in mining camps, and how gold rushes transformed economic, ecological and social landscapes.

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Jul 31, 2022
Reconstructing black lives in the Antebellum South
26:31

As part of our series of conversations with winners of the 2022 Dan David Prize, Dr Kimberly Welch talks to Helen Carr about her research using legal records to reconstruct the lives of free and enslaved black people in the Antebellum South.


The Dan David Prize is the world's largest history prize, which recognizes outstanding historical scholarship. Find out more at dandavidprize.org.



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Jul 29, 2022
The end of Roman Britain | 8. ends and beginnings
29:11
In the final episode of the series, David Musgrove wraps up what we’ve learnt from our experts about how Britain moved out of the orbit of the Roman empire in the 5th century. He also considers how some modern parallels might help us get a handle on what life was like for those living at the time, and looks forward to some exciting possibilities for future research.

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Jul 28, 2022
Hannibal: Rome’s greatest nightmare
30:47

Philip Freeman shares the story of how the brilliant Carthaginian general Hannibal led his elephants over the Alps and into Rome’s nightmares, making his name a byword for terror for centuries. Speaking to Spencer Mizen, he reveals how Hannibal outfoxed his mortal enemy, only to throw it all away.

(Ad) Philip Freeman is the author of Hannibal: Rome’s Greatest Enemy (Pegasus, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Hannibal-Greatest-Philip-Freeman-PhD/dp/1643138715/ref=asc_df_1643138715/?tag=googshopuk-21&linkCode=df0&hvadid=570354289872&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=289873074649221366&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9045629&hvtargid=pla-1395462607153&psc=1&th=1&psc=1&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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Jul 27, 2022
Stalin’s library: inside the mind of a dictator
38:08

Historian Geoffrey Roberts explores the life and career of Josef Stalin through his vast book collection. In conversation with Rob Attar, Professor Roberts highlights some of the unexpected items on the Soviet dictator's shelves and explains the influence that reading had on his brutal regime.

(Ad) Geoffrey Roberts is the author of Stalin's Library: A Dictator and his Books (Yale University Press, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Jul 26, 2022
15 minutes of fame: Queen Tiye, overshadowed ancient Egyptian royal
13:50
It’s the HistoryExtra podcast’s 15th birthday! To celebrate, we’ve asked 15 historians to nominate a figure from history they think deserves their ‘15 minutes of fame’. In this episode, Professor Joyce Tyldesley nominates the ancient Egyptian Queen Tiye. Speaking with Ellie Cawthorne, she considers how the queen consort and queen mother has previously been overlooked, despite playing an important religious and diplomatic role in Egypt's 18th dynasty.

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Jul 25, 2022
The partition of India: everything you wanted to know
30:51
For the latest in our everything you want to know series, historian Dr Anwesha Roy revisits the 1947 partition of India, which divided British-ruled India into two independent countries. In conversation with Rob Attar she explains how India came to be divided and considers why the process was accompanied by such terrible violence and suffering.

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Jul 24, 2022
The BBC at 100: scandals break
48:30
In the penultimate episode of our series marking the centenary of the BBC, David Hendy looks back at some of the scandals surrounding the corporation across the past two decades – both new and historical – and what they tell us about its relationship with politics and the public.

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Jul 22, 2022
The end of Roman Britain | 7. bones, diet and migrants
40:49
In this episode, we talk to Dr Sam Leggett, an expert in archaeological bone analysis, about the latest fascinating research with stable isotopes, to find out what the bones of burials from the 5th century can tell us about how much people were moving around and what they were eating in post-roman Britain

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Jul 21, 2022
The first Vietnam War
40:42

Historian Christopher Goscha explores the decade-long conflict between the French empire and Ho Chi Minh’s communist Vietnamese forces that followed the Second World War. Speaking to Rob Attar, he argues that the Vietnamese triumph was unlike any other anti-colonial struggle of the era.

(Ad) Christopher Goscha is the author of The Road to Dien Bien Phu: A History of the First War for Vietnam (Princeton University Press, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Road-Dien-Bien-Phu-History/dp/0691180164/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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Jul 20, 2022
Powerful pages: the beguiling history of books
30:53

For centuries, humanity has had a love affair with books. But these volumes are far more than just receptacles for stories. They have been tools to spread religion and empire, and have contained dangerous politics and talismanic protections. Emma Smith tells Rhiannon Davies about our complex relationship with the printed word.

(Ad) Emma Smith is the author of Portable Magic: A History of Books and Their Readers (Allen Lane, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Jul 19, 2022
15 minutes of fame: Marie Tharp, ground-breaking cartographer
18:50
It’s the HistoryExtra podcast’s 15th birthday! To celebrate, we’ve asked 15 historians to nominate a figure from history they think deserves their ‘15 minutes of fame’. In this episode, Professor Jerry Brotton nominates Marie Tharp. Speaking with Dave Musgrove, he dives into the life of the pioneering geologist and ocean cartographer and explores her remarkable legacy.

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Jul 18, 2022
The Inca empire: everything you wanted to know
54:23
What did an ordinary day in the Inca empire look like? How did the Inca count using knots? And why were stones so sacred to the civilization? In conversation with Emily Briffett, Bill Sillar answers listener questions on the mighty empire which dominated swathes of land in South America.

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Jul 17, 2022
The vanishing inventor
39:33

On 16 September 1890, inventor Louis Le Prince boarded a train to Paris and vanished without a trace. In his book The Man Who Invented Motion Pictures, Paul Fischer explores his life and disappearance. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, he delves into the many theories about what may have happened Le Prince – from an accident or mugging, to murder by his rival Thomas Edison in order to steal his latest invention.

(Ad) Paul Fischer is the author of The Man Who Invented Motion Pictures: A True Tale of Obsession, Murder, and the Movies (Simon & Schuster, 2022. Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Man-Who-Invented-Motion-Pictures/dp/1982114827/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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Jul 15, 2022
The end of Roman Britain | 6. cultures lost and found
39:02
In episode six of our podcast series on the end of Roman Britain, Professor Robin Fleming speaks to David Musgrove about how far the archaeological evidence and the documentary sources agree – or disagree – about what happened as Britain moved away from the influence of the Roman empire.

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Jul 14, 2022
Britain’s century of political nightmares
36:08

From the First World War to the financial crash of 2008, Phil Tinline tells Spencer Mizen how politicians have reacted to the many crises that have beset Britain in the era since the rise of mass democracy.

(Ad) Phil Tinline is the author of The Death of Consensus: 100 Years of British Political Nightmares (Hurst, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Death-Consensus-British-Political-Nightmares/dp/1787386902/ref=tmm_hrd_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=&sr=&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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Jul 13, 2022
Royal rivals? Medieval England and France’s tempestuous relationship
38:57

Catherine Hanley chronicles the greatest conflicts and alliances between England and France from 1100-1300, through the stories of the men, women and children involved. She explains to Emily Briffett how, in a time of personal monarchy, unexpected events, familial ties and personalities forged the fate of the two intertwined kingdoms.

(Ad) Catherine Hanley is the author of Two Houses, Two Kingdoms: A History of France and England, 1100–1300 (Yale University Press, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

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Jul 12, 2022
15 minutes of fame: Tsiang Ting-fu, Chinese historian and diplomat
20:38
It’s the HistoryExtra podcast’s 15th birthday! To celebrate, we’ve asked 15 historians to nominate a figure from history they think deserves their ‘15 minutes of fame’. In this episode, Professor Rana Mitter nominates Tsiang Tingfu. He tells Rob Attar about this 20th-century Chinese historian and diplomat who was an important link between the country and the west before the Communist revolution.

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Jul 11, 2022
The Peasants’ Revolt: everything you wanted to know
43:35
In 1381, thousands of men and women surged into London, attacking jails, burning down palaces, murdering the Archbishop of Canterbury and confronting the king. But what caused the Peasants’ Revolt? Is it even accurate to describe the rebels as “peasants”? Was Richard II sympathetic to their grievances? And how brutal was the authorities’ response to the revolt? Speaking to Spencer Mizen, Helen Carr answers your top queries on the turbulent events of 1381.

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Jul 10, 2022
Elizabeth I’s greatest rival?
38:04

Sixteenth-century Europe was dominated by two female powerhouses: Elizabeth I of England and Catherine de Medici, the French Queen Mother. The two women had a tumultuous relationship, being sometimes friends and at other times foes, as Estelle Paranque reveals to Rhiannon Davies.

(Ad) Estelle Paranque is the author of Blood, Fire and Gold: The story of Elizabeth I and Catherine de Medici (Ebury Digital, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Blood-Fire-Gold-Elizabeth-Catherine-ebook/dp/B09HWYQ31V/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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Jul 08, 2022
The end of Roman Britain | 5. an identity crisis?
48:03
In the fifth episode of our podcast series on the end of Roman Britain, David Musgrove talks to Dr James Gerrard about how society changed as Britain slipped out of Roman control in the fifth century. They also discuss what the latest research can tell us about how people might have reimagined their identities in the face of a changing world.

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Jul 07, 2022
David Stirling: SAS hero or fraud?
38:04

Special forces historian Gavin Mortimer casts a critical eye over David Stirling, who is renowned as the founder of the SAS in the Second World War. Speaking to Rob Attar, Mortimer argues that Stirling’s wartime record was far less impressive than he claimed and that his legend has obscured the achievements of those around him.

(Ad) Gavin Mortimer is the author of David Stirling: The Phoney Major: The Life, Times and Truth about the Founder of the SAS (Little Brown, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Jul 06, 2022
The Norman kings of Africa
32:24

The Normans famously conquered England, but did you know they also had a short-lived kingdom in North Africa in the 12th century? Professor Levi Roach explains to David Musgrove how the Normans established a presence in southern Italy and Sicily and expanded south towards Africa.

(Ad) Levi Roach is the author of Empires of the Normans: Makers of Europe, Conquerors of Asia (John Murray Press, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Jul 05, 2022
15 minutes of fame: Hildegard of Bingen, medieval polymath
19:49
It’s the HistoryExtra podcast’s 15th birthday! To celebrate, we’ve asked 15 historians to nominate a figure from history they think deserves their ‘15 minutes of fame’. In this episode, Dr Janina Ramirez nominates Hildegard of Bingen. Speaking with Emily Briffett, she explains why this 12th-century abbess, composer, scientist, writer and saint deserves to be better remembered today.

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Jul 04, 2022
British schools and education: everything you wanted to know
1:03:30
When did schooling become compulsory? How far did education differ between girls and boys? And why does the British school year start in September? Speaking to Emma Slattery Williams, Susannah Wright answers some of our listeners’ most popular questions on the history of British schools – from the establishment of the earliest schools to the surprisingly late abolition of corporal punishment.

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Jul 03, 2022
On the streets of 19th-century London
37:18

Oskar Jensen introduces the characters roaming the streets of Georgian and Victorian London, from beggars to ballad singers. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, he explores what it would have been like to live and work on the streets of the capital, sharing stories of entrepreneurial street sweepers, impatient milkmaids, kidnapped children and timid hot-cross bun sellers.

(Ad) Oskar Jensen is the author of Vagabonds: Life on the Streets of Nineteenth-century London (Prelude, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Jul 01, 2022
The end of Roman Britain | 4. religion and belief
36:06
In the fourth episode of our podcast series on the end of Roman Britain, David Musgrove considers the role of religion in late Roman Britain with Dr David Petts. They look at how far Christianity was embedded in Britain by the fourth century, what other religious practices existed alongside it and, crucially, how far adherence to the Christian faith in the declining years of the empire helped to keep the Roman way of life going in Britain.

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Jun 30, 2022
Casanova: more than a serial seducer
42:46

Giacomo Casanova is remembered for his reputation as a serial seducer. But according to author Leo Damrosch, he was far more than that. Speaking with Emily Briffett, Leo explains how Casanova was also an aspiring priest, spy, army officer and Masonic master, who led a colourful life that saw him interact with kings, empresses and some of the most famous writers of his time.

(Ad) Leo Damrosch is the author of Adventurer: The Life and Times of Giacomo Casanova (Yale University Press, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Jun 29, 2022
From bohemian Brighton to military Plymouth: the LGBTQ history of four British cities
51:23

Matt Cook and Alison Oram discuss their new book Queer Beyond London, which uncovers the LGBTQ experience in four English cities – Brighton, Manchester, Plymouth and Leeds – from the sixties to the noughties. Speaking with Rachel Dinning, they consider how local people, places and politics shaped LGBTQ lives in each city, establishing individual cultures often very distinct from the national narrative.

(Ad) Alison Oram and Matt Cook are the authors of Queer Beyond London (Manchester University Press, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Jun 28, 2022
15 minutes of fame: Marguerite de Navarre, royal influencer
16:17

It’s the HistoryExtra podcast’s 15th birthday! To celebrate, we’ve asked 15 historians to nominate a figure from history they think deserves their 15 minutes of fame. In today’s episode, Suzannah Lipscomb tells Emily Briffett about the life of Marguerite de Navarre, a 16th-century royal player who had a major influence on both the Renaissance and Reformation.


If you’re enjoying this series and would like early access to more episodes, head to www.historyextra.com/15-minutes.



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Jun 27, 2022
The Mali empire: everything you wanted to know
50:12
Who founded the Mali empire? What impact did Islam have on its trajectory? What were its interactions with medieval Europe like? And what made its greatest leader, Mansa Musa, so fabulously wealthy? Speaking to Spencer Mizen, Kevin MacDonald answers listener questions on one of Africa’s greatest historical powers.

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Jun 26, 2022
The BBC at 100: political tensions in the 1970s and 80s
37:09

In the latest instalment of our monthly series marking the centenary of the BBC, media historian David Hendy talks to Matt Elton about the political pressures and fissures that defined the 1970s and 80s – and the ways in which they shaped the corporation’s output.

(Ad) David Hendy is the author of The BBC: A People’s History (Profile Books, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Jun 24, 2022
The end of Roman Britain | 3. a militarised state?
42:49
In the third episode of our podcast series on the end of Roman Britain, David Musgrove looks at how far Britain was a militarised state between the third and fifth centuries. Historian Dr Rob Collins explains how Roman Britain was set up to support the military machine of the wider empire, and what might have happened when that military machine began to falter.

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Jun 23, 2022
Who were the Celts?
32:26

Simon Jenkins considers the enigmatic story of the Celts, and asks whether any such people ever actually existed. Speaking with David Musgrove, he also questions what the term ‘Celtic’ should mean to us today.

(Ad) Simon Jenkins is the author of The Celts: A Sceptical History (Profile Books, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Jun 22, 2022
Pioneering women pilots: from ballooning spectacles to flying escapades
49:02

Sally Smith considers the contributions made and significant firsts achieved by British women in the field of aviation, from ballooning and parachuting, to piloting airships and fixed-wing aircraft. Speaking with Emily Briffett, she highlights the extraordinary lives these pioneers led and the trials they faced in order to achieve success.

(Ad) Sally Smith is the author of Magnificent Women and Flying Machines: The First 200 Years of British Women in the Sky (The History Press, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Magnificent-Women-Flying-Machines-British/dp/075099746X/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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Jun 21, 2022
Discovering a lost royal battleship
34:52

Claire Jowitt discusses the discovery of a 17th-century shipwreck off the coast of Norfolk 

 

Claire Jowitt speaks to Matt Elton about the news of the discovery of a 17th-century shipwreck off the coast of Norfolk – and why it might be the most important maritime find in decades. 



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Jun 20, 2022
The Edwardians: everything you wanted to know
34:46

In our latest everything you wanted to know episode, Dr John Jacob Woolf answers listener questions on Edwardian Britain. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, he touches on subjects ranging from suffrage, labour movements, empire and international relations, to leisure time, childhood and roller-skating.



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Jun 19, 2022
Watergate at 50: the making of an American scandal
49:50
Half a century on from the Watergate scandal, Clifford Williamson explores its twists and turns, its key players, and its lasting impact on American politics. Speaking with Matt Elton, he explains how the conspiracy sparked a constitutional crisis that brought down a president.

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Jun 17, 2022
The end of Roman Britain | 2. life in the late imperial age
40:18

In the second episode of our podcast series on the end of Roman Britain, David Musgrove investigates what life was like for people living in the later Roman era, in the third and fourth centuries. He speaks to Professor Will Bowden to explore the inequalities that existed between the haves and have-nots, and how far the stresses and strains that were at play in the wider empire impacted on everyday life in Britain.





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Jun 16, 2022
African-American philanthropy
31:30

In the first episode in our series of conversations with winners of the 2022 Dan David Prize, Dr Tyrone Freeman speaks to Helen Carr about his award-winning research into charitable traditions in African-American communities.

The Dan David Prize is the world's largest history prize, which recognizes outstanding historical scholarship. Hear more conversations with other winners of the 2022 Dan David prize, early and ad-free now at historyextra.com/dan-david-prize.



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Jun 15, 2022
Reconstructing the body of God
25:21

Francesca Stavrakopoulou, author of the Wolfson History Prize shortlisted book God: An Anatomy, discusses what ancient biblical texts tell us about the body of God. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, she traces the origins of God back to an ancient deity called Yahweh, and talks about the challenges of working on religious history.

(Ad) Francesca Stavrakopoulou is the author of God: An Anatomy (Picador, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/God-Anatomy-Francesca-Stavrakopoulou/dp/1509867333/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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Jun 14, 2022
Midway: why America won the WW2 naval battle
34:28

In June 1942, the US and Japanese navies went head to head over a small atoll in the middle of the Pacific ocean. Brendan Simms and Steven McGregor, authors of The Silver Waterfall, speak to Ellie Cawthorne about the factors that led to the United States’ victory at Midway, exploring the importance of American industrial innovation, and reflecting on the extent to which Midway changed the course of the Pacific War.

(Ad) Brendan Simms and Steven McGregor are the authors of The Silver Waterfall: How America Won the War in the Pacific at Midway (PublicAffairs, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Jun 13, 2022
Crime & punishment in Britain: everything you wanted to know
1:02:57
Who maintained law and order before the police? When did Britain ban capital punishment – and why? And what are some of the weirdest punishments doled out through history? Historian of crime Nell Darby answers listener questions on crime and punishment through history. Speaking to Rachel Dinning, she discusses subjects ranging from the origins of the police to the history of prisons and the death penalty.

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Jun 12, 2022
Has Britain always looked backwards?
27:57

From the “Blitz spirit” invoked in the Covid-19 pandemic, to the 16th-century sense that a lost greatness needed to be recovered, historian Hannah Rose Woods reveals how nostalgia for a bygone era is nothing new. Speaking to Elinor Evans about her new book Rule, Nostalgia, she discusses the various ways our ancestors have looked back at our national past.

(Ad) Hannah Rose Woods is the author of Rule, Nostalgia: A Backwards History of Britain (Ebury Publishing, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Jun 10, 2022
The end of Roman Britain | 1. introduction, and a mystery mosaic
38:40
What really happened in Britain as Roman influence waned? Recent research is shaking up our view of the end of imperial rule during the fifth century, and one new find in particular – a mosaic at Chedworth Roman villa – is leading experts to reassess how far people carried on “being Roman”. In the opening episode of our new series, David Musgrove takes a trip to Chedworth to begin his investigation into the end of Roman Britain.

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Jun 09, 2022
How the Persians were written out of history
35:16

Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones tells Spencer Mizen why Eurocentric depictions of the “barbarous” Persians have obscured the achievements of one of the ancient world’s great civilisations.

(Ad) Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones is the author of Persians: The Age of The Great Kings (Wildfire, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

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Jun 08, 2022
Shady deals & rigged elections: the changing face of corruption
35:41

Professor Mark Knights discusses how ideas about corruption were transformed in Britain and its empire between 1600 and 1850. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, he delves into the shady realms of bribery and electoral corruption and the blurred lines between public service and private gain.

(Ad) Mark Knights is the author of Trust and Distrust: Corruption in Office in Britain and its Empire, 1600-1850 (Oxford University press, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Ftrust-and-distrust%2Fmark-knights%2F9780198796244



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Jun 07, 2022
Plastic surgery: transformed by WW1
37:49

The First World War unleashed an unprecedented wave of violence, and medicine struggled to keep up. British surgeon Harold Gillies was at the forefront of those dragging plastic surgery into the modern age, reconstructing the faces of thousands of soldiers. Lindsey Fitzharris speaks to Rhiannon Davies about Gillies’ remarkable contribution to medical science.

(Ad) Lindsey Fitzharris is the author of The Facemaker: A Visionary Surgeon's Battle to Mend the Disfigured Soldiers of World War I (Penguin, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Jun 06, 2022
Britain’s transformation during the Queen’s lifetime
32:36
This week sees Queen Elizabeth II make history as the first ever British monarch to celebrate their platinum jubilee. To mark her 70 years on the throne, Rhiannon Davies speaks to Dominic Sandbrook about some of the radical transformations the nation has undergone during her lifetime.

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Jun 05, 2022
Empire of blood
45:33

Professor Caroline Elkins explains how the British empire was sustained by violence for more than 200 years. Speaking with Rob Attar, she reveals how liberal imperialism was able to coexist with regular acts of brutality in Britain’s colonies.

(Ad) Caroline Elkins is the author of Legacy of Violence: A History of the British Empire (Bodley Head, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Jun 03, 2022
The Black Death | 6. how the pandemic transformed societies
39:52

In the final episode of our series on the Black Death, Professor Mark Bailey and Dr Claire Kennan discuss the medieval pandemic’s dramatic social, political and economic impact. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, they use England as a case study to explore how it restructured society, with effects that were felt for hundreds of years.


The primary sources quoted in this series are mainly taken from:

The Black Death, translated and edited by Rosemary Horrox (1994)

The Black Death, The Great Mortality of 1348-1350: A Brief History with Documents, John Arberth (2005)



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Jun 02, 2022
Fairy queens & giantesses: pagan goddesses in Christian Europe
35:07

Although medieval Europe was firmly Christian, pagan deities still loomed large in the popular imagination. Rhiannon Davies spoke to Ronald Hutton about four of these divine figures: the powerful and protective Mother Earth; the glamorous fairy queen; a night-roaming supernatural lady; and a Gaelic giantess.

(Ad) Ronald Hutton is the author of Queens of the Wild: Pagan Goddesses in Christian Europe: An Investigation (Yale University Press, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Queens-Wild-Goddesses-Christian-Investigation/dp/0300261012/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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Jun 01, 2022
The birth of insulin: a scientific drama
51:01

One hundred years on from Fred Banting and Charles Best’s discovery, Dr Kersten Hall tells the tale of insulin and its vital role in helping people with diabetes. Speaking with Emily Briffett, he explores the other unsung heroes involved in the drama that saw insulin develop from “thick brown muck” to wall street gold.

(Ad) Kersten Hall is the author of Insulin - The Crooked Timber: A History from Thick Brown Muck to Wall Street Gold (Oxford University Press, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Insulin-Crooked-Timber-History-Street/dp/0192855387/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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May 31, 2022
Dracula at 125: what can a vampire tell us about Victorian Britain?
29:39
Marking the 125th anniversary of the publication of Dracula, Roger Luckhurst tells Ellie Cawthorne why Bram Stoker’s vampire thriller has had such an enduring appeal. They discuss how the book exposed the anxieties of the late Victorian age, how contemporary readers reacted, and some of the most intriguing adaptations.

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May 30, 2022
Witchcraft: everything you wanted to know
42:21

Were all suspected witches burned at the stake? Was torture a legal way of gaining a confession of practising magic? And which professions were most commonly accused of dabbling in the dark arts? Speaking with Charlotte Hodgman, Owen Davies answers your top questions about witchcraft in our latest Everything you wanted to know episode.




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May 29, 2022
Alice Roberts on unearthing the Romans, Vikings & Anglo-Saxons
43:51

Professor Alice Roberts explores how cutting-edge developments in archaeology and genetic science can broaden our understanding of what happened in Britain between the first and tenth centuries AD. Through exploring the funerary sites of Romans, Vikings and Anglo-Saxons, she explains to Emily Briffett what we can learn about life and death at this time.

(Ad) Alice Roberts is the author of Buried: An Alternative History of the First Millennium in Britain (Simon & Schuster, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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May 27, 2022
The Black Death | 5. death, sin & spirituality
31:52

The arrival of a terrifying pandemic made medieval people increasingly preoccupied with death, sin and the afterlife. In this episode, Ellie Cawthorne speaks to Helen Carr about spiritual responses to the Black Death, from special prayers to self-flagellation.


The primary sources quoted in this series are mainly taken from:

The Black Death, translated and edited by Rosemary Horrox (1994)

The Black Death, The Great Mortality of 1348-1350: A Brief History with Documents, John Arberth (2005)



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May 26, 2022
Antony Beevor on the Russian revolution
41:20

Bestselling military historian Antony Beevor discusses his new book Russia: Revolution and Civil War 1917-1921. In conversation with Rob Attar, he delves into the two revolutions that overthrew Tsar Nicholas II and brought the Bolsheviks to power, and then examines the bloody civil war that ultimately consolidated communist control.

(Ad) Antony Beevor is the author of Russia: Revolution and Civil War 1917-1921 (Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Russia-Revolution-Civil-War-1917-1921/dp/1474610145/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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May 25, 2022
Eliza Acton: Britain’s first modern cookery writer
34:41

Writer Annabel Abbs discusses poet and food writer Eliza Acton, the protagonist of her new historical novel The Language of Food. She tells Emma Slattery Williams about Acton’s story and how her legacy has been overshadowed by Mrs Beeton.

(Ad) Annabel Abbs is the author of The Language of Food (Simon & Schuster, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-language-of-food%2Fannabel-abbs%2F9781398502222



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May 24, 2022
The BBC at 100: change & innovation in 60s Britain
35:20

In the latest episode of our monthly series marking the centenary of the BBC, media historian David Hendy speaks to Matt Elton about the ways in which the corporation kept up with a changing Britain through the 1960s.

(Ad) David Hendy is the author of The BBC: A People’s History (Profile Books, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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May 23, 2022
WW2’s desert war: everything you wanted to know
39:26

Historian Jonathan Fennell answers listener questions on the North African campaign in the Second World War. Speaking with Rob Attar, he discusses some of the key moments and personalities, reflects on the challenges of fighting in a desert and considers whether this theatre really was a war without hate.

(Ad) Jonathan Fennell is the author of ​​Fighting the People's War: The British and Commonwealth Armies and the Second World War (Cambridge University Press, 2019). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Fighting-Peoples-War-British-Commonwealth/dp/1107030951/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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May 22, 2022
Christine de Pizan: from medieval writer to feminist icon
40:36

Charlotte Cooper-Davis delves into the life and legacy of Christine de Pizan, a late medieval writer who was actively involved in the production of her own works. Speaking with Emily Briffett, Charlotte explores Christine’s vast catalogue of written work and how she has since become seen as a feminist icon.

(Ad) Charlotte Cooper-Davis is the author of Christine de Pizan: Life, Work, Legacy (Reaktion Books, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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May 20, 2022
The Black Death | 4. medieval medical thinking
33:16

How do you fight a disease, when you don’t know what causes it? In this episode, Ellie Cawthorne speaks to Elma Brenner about medieval medical thinking and how it informed responses to the Black Death, from ideas about how bad air and misaligned planets could make you sick, to the rituals and remedies used to treat plague victims and the state of 14th-century hospital care.

The primary sources quoted in this series are mainly taken from:

The Black Death, translated and edited by Rosemary Horrox (1994)

The Black Death, The Great Mortality of 1348-1350: A Brief History with Documents, John Arberth (2005)



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May 19, 2022
A legacy of inequality: the economic impact of empire
32:36

Imperialism led to eye-watering profits for the British, and after decolonisation those who had grown rich from the colonial project rewrote the rules to keep the coffers open. Rhiannon Davies speaks to Kojo Koram about the economic and legal effects of decolonisation, and how growing global inequality has its roots in empire.

(Ad) Kojo Koram is the author of Uncommon Wealth: Britain and the Aftermath of Empire (John Murray Press, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Uncommon-Wealth-Britain-Aftermath-Empire-ebook/dp/B093S5H74N/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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May 18, 2022
Stasi poets: creative writing & the Cold War
41:22

Journalist Philip Oltermann explores the unusual story of the poetry group run by the East German Ministry for State Security. Speaking to Rob Attar, he explains why the Stasi decided to employ rhyme and verse in their battle against capitalism.

(Ad) Philip Oltermann is the author of The Stasi Poetry Circle (Faber & Faber, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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May 17, 2022
Cathedrals: from bishops' seats to tourist hotspots
42:24
Nicholas Orme speaks to Emily Briffett about the long story of English cathedrals, tracing their role in society from their beginnings in the early Middle Ages to the modern day. Nicholas reveals how cathedrals have survived the turbulence of religious and social change, and explores what they can reveal to us about our history.

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May 16, 2022
The Restoration: everything you wanted to know
54:50
How did the Restoration of the monarchy come about, after a period of civil war and 11 years of Republican rule? How smooth was the transfer of power? And what did it mean for the everyday person? Speaking with Elinor Evans, Dr Clare Jackson tackles listener questions and popular internet search queries on Charles II’s ascension to the throne, in the latest episode in our Everything you wanted to know series.

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May 15, 2022
HistoryExtra Plus: get early access to our podcast series
0:33


Enjoying our new Black Death series? Listen to the next three episodes right now on our new subscription podcast channel HistoryExtra Plus, along with early access to our new series on the end of Roman Britain. Follow the link below to sign up now: 

https://apple.co/3w0aaXz

 



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May 14, 2022
Eurovision: a political history
37:44

From voting scandals and political messaging to drag queens and ABBA, Dr Dean Vuletic speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about the history of the Eurovision Song Contest. He discusses some of the controversies in the competition’s past and reveals what it can tell us about the changing face of Europe over the last six decades.

(Ad) Dean Vuletic is the author of Postwar Europe and the Eurovision Song Contest (Bloomsbury Academic, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Postwar-Europe-Eurovision-Song-Contest/dp/1350107395/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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May 13, 2022
The Black Death | 3. living through the plague
28:26

What would it have been like to live through a Black Death outbreak? In this episode, Ellie Cawthorne speaks to Professor Samuel Cohn about the experiences of medieval people in communities ravaged by the deadly disease. He reveals what the chroniclers tell us about the range of responses to the crisis in the late 1340s, and the lengths people went to to survive.


The primary sources quoted in this series are taken from:

The Black Death, translated and edited by Rosemary Horrox (1994)

The Black Death, The Great Mortality of 1348-1350: A Brief History with Documents, John Arberth (2005)



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May 12, 2022
Free speech: a brief, contentious history
40:27

Jacob Mchangama explores the global history of free speech, discussing its ancient origins, staunchest defenders and biggest critics. Speaking to Matt Elton, he also reveals the ways the right to speak freely has been threatened at moments of social upheaval.

(Ad) Jacob Mchangama is the author of Free Speech: A Global History from Socrates to Social Media (Basic Books, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Free-Speech-Global-History-Socrates-ebook/dp/B09JFTPG9H/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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May 11, 2022
Disabled people in Tudor times
21:53

Phillipa Vincent-Connolly explores the lives of disabled people in the Tudor era. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, she uncovers complex attitudes to disability in the period, and reveals how some disabled figures played key roles at the royal court.

(Ad) Phillipa Vincent-Connolly is the author of the Disability and the Tudors: All the King's Fools (Pen & Sword, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Disability-Tudors-All-Kings-Fools/dp/1526720051#:~:text=Being%20disabled%20with%20cerebral%20palsy,UK%20with%20her%20two%20boys/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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May 10, 2022
Magellan: daring explorer or doomed failure?
37:50

In September 1519, Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan set off on a fateful voyage to find a route to the Spice Islands. In the centuries since, Magellan has gone down in history as a chivalric adventurer, his name forever linked to the first circumnavigation of the globe. But, as Professor Felipe Fernández-Armesto tells Ellie Cawthorne, Magellan’s career was in fact shaped more by failure than success.

(Ad) Felipe Fernández-Armesto is the author of Straits: Beyond the Myth of Magellan (Bloomsbury, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Straits-Beyond-Magellan-Felipe-Fernandez-Armesto/dp/152663208X/ref=sr_1_1?qid=1650974172&refinements=p_27%3AFelipe+Fernandez-Armesto&s=books&sr=1-1&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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May 09, 2022
War in the air: everything you wanted to know
1:04:20
What are the origins of aircraft being used in war? How common were dogfights? And were early fighter pilots really the ‘knights of the air’? Speaking with Emily Briffett, Paul Beaver answers your top questions about military aviation in our latest Everything you wanted to know episode.

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May 08, 2022
The Dudleys: power behind the Tudor throne
34:46

The might of the Tudor dynasty was built on the blood and sweat of three generations of another family – the Dudleys. And sometimes, they paid the ultimate price. Rhiannon Davies speaks to Joanne Paul about the members of the family who were key players in the Tudor era, from Edmund Dudley’s efforts to raise taxes for Henry VII to Robert Dudley’s flirtatious friendship with Elizabeth I.

(Ad) Joanne Paul is the author of The House of Dudley: A New History of Tudor England (Penguin, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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May 06, 2022
The Black Death | 2. origins & spread
37:13

Over recent years, our understanding of the Black Death has been radically transformed by new scientific developments. In this episode, Ellie Cawthorne speaks to Professor Monica Green about what the latest research can tell us about where the plague originated, and how it spread to eventually engulf vast swathes of the globe.


The primary sources quoted in this series are taken from:

The Black Death, translated and edited by Rosemary Horrox (1994)

The Black Death, The Great Mortality of 1348-1350: A Brief History with Documents, John Arberth (2005)



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May 05, 2022
Spain’s tumultuous story
35:13

Giles Tremlett explores the turbulent history of Spain. Speaking to Elinor Evans, he explores how its position on Europe's south-western corner has exposed it to influences from all over the world, giving it a history unlike any other nation on the continent.

(Ad) Giles Tremlett is the author of España: A Brief History of Spain (Apollo, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Espa%C3%B1a-Brief-History-Spain-Tremlett/dp/1789544378/ref=sr_1_1?adgrpid=128739111730&gclid=Cj0KCQjw3v6SBhCsARIsACyrRAnQs1UN8yLBkk3J9LcWXCXJWT2-TxMBY-mF-ngKEnypYTRXTiaK0fcaAnhYEALw_wcB&hvadid=583087823497&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=1006715&hvnetw=g&hvqmt=b&hvrand=17429477802024292298&hvtargid=kwd-1645455064740&hydadcr=24428_1748934&keywords=espana+giles+tremlett&qid=1650454336&sr=8-1&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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May 04, 2022
Despatches on dictators: US reporters in 1930s Europe
38:26

Deborah Cohen discusses a close-knit group of American foreign correspondents who reported on the tumult of interwar Europe in the 1920s and 1930s. She talks to Elinor Evans about how they dispatched breaking news back to the US, becoming some of the most famous names of the day in the process.

(Ad) Deborah Cohen is the author of Last Call at the Hotel Imperial: The Reporters Who Took on a World at War (William Collins, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Last-Call-Hotel-Imperial-Generation-ebook/dp/B08F9CBLR9/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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May 03, 2022
Britain’s lost towns and villages
32:29

Britain is a land full of lost settlements – villages, towns and even cities. Matthew Green explores these deserted places with David Musgrove, looking at their scarred and romantic remains in the landscape, and considering how and why they became lost to time.

(Ad) Matthew Green is the author of Shadowlands: A Journey through Lost Britain (Faber & Faber, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Shadowlands-Journey-Britains-Vanished-Villages/dp/057133802X/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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May 02, 2022
Medieval childhood: everything you wanted to know
58:22
What was it like to grow up in the Middle Ages? In our latest Everything you wanted to know episode, Dr Emily Joan Ward answers your questions about medieval childhood. Speaking to Dave Musgrove, she discusses topics including education, how children were put to work, and what they did for fun.

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May 01, 2022
The failings of emancipation
39:12

Professor Kris Manjapra speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about his book Black Ghost of Empire, which reveals how the end of slavery helped perpetuate systems of oppression and racial injustice, rather than disrupt them.

(Ad) Kris Manjapra is the author of Black Ghost of Empire: The Long Death of Slavery and the Failure of Emancipation (Penguin, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Apr 29, 2022
The Black Death | 1. Introduction
17:22

In the late 1340s, people in cities, towns and villages across the medieval world began to fall ill from a mysterious pestilence. This six part series looks at the how the Black Death shook the Middle Ages, killing millions and transforming societies. Speaking to expert historians, we'll track the spread of this devastating disease, reveal what it was like to live through the pandemic and consider its dramatic, long-lasting impact.



The primary sources quoted in this series are taken from:

The Black Death, translated and edited by Rosemary Horrox (1994)

The Black Death, The Great Mortality of 1348-1350: A Brief History with Documents, John Arberth (2005)



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Apr 28, 2022
Video games at 50: a cultural history
43:46
Fifty years on from the launch of the world’s first commercial home video game console – the Magnavox Odyssey – John Wills talks to Matt Elton about how videogames have reflected the world around them over the past half century, and the ways in which history and gaming increasingly overlap.

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Apr 27, 2022
Libraries: a book lover’s history
44:18

Andrew Pettegree and Arthur der Weduwen delve into the history of libraries, from the humble book lover’s private selection to the most lavish literary collections. In conversation with Emily Briffett, they explore the innovations and ideas that made libraries what they are today.

(Ad) Andrew Pettegree and Arthur der Weduwen are the authors of

The Library: A Fragile History (Profile Books, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Apr 26, 2022
The BBC at 100: TV takes off in the 1950s
33:29

In the latest episode of our monthly series marking the centenary of the BBC, media historian David Hendy speaks to Matt Elton about the rise of television during the 1950s – and how the decade saw the BBC increasingly clash with the political world.

 

(Ad) David Hendy is the author of The BBC: A People’s History (Profile Books, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-bbc%2Fdavid-hendy%2F%2F9781781255254%3Fawaid%3D3787%26utm_source%3Dredbrain%26utm_medium%3Dshopping%26utm_campaign%3Dcss%26gclid%3DCj0KCQiAip-PBhDVARIsAPP2xc2PCYX_d_582jtZj6du6A-9dNO8d8xXvVkPhP_Jmh1FuEm7Mui3xSYaAvwiEALw_wcB



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Apr 25, 2022
The Falklands War: everything you wanted to know
45:14
How much of a gamble did sending a task force to the South Atlantic represent for Margaret Thatcher? How close did Britain come to losing the conflict? And did victory change the nation’s relationship with its armed forces? Speaking to Spencer Mizen, Helen Parr answers listener questions about British troops’ campaign to retake the Falkland Islands four decades ago.

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Apr 24, 2022
Introducing: HistoryExtra Plus
0:35

Would you like ad-free versions of our podcasts, early access to series and exclusive bonus content? Then check out our subscription podcast feed HistoryExtra Plus. Follow the link below to sign up now: 

https://apple.co/3xNlgAM



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Apr 23, 2022
Rebel ramblers of the Kinder Trespass
26:25
Ninety years on from the Kinder Mass Trespass, Ben Anderson speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about what this act of popular protest achieved in 1932, how it became mythologised as a key moment in the right-to-roam campaign, and how we should remember it today.

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Apr 22, 2022
Catherine the Great: inoculation pioneer
37:22

Lucy Ward speaks to Elinor Evans about the story of English Quaker doctor Thomas Dimsdale, who took up the risky challenge of inoculating Empress Catherine II against smallpox, as a powerful statement at a time when the disease was ravaging Russia and superstition held sway.

(Ad) Lucy Ward is the author of The Empress and the English Doctor: How Catherine the Great defied a deadly virus (Oneworld Publications, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-empress-and-the-english-doctor%2Flucy-ward%2F9780861542451



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Apr 21, 2022
Trailblazers of black British theatre
30:20

Stephen Bourne introduces Spencer Mizen to some of the pioneers of black British theatre, from Ira Aldridge, who in 1825 became the first black actor to play Othello, to the emergence of Britain’s black-led theatre companies.

(Ad) Stephen Bourne is the author of Deep Are the Roots: Trailblazers Who Changed Black British Theatre (The History Press 2021). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Deep-Are-Roots-Trailblazers-Changed/dp/0750996293/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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Apr 20, 2022
The Jagiellonians: the dynasty that shaped central Europe
45:59
Natalia Nowakowska reveals the story of the Jagiellonians – one of the most successful dynasties that many people have never even heard of. Speaking with Emily Briffett, she discusses how they rose from pagan tribal origins in Lithuania to become one of the biggest Catholic dynasties in Europe, with an expansive empire and a legacy that can still be felt today.

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Apr 19, 2022
Operation Mincemeat: WW2 espionage on film
28:30

In 1943, British agents concocted a daring plot to trick Hitler, involving a dead body, fake love letters and a false identity. Speaking with Emily Briffett, author and historian Ben Macintyre discusses the real history behind Operation Mincemeat, a new film adapted from his 2010 book of the same name.

Operation Mincemeat is in UK cinemas from 15 April.



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Apr 18, 2022
Royal residences: everything you wanted to know
48:49
Historian Tracy Borman answers listener questions about the history of British royal residences, from imposing castles to decadent palaces. She speaks to Rachel Dinning about secret rooms, spooky hauntings, and her work as Joint Chief Curator at Historic Royal Palaces.

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Apr 17, 2022
The Northman: bringing the Viking world to life on screen
24:31

A blood-splattered slice of Viking action arrives in UK cinemas today with the release of Robert Eggers’ new saga-inspired epic, The Northman. Professor Neil Price, archaeologist and historical consultant on the film, speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about the process of recreating the Viking world on screen, and some of the historical themes that inspired the story.

The Northman is in UK cinemas from 15 April.



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Apr 15, 2022
Pets, pests & portents: birds through time
29:33

Over time, we’ve viewed birds as pets, pests, natural delights and bad omens. Roy and Lesley Adkins tell Emily Briffett about our complex and lengthy relationship with birds – a story of changing landscapes, fluctuating tastes in food and fashion, enjoyment and exploitation.

(Ad) Roy and Lesley Adkins are the authors of When There Were Birds (Little Brown, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Apr 14, 2022
Inside a Roman home
55:53

What could you expect to hear in the atrium of a Roman home? What was everyday life like for the slaves who worked in the kitchens? And which emperor hosted the worst dinner party? In conversation with Emily Briffett, Dr Hannah Platts takes us on a multi-sensory tour of the ancient Roman home.

(Ad) Hannah Platts is author of Multisensory Living in Ancient Rome: Power and Space in Roman Houses (Bloomsbury, 2019). Buy it now from Bloomsbury:

https://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/multisensory-living-in-ancient-rome-9781350194496/



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Apr 13, 2022
Medieval emotions: were they like our own?
34:55

Speaking to Dave Musgrove, medieval historian Elizabeth Boyle reflects on life throughout the Covid lockdowns, using early Irish literature to explore how similar the emotions of people in the middle ages were to our own.

(Ad) Elizabeth Boyle is the author of Fierce Appetites: Loving, Losing and Living to Excess in my Present and in the Writings of the Past (Sandycove, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

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Apr 12, 2022
Corruption in the ancient world
37:30
What was corruption like in the ancient world – and how can studying it help us make sense of shady dealings in the 21st century? Matt Elton speaks to Shushma Malik, Marta Garcia and Yehudah Gershon – three researchers behind a new project to reveal more about the murkier side of ancient Greece and Rome.

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Apr 11, 2022
Trade unions: everything you wanted to know
52:53
Mark Crail tackles popular internet search queries and listener questions about the history of Britain’s trade union movement and its attempts to secure better conditions for the country’s workers. He talks to Jon Bauckham about the 19th-century origins of the unions, their connection with the Labour Party, and their role in strikes through the centuries.

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Apr 10, 2022
Wiretapping: a secret history
37:02

Wiretapping has a chequered past in the United States, from civil war soldiers who were seen as heroes for tapping enemy wires to the political scandals that rocked the 20th-century establishment. Brian Hochman, the author of The Listeners: A History of Wiretapping in the United States tells Rhiannon Davies about the history of electronic eavesdropping.

(Ad) Brian Hochman is the author of The Listeners: A History of Wiretapping in the United States (Harvard University Press, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FListeners-History-Wiretapping-United-States%2Fdp%2F0674249283%2Fref%3Dsr_1_1%3Fqid%3D1643728025%26refinements%3Dp_27%3ABrian%2BHochman%26s%3Dbooks%26sr%3D1-1



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Apr 08, 2022
Burning down Ireland’s stately homes
31:02

Professor Terence Dooley, author of Burning the Big House, tells Ellie Cawthorne why so many of Ireland’s grand homes were subjected to arson during the early 20th century, revealing a complex web of disputes over land, protests against imperialism and IRA reprisals.

(Ad) Terence Dooley is the author of Burning the Big House: The Story of the Irish Country House in a Time of War and Revolution (Yale University Press, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fburning-the-big-house%2Fterence-dooley%2F9780300260748



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Apr 07, 2022
Benjamin Franklin: portrait of a revolutionary
39:05
Acclaimed filmmaker Ken Burns tells Elinor Evans about the life and accomplishments of Benjamin Franklin – a man who both loved Britain but became a key figure in American independence, and who was a slave-owner yet later campaigned for abolition. Burns also talks about the challenges and thrills of portraying complex histories on screen, and of finding voices that bring the past to life.

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Apr 06, 2022
Oxford: from wild student parties to the shadow of war
33:01

Daisy Dunn tells Spencer Mizen how students at Oxford University – including Evelyn Waugh, Vera Brittain and John Betjeman – were buffeted by world events in the 1920s and 30s.

(Ad) Daisy Dunn is the author of Not Far From Brideshead: Oxford Between the Wars (Orion Publishing, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones: http://www.awin1.com/cread.php?awinmid=4746&awinaffid=489797&p=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fnot-far-from-brideshead%2Fdaisy-dunn%2F9781474615570&clickref=historyextra-social-histboty



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Apr 05, 2022
Why the Ukraine conflict isn’t a new Cold War
30:52
International history expert Professor Kristina Spohr talks to Matt Elton about the historical parallels of the current conflict in Ukraine – and why we shouldn’t see it as a new Cold War.

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Apr 04, 2022
Scottish clans: everything you wanted to know
55:08
What do we mean by the word ‘clan’? Were these Scottish kinship groups more often allies or enemies? And did they really wear tartan? Speaking with Emily Briffett, Professor Murray Pittock tackles popular search queries and listener questions about Scottish clans.

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Apr 03, 2022
What one duel can tell us about Jacobean England
50:17

Lloyd Bowen shares the story of one remarkable 1601 duel with Elinor Evans. He reveals what the wealth of evidence around a single dispute can tell us about the codes of honour that governed elite violence in early modern England.

(Ad) Lloyd Bowen is the author Anatomy of a Duel in Jacobean England: Gentry Honour, Violence and the Law (Boydell & Brewer, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Apr 01, 2022
Digging up Roman London
50:31

Archaeologist Dominic Perring discusses what we know about London’s Roman past with Emily Briffett, examining the city’s key turning points and exploring how life there was affected by fire, plague and warfare. Using archaeological and historical records, he ties London’s story into the wider history of the Roman empire.

(Ad) Dominic Perring is the author of London in the Roman World (Oxford University Press, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Mar 31, 2022
Life in Cromwell’s Britain
38:23

Anna Keay introduces Spencer Mizen to the dramatic decade between the execution of Charles I in 1649 and the restoration of the monarchy in 1660. She reveals what life was like under Oliver Cromwell, as Britain embarked on its experiment with republicanism.

(Ad) Anna Keay is the author of The Restless Republic: Britain without a Crown (William Collins, 2022). Buy it now on Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Interregnum-Peoples-Republic-Anna-Keay/dp/0008282021/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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Mar 30, 2022
1942: Churchill’s darkest hour
42:20

Historian Taylor Downing chronicles the events of the year 1942, which he contends was Britain’s lowest moment in the Second World War. Speaking to Rob Attar, he revisits some of the disasters that befell the country that year and highlights the crucial victory that transformed Churchill’s fortunes.

(Ad) Taylor Downing is the author of 1942: Britain at the Brink (Little Brown, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Mar 29, 2022
Rapa Nui’s island mysteries
30:18
Archaeologist Cat Jarman delves into the mysteries and debates surrounding the history of Rapa Nui, also known as Easter Island. In conversation with Rob Attar, she explores the creation of the astonishing moai monuments and explains the seemingly dramatic collapse of the island’s population.

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Mar 28, 2022
The history of beauty: everything you wanted to know
46:23
Health and beauty historian Lucy Jane Santos answers listener questions and popular online search queries about beauty throughout the ages. From early cosmetics apparently made for gladiators to whether Georgian women really did use mouse fur for false eyebrows, this whistle-stop tour highlights some of the past’s strangest – and most dangerous – beauty practices.

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Mar 27, 2022
Bridgerton: behind the scenes of season 2
31:17
Hannah Greig, a historical consultant to the hit series Bridgerton, takes us behind the scenes of season two. She speaks to Elinor Evans about the real history on screen, from Regency etiquette to the gentlemen’s clubs that gained popularity in the era.

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Mar 25, 2022
Suleyman the Magnificent: the 16th-century’s most powerful ruler?
48:43

When Suleyman the Magnificent became Sultan of the Ottoman empire in 1520, he was proclaimed the world’s most powerful man, who could use his armies to smite Christendom. But behind the facade, scheming favourites pulled the strings and worked tirelessly to fulfil their own endless ambitions. Rhiannon Davies spoke to Christopher de Bellaigue to uncover the truth about Suleyman’s fascinating reign.

(Ad) Christopher de Bellaigue is the author of The Lion House: The Coming of A King (Vintage, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Mar 24, 2022
Our Winston Churchill obsession
30:40

Winston Churchill looms large in the modern imagination. Everyone from Fidel Castro to George W Bush have cited him as an exemplar in times of crisis. Historian Geoffrey Wheatcroft talks to Spencer Mizen about the world’s fixation with the wartime leader, arguing that this obsession is neither healthy, nor necessarily merited.

(Ad) Geoffrey Wheatcroft is the author of Churchill’s Shadow: An Astonishing Life and a Dangerous Legacy (Vintage, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Mar 23, 2022
Naked statues, naughty gods & bad wine
42:43

Classicist and author Garrett Ryan talks to Kev Lochun about some of the biggest and most commonly asked questions surrounding ancient Greece and Rome. Why are all the statues naked? Who was the biggest drinker in the classical world? And why didn’t anyone go looking for the Greek gods on Olympus – or did they?

(Ad) Garrett Ryan is the author of Naked Statues, Fat Gladiators, and War Elephants (Prometheus, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Naked-Statues-Fat-Gladiators-Elephants/dp/1633887022/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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Mar 22, 2022
The BBC at 100: the corporation at war
41:12

In the third episode of our monthly series marking the centenary of the BBC, media historian David Hendy tells Matt Elton how the BBC became an important part of the national fabric during the Second World War – and how the conflict changed the organisation forever.

(Ad) David Hendy is the author of The BBC: A People’s History (Profile Books, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Mar 21, 2022
The Napoleonic Wars: everything you wanted to know
1:03:22
Dr Mike Rapport tackles popular search queries and listener questions about the 19th-century conflicts that tore Europe apart and triggered seismic political changes around the globe. He speaks to Jon Bauckham about the causes of the wars, the pivotal battles of Trafalgar and Waterloo, and the life of Napoleon Bonaparte himself.

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Mar 20, 2022
Prohibition: busting myths about the ban on booze
33:47

Mark Lawrence Schrad speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about his book Smashing the Liquor Machine, which busts commonly held myths about prohibition, revealing how campaigns to ban alcohol weren’t just led by puritanical evangelicals in the US, but were also backed by progressive campaigners across the globe.

(Ad) Mark Lawrence Schrad is the author of Smashing the Liquor Machine: A Global History (Oxford University Press, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Smashing-Liquor-Machine-History-Prohibition/dp/0190841575/ref=asc_df_0190841575/?tag=googshopuk-21&linkCode=df0&hvadid=535049525184&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=12530786669099962417&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=1006715&hvtargid=pla-995956505473&psc=1&th=1&psc=1&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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Mar 18, 2022
Stitching together the history of fabric
33:53

The history of fabric is interwoven with the story of humanity, from the sackcloth shirts that tore open the skin of pious medieval saints to cotton’s connections to colonisation and the Industrial Revolution. Rhiannon Davies spoke to Victoria Finlay to unravel these complex stories.

(Ad) Victoria Finlay is the author of Fabric: The Hidden History of the Material World (Profile Books, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Fabric-Hidden-History-Material-World/dp/178125706X/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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Mar 17, 2022
Carrot conspiracies & digging for victory: feeding Britain in WW2
28:44
Professor John Martin speaks to Emily Briffett about Britain’s battle against starvation during the Second World War. From the invention of familiar myths about bread crusts and carrots, to the Dig for Victory and Ploughing Up campaigns, he examines the food shortages the government faced and the agricultural mission to ensure Britons had enough to put on the table.

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Mar 16, 2022
​​Children of the Norman Conquest
33:19

Dr Eleanor Parker, author of Conquered: The Last Children of Anglo-Saxon England, talks to David Musgrove about the young people whose lives were upended by the momentous change of circumstances brought about by the Norman Conquest of 1066. She reveals how exploring their stories can offer a fresh approach to studying the Normans.

(Ad) Eleanor Parker is the author of Conquered: The Last Children of Anglo-Saxon England (Bloomsbury, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Conquered-Parker-Eleanor/dp/1788314506/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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Mar 15, 2022
Britain’s WW2 island internment camp
46:52

During the Second World War, the British government imprisoned thousands of German and Austrian-born residents – many of them refugees from Nazi oppression – in makeshift internment camps on the Isle of Man. Acclaimed journalist Simon Parkin speaks to Jon Bauckham about the history of Hutchinson camp, which became home to a vibrant intellectual and artistic community.

(Ad) Simon Parkin is the author of The Island of Extraordinary Captives: A True Story of an Artist, a Spy and a Wartime Scandal (Sceptre, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Mar 14, 2022
Gladiators: everything you wanted to know
55:58
Who became a gladiator? Were they really the superstars of their day? And was giving a thumbs down for a death sentence a real thing? In this Everything you wanted to know episode, Emily Briffett speaks with Alison Futrell to answers your top questions about ancient Rome’s arena fighters.

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Mar 13, 2022
Fredegund and Brunhild: a tale of two queens
36:05

Shelley Puhak delves into the lives of queens Fredegund and Brunhild, famed for their bitter and bloody rivalry which wracked the Frankish empire in the latter sixth century. Speaking with Emily Briffett, she reveals how their stories were suppressed, overlooked and used as political propaganda by subsequent rulers, and considers how they should be seen today.

(Ad) Shelley Puhak is the author of The Dark Queens: A Gripping Tale of Power, Ambition and Murderous Rivalry in Early Medieval France (Apollo, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

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Mar 11, 2022
Eugenics: a toxic history
36:47

Adam Rutherford discusses the dark – and often surprising – history of the eugenics movement

Geneticist Adam Rutherford speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about the dark, and often surprising, history of the eugenics movement, from ‘best baby’ fairs and population control to the Nazi ‘euthanasia’ programme. He discusses the ideas behind the ideology, and how its implementation has had devastating impacts.

(Ad) Adam Rutherford is the author of Control: The Dark History and Troubling Present of Eugenics (Orion, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Mar 10, 2022
​​Gardens and the scientific revolution
34:46

Clare Hickman explores how gardens were used as places of scientific experimentation in the 18th and 19th centuries

During the scientific revolution of the 18th and 19th centuries, gardens were not only used for leisure and pleasure. Clare Hickman explains to Dave Musgrove how they also became places of scientific experimentation.

(Ad) Clare Hickman is the author of The Doctor’s Garden: Medicine, Science and Horticulture in Britain (Yale University Press, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Doctors-Garden-Medicine-Science-Horticulture/dp/0300236107/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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Mar 09, 2022
Periods, fertility & childbirth: a pre-modern history
36:50
Mary Fissell talks to Ellie Cawthorne about women’s reproductive health in early modern Europe and America. She discusses how women dealt with their periods, theories about fertility, ideas about the female body and the childbirth process.

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Mar 08, 2022
Radical women
30:07

Nan Sloane speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about her new book Uncontrollable Women, which charts the stories of now largely forgotten female activists who were involved in radical and reform movements between 1789 and 1832.

(Ad) Nan Sloane is the author of Uncontrollable Women: Radicals, Reformers and Revolutionaries (Bloomsbury, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Mar 07, 2022
The Franks: everything you wanted to know
46:26
Dr Christian Cooijmans answers listener questions on the medieval world of the Franks. Speaking to David Musgrove, he discusses long-lasting Frankish dynasties, renowned rulers and the Franks’ connections with the wider world.

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Mar 06, 2022
How museums are shaping the future
27:59
Neil MacGregor talks to Matt Elton about his new BBC Radio 4 series, The Museums that Make Us, and the ways in which museums around the UK are adapting to a changing society – and shaping the future.

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Mar 04, 2022
Ukraine: the WW2 roots of today's conflict
25:01

Keith Lowe talks to Matt Elton about the ways in which today’s conflict between Russia and Ukraine can be traced back to the Second World War and decisions made in the years that followed.

Keith will be giving a five-part masterclass series on the aftermath of the Second World War beginning on 4 March – find out more at historyextra.com/masterclass.



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Mar 03, 2022
Old English: a quick guide
35:58

Hana Videen explores the Old English language and reveals what it can tell us about daily life at the time it was spoken

The medieval language of Old English is full of linguistic gems. Speaking to David Musgrove, Dr Hana Videen opens up this treasure chest of words to reveal what the language can tell us about daily life at the time it was spoken.

(Ad) Hana Videen is the author of The Wordhord: Daily Life in Old English (Profile Books, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Wordhord-Daily-Life-Old-English/dp/1788166108/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-Histboty



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Mar 02, 2022
Witch hunters: cynical persecutors or misguided zealots?
30:28
Marion Gibson discusses the motivations and methods of “witch finders” who sought out supernatural wrongdoing in Stuart Britain. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, she discusses why people became witch hunters and explores the techniques they used to extract confessions, from strip-searching and sleep deprivation to ‘swimming’.

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Mar 01, 2022
Fascism in Britain
39:43

Nigel Copsey discusses the British Union of Fascists and its leader, Oswald Mosley

Nigel Copsey speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about the British Union of Fascists, which gained support in the 1930s, and its leader Oswald Mosley. They also discuss the party’s foundation, ideology and connections to the fascist regimes of Italy and Germany.



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Feb 28, 2022
The American Revolutionary War: everything you wanted to know
1:00:05
Benjamin Carp tackles listener questions and popular search queries on the conflict that saw colonists in North America rise up and declare independence from the British. He speaks to Elinor Evans about the causes of the war, key battles, and how the revolution is mythologised today.

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Feb 27, 2022
The BBC at 100: establishment values in the 1930s
36:28

In the second instalment of our new monthly series marking the centenary of the BBC, media historian David Hendy speaks to Matt Elton about the ways in which the corporation expanded and evolved throughout the 1930s to become part of the British establishment.

(Ad) David Hendy is the author of The BBC: A People’s History (Profile Books, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-bbc%2Fdavid-hendy%2F%2F9781781255254%3Fawaid%3D3787%26utm_source%3Dredbrain%26utm_medium%3Dshopping%26utm_campaign%3Dcss%26gclid%3DCj0KCQiAip-PBhDVARIsAPP2xc2PCYX_d_582jtZj6du6A-9dNO8d8xXvVkPhP_Jmh1FuEm7Mui3xSYaAvwiEALw_wcB



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Feb 26, 2022
Vikings: Valhalla’s real inspirations
31:47

Screenwriter Jeb Stuart discusses the real history that inspired his new Netflix show Vikings: Valhalla

 

Screenwriter Jeb Stuart speaks to Kev Lochun about his new Netflix show Vikings: Valhalla, the successor to the hugely popular series Vikings. They discuss the real historical characters being brought to life through the series, the enduring popularity of the Vikings, and where the show could take viewers after season one.



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Feb 25, 2022
Nixon in China: the trip that changed the Cold War
35:02
Fifty years ago this month, US president Richard Nixon embarked on a trip to China – a visit that marked a key moment in the thawing of relations between the two nations. Rana Mitter talks to Matt Elton about the 1972 visit, and how it changed the course of the Cold War.

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Feb 23, 2022
In defence of Neville Chamberlain
41:16

Walter Reid tells Spencer Mizen that, far from going down in history as the bloodless author of appeasement, Neville Chamberlain should be remembered as a radical politician who saw through Hitler’s lies.

(Ad) Walter Reid is the author of Neville Chamberlain: The Passionate Radical (Birlinn, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Neville-Chamberlain-Passionate-Walter-Reid/dp/1780276745/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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Feb 22, 2022
Spies in show business
34:49

Professor Christopher Andrew talks to Elinor Evans about his book Stars and Spies, co-written with Julius Green. He reveals the many historical links between spying and the entertainment industry that for centuries have helped intelligence operatives to hide in plain sight.

(Ad) Christopher Andrew and Julius Green are the authors of Stars and Spies: The Story of Intelligence Operations and the Entertainment Industry (Bodley Head, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fstars-and-spies%2Fchristopher-andrew%2Fjulius-green%2F9781847925282



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Feb 21, 2022
Stonehenge: everything you wanted to know (part two)
36:44

In the second episode of this two-part special on Stonehenge, archaeologist and author Mike Pitts answers more listener questions on the most famous prehistoric monument in Britain. Speaking to David Musgrove, he discusses Stonehenge’s relationship with other prehistoric sites, its long legacy, and why we call it “Stonehenge”.

(Ad) Mike Pitts is the author of How to Build Stonehenge (Thames & Hudson, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Feb 20, 2022
The secret WW2 mission to save Britain’s art collections
40:39

Caroline Shenton tells the story of the colourful cast of curators, museum directors and civil servants who embarked on a top-secret mission to protect Britain’s national art collections during the Second World War. Speaking to Emily Briffett, she explains how these dedicated men and women devised ingenious escape plans and concealed artworks and artefacts in the most unlikely of places in a race against time to save the nation’s heritage.

(Ad) Caroline Shenton is the author of National Treasures: Saving the Nation’s Art in World War II (John Murray Press, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/National-Treasures-Saving-Nations-World/dp/1529387434/?tag=mad06e-21&ascsubtag=madeformums-social-Histboty



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Feb 19, 2022
The Normans: beyond 1066
44:34

Judith Green reveals how there is much more to the Norman story than the events of the 1066 Conquest

We all know the story of the Norman Conquest, when Duke William of Normandy led his troops across the Channel and took the crown of England. However, as Professor Judith Green tells David Musgrove, there is a lot more to the history of the Normans than the events of 1066.

(Ad) Judith Green is the author of The Normans: Power, Conquest and Culture in the 11th Century Europe (Yale University Press, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-Histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FNormans-Conquest-Culture-Century-Europe%2Fdp%2F0300180330



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Feb 18, 2022
British identity in 50 documents
41:48

Dominic Selwood chronicles Britain’s past through a diverse – and sometimes unexpected – selection of historical documents, from birthday invites and Valentine’s Day letters, to musical scores and shipping forecasts. Speaking with Emily Briffett, he explains what these can tell us about British identity past and present.

(Ad) Dominic Selwood is the author of Anatomy of a Nation: A History of British Identity in 50 Documents (Constable, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Anatomy-Nation-British-Identity-Documents/dp/1472131894/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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Feb 16, 2022
Medieval masterclass 4: Revolution 1348-1527
59:17
In this fourth and final episode, Dan Jones reveals how the Middle Ages came to a close, starting off with a global pandemic that ripped across the world, devastating populations, reshaping economies and bringing societal change. Speaking to David Musgrove, he also introduces the geniuses of the Renaissance, and the great navigators who struck out in search of new worlds. Lastly, he examines how shifting religious dogma, allied to new communication technology, brought about the Protestant Reformation – an upheaval which brought the curtain down on “the middle age”.

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Feb 15, 2022
Shakespearean deaths: swordfights, snakebites & poison
29:25

From poison and fatal snakebites to dying from a broken heart, more than 250 named characters die in Shakespeare’s plays. Speaking with Ellie Cawthorne, Kathryn Harkup guides us through a grisly range of the Bard’s death scenes. She looks at the real history and science behind them, and how they would have been staged in Elizabethan England.

(Ad) Kathryn Harkup is the author of Death By Shakespeare: Snakebites, Stabbings and Broken Hearts (Bloomsbury, 2020). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Feb 14, 2022
Stonehenge: everything you wanted to know (part one)
42:03

In the first episode of a two-part special, archaeologist Mike Pitts answers listener questions on the most famous prehistoric site in Britain. Speaking to David Musgrove, he discusses how Stonehenge was built – and why.

(Ad) Mike Pitts is the author of How to Build Stonehenge (Thames & Hudson, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Feb 13, 2022
Britain’s only war crimes trial
35:55

Mike Anderson and Neil Hanson discuss the 1999 prosecution of a former Nazi collaborator – Britain’s only war crimes trial

Mike Anderson and Neil Hanson discuss Britain’s only war crimes trial, where a former Nazi collaborator was prosecuted for his involvement in the Holocaust, more than five decades after the events had occurred. In conversation with Rob Attar, they explore this landmark moment and consider the challenges of bringing perpetrators to justice after so much time has elapsed.

(Ad) Mike Anderson and Neil Hanson are the authors of The Ticket Collector from Belarus: An Extraordinary True Story of Britain's Only War Crimes Trial (Simon & Schuster, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

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Feb 12, 2022
Extinct animals of medieval Britain
51:19

From beavers to whales, Lee Raye discusses wildlife found across medieval Britain that has since gone extinct from the region

In conversation with David Musgrove, Lee Raye discusses the animals that lived in medieval Britain but have since gone extinct from the region, from beavers and boars to whales and wolves – plus elusive big cats and birds.



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Feb 11, 2022
Mexico’s ill-fated Austrian emperor
58:35

Edward Shawcross speaks to Elinor Evans about a little-known and disastrous attempt to install a Habsburg archduke, Ferdinand Maximilian, as emperor of Mexico in the mid-19th century, at a time when the US Civil War was raging.

(Ad) Edward Shawcross is the author of The Last Emperor of Mexico: A Disaster in the New World (Faber & Faber, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Last-Emperor-Mexico-Dramatic-Habsburg/dp/1541674197/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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Feb 09, 2022
Medieval masterclass 3: Rebirth 1216-1347
1:01:11
Dan Jones charts the rise of the Mongols in the twelfth century – a sharp and hideously brutal episode, in which an eastern empire achieved fleeting domination over half the world, at the cost of millions of lives. Speaking to David Musgrove, he also looks at other emerging powers in the ‘high’ Middle Ages. He introduces merchants who invented extraordinary new ways to make fortunes, scholars who revived the wisdom of the ancients and founded great universities, and architects and engineers who built the cities, cathedrals and castles that still stand 500 years on. 

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Feb 08, 2022
Georgian Britain: the highs and lows of a transformative age
55:02

Penelope J Corfield discusses the highs and lows of the Georgian era, from the abolition movement to the gin craze

The long 18th century saw Britain undergo colossal changes, from growing overseas expansion and the transformation of attitudes towards disability, to the sexualisation of popular culture. Penelope J Corfield speaks to Rhiannon Davies about this explosive era of British history.

(Ad) Penelope J Corfield is the author of The Georgians: The Deeds and Misdeeds of 18th Century Britain (Yale University Press, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Georgians-Deeds-Misdeeds-Century-Britain/dp/0300253575/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



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Feb 07, 2022
Vichy France: everything you wanted to know
1:04:25

Shannon Fogg answers listener questions on the collaborationist regime created following France’s defeat by Nazi Germany

In the latest episode in our series on history’s biggest topics, Professor Shannon Fogg answers listener questions on the collaborationist French regime that was created following the country’s defeat by Nazi Germany. In conversation with Rob Attar, she examines the origins of Vichy France, explores its relationship with Nazi Germany and reveals what life was like for those who lived under Vichy rule.



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Feb 06, 2022
Berlin’s tumultuous history
43:30

Barney White-Spunner discusses the extraordinary, absorbing and often tragic history of Germany’s capital

Barney White-Spunner tells Spencer Mizen why Berlin – a metropolis that was at the centre of the Reformation, the Thirty Years’ War, the Third Reich and the Cold War – has a history like no other city in the world.

(Ad) Barney White-Spunner is the author of Berlin: The Story of a City (Simon & Schuster, 2020). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Feb 05, 2022
Three female civil rights pioneers
31:08
Pamela Roberts discusses her research on Mary Church Terrell, Rosetta Lawson and Josephine Wilson Bruce – three women activists of Washington’s ‘black elite’ who visited Britain in the early 20th century and campaigned on issues including women’s rights, civil rights, temperance and education.

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Feb 04, 2022
America’s Cold War culture boom
28:01

From artistic experimentation to an explosion in pop music, Louis Menand speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about American art, culture and ideas between 1945-65. They touch on the Beatles making waves in the US, the rise of counterculture, and how silent compositions and messy canvases redefined the boundaries of art.

(Ad) Louis Menand is the author of The Free World: Art and Thought in the Cold War (HarperCollins, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Feb 02, 2022
Medieval masterclass 2: Domination 750-1215
1:02:48
Dan Jones and David Musgrove delve into the age of the Franks, who revived a Christian, pseudo-Roman empire in the west. They trace the rise of the dynasties who carved Europe into Christian royal realms and look at the new forms of cultural ‘soft’ power that emerged around the turn of the first millennium. This episode also explores how monks and knights came to play such an important role in western society during the Middle Ages – and how the fusion of their two mindsets gave birth to the crusades. 

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Feb 01, 2022
Margery Kempe: medieval mystic
53:19

Anthony Bale discusses the sensational life of medieval mystic Margery Kempe, charting a story of unusual visions, spiritual revelations, turbulent emotions and religious controversies. Speaking with Emily Briffett, he explores how her autobiography, The Book of Margery Kempe, has enriched our understanding of the early 15th century.




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Jan 31, 2022
Greek myths: everything you wanted to know
59:46
In the latest episode in our series on history’s biggest topics, classicist Natalie Haynes tackles listener questions on Greek myths. Speaking to Rachel Dinning, she examines the tales of popular figures including Hercules and Aphrodite, and explores how these ancient stories have changed and evolved across history.

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Jan 30, 2022
Bloody Sunday: 50 years on
38:10
To mark the 50th anniversary of Bloody Sunday, Diarmaid Ferriter speaks about the event and its tangled legacy today To mark the 50th anniversary of Bloody Sunday, historian Diarmaid Ferriter speaks to Rhiannon Davies about the events of 30 January 1972 and their tangled legacy for the people and politics of Northern Ireland today.

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Jan 29, 2022
The BBC at 100: audio adventures in the 1920s
41:06

In the first episode of our new monthly series marking the centenary of the BBC, media historian David Hendy speaks to Matt Elton about the institution’s founding in the 1920s – a decade of innovation and ingenuity.

(Ad) David Hendy is the author of The BBC: A People’s History (Profile Books, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Jan 28, 2022
Elitism in cricket: a history
33:48

Duncan Stone argues that classism and racism have held back England’s summer sport for decades


Duncan Stone talks to Spencer Mizen about cricket’s history of elitism – a story that, he contends, has long seen the rich and powerful dominate the sport’s evolution and image.


(Ad) Duncan Stone is the author of Different Class: The Untold Story of English Cricket (Repeater, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon: 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Different-Class-Untold-English-Cricket/dp/1913462803/ref=asc_df_1913462803/?tag=googshopuk-21&linkCode=df0&hvadid=499348463277&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=9158678485622880103&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=1006476&hvtargid=pla-1294513684256&psc=1&th=1&psc=1&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty

 



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Jan 26, 2022
Medieval masterclass 1: Imperium 410-750
59:18
Dan Jones takes listeners on a journey through early medieval Europe, beginning with the Roman empire in a state of collapse, rocked by a changing climate and mass migration. He speaks to David Musgrove about the superpowers that emerged in Rome’s wake: the so-called “barbarian” realms that laid the foundations for the European kingdoms, the state of Byzantium and the first Islamic empires.

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Jan 25, 2022
Cold war mind games
36:45

Martin Sixsmith speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about his book The War of Nerves, which explores the role of psychology in the Cold War, from propaganda and paranoia to a divided mindset and unpredictable decisions made by unstable leaders.

(Ad) Martin Sixsmith is the author of The War of Nerves: Inside the Cold War Mind (Profile Books, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-war-of-nerves%2Fmartin-sixsmith%2F9781781259122



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Jan 24, 2022
America’s “Roaring Twenties”: everything you wanted to know
1:05:02
Were the twenties really “roaring”? If so, who actually experienced the best of the era? And were the parties really as debauched as popular culture suggests? Speaking with Emily Briffett, historian Sarah Churchwell answers listener questions about life in the United States during the 1920s.

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Jan 23, 2022
Escaping slavery in the American South
34:00
How can we reconstruct the experiences of enslaved people? Historian Shaun Wallace speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about his work on the Fugitive Slave Database, which uses newspaper adverts for fugitive enslaved people from the American South to reconstruct the stories of those who escaped from slavery.

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Jan 22, 2022
Munich: the real history behind the new film
22:01
Author Robert Harris speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about Munich: The Edge of War, the new Netflix film adapted from his 2017 historical novel Munich. They discuss the real history behind the 1938 Munich conference, the challenges of reassessing Neville Chamberlain, and what it’s like seeing your book adapted for the screen.

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Jan 21, 2022
The Gothic: from Dracula to The Shining
41:11

Roger Luckhurst speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about how the idea of the Gothic has evolved and mutated over time, from medieval-inspired architecture and 19th-century vampire fiction to politicised horror films. He also reveals how the genre has been used as a vehicle to explore society’s anxieties over time, from sex and gender to race and colonialism. 


(Ad) Roger Luckhurst is the author of Gothic: An Illustrated History (Thames & Hudson, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Jan 19, 2022
Women of the Rothschild dynasty
33:37

Historian Natalie Livingstone chronicles the unexplored lives of the women who shaped the famous Rothschild banking dynasty. She speaks to Elinor Evans about how – though often excluded in a patriarchal society – they forged their own paths, from influential hostesses to pioneering scientists.

(Ad) Natalie Livingstone is the author of The Women of Rothschild: The Untold Story of the World's Most Famous Dynasty (John Murray, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Women-Rothschild-Untold-Worlds-Dynasty/dp/1529366712#:~:text=From%20the%20East%20End%20of,dawn%20of%20the%20nineteenth%20century/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-Histboty



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Jan 18, 2022
Queen Victoria’s spy network
43:41

Richard J Aldrich and Rory Cormac discuss Queen Victoria’s love of espionage and her network of royal intelligence agents

 

Historians Richard J Aldrich and Rory Cormac speak to Emma Slattery Williams about their book The Secret Royals, which explores the connections between espionage and the British monarchy, revealing how Queen Victoria utilised a large covert network of international spies.

 

(Ad) Richard J Aldrich and Rory Cormac are the authors of The Secret Royals: Spying and the Crown, from Victoria to Diana (Atlantic Books, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-secret-royals%2Frichard-aldrich%2Frory-cormac%2F9781786499127



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Jan 17, 2022
Mao’s Cultural Revolution: everything you wanted to know
44:06
In the latest episode in our series on history’s biggest topics, Professor Rana Mitter answers your questions about one of the defining events of modern Chinese history. Speaking to Rob Attar, he explores the role of Chairman Mao in the Cultural Revolution, its impact on China’s population and its legacy today.

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Jan 16, 2022
How the Beatles were in tune with 60s Britain
38:46

Dominic Sandbrook explains how the Beatles reflected 1960s Britain, from the globalisation of pop culture to a fascination with mysticism 

 

The 1960s was a time of transformation, as the grey of postwar Britain gave way to a technicolour youth culture, with screaming teenage fans, an outpouring of merchandise and a deep obsession with pop music. Dominic Sandbrook speaks to Rhiannon Davies about how the Beatles provided the soundtrack to a rapidly changing society.   



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Jan 15, 2022
Shining new light on medieval Europe
46:46

Matthew Gabriele and David M Perry speak to David Musgrove about their book The Bright Ages, which tackles the big themes of the Middle Ages and challenges some widely held views about the history of medieval Europe.


(Ad) Matthew Gabriele and David M Perry are the authors of 

The Bright Ages: A New History of Medieval Europe (HarperCollins, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

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Jan 14, 2022
A murder mystery in 19th-century Dublin
32:13

Thomas Morris speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about his book The Dublin Railway Murder, which reconstructs a strange historical cold case from 1856, revolving around a body discovered in a railway station office that was locked from the inside. 


(Ad) Thomas Morris is the author of The Dublin Railway Murder: The Sensational True Story of a Victorian Murder Mystery (Harvill Secker, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Dublin-Railway-Murder-Thomas-Morris/dp/1787302393/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-Histboty



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Jan 12, 2022
Trading and crusading in the Middle Ages
29:24
Mike Carr speaks to David Musgrove about Muslim-Christian relations in the medieval era, revealing how Papal-sanctioned trade was going on despite the background of the Crusades.

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Jan 11, 2022
The Demerara slave uprising
42:18

Thomas Harding discusses a little-known uprising by enslaved people in the British colony of Demerara in 1823

Thomas Harding speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about his new book, White Debt, which recounts the little-known uprising by enslaved people in the British colony of Demerara in 1823, as told through the experiences of four eyewitnesses.



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Jan 10, 2022
The Age of Sail: everything you wanted to know
50:03

Naval historian Kate Jamieson tackles listener questions on the Age of Sail, when sailing ships dominated global trade and warfare

In the latest episode in our series on history’s biggest topics, naval historian Kate Jamieson tackles listener questions on the Age of Sail. Speaking to Kev Lochun, she covers subjects ranging from ghost ships and sea monsters to the rigours of life at sea.



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Jan 09, 2022
Ancient Greek scientific thinking
16:59
Curator Jane Desborough talks to Ellie Cawthorne about a new Science Museum exhibition, Ancient Greeks: Science and Wisdom, which explores the ways in which Greek thinkers sought to understand the world around them – from the oceans and animals, to the cosmos and the human body.

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Jan 08, 2022
Hells, heavens and afterworlds: a traveller’s guide
29:35

Edward Brooke-Hitching explores the many heavens, hells and lands of the dead from civilisations across global history

Edward Brooke-Hitching speaks to Charlotte Hodgman about his latest book, The Devil's Atlas: An Explorer's Guide to Heavens, Hells and Afterworlds, exploring visions of the afterlife as imagined throughout history by cultures and religions around the world.



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Jan 07, 2022
Women who served in WW2
58:56

In commemoration of the 80th anniversary of conscription for women, historian Tessa Dunlop has written a new book capturing the remarkable lives of the last surviving women who served in Britain’s armed forces during the Second World War. Speaking to Emma Slattery Williams, Tessa draws on individual stories to paint a picture of what it was like to be young, female and at war.

(Ad) Tessa Dunlop is the author of Army Girls: The secrets and stories of military service from the final few women who fought in World War II (Headline, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Farmy-girls%2Ftessa-dunlop%2F9781472282088



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Jan 05, 2022
A forgotten witch hunt in New England
0
Malcolm Gaskill speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about his book The Ruin of All Witches, which chronicles a little-known 1651 witchcraft case from Springfield, Massachusetts, revealing how an irascible brickmaker and his wife found themselves accused of diabolical activity. (Ad) Malcolm Gaskill is the author of The Ruin of All Witches: Life and Death in the New World (Allen Lane, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:https://www.amazon.co.uk/Ruin-All-Witches-Death-World/dp/0241413389/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide

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Jan 04, 2022
Goods & globalisation: merchants in Tudor & Stuart England
32:55
Between 1550 and 1650, English trade flourished as thousands of merchants sought out trading ventures across the globe. In conversation with Emily Briffett, Edmond Smith tracks the experiences of England’s merchants and explores how their efforts as a community shaped England’s relationship with the rest of the world.(Ad) Edmond Smith is the author of Merchants: The Community that Shaped England's Trade and Empire, 1550-1650 (Yale University Press, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:https://www.amazon.co.uk/Merchants-Community-Shaped-Englands-1550-1650/dp/0300257953/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide

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Jan 03, 2022
The Jacobites: everything you wanted to know
42:51
Murray Pittock answers listener questions about the Jacobites, and their attempts to restore the Stuart dynasty to the throne. Speaking to Emma Slattery Williams, he discusses who the Jacobites were, why their risings failed, and how realistic the hit show Outlander is in its portrayal of the Jacobite cause.

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Jan 02, 2022
History’s greatest mysteries: what caused the medieval ‘dancing plague’?
21:38
On several occasions from the 14th to 16th centuries, hundreds of people in central Europe began moving their bodies in a strange uncontrollable fashion – often for days on end. What was behind this unusual behaviour? In the final episode of this series of History’s Greatest Mysteries, medieval historian Helen Carr describes the events of the ‘dancing plagues’ and considers the various explanations that have been put forward so far. 

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Jan 01, 2022
History’s greatest mysteries: why did Mao’s chosen successor flee China?
37:22
Fifty years ago, in September 1971, Lin Biao boarded a flight out of the country, only to crash in the Mongolian desert shortly afterwards. Was this the result of an aborted coup on Lin’s part? And where exactly was his plane heading? In the latest in our series on history’s biggest conundrums, historian Rana Mitter answers these questions and more about the mysterious “Lin Biao incident”.

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Dec 31, 2021
History’s greatest mysteries: was the Trojan War fact or fiction?
28:16
Thanks largely to Homer’s Iliad, the Trojan War is one of the most famous events in Greek mythology. But how much – if any – of the legend is actually true? In the latest in our series on history’s biggest conundrums, the author and classicist Daisy Dunn revisits the literary and archaeological sources to seek out evidence for the clash between the Greeks and the city of Troy.

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Dec 29, 2021
History’s greatest mysteries: what happened to the Roman Ninth Legion?
32:33
The Ninth Legion of the Roman army was last recorded in York in around AD 107. After that it simply vanished from history. To this day no-one knows what caused the destruction of this elite army unit, although many theories have been put forward. As we continue our series on history’s most puzzling events, Miles Russell explores the various possibilities and explains what he think is the most likely reason for the legion’s disappearance.

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Dec 28, 2021
History’s greatest mysteries: Agatha Christie disappears
30:34
In December 1926, crime writer Agatha Christie left her home and vanished without a trace. When she was discovered 11 days later, Christie claimed to have no memory of what had happened. As part of our series on history’s greatest mysteries, Dominic Sandbrook discusses the case that baffled the British public and triggered one of the largest manhunts ever mounted.

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Dec 27, 2021
The state of history in 2021
32:36
Anna Whitelock looks back on some key moments and trends that made the historical headlines in 2021. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, she covers topics including the “history wars”, cuts to university history courses and the best books published this year.

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Dec 26, 2021
Christmas feasts: WW2 rationing & postwar absurdity
27:03
Annie Gray looks back on festive food in the 20th century – from suspect dishes made under WW2 rationing to joyful postwar creations pickled in aspic and coated in piped green mayonnaise. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, for the final episode in our mini-series on Christmas food through history, she also touches on the best wartime cake recipes, Fanny Craddock, and putting bananas in Christmas pudding. (Ad) Annie Gray is the author of At Christmas We Feast: Festive Food through the Ages (Profile Books, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fat-christmas-we-feast%2Fannie-gray%2F9781788168199%23%3A~%3Atext%3DAt%20Christmas%20We%20Feast%3A%20Festive%20Food%20Through%20the%20Ages%20(Hardback)%26text%3D'A%20joy%20to%20immerse%20oneself%2Ctrimmings%2C%20pudding%20and%20brandy%20butter.

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Dec 24, 2021
Thomas Kendrick: MI6 spymaster who helped win WW2
37:29

Helen Fry speaks to Jon Bauckham about the remarkable life and career of Thomas Kendrick, an elusive MI6 intelligence officer who helped thousands of Jews escape Nazi-controlled Austria, before going on to mastermind the biggest Allied bugging operation of the Second World War.

(Ad) Helen Fry is the author of Spymaster: The Man Who Saved MI6 (Yale University Press, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Spymaster-Man-Who-Saved-MI6/dp/0300255950/ref=asc_df_0300255950/?tag=googshopuk-21&linkCode=df0&hvadid=499174488919&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=13204997830046097313&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=1006715&hvtargid=pla-1244937888688&psc=1&th=1&psc=1&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-Histboty



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Dec 22, 2021
Pearl Harbor episode 5: Chaos unleashed
37:02
In the final episode in our new series on the raid on Pearl Harbor, Ellie Cawthorne speaks to Robert Lyman about the attack’s immediate aftermath and long term legacy, charting the chaos the Japanese offensive unleashed and tracing events through to the present day.

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Dec 21, 2021
The Stuart princess who could have deposed Charles I
35:32

Elizabeth Stuart was beloved by Protestants and Catholics, English and Scots alike. Many clamoured for her to replace her brother, Charles I, on the throne, and one admirer even commissioned a treasonous painting of her wearing the Tudor crown. Nadine Akkerman speaks to Rhiannon Davies about this fascinating and now largely forgotten figure.

(Ad) Nadine Akkerman is the author of Elizabeth Stuart, Queen of Hearts (Oxford University Press, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Elizabeth-Stuart-Hearts-Nadine-Akkerman/dp/0199668302/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-Histboty



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Dec 20, 2021
Fascism: everything you wanted to know
37:44

Richard Bosworth answers listener questions on the authoritarian ideology that emerged in Italy a century ago

How was Mussolini able to seize control in Italy a century ago? What differentiated Italian Fascism from Nazism? And is the term “fascist” bandied around too much today? In the latest in our series answering your questions on history’s biggest subjects, Richard Bosworth speaks to Spencer Mizen about the history of the rightwing ideology.



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Dec 19, 2021
Yugoslavia: the beginning of the end
1:05:31
Dejan Djokic reflects on the brief 1991 war that saw Slovenia secure independence and helped set in motion the bloody collapse of Yugoslavia. In conversation with Rob Attar, he explores the events both as a historian and through his own memories of being a Yugoslav conscript based in Slovenia at the time.

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Dec 18, 2021
Christmas feasts: Victorian merrymaking
0
From Twelfth cakes to creepy greetings cards and booze-soaked desserts, Annie Gray guides us through festive feasting in the Victorian era. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, for the third episode in our mini-series on Christmas food through history, she also touches on turkey, trifle and whether the Victorians really did “invent Christmas”. (Ad) Annie Gray is the author of At Christmas We Feast: Festive Food through the Ages (Profile Books, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fat-christmas-we-feast%2Fannie-gray%2F9781788168199%23%3A~%3Atext%3DAt%20Christmas%20We%20Feast%3A%20Festive%20Food%20Through%20the%20Ages%20(Hardback)%26text%3D'A%20joy%20to%20immerse%20oneself%2Ctrimmings%2C%20pudding%20and%20brandy%20butter.

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Dec 17, 2021
Triumph against the odds: the 1821 Greek Revolution
34:44

Historian Mark Mazower explains how the Greeks secured an unlikely victory against the Ottoman empire in their 1820s fight for freedom. Speaking to Rob Attar, he also reveals how the dramatic events of two centuries ago would have a profound impact on the future of the European continent.


(Ad) Mark Mazower is the author of The Greek Revolution: 1821 and the Making of Modern Europe (Allen Lane, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Greek-Revolution-Making-Modern-Europe-ebook/dp/B08W1TZMG9/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-Histboty



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Dec 15, 2021
Pearl Harbor episode 4: The day of the attack
32:01
In the latest episode in our new series on the raid on Pearl Harbor, Ellie Cawthorne and Gavin Mortimer chart how the attack unfolded on 7 December 1941, sharing the stories and eyewitness accounts of those involved, from Japanese pilots and US navy personnel to army nurses and top commanders.

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Dec 14, 2021
England’s last witches
49:38

John Callow discusses the tragic case of the Bideford witches, the last women in England to be executed for the crime of witchcraft


In 1682, three women – Temperance Lloyd, Susannah Edwards and Mary Trembles – became the last in England to be hanged for the crime of witchcraft. John Callow speaks to Kev Lochun about how circumstance and ill-fortune led the so-called “Bideford witches” to the gallows, and how history has rehabilitated them.


(Ad) John Callow is the author of The Last Witches of England: A Tragedy of Sorcery and Superstition (Bloomsbury, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-Histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-last-witches-of-england%2Fjohn-callow%2F9781788314398



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Dec 13, 2021
Hadrian’s Wall: everything you wanted to know
1:01:04
As we approach the 1900th anniversary of the building of Hadrian’s Wall, Rob Collins answers listener questions on Britain’s most famous Roman fortification. Speaking to David Musgrove, he tackles the big issues about the boundary’s creation and purpose, as well as looking at everyday life on the wall. 

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Dec 12, 2021
Animals in space: from Laika to jellyfish & tortoises
46:13

Stephen Walker tells Rhiannon Davies about the history of animals in space, from fruit flies and monkeys to Laika the Soviet space dog 


Thousands of animals paved the way for human space travel. But for many of them, it was an incredibly painful – or deadly – experience. Stephen Walker tells Rhiannon Davies about this overlooked chapter of space exploration, from Soviet space dogs strapped to rockets and chimpanzees sent up by NASA, to two tortoises who orbited the moon. 


(Ad) Stephen Walker is the author of Beyond: The Astonishing Story of the First Human to Leave Our Planet and Journey into Space(HarperCollins, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-Histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fbeyond%2Fstephen-walker%2F9780008372507



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Dec 11, 2021
Christmas feasts: Georgian elegance
23:48

Taking in glamorous dinner parties and decadent “wine-chocolate”, Annie Graytransports us back to a festive feast from the Georgian era. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, for the second episode in our mini-series on Christmas food through history, she also touches on dangerous parlour games and complaints about Christmas being “too commercial”.

(Ad) Annie Gray is the author of At Christmas We Feast: Festive Food through the Ages (Profile Books, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fat-christmas-we-feast%2Fannie-gray%2F9781788168199%23%3A~%3Atext%3DAt Christmas We Feast%3A Festive Food Through the Ages (Hardback)%26text%3D'A joy to immerse oneself%2Ctrimmings%2C pudding and brandy butter.



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Dec 10, 2021
How US-Russian relations fractured in the 1990s
36:50

Mary Sarotte tells Spencer Mizen about her new book Not One Inch, which reveals how diplomatic missteps after the fall of the Berlin Wall soured US-Russian relations and fuelled the rise of Vladimir Putin.


(Ad) Mary Sarotte is the author of Not One Inch: America, Russia and the Making of Post-Cold War Stalemate (Yale University Press, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

​​https://www.amazon.co.uk/Not-One-Inch-Post-Cold-Stalemate/dp/030025993X/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-Histboty



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Dec 08, 2021
Pearl Harbor episode 2: America on the eve of war
36:08
In the latest episode in our new series on the raid on Pearl Harbor, Dayna Barnes speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about the United States in the years and months leading up to the attack. They discuss the American perspective on the disintegrating relationship with Japan, get to grips with US thinking on the eve of the attack, and ask: why was the American public blindsided by the Japanese raid?

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Dec 07, 2021
Pearl Harbor episode 3: Countdown to the raid
41:17
In the latest episode in our new series on the raid on Pearl Harbor, Steve Twomey speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about the immediate run-up to the attack, revealing how inch-perfect Japanese planning and complacent oversights by American military figures combined to leave Pearl Harbor naval base a sitting duck for Japanese bombers.

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Dec 07, 2021
Sex lives of medieval people
24:10

Were medieval attitudes to sex really that different from our own? Historian Katherine Harvey speaks to Elinor Evans about the sex lives of ordinary people in the Middle Ages – from how sexuality was governed by ideas about sin, to the “love magic” that was thought to trick people into bed.


(Ad) Katherine Harvey is the author of The Fires of Lust: Sex in the Middle Ages (Reaktion Books, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-Histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-fires-of-lust%2Fkatherine-harvey%2F9781789144895



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Dec 06, 2021
The Great Depression: everything you wanted to know
50:36
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Dec 05, 2021
Searching for WW1’s fallen soldiers
41:02

Robert Sackville-West describes attempts to identify the bodies of the dead after the devastating battles of the First World War 


Historian Robert Sackville-West describes the searches to identify – and in some cases, return – bodies of the dead after the devastating battles of the First World War: a service that provided important closure for many bereaved families. Speaking with Elinor Evans, he also explores how commemoration of the war dead has changed over the last century.

 

(Ad) Robert Sackville-West is the author of The Searchers: The Quest for the Lost of the First World War(Bloomsbury, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Searchers-Quest-Lost-First-World/dp/1526613158/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide



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Dec 04, 2021
Christmas feasts: Medieval & Tudor revelry
26:42

From brawn to plum pottage, Annie Gray takes us back to the raucous world of festive feasting in the medieval and Tudor eras. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, for the first episode in our new mini-series on Christmas food through history, she also touches on subversive merrymaking, spectacular dinnertime entertainments and hefty meat pies.


(Ad) Annie Gray is the author of At Christmas We Feast: Festive Food through the Ages (Profile Books, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fat-christmas-we-feast%2Fannie-gray%2F9781788168199%23%3A~%3Atext%3DAt%20Christmas%20We%20Feast%3A%20Festive%20Food%20Through%20the%20Ages%20(Hardback)%26text%3D'A%20joy%20to%20immerse%20oneself%2Ctrimmings%2C%20pudding%20and%20brandy%20butter.



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Dec 03, 2021
Pearl Harbor episode 1: A gathering storm in Japan
42:47
In the first episode in our new series on the raid on Pearl Harbor, Chris Harding speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about Japan in the years running up to December 1941. They discuss the long-running historical factors that edged the country ever closer to war with the United States, and ask: what led Japan to embark on such a risky gamble?

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Dec 01, 2021
Colour: a human history
47:53

Colour has been hugely important to humans through history, with different cultures attaching their own meanings to all the hues of the rainbow. From the ancient societies who venerated purple to the modern political radicals who chose red as the colour of revolution, James Fox speaks to Rhiannon Davies about these fascinating associations. 


(Ad) James Fox is the author The World According to Colour: A Cultural History (Allen Lane, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

​​https://www.amazon.co.uk/World-According-Colour-Cultural-History/dp/1846148243/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide



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Nov 30, 2021
Stranger danger? Xenophobia’s unexpected history
38:01

Psychiatrist and historian George Makari speaks to Jon Bauckham about the origins of the term “xenophobia”, and the ways in which western thinkers have interpreted people’s fear of strangers, from the 19th century to the present day.

 

(Ad) George Makari is the author of Of Fear and Strangers: A History of Xenophobia (Yale University Press, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Fear-Strangers-History-Xenophobia/dp/0300259735/ref=asc_df_0300259735/?tag=googshopuk-21&linkCode=df0&hvadid=534924812094&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=12591081103742328032&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=1006715&hvtargid=pla-1420993758651&psc=1&th=1&psc=1&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide



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Nov 29, 2021
The Irish famine: everything you wanted to know
50:43

Christine Kinealy answers listener questions on the devastating famine that struck Ireland in the mid-19th century


Christine Kinealy answers listener questions on the causes and consequences of the devastating famine that struck Ireland in the mid-19th century. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, she also discusses whether we should call it a “famine”, the role of aid and migration in the crisis, and if the British government can be blamed for what happened. 



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Nov 28, 2021
How Shakespeare inspired terrorists
39:06

Shakespeare has been an obsession of extremist groups across the globe over the centuries. The Nazi Party held him up as a hero, while Osama Bin Laden condemned him as the ultimate symbol of the depraved west. Islam Issa speaks to Rhiannon Davies about the playwright’s tangled relationship with terror.


(Ad) Islam Issa is the author of Shakespeare and Terrorism (Routledge, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Shakespeare-Terrorism-Spotlight-Islam-Issa/dp/0367334836/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide




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Nov 27, 2021
How the Greeks changed the world
50:06

Historian Roderick Beaton ranges over 4,000 years of Greek history, from the glories of Mycenae to the life of a modern European nation. In discussion with Rob Attar, he picks out some of the key moments in this journey, including the triumphs of ancient Greece, the conquests of Alexander the Great and the 1820s battle for independence. 


(Ad) Roderick Beaton is the author of The Greeks: A Global History (Faber, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-greeks%2Fprofessor-prof-roderick-beaton%2F9780571353569



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Nov 26, 2021
What can churches tell us?
49:52

Peter Stanford speaks to Emily Briffett about his new book, If These Stones Could Talk, which chronicles his journeys around Britain and Ireland’s churches, abbeys, chapels and cathedrals in a quest to understand how religion has defined our past and continues to shape our present. 


(Ad) Peter Stanford is the author of If These Stones Could Talk: The History of Christianity in Britain and Ireland through Twenty Buildings (Hodder & Stoughton, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fif-these-stones-could-talk%2Fpeter-stanford%2F9781529396423




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Nov 24, 2021
Sex work: a brief history
31:00

From the courtesans of Edo Japan and ancient Greece to the mollyhouses of Regency London, Kate Lister speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about her new book Harlots, Whores and Hackabouts, which charts the long, diverse and colourful history of sex work. 

 

(Ad) Kate Lister is the author of Harlots, Whores & Hackabouts: A History of Sex for Sale (Thames & Hudson, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fharlots-whores-and-hackabouts%2Fkate-lister%2Fwellcome-collection%2F9780500252444



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Nov 23, 2021
The Ottoman “Age of Discovery”
29:58

The “Age of Discovery” is traditionally known as a period between the 15th and 16th centuries, when European Christian powers sailed west and encountered lands and peoples previously unknown to them. However, speaking to David Musgrove, Professor Marc David Baer contends that this narrative overlooks the influential role of the Ottoman empire.

 

(Ad) Marc David Baer is the author of The Ottomans: Khans, Caesars and Caliphs (Basic Books, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Ottomans-Khans-Caesars-Caliphs/dp/1473695708/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide



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Nov 22, 2021
Anglo-Scottish border wars: everything you wanted to know
43:15
How much blood was spilled in the border regions of England and Scotland from the 14th to the 16th centuries? Who were the Reivers? And why did the French get involved? Michael Brown talks to Spencer Mizen about the cross-border clashes that marred Anglo-Scottish relations for 200 years.

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Nov 21, 2021
A secret trial that transformed transgender rights
33:43

In 1965, Scottish aristocrat Ewan Forbes stood to inherit his family’s baronetcy but, as a transgender man, he soon became embroiled in a top-secret legal case which had consequences that still affect the lives of trans people today. Zoe Playdon explores this still largely unknown story, in conversation with Matt Elton.


(Ad) Zoe Playdon is the author of The Hidden Case of Ewan Forbes: The Transgender Trial that Threatened to Upend the British Establishment (Bloomsbury, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Hidden-Case-Ewan-Forbes/dp/152661913X/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide



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Nov 20, 2021
How to tell the story of WW2 in museums
26:47