History Extra podcast

By Immediate Media

Listen to a podcast, please open Podcast Republic app. Available on Google Play Store.


Category: History

Open in Apple Podcasts


Open RSS feed


Open Website


Rate for this podcast

Subscribers: 5424
Reviews: 11

Balmusico
 Oct 27, 2021
Always interesting

dave
 May 18, 2021
good

Tristan John
 Nov 30, 2020
Great fun


 Sep 23, 2020


 Aug 1, 2020

Description

The latest news from the team behind BBC History Magazine - a popular History magazine. To find out more, visit www.historyextra.com

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.


Episode Date
David Stirling: SAS hero or fraud?
38:04

Special forces historian Gavin Mortimer casts a critical eye over David Stirling, who is renowned as the founder of the SAS in the Second World War. Speaking to Rob Attar, Mortimer argues that Stirling’s wartime record was far less impressive than he claimed and that his legend has obscured the achievements of those around him.

(Ad) Gavin Mortimer is the author of David Stirling: The Phoney Major: The Life, Times and Truth about the Founder of the SAS (Little Brown, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fdavid-stirling%2Fgavin-mortimer%2F9781472134592



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 06, 2022
The Norman kings of Africa
32:24

The Normans famously conquered England, but did you know they also had a short-lived kingdom in North Africa in the 12th century? Professor Levi Roach explains to David Musgrove how the Normans established a presence in southern Italy and Sicily and expanded south towards Africa.

(Ad) Levi Roach is the author of Empires of the Normans: Makers of Europe, Conquerors of Asia (John Murray Press, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2F9781529398465



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 05, 2022
15 minutes of fame: Hildegard of Bingen, medieval polymath
19:49
It’s the HistoryExtra podcast’s 15th birthday! To celebrate, we’ve asked 15 historians to nominate a figure from history they think deserves their ‘15 minutes of fame’. In this episode, Dr Janina Ramirez nominates Hildegard of Bingen. Speaking with Emily Briffett, she explains why this 12th-century abbess, composer, scientist, writer and saint deserves to be better remembered today.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 04, 2022
British schools and education: everything you wanted to know
1:03:30
When did schooling become compulsory? How far did education differ between girls and boys? And why does the British school year start in September? Speaking to Emma Slattery Williams, Susannah Wright answers some of our listeners’ most popular questions on the history of British schools – from the establishment of the earliest schools to the surprisingly late abolition of corporal punishment.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 03, 2022
On the streets of 19th-century London
37:18

Oskar Jensen introduces the characters roaming the streets of Georgian and Victorian London, from beggars to ballad singers. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, he explores what it would have been like to live and work on the streets of the capital, sharing stories of entrepreneurial street sweepers, impatient milkmaids, kidnapped children and timid hot-cross bun sellers.

(Ad) Oskar Jensen is the author of Vagabonds: Life on the Streets of Nineteenth-century London (Prelude, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fvagabonds-life-on-the-streets-of-nineteenth-century-london-by-bbc-new-generation-thinker-2022%2Foskar-jensen%2F9780715654392



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 01, 2022
The end of Roman Britain | 4. religion and belief
36:06
In the fourth episode of our podcast series on the end of Roman Britain, David Musgrove considers the role of religion in late Roman Britain with Dr David Petts. They look at how far Christianity was embedded in Britain by the fourth century, what other religious practices existed alongside it and, crucially, how far adherence to the Christian faith in the declining years of the empire helped to keep the Roman way of life going in Britain.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 30, 2022
Casanova: more than a serial seducer
42:46

Giacomo Casanova is remembered for his reputation as a serial seducer. But according to author Leo Damrosch, he was far more than that. Speaking with Emily Briffett, Leo explains how Casanova was also an aspiring priest, spy, army officer and Masonic master, who led a colourful life that saw him interact with kings, empresses and some of the most famous writers of his time.

(Ad) Leo Damrosch is the author of Adventurer: The Life and Times of Giacomo Casanova (Yale University Press, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fadventurer%2Fleo-damrosch%2F9780300248289



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 29, 2022
From bohemian Brighton to military Plymouth: the LGBTQ history of four British cities
51:23

Matt Cook and Alison Oram discuss their new book Queer Beyond London, which uncovers the LGBTQ experience in four English cities – Brighton, Manchester, Plymouth and Leeds – from the sixties to the noughties. Speaking with Rachel Dinning, they consider how local people, places and politics shaped LGBTQ lives in each city, establishing individual cultures often very distinct from the national narrative.

(Ad) Alison Oram and Matt Cook are the authors of Queer Beyond London (Manchester University Press, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fqueer-beyond-london%2Fprofessor-matt-cook%2Fprofessor-alison-oram%2F9781526145864



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 28, 2022
15 minutes of fame: Marguerite de Navarre, royal influencer
16:17

It’s the HistoryExtra podcast’s 15th birthday! To celebrate, we’ve asked 15 historians to nominate a figure from history they think deserves their 15 minutes of fame. In today’s episode, Suzannah Lipscomb tells Emily Briffett about the life of Marguerite de Navarre, a 16th-century royal player who had a major influence on both the Renaissance and Reformation.


If you’re enjoying this series and would like early access to more episodes, head to www.historyextra.com/15-minutes.



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 27, 2022
The Mali empire: everything you wanted to know
50:12
Who founded the Mali empire? What impact did Islam have on its trajectory? What were its interactions with medieval Europe like? And what made its greatest leader, Mansa Musa, so fabulously wealthy? Speaking to Spencer Mizen, Kevin MacDonald answers listener questions on one of Africa’s greatest historical powers.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 26, 2022
The BBC at 100: political tensions in the 1970s and 80s
37:09

In the latest instalment of our monthly series marking the centenary of the BBC, media historian David Hendy talks to Matt Elton about the political pressures and fissures that defined the 1970s and 80s – and the ways in which they shaped the corporation’s output.

(Ad) David Hendy is the author of The BBC: A People’s History (Profile Books, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-bbc%2Fdavid-hendy%2F%2F9781781255254%3Fawaid%3D3787%26utm_source%3Dredbrain%26utm_medium%3Dshopping%26utm_campaign%3Dcss%26gclid%3DCj0KCQiAip-PBhDVARIsAPP2xc2PCYX_d_582jtZj6du6A-9dNO8d8xXvVkPhP_Jmh1FuEm7Mui3xSYaAvwiEALw_wcB



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 24, 2022
The end of Roman Britain | 3. a militarised state?
42:49
In the third episode of our podcast series on the end of Roman Britain, David Musgrove looks at how far Britain was a militarised state between the third and fifth centuries. Historian Dr Rob Collins explains how Roman Britain was set up to support the military machine of the wider empire, and what might have happened when that military machine began to falter.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 23, 2022
Who were the Celts?
32:26

Simon Jenkins considers the enigmatic story of the Celts, and asks whether any such people ever actually existed. Speaking with David Musgrove, he also questions what the term ‘Celtic’ should mean to us today.

(Ad) Simon Jenkins is the author of The Celts: A Sceptical History (Profile Books, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-celts%2Fsimon-jenkins%2F9781788168809



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 22, 2022
Pioneering women pilots: from ballooning spectacles to flying escapades
49:02

Sally Smith considers the contributions made and significant firsts achieved by British women in the field of aviation, from ballooning and parachuting, to piloting airships and fixed-wing aircraft. Speaking with Emily Briffett, she highlights the extraordinary lives these pioneers led and the trials they faced in order to achieve success.

(Ad) Sally Smith is the author of Magnificent Women and Flying Machines: The First 200 Years of British Women in the Sky (The History Press, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Magnificent-Women-Flying-Machines-British/dp/075099746X/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 21, 2022
Discovering a lost royal battleship
34:52

Claire Jowitt discusses the discovery of a 17th-century shipwreck off the coast of Norfolk 

 

Claire Jowitt speaks to Matt Elton about the news of the discovery of a 17th-century shipwreck off the coast of Norfolk – and why it might be the most important maritime find in decades. 



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 20, 2022
The Edwardians: everything you wanted to know
34:46

In our latest everything you wanted to know episode, Dr John Jacob Woolf answers listener questions on Edwardian Britain. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, he touches on subjects ranging from suffrage, labour movements, empire and international relations, to leisure time, childhood and roller-skating.



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 19, 2022
Watergate at 50: the making of an American scandal
49:50
Half a century on from the Watergate scandal, Clifford Williamson explores its twists and turns, its key players, and its lasting impact on American politics. Speaking with Matt Elton, he explains how the conspiracy sparked a constitutional crisis that brought down a president.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 17, 2022
The end of Roman Britain | 2. life in the late imperial age
40:18

In the second episode of our podcast series on the end of Roman Britain, David Musgrove investigates what life was like for people living in the later Roman era, in the third and fourth centuries. He speaks to Professor Will Bowden to explore the inequalities that existed between the haves and have-nots, and how far the stresses and strains that were at play in the wider empire impacted on everyday life in Britain.





See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 16, 2022
African-American philanthropy
31:30

In the first episode in our series of conversations with winners of the 2022 Dan David Prize, Dr Tyrone Freeman speaks to Helen Carr about his award-winning research into charitable traditions in African-American communities.

The Dan David Prize is the world's largest history prize, which recognizes outstanding historical scholarship. Hear more conversations with other winners of the 2022 Dan David prize, early and ad-free now at historyextra.com/dan-david-prize.



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 15, 2022
Reconstructing the body of God
25:21

Francesca Stavrakopoulou, author of the Wolfson History Prize shortlisted book God: An Anatomy, discusses what ancient biblical texts tell us about the body of God. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, she traces the origins of God back to an ancient deity called Yahweh, and talks about the challenges of working on religious history.

(Ad) Francesca Stavrakopoulou is the author of God: An Anatomy (Picador, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/God-Anatomy-Francesca-Stavrakopoulou/dp/1509867333/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 14, 2022
Midway: why America won the WW2 naval battle
34:28

In June 1942, the US and Japanese navies went head to head over a small atoll in the middle of the Pacific ocean. Brendan Simms and Steven McGregor, authors of The Silver Waterfall, speak to Ellie Cawthorne about the factors that led to the United States’ victory at Midway, exploring the importance of American industrial innovation, and reflecting on the extent to which Midway changed the course of the Pacific War.

(Ad) Brendan Simms and Steven McGregor are the authors of The Silver Waterfall: How America Won the War in the Pacific at Midway (PublicAffairs, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2F9781541701373



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 13, 2022
Crime & punishment in Britain: everything you wanted to know
1:02:57
Who maintained law and order before the police? When did Britain ban capital punishment – and why? And what are some of the weirdest punishments doled out through history? Historian of crime Nell Darby answers listener questions on crime and punishment through history. Speaking to Rachel Dinning, she discusses subjects ranging from the origins of the police to the history of prisons and the death penalty.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 12, 2022
Has Britain always looked backwards?
27:57

From the “Blitz spirit” invoked in the Covid-19 pandemic, to the 16th-century sense that a lost greatness needed to be recovered, historian Hannah Rose Woods reveals how nostalgia for a bygone era is nothing new. Speaking to Elinor Evans about her new book Rule, Nostalgia, she discusses the various ways our ancestors have looked back at our national past.

(Ad) Hannah Rose Woods is the author of Rule, Nostalgia: A Backwards History of Britain (Ebury Publishing, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Frule-nostalgia%2Fhannah-rose-woods%2F9780753558737%23%3A~%3Atext%3DRule%2C%20Nostalgia%20is%20a%20timely%2C%3A%20past%2C%20present%20and%20future



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 10, 2022
The end of Roman Britain | 1. introduction, and a mystery mosaic
38:40
What really happened in Britain as Roman influence waned? Recent research is shaking up our view of the end of imperial rule during the fifth century, and one new find in particular – a mosaic at Chedworth Roman villa – is leading experts to reassess how far people carried on “being Roman”. In the opening episode of our new series, David Musgrove takes a trip to Chedworth to begin his investigation into the end of Roman Britain.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 09, 2022
How the Persians were written out of history
35:16

Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones tells Spencer Mizen why Eurocentric depictions of the “barbarous” Persians have obscured the achievements of one of the ancient world’s great civilisations.

(Ad) Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones is the author of Persians: The Age of The Great Kings (Wildfire, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Persians-Great-Professor-Lloyd-Llewellyn-Jones/dp/1472277287/ref=asc_df_1472277287/?tag=googshopuk-21&linkCode=df0&hvadid=535049525184&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=5614143262630945554&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=1006715&hvtargid=pla-1410292999858&psc=1&th=1&psc=1&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 08, 2022
Shady deals & rigged elections: the changing face of corruption
35:41

Professor Mark Knights discusses how ideas about corruption were transformed in Britain and its empire between 1600 and 1850. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, he delves into the shady realms of bribery and electoral corruption and the blurred lines between public service and private gain.

(Ad) Mark Knights is the author of Trust and Distrust: Corruption in Office in Britain and its Empire, 1600-1850 (Oxford University press, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Ftrust-and-distrust%2Fmark-knights%2F9780198796244



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 07, 2022
Plastic surgery: transformed by WW1
37:49

The First World War unleashed an unprecedented wave of violence, and medicine struggled to keep up. British surgeon Harold Gillies was at the forefront of those dragging plastic surgery into the modern age, reconstructing the faces of thousands of soldiers. Lindsey Fitzharris speaks to Rhiannon Davies about Gillies’ remarkable contribution to medical science.

(Ad) Lindsey Fitzharris is the author of The Facemaker: A Visionary Surgeon's Battle to Mend the Disfigured Soldiers of World War I (Penguin, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-facemaker%2Flindsey-fitzharris%2F2928377080389



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 06, 2022
Britain’s transformation during the Queen’s lifetime
32:36
This week sees Queen Elizabeth II make history as the first ever British monarch to celebrate their platinum jubilee. To mark her 70 years on the throne, Rhiannon Davies speaks to Dominic Sandbrook about some of the radical transformations the nation has undergone during her lifetime.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 05, 2022
Empire of blood
45:33

Professor Caroline Elkins explains how the British empire was sustained by violence for more than 200 years. Speaking with Rob Attar, she reveals how liberal imperialism was able to coexist with regular acts of brutality in Britain’s colonies.

(Ad) Caroline Elkins is the author of Legacy of Violence: A History of the British Empire (Bodley Head, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

http://www.awin1.com/cread.php?awinmid=7921&awinaffid=489797&p=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Flegacy-of-violence%2Fcaroline-elkins%2F9781847921062&clickref=historyextra-social-histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 03, 2022
The Black Death | 6. how the pandemic transformed societies
39:52

In the final episode of our series on the Black Death, Professor Mark Bailey and Dr Claire Kennan discuss the medieval pandemic’s dramatic social, political and economic impact. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, they use England as a case study to explore how it restructured society, with effects that were felt for hundreds of years.


The primary sources quoted in this series are mainly taken from:

The Black Death, translated and edited by Rosemary Horrox (1994)

The Black Death, The Great Mortality of 1348-1350: A Brief History with Documents, John Arberth (2005)



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 02, 2022
Fairy queens & giantesses: pagan goddesses in Christian Europe
35:07

Although medieval Europe was firmly Christian, pagan deities still loomed large in the popular imagination. Rhiannon Davies spoke to Ronald Hutton about four of these divine figures: the powerful and protective Mother Earth; the glamorous fairy queen; a night-roaming supernatural lady; and a Gaelic giantess.

(Ad) Ronald Hutton is the author of Queens of the Wild: Pagan Goddesses in Christian Europe: An Investigation (Yale University Press, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Queens-Wild-Goddesses-Christian-Investigation/dp/0300261012/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 01, 2022
The birth of insulin: a scientific drama
51:01

One hundred years on from Fred Banting and Charles Best’s discovery, Dr Kersten Hall tells the tale of insulin and its vital role in helping people with diabetes. Speaking with Emily Briffett, he explores the other unsung heroes involved in the drama that saw insulin develop from “thick brown muck” to wall street gold.

(Ad) Kersten Hall is the author of Insulin - The Crooked Timber: A History from Thick Brown Muck to Wall Street Gold (Oxford University Press, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Insulin-Crooked-Timber-History-Street/dp/0192855387/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 31, 2022
Dracula at 125: what can a vampire tell us about Victorian Britain?
29:39
Marking the 125th anniversary of the publication of Dracula, Roger Luckhurst tells Ellie Cawthorne why Bram Stoker’s vampire thriller has had such an enduring appeal. They discuss how the book exposed the anxieties of the late Victorian age, how contemporary readers reacted, and some of the most intriguing adaptations.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 30, 2022
Witchcraft: everything you wanted to know
42:21

Were all suspected witches burned at the stake? Was torture a legal way of gaining a confession of practising magic? And which professions were most commonly accused of dabbling in the dark arts? Speaking with Charlotte Hodgman, Owen Davies answers your top questions about witchcraft in our latest Everything you wanted to know episode.




See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 29, 2022
Alice Roberts on unearthing the Romans, Vikings & Anglo-Saxons
43:51

Professor Alice Roberts explores how cutting-edge developments in archaeology and genetic science can broaden our understanding of what happened in Britain between the first and tenth centuries AD. Through exploring the funerary sites of Romans, Vikings and Anglo-Saxons, she explains to Emily Briffett what we can learn about life and death at this time.

(Ad) Alice Roberts is the author of Buried: An Alternative History of the First Millennium in Britain (Simon & Schuster, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fburied%2Falice-roberts%2F9781398510036



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 27, 2022
The Black Death | 5. death, sin & spirituality
31:52

The arrival of a terrifying pandemic made medieval people increasingly preoccupied with death, sin and the afterlife. In this episode, Ellie Cawthorne speaks to Helen Carr about spiritual responses to the Black Death, from special prayers to self-flagellation.


The primary sources quoted in this series are mainly taken from:

The Black Death, translated and edited by Rosemary Horrox (1994)

The Black Death, The Great Mortality of 1348-1350: A Brief History with Documents, John Arberth (2005)



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 26, 2022
Antony Beevor on the Russian revolution
41:20

Bestselling military historian Antony Beevor discusses his new book Russia: Revolution and Civil War 1917-1921. In conversation with Rob Attar, he delves into the two revolutions that overthrew Tsar Nicholas II and brought the Bolsheviks to power, and then examines the bloody civil war that ultimately consolidated communist control.

(Ad) Antony Beevor is the author of Russia: Revolution and Civil War 1917-1921 (Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Russia-Revolution-Civil-War-1917-1921/dp/1474610145/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 25, 2022
Eliza Acton: Britain’s first modern cookery writer
34:41

Writer Annabel Abbs discusses poet and food writer Eliza Acton, the protagonist of her new historical novel The Language of Food. She tells Emma Slattery Williams about Acton’s story and how her legacy has been overshadowed by Mrs Beeton.

(Ad) Annabel Abbs is the author of The Language of Food (Simon & Schuster, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-language-of-food%2Fannabel-abbs%2F9781398502222



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 24, 2022
The BBC at 100: change & innovation in 60s Britain
35:20

In the latest episode of our monthly series marking the centenary of the BBC, media historian David Hendy speaks to Matt Elton about the ways in which the corporation kept up with a changing Britain through the 1960s.

(Ad) David Hendy is the author of The BBC: A People’s History (Profile Books, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-bbc%2Fdavid-hendy%2F%2F9781781255254%3Fawaid%3D3787%26utm_source%3Dredbrain%26utm_medium%3Dshopping%26utm_campaign%3Dcss%26gclid%3DCj0KCQiAip-PBhDVARIsAPP2xc2PCYX_d_582jtZj6du6A-9dNO8d8xXvVkPhP_Jmh1FuEm7Mui3xSYaAvwiEALw_wcB



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 23, 2022
WW2’s desert war: everything you wanted to know
39:26

Historian Jonathan Fennell answers listener questions on the North African campaign in the Second World War. Speaking with Rob Attar, he discusses some of the key moments and personalities, reflects on the challenges of fighting in a desert and considers whether this theatre really was a war without hate.

(Ad) Jonathan Fennell is the author of ​​Fighting the People's War: The British and Commonwealth Armies and the Second World War (Cambridge University Press, 2019). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Fighting-Peoples-War-British-Commonwealth/dp/1107030951/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 22, 2022
Christine de Pizan: from medieval writer to feminist icon
40:36

Charlotte Cooper-Davis delves into the life and legacy of Christine de Pizan, a late medieval writer who was actively involved in the production of her own works. Speaking with Emily Briffett, Charlotte explores Christine’s vast catalogue of written work and how she has since become seen as a feminist icon.

(Ad) Charlotte Cooper-Davis is the author of Christine de Pizan: Life, Work, Legacy (Reaktion Books, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fchristine-de-pizan%2Fcharlotte-cooper-davis%2F9781789144420



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 20, 2022
The Black Death | 4. medieval medical thinking
33:16

How do you fight a disease, when you don’t know what causes it? In this episode, Ellie Cawthorne speaks to Elma Brenner about medieval medical thinking and how it informed responses to the Black Death, from ideas about how bad air and misaligned planets could make you sick, to the rituals and remedies used to treat plague victims and the state of 14th-century hospital care.

The primary sources quoted in this series are mainly taken from:

The Black Death, translated and edited by Rosemary Horrox (1994)

The Black Death, The Great Mortality of 1348-1350: A Brief History with Documents, John Arberth (2005)



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 19, 2022
A legacy of inequality: the economic impact of empire
32:36

Imperialism led to eye-watering profits for the British, and after decolonisation those who had grown rich from the colonial project rewrote the rules to keep the coffers open. Rhiannon Davies speaks to Kojo Koram about the economic and legal effects of decolonisation, and how growing global inequality has its roots in empire.

(Ad) Kojo Koram is the author of Uncommon Wealth: Britain and the Aftermath of Empire (John Murray Press, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Uncommon-Wealth-Britain-Aftermath-Empire-ebook/dp/B093S5H74N/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 18, 2022
Stasi poets: creative writing & the Cold War
41:22

Journalist Philip Oltermann explores the unusual story of the poetry group run by the East German Ministry for State Security. Speaking to Rob Attar, he explains why the Stasi decided to employ rhyme and verse in their battle against capitalism.

(Ad) Philip Oltermann is the author of The Stasi Poetry Circle (Faber & Faber, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-stasi-poetry-circle%2Fphilip-oltermann%2F9780571331192



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 17, 2022
Cathedrals: from bishops' seats to tourist hotspots
42:24
Nicholas Orme speaks to Emily Briffett about the long story of English cathedrals, tracing their role in society from their beginnings in the early Middle Ages to the modern day. Nicholas reveals how cathedrals have survived the turbulence of religious and social change, and explores what they can reveal to us about our history.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 16, 2022
The Restoration: everything you wanted to know
54:50
How did the Restoration of the monarchy come about, after a period of civil war and 11 years of Republican rule? How smooth was the transfer of power? And what did it mean for the everyday person? Speaking with Elinor Evans, Dr Clare Jackson tackles listener questions and popular internet search queries on Charles II’s ascension to the throne, in the latest episode in our Everything you wanted to know series.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 15, 2022
HistoryExtra Plus: get early access to our podcast series
0:33


Enjoying our new Black Death series? Listen to the next three episodes right now on our new subscription podcast channel HistoryExtra Plus, along with early access to our new series on the end of Roman Britain. Follow the link below to sign up now: 

https://apple.co/3w0aaXz

 



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 14, 2022
Eurovision: a political history
37:44

From voting scandals and political messaging to drag queens and ABBA, Dr Dean Vuletic speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about the history of the Eurovision Song Contest. He discusses some of the controversies in the competition’s past and reveals what it can tell us about the changing face of Europe over the last six decades.

(Ad) Dean Vuletic is the author of Postwar Europe and the Eurovision Song Contest (Bloomsbury Academic, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Postwar-Europe-Eurovision-Song-Contest/dp/1350107395/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 13, 2022
The Black Death | 3. living through the plague
28:26

What would it have been like to live through a Black Death outbreak? In this episode, Ellie Cawthorne speaks to Professor Samuel Cohn about the experiences of medieval people in communities ravaged by the deadly disease. He reveals what the chroniclers tell us about the range of responses to the crisis in the late 1340s, and the lengths people went to to survive.


The primary sources quoted in this series are taken from:

The Black Death, translated and edited by Rosemary Horrox (1994)

The Black Death, The Great Mortality of 1348-1350: A Brief History with Documents, John Arberth (2005)



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 12, 2022
Free speech: a brief, contentious history
40:27

Jacob Mchangama explores the global history of free speech, discussing its ancient origins, staunchest defenders and biggest critics. Speaking to Matt Elton, he also reveals the ways the right to speak freely has been threatened at moments of social upheaval.

(Ad) Jacob Mchangama is the author of Free Speech: A Global History from Socrates to Social Media (Basic Books, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Free-Speech-Global-History-Socrates-ebook/dp/B09JFTPG9H/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 11, 2022
Disabled people in Tudor times
21:53

Phillipa Vincent-Connolly explores the lives of disabled people in the Tudor era. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, she uncovers complex attitudes to disability in the period, and reveals how some disabled figures played key roles at the royal court.

(Ad) Phillipa Vincent-Connolly is the author of the Disability and the Tudors: All the King's Fools (Pen & Sword, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Disability-Tudors-All-Kings-Fools/dp/1526720051#:~:text=Being%20disabled%20with%20cerebral%20palsy,UK%20with%20her%20two%20boys/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 10, 2022
Magellan: daring explorer or doomed failure?
37:50

In September 1519, Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan set off on a fateful voyage to find a route to the Spice Islands. In the centuries since, Magellan has gone down in history as a chivalric adventurer, his name forever linked to the first circumnavigation of the globe. But, as Professor Felipe Fernández-Armesto tells Ellie Cawthorne, Magellan’s career was in fact shaped more by failure than success.

(Ad) Felipe Fernández-Armesto is the author of Straits: Beyond the Myth of Magellan (Bloomsbury, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Straits-Beyond-Magellan-Felipe-Fernandez-Armesto/dp/152663208X/ref=sr_1_1?qid=1650974172&refinements=p_27%3AFelipe+Fernandez-Armesto&s=books&sr=1-1&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 09, 2022
War in the air: everything you wanted to know
1:04:20
What are the origins of aircraft being used in war? How common were dogfights? And were early fighter pilots really the ‘knights of the air’? Speaking with Emily Briffett, Paul Beaver answers your top questions about military aviation in our latest Everything you wanted to know episode.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 08, 2022
The Dudleys: power behind the Tudor throne
34:46

The might of the Tudor dynasty was built on the blood and sweat of three generations of another family – the Dudleys. And sometimes, they paid the ultimate price. Rhiannon Davies speaks to Joanne Paul about the members of the family who were key players in the Tudor era, from Edmund Dudley’s efforts to raise taxes for Henry VII to Robert Dudley’s flirtatious friendship with Elizabeth I.

(Ad) Joanne Paul is the author of The House of Dudley: A New History of Tudor England (Penguin, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-house-of-dudley%2Fdr-joanne-paul%2F9780241349823



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 06, 2022
The Black Death | 2. origins & spread
37:13

Over recent years, our understanding of the Black Death has been radically transformed by new scientific developments. In this episode, Ellie Cawthorne speaks to Professor Monica Green about what the latest research can tell us about where the plague originated, and how it spread to eventually engulf vast swathes of the globe.


The primary sources quoted in this series are taken from:

The Black Death, translated and edited by Rosemary Horrox (1994)

The Black Death, The Great Mortality of 1348-1350: A Brief History with Documents, John Arberth (2005)



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 05, 2022
Spain’s tumultuous story
35:13

Giles Tremlett explores the turbulent history of Spain. Speaking to Elinor Evans, he explores how its position on Europe's south-western corner has exposed it to influences from all over the world, giving it a history unlike any other nation on the continent.

(Ad) Giles Tremlett is the author of España: A Brief History of Spain (Apollo, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Espa%C3%B1a-Brief-History-Spain-Tremlett/dp/1789544378/ref=sr_1_1?adgrpid=128739111730&gclid=Cj0KCQjw3v6SBhCsARIsACyrRAnQs1UN8yLBkk3J9LcWXCXJWT2-TxMBY-mF-ngKEnypYTRXTiaK0fcaAnhYEALw_wcB&hvadid=583087823497&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=1006715&hvnetw=g&hvqmt=b&hvrand=17429477802024292298&hvtargid=kwd-1645455064740&hydadcr=24428_1748934&keywords=espana+giles+tremlett&qid=1650454336&sr=8-1&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 04, 2022
Despatches on dictators: US reporters in 1930s Europe
38:26

Deborah Cohen discusses a close-knit group of American foreign correspondents who reported on the tumult of interwar Europe in the 1920s and 1930s. She talks to Elinor Evans about how they dispatched breaking news back to the US, becoming some of the most famous names of the day in the process.

(Ad) Deborah Cohen is the author of Last Call at the Hotel Imperial: The Reporters Who Took on a World at War (William Collins, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Last-Call-Hotel-Imperial-Generation-ebook/dp/B08F9CBLR9/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 03, 2022
Britain’s lost towns and villages
32:29

Britain is a land full of lost settlements – villages, towns and even cities. Matthew Green explores these deserted places with David Musgrove, looking at their scarred and romantic remains in the landscape, and considering how and why they became lost to time.

(Ad) Matthew Green is the author of Shadowlands: A Journey through Lost Britain (Faber & Faber, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Shadowlands-Journey-Britains-Vanished-Villages/dp/057133802X/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 02, 2022
Medieval childhood: everything you wanted to know
58:22
What was it like to grow up in the Middle Ages? In our latest Everything you wanted to know episode, Dr Emily Joan Ward answers your questions about medieval childhood. Speaking to Dave Musgrove, she discusses topics including education, how children were put to work, and what they did for fun.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

May 01, 2022
The failings of emancipation
39:12

Professor Kris Manjapra speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about his book Black Ghost of Empire, which reveals how the end of slavery helped perpetuate systems of oppression and racial injustice, rather than disrupt them.

(Ad) Kris Manjapra is the author of Black Ghost of Empire: The Long Death of Slavery and the Failure of Emancipation (Penguin, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fblack-ghost-of-empire%2Fkris-manjapra%2F9780241392461



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 29, 2022
The Black Death | 1. Introduction
17:22

In the late 1340s, people in cities, towns and villages across the medieval world began to fall ill from a mysterious pestilence. This six part series looks at the how the Black Death shook the Middle Ages, killing millions and transforming societies. Speaking to expert historians, we'll track the spread of this devastating disease, reveal what it was like to live through the pandemic and consider its dramatic, long-lasting impact.



The primary sources quoted in this series are taken from:

The Black Death, translated and edited by Rosemary Horrox (1994)

The Black Death, The Great Mortality of 1348-1350: A Brief History with Documents, John Arberth (2005)



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 28, 2022
Video games at 50: a cultural history
43:46
Fifty years on from the launch of the world’s first commercial home video game console – the Magnavox Odyssey – John Wills talks to Matt Elton about how videogames have reflected the world around them over the past half century, and the ways in which history and gaming increasingly overlap.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 27, 2022
Libraries: a book lover’s history
44:18

Andrew Pettegree and Arthur der Weduwen delve into the history of libraries, from the humble book lover’s private selection to the most lavish literary collections. In conversation with Emily Briffett, they explore the innovations and ideas that made libraries what they are today.

(Ad) Andrew Pettegree and Arthur der Weduwen are the authors of

The Library: A Fragile History (Profile Books, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-library%2Farthur-der-weduwen%2Fandrew-pettegree%2F9781788163422



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 26, 2022
The BBC at 100: TV takes off in the 1950s
33:29

In the latest episode of our monthly series marking the centenary of the BBC, media historian David Hendy speaks to Matt Elton about the rise of television during the 1950s – and how the decade saw the BBC increasingly clash with the political world.

 

(Ad) David Hendy is the author of The BBC: A People’s History (Profile Books, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-bbc%2Fdavid-hendy%2F%2F9781781255254%3Fawaid%3D3787%26utm_source%3Dredbrain%26utm_medium%3Dshopping%26utm_campaign%3Dcss%26gclid%3DCj0KCQiAip-PBhDVARIsAPP2xc2PCYX_d_582jtZj6du6A-9dNO8d8xXvVkPhP_Jmh1FuEm7Mui3xSYaAvwiEALw_wcB



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 25, 2022
The Falklands War: everything you wanted to know
45:14
How much of a gamble did sending a task force to the South Atlantic represent for Margaret Thatcher? How close did Britain come to losing the conflict? And did victory change the nation’s relationship with its armed forces? Speaking to Spencer Mizen, Helen Parr answers listener questions about British troops’ campaign to retake the Falkland Islands four decades ago.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 24, 2022
Introducing: HistoryExtra Plus
0:35

Would you like ad-free versions of our podcasts, early access to series and exclusive bonus content? Then check out our subscription podcast feed HistoryExtra Plus. Follow the link below to sign up now: 

https://apple.co/3xNlgAM



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 23, 2022
Rebel ramblers of the Kinder Trespass
26:25
Ninety years on from the Kinder Mass Trespass, Ben Anderson speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about what this act of popular protest achieved in 1932, how it became mythologised as a key moment in the right-to-roam campaign, and how we should remember it today.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 22, 2022
Catherine the Great: inoculation pioneer
37:22

Lucy Ward speaks to Elinor Evans about the story of English Quaker doctor Thomas Dimsdale, who took up the risky challenge of inoculating Empress Catherine II against smallpox, as a powerful statement at a time when the disease was ravaging Russia and superstition held sway.

(Ad) Lucy Ward is the author of The Empress and the English Doctor: How Catherine the Great defied a deadly virus (Oneworld Publications, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-empress-and-the-english-doctor%2Flucy-ward%2F9780861542451



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 21, 2022
Trailblazers of black British theatre
30:20

Stephen Bourne introduces Spencer Mizen to some of the pioneers of black British theatre, from Ira Aldridge, who in 1825 became the first black actor to play Othello, to the emergence of Britain’s black-led theatre companies.

(Ad) Stephen Bourne is the author of Deep Are the Roots: Trailblazers Who Changed Black British Theatre (The History Press 2021). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Deep-Are-Roots-Trailblazers-Changed/dp/0750996293/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 20, 2022
The Jagiellonians: the dynasty that shaped central Europe
45:59
Natalia Nowakowska reveals the story of the Jagiellonians – one of the most successful dynasties that many people have never even heard of. Speaking with Emily Briffett, she discusses how they rose from pagan tribal origins in Lithuania to become one of the biggest Catholic dynasties in Europe, with an expansive empire and a legacy that can still be felt today.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 19, 2022
Operation Mincemeat: WW2 espionage on film
28:30

In 1943, British agents concocted a daring plot to trick Hitler, involving a dead body, fake love letters and a false identity. Speaking with Emily Briffett, author and historian Ben Macintyre discusses the real history behind Operation Mincemeat, a new film adapted from his 2010 book of the same name.

Operation Mincemeat is in UK cinemas from 15 April.



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 18, 2022
Royal residences: everything you wanted to know
48:49
Historian Tracy Borman answers listener questions about the history of British royal residences, from imposing castles to decadent palaces. She speaks to Rachel Dinning about secret rooms, spooky hauntings, and her work as Joint Chief Curator at Historic Royal Palaces.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 17, 2022
The Northman: bringing the Viking world to life on screen
24:31

A blood-splattered slice of Viking action arrives in UK cinemas today with the release of Robert Eggers’ new saga-inspired epic, The Northman. Professor Neil Price, archaeologist and historical consultant on the film, speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about the process of recreating the Viking world on screen, and some of the historical themes that inspired the story.

The Northman is in UK cinemas from 15 April.



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 15, 2022
Pets, pests & portents: birds through time
29:33

Over time, we’ve viewed birds as pets, pests, natural delights and bad omens. Roy and Lesley Adkins tell Emily Briffett about our complex and lengthy relationship with birds – a story of changing landscapes, fluctuating tastes in food and fashion, enjoyment and exploitation.

(Ad) Roy and Lesley Adkins are the authors of When There Were Birds (Little Brown, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fwhen-there-were-birds%2Froy-adkins%2Flesley-adkins%2F9781408713570



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 14, 2022
Inside a Roman home
55:53

What could you expect to hear in the atrium of a Roman home? What was everyday life like for the slaves who worked in the kitchens? And which emperor hosted the worst dinner party? In conversation with Emily Briffett, Dr Hannah Platts takes us on a multi-sensory tour of the ancient Roman home.

(Ad) Hannah Platts is author of Multisensory Living in Ancient Rome: Power and Space in Roman Houses (Bloomsbury, 2019). Buy it now from Bloomsbury:

https://www.bloomsbury.com/uk/multisensory-living-in-ancient-rome-9781350194496/



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 13, 2022
Medieval emotions: were they like our own?
34:55

Speaking to Dave Musgrove, medieval historian Elizabeth Boyle reflects on life throughout the Covid lockdowns, using early Irish literature to explore how similar the emotions of people in the middle ages were to our own.

(Ad) Elizabeth Boyle is the author of Fierce Appetites: Loving, Losing and Living to Excess in my Present and in the Writings of the Past (Sandycove, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Fierce-Appetites-Loving-present-writings/dp/1844885445/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 12, 2022
Corruption in the ancient world
37:30
What was corruption like in the ancient world – and how can studying it help us make sense of shady dealings in the 21st century? Matt Elton speaks to Shushma Malik, Marta Garcia and Yehudah Gershon – three researchers behind a new project to reveal more about the murkier side of ancient Greece and Rome.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 11, 2022
Trade unions: everything you wanted to know
52:53
Mark Crail tackles popular internet search queries and listener questions about the history of Britain’s trade union movement and its attempts to secure better conditions for the country’s workers. He talks to Jon Bauckham about the 19th-century origins of the unions, their connection with the Labour Party, and their role in strikes through the centuries.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 10, 2022
Wiretapping: a secret history
37:02

Wiretapping has a chequered past in the United States, from civil war soldiers who were seen as heroes for tapping enemy wires to the political scandals that rocked the 20th-century establishment. Brian Hochman, the author of The Listeners: A History of Wiretapping in the United States tells Rhiannon Davies about the history of electronic eavesdropping.

(Ad) Brian Hochman is the author of The Listeners: A History of Wiretapping in the United States (Harvard University Press, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FListeners-History-Wiretapping-United-States%2Fdp%2F0674249283%2Fref%3Dsr_1_1%3Fqid%3D1643728025%26refinements%3Dp_27%3ABrian%2BHochman%26s%3Dbooks%26sr%3D1-1



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 08, 2022
Burning down Ireland’s stately homes
31:02

Professor Terence Dooley, author of Burning the Big House, tells Ellie Cawthorne why so many of Ireland’s grand homes were subjected to arson during the early 20th century, revealing a complex web of disputes over land, protests against imperialism and IRA reprisals.

(Ad) Terence Dooley is the author of Burning the Big House: The Story of the Irish Country House in a Time of War and Revolution (Yale University Press, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fburning-the-big-house%2Fterence-dooley%2F9780300260748



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 07, 2022
Benjamin Franklin: portrait of a revolutionary
39:05
Acclaimed filmmaker Ken Burns tells Elinor Evans about the life and accomplishments of Benjamin Franklin – a man who both loved Britain but became a key figure in American independence, and who was a slave-owner yet later campaigned for abolition. Burns also talks about the challenges and thrills of portraying complex histories on screen, and of finding voices that bring the past to life.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 06, 2022
Oxford: from wild student parties to the shadow of war
33:01

Daisy Dunn tells Spencer Mizen how students at Oxford University – including Evelyn Waugh, Vera Brittain and John Betjeman – were buffeted by world events in the 1920s and 30s.

(Ad) Daisy Dunn is the author of Not Far From Brideshead: Oxford Between the Wars (Orion Publishing, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones: http://www.awin1.com/cread.php?awinmid=4746&awinaffid=489797&p=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fnot-far-from-brideshead%2Fdaisy-dunn%2F9781474615570&clickref=historyextra-social-histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 05, 2022
Why the Ukraine conflict isn’t a new Cold War
30:52
International history expert Professor Kristina Spohr talks to Matt Elton about the historical parallels of the current conflict in Ukraine – and why we shouldn’t see it as a new Cold War.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 04, 2022
Scottish clans: everything you wanted to know
55:08
What do we mean by the word ‘clan’? Were these Scottish kinship groups more often allies or enemies? And did they really wear tartan? Speaking with Emily Briffett, Professor Murray Pittock tackles popular search queries and listener questions about Scottish clans.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 03, 2022
What one duel can tell us about Jacobean England
50:17

Lloyd Bowen shares the story of one remarkable 1601 duel with Elinor Evans. He reveals what the wealth of evidence around a single dispute can tell us about the codes of honour that governed elite violence in early modern England.

(Ad) Lloyd Bowen is the author Anatomy of a Duel in Jacobean England: Gentry Honour, Violence and the Law (Boydell & Brewer, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fanatomy-of-a-duel-in-jacobean-england%2Flloyd-bowen%2F9781783276097



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Apr 01, 2022
Digging up Roman London
50:31

Archaeologist Dominic Perring discusses what we know about London’s Roman past with Emily Briffett, examining the city’s key turning points and exploring how life there was affected by fire, plague and warfare. Using archaeological and historical records, he ties London’s story into the wider history of the Roman empire.

(Ad) Dominic Perring is the author of London in the Roman World (Oxford University Press, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Flondon-in-the-roman-world%2Fdominic-perring%2F9780198789000



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 31, 2022
Life in Cromwell’s Britain
38:23

Anna Keay introduces Spencer Mizen to the dramatic decade between the execution of Charles I in 1649 and the restoration of the monarchy in 1660. She reveals what life was like under Oliver Cromwell, as Britain embarked on its experiment with republicanism.

(Ad) Anna Keay is the author of The Restless Republic: Britain without a Crown (William Collins, 2022). Buy it now on Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Interregnum-Peoples-Republic-Anna-Keay/dp/0008282021/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 30, 2022
1942: Churchill’s darkest hour
42:20

Historian Taylor Downing chronicles the events of the year 1942, which he contends was Britain’s lowest moment in the Second World War. Speaking to Rob Attar, he revisits some of the disasters that befell the country that year and highlights the crucial victory that transformed Churchill’s fortunes.

(Ad) Taylor Downing is the author of 1942: Britain at the Brink (Little Brown, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-stasi-poetry-circle%2Fphilip-oltermann%2F9780571331192



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 29, 2022
Rapa Nui’s island mysteries
30:18
Archaeologist Cat Jarman delves into the mysteries and debates surrounding the history of Rapa Nui, also known as Easter Island. In conversation with Rob Attar, she explores the creation of the astonishing moai monuments and explains the seemingly dramatic collapse of the island’s population.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 28, 2022
The history of beauty: everything you wanted to know
46:23
Health and beauty historian Lucy Jane Santos answers listener questions and popular online search queries about beauty throughout the ages. From early cosmetics apparently made for gladiators to whether Georgian women really did use mouse fur for false eyebrows, this whistle-stop tour highlights some of the past’s strangest – and most dangerous – beauty practices.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 27, 2022
Bridgerton: behind the scenes of season 2
31:17
Hannah Greig, a historical consultant to the hit series Bridgerton, takes us behind the scenes of season two. She speaks to Elinor Evans about the real history on screen, from Regency etiquette to the gentlemen’s clubs that gained popularity in the era.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 25, 2022
Suleyman the Magnificent: the 16th-century’s most powerful ruler?
48:43

When Suleyman the Magnificent became Sultan of the Ottoman empire in 1520, he was proclaimed the world’s most powerful man, who could use his armies to smite Christendom. But behind the facade, scheming favourites pulled the strings and worked tirelessly to fulfil their own endless ambitions. Rhiannon Davies spoke to Christopher de Bellaigue to uncover the truth about Suleyman’s fascinating reign.

(Ad) Christopher de Bellaigue is the author of The Lion House: The Coming of A King (Vintage, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-lion-house%2Fchristopher-de-bellaigue%2F9781847922397



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 24, 2022
Our Winston Churchill obsession
30:40

Winston Churchill looms large in the modern imagination. Everyone from Fidel Castro to George W Bush have cited him as an exemplar in times of crisis. Historian Geoffrey Wheatcroft talks to Spencer Mizen about the world’s fixation with the wartime leader, arguing that this obsession is neither healthy, nor necessarily merited.

(Ad) Geoffrey Wheatcroft is the author of Churchill’s Shadow: An Astonishing Life and a Dangerous Legacy (Vintage, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fchurchills-shadow%2Fgeoffrey-wheatcroft%2F9781847925732



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 23, 2022
Naked statues, naughty gods & bad wine
42:43

Classicist and author Garrett Ryan talks to Kev Lochun about some of the biggest and most commonly asked questions surrounding ancient Greece and Rome. Why are all the statues naked? Who was the biggest drinker in the classical world? And why didn’t anyone go looking for the Greek gods on Olympus – or did they?

(Ad) Garrett Ryan is the author of Naked Statues, Fat Gladiators, and War Elephants (Prometheus, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Naked-Statues-Fat-Gladiators-Elephants/dp/1633887022/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 22, 2022
The BBC at 100: the corporation at war
41:12

In the third episode of our monthly series marking the centenary of the BBC, media historian David Hendy tells Matt Elton how the BBC became an important part of the national fabric during the Second World War – and how the conflict changed the organisation forever.

(Ad) David Hendy is the author of The BBC: A People’s History (Profile Books, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-bbc%2Fdavid-hendy%2F%2F9781781255254%3Fawaid%3D3787%26utm_source%3Dredbrain%26utm_medium%3Dshopping%26utm_campaign%3Dcss%26gclid%3DCj0KCQiAip-PBhDVARIsAPP2xc2PCYX_d_582jtZj6du6A-9dNO8d8xXvVkPhP_Jmh1FuEm7Mui3xSYaAvwiEALw_wcB



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 21, 2022
The Napoleonic Wars: everything you wanted to know
1:03:22
Dr Mike Rapport tackles popular search queries and listener questions about the 19th-century conflicts that tore Europe apart and triggered seismic political changes around the globe. He speaks to Jon Bauckham about the causes of the wars, the pivotal battles of Trafalgar and Waterloo, and the life of Napoleon Bonaparte himself.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 20, 2022
Prohibition: busting myths about the ban on booze
33:47

Mark Lawrence Schrad speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about his book Smashing the Liquor Machine, which busts commonly held myths about prohibition, revealing how campaigns to ban alcohol weren’t just led by puritanical evangelicals in the US, but were also backed by progressive campaigners across the globe.

(Ad) Mark Lawrence Schrad is the author of Smashing the Liquor Machine: A Global History (Oxford University Press, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Smashing-Liquor-Machine-History-Prohibition/dp/0190841575/ref=asc_df_0190841575/?tag=googshopuk-21&linkCode=df0&hvadid=535049525184&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=12530786669099962417&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=1006715&hvtargid=pla-995956505473&psc=1&th=1&psc=1&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 18, 2022
Stitching together the history of fabric
33:53

The history of fabric is interwoven with the story of humanity, from the sackcloth shirts that tore open the skin of pious medieval saints to cotton’s connections to colonisation and the Industrial Revolution. Rhiannon Davies spoke to Victoria Finlay to unravel these complex stories.

(Ad) Victoria Finlay is the author of Fabric: The Hidden History of the Material World (Profile Books, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Fabric-Hidden-History-Material-World/dp/178125706X/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 17, 2022
Carrot conspiracies & digging for victory: feeding Britain in WW2
28:44
Professor John Martin speaks to Emily Briffett about Britain’s battle against starvation during the Second World War. From the invention of familiar myths about bread crusts and carrots, to the Dig for Victory and Ploughing Up campaigns, he examines the food shortages the government faced and the agricultural mission to ensure Britons had enough to put on the table.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 16, 2022
​​Children of the Norman Conquest
33:19

Dr Eleanor Parker, author of Conquered: The Last Children of Anglo-Saxon England, talks to David Musgrove about the young people whose lives were upended by the momentous change of circumstances brought about by the Norman Conquest of 1066. She reveals how exploring their stories can offer a fresh approach to studying the Normans.

(Ad) Eleanor Parker is the author of Conquered: The Last Children of Anglo-Saxon England (Bloomsbury, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Conquered-Parker-Eleanor/dp/1788314506/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 15, 2022
Britain’s WW2 island internment camp
46:52

During the Second World War, the British government imprisoned thousands of German and Austrian-born residents – many of them refugees from Nazi oppression – in makeshift internment camps on the Isle of Man. Acclaimed journalist Simon Parkin speaks to Jon Bauckham about the history of Hutchinson camp, which became home to a vibrant intellectual and artistic community.

(Ad) Simon Parkin is the author of The Island of Extraordinary Captives: A True Story of an Artist, a Spy and a Wartime Scandal (Sceptre, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-island-of-extraordinary-captives%2Fsimon-parkin%2F9781529347227



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 14, 2022
Gladiators: everything you wanted to know
55:58
Who became a gladiator? Were they really the superstars of their day? And was giving a thumbs down for a death sentence a real thing? In this Everything you wanted to know episode, Emily Briffett speaks with Alison Futrell to answers your top questions about ancient Rome’s arena fighters.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 13, 2022
Fredegund and Brunhild: a tale of two queens
36:05

Shelley Puhak delves into the lives of queens Fredegund and Brunhild, famed for their bitter and bloody rivalry which wracked the Frankish empire in the latter sixth century. Speaking with Emily Briffett, she reveals how their stories were suppressed, overlooked and used as political propaganda by subsequent rulers, and considers how they should be seen today.

(Ad) Shelley Puhak is the author of The Dark Queens: A Gripping Tale of Power, Ambition and Murderous Rivalry in Early Medieval France (Apollo, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Dark-Queens-Bloody-Rivalry-Medieval/dp/180110915X/ref=asc_df_180110915X/?tag=googshopuk-21&linkCode=df0&hvadid=570409167989&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=17412272789854525338&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=1006715&hvtargid=pla-1570399930681&psc=1&th=1&psc=1&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 11, 2022
Eugenics: a toxic history
36:47

Adam Rutherford discusses the dark – and often surprising – history of the eugenics movement

Geneticist Adam Rutherford speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about the dark, and often surprising, history of the eugenics movement, from ‘best baby’ fairs and population control to the Nazi ‘euthanasia’ programme. He discusses the ideas behind the ideology, and how its implementation has had devastating impacts.

(Ad) Adam Rutherford is the author of Control: The Dark History and Troubling Present of Eugenics (Orion, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fcontrol%2Fadam-rutherford%2F9781474622387



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 10, 2022
​​Gardens and the scientific revolution
34:46

Clare Hickman explores how gardens were used as places of scientific experimentation in the 18th and 19th centuries

During the scientific revolution of the 18th and 19th centuries, gardens were not only used for leisure and pleasure. Clare Hickman explains to Dave Musgrove how they also became places of scientific experimentation.

(Ad) Clare Hickman is the author of The Doctor’s Garden: Medicine, Science and Horticulture in Britain (Yale University Press, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Doctors-Garden-Medicine-Science-Horticulture/dp/0300236107/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 09, 2022
Periods, fertility & childbirth: a pre-modern history
36:50
Mary Fissell talks to Ellie Cawthorne about women’s reproductive health in early modern Europe and America. She discusses how women dealt with their periods, theories about fertility, ideas about the female body and the childbirth process.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 08, 2022
Radical women
30:07

Nan Sloane speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about her new book Uncontrollable Women, which charts the stories of now largely forgotten female activists who were involved in radical and reform movements between 1789 and 1832.

(Ad) Nan Sloane is the author of Uncontrollable Women: Radicals, Reformers and Revolutionaries (Bloomsbury, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Funcontrollable-women%2Fnan-sloane%2F9781838606633



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 07, 2022
The Franks: everything you wanted to know
46:26
Dr Christian Cooijmans answers listener questions on the medieval world of the Franks. Speaking to David Musgrove, he discusses long-lasting Frankish dynasties, renowned rulers and the Franks’ connections with the wider world.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 06, 2022
How museums are shaping the future
27:59
Neil MacGregor talks to Matt Elton about his new BBC Radio 4 series, The Museums that Make Us, and the ways in which museums around the UK are adapting to a changing society – and shaping the future.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 04, 2022
Ukraine: the WW2 roots of today's conflict
25:01

Keith Lowe talks to Matt Elton about the ways in which today’s conflict between Russia and Ukraine can be traced back to the Second World War and decisions made in the years that followed.

Keith will be giving a five-part masterclass series on the aftermath of the Second World War beginning on 4 March – find out more at historyextra.com/masterclass.



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 03, 2022
Old English: a quick guide
35:58

Hana Videen explores the Old English language and reveals what it can tell us about daily life at the time it was spoken

The medieval language of Old English is full of linguistic gems. Speaking to David Musgrove, Dr Hana Videen opens up this treasure chest of words to reveal what the language can tell us about daily life at the time it was spoken.

(Ad) Hana Videen is the author of The Wordhord: Daily Life in Old English (Profile Books, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Wordhord-Daily-Life-Old-English/dp/1788166108/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-Histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 02, 2022
Witch hunters: cynical persecutors or misguided zealots?
30:28
Marion Gibson discusses the motivations and methods of “witch finders” who sought out supernatural wrongdoing in Stuart Britain. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, she discusses why people became witch hunters and explores the techniques they used to extract confessions, from strip-searching and sleep deprivation to ‘swimming’.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Mar 01, 2022
Fascism in Britain
39:43

Nigel Copsey discusses the British Union of Fascists and its leader, Oswald Mosley

Nigel Copsey speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about the British Union of Fascists, which gained support in the 1930s, and its leader Oswald Mosley. They also discuss the party’s foundation, ideology and connections to the fascist regimes of Italy and Germany.



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 28, 2022
The American Revolutionary War: everything you wanted to know
1:00:05
Benjamin Carp tackles listener questions and popular search queries on the conflict that saw colonists in North America rise up and declare independence from the British. He speaks to Elinor Evans about the causes of the war, key battles, and how the revolution is mythologised today.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 27, 2022
The BBC at 100: establishment values in the 1930s
36:28

In the second instalment of our new monthly series marking the centenary of the BBC, media historian David Hendy speaks to Matt Elton about the ways in which the corporation expanded and evolved throughout the 1930s to become part of the British establishment.

(Ad) David Hendy is the author of The BBC: A People’s History (Profile Books, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-bbc%2Fdavid-hendy%2F%2F9781781255254%3Fawaid%3D3787%26utm_source%3Dredbrain%26utm_medium%3Dshopping%26utm_campaign%3Dcss%26gclid%3DCj0KCQiAip-PBhDVARIsAPP2xc2PCYX_d_582jtZj6du6A-9dNO8d8xXvVkPhP_Jmh1FuEm7Mui3xSYaAvwiEALw_wcB



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 26, 2022
Vikings: Valhalla’s real inspirations
31:47

Screenwriter Jeb Stuart discusses the real history that inspired his new Netflix show Vikings: Valhalla

 

Screenwriter Jeb Stuart speaks to Kev Lochun about his new Netflix show Vikings: Valhalla, the successor to the hugely popular series Vikings. They discuss the real historical characters being brought to life through the series, the enduring popularity of the Vikings, and where the show could take viewers after season one.



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 25, 2022
Nixon in China: the trip that changed the Cold War
35:02
Fifty years ago this month, US president Richard Nixon embarked on a trip to China – a visit that marked a key moment in the thawing of relations between the two nations. Rana Mitter talks to Matt Elton about the 1972 visit, and how it changed the course of the Cold War.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 23, 2022
In defence of Neville Chamberlain
41:16

Walter Reid tells Spencer Mizen that, far from going down in history as the bloodless author of appeasement, Neville Chamberlain should be remembered as a radical politician who saw through Hitler’s lies.

(Ad) Walter Reid is the author of Neville Chamberlain: The Passionate Radical (Birlinn, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Neville-Chamberlain-Passionate-Walter-Reid/dp/1780276745/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 22, 2022
Spies in show business
34:49

Professor Christopher Andrew talks to Elinor Evans about his book Stars and Spies, co-written with Julius Green. He reveals the many historical links between spying and the entertainment industry that for centuries have helped intelligence operatives to hide in plain sight.

(Ad) Christopher Andrew and Julius Green are the authors of Stars and Spies: The Story of Intelligence Operations and the Entertainment Industry (Bodley Head, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fstars-and-spies%2Fchristopher-andrew%2Fjulius-green%2F9781847925282



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 21, 2022
Stonehenge: everything you wanted to know (part two)
36:44

In the second episode of this two-part special on Stonehenge, archaeologist and author Mike Pitts answers more listener questions on the most famous prehistoric monument in Britain. Speaking to David Musgrove, he discusses Stonehenge’s relationship with other prehistoric sites, its long legacy, and why we call it “Stonehenge”.

(Ad) Mike Pitts is the author of How to Build Stonehenge (Thames & Hudson, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-TTClub&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fhow-to-build-stonehenge%2Fmike-pitts%2F%2F9780500024195%3Fawaid%3D3787%26utm_source%3Dredbrain%26utm_medium%3Dshopping%26utm_campaign%3Dcss%26gclid%3DCj0KCQiAnuGNBhCPARIsACbnLzpsBA_shuubuZPKpKG0GYoG5FSn-YLJkUjZS3M0BBv9ZWfutkfZMKsaAt0uEALw_wcB



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 20, 2022
The secret WW2 mission to save Britain’s art collections
40:39

Caroline Shenton tells the story of the colourful cast of curators, museum directors and civil servants who embarked on a top-secret mission to protect Britain’s national art collections during the Second World War. Speaking to Emily Briffett, she explains how these dedicated men and women devised ingenious escape plans and concealed artworks and artefacts in the most unlikely of places in a race against time to save the nation’s heritage.

(Ad) Caroline Shenton is the author of National Treasures: Saving the Nation’s Art in World War II (John Murray Press, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/National-Treasures-Saving-Nations-World/dp/1529387434/?tag=mad06e-21&ascsubtag=madeformums-social-Histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 19, 2022
The Normans: beyond 1066
44:34

Judith Green reveals how there is much more to the Norman story than the events of the 1066 Conquest

We all know the story of the Norman Conquest, when Duke William of Normandy led his troops across the Channel and took the crown of England. However, as Professor Judith Green tells David Musgrove, there is a lot more to the history of the Normans than the events of 1066.

(Ad) Judith Green is the author of The Normans: Power, Conquest and Culture in the 11th Century Europe (Yale University Press, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-Histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FNormans-Conquest-Culture-Century-Europe%2Fdp%2F0300180330



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 18, 2022
British identity in 50 documents
41:48

Dominic Selwood chronicles Britain’s past through a diverse – and sometimes unexpected – selection of historical documents, from birthday invites and Valentine’s Day letters, to musical scores and shipping forecasts. Speaking with Emily Briffett, he explains what these can tell us about British identity past and present.

(Ad) Dominic Selwood is the author of Anatomy of a Nation: A History of British Identity in 50 Documents (Constable, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Anatomy-Nation-British-Identity-Documents/dp/1472131894/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 16, 2022
Medieval masterclass 4: Revolution 1348-1527
59:17
In this fourth and final episode, Dan Jones reveals how the Middle Ages came to a close, starting off with a global pandemic that ripped across the world, devastating populations, reshaping economies and bringing societal change. Speaking to David Musgrove, he also introduces the geniuses of the Renaissance, and the great navigators who struck out in search of new worlds. Lastly, he examines how shifting religious dogma, allied to new communication technology, brought about the Protestant Reformation – an upheaval which brought the curtain down on “the middle age”.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 15, 2022
Shakespearean deaths: swordfights, snakebites & poison
29:25

From poison and fatal snakebites to dying from a broken heart, more than 250 named characters die in Shakespeare’s plays. Speaking with Ellie Cawthorne, Kathryn Harkup guides us through a grisly range of the Bard’s death scenes. She looks at the real history and science behind them, and how they would have been staged in Elizabethan England.

(Ad) Kathryn Harkup is the author of Death By Shakespeare: Snakebites, Stabbings and Broken Hearts (Bloomsbury, 2020). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fdeath-by-shakespeare%2Fkathryn-harkup%2F9781472958228



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 14, 2022
Stonehenge: everything you wanted to know (part one)
42:03

In the first episode of a two-part special, archaeologist Mike Pitts answers listener questions on the most famous prehistoric site in Britain. Speaking to David Musgrove, he discusses how Stonehenge was built – and why.

(Ad) Mike Pitts is the author of How to Build Stonehenge (Thames & Hudson, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-TTClub&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fhow-to-build-stonehenge%2Fmike-pitts%2F%2F9780500024195%3Fawaid%3D3787%26utm_source%3Dredbrain%26utm_medium%3Dshopping%26utm_campaign%3Dcss%26gclid%3DCj0KCQiAnuGNBhCPARIsACbnLzpsBA_shuubuZPKpKG0GYoG5FSn-YLJkUjZS3M0BBv9ZWfutkfZMKsaAt0uEALw_wcB



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 13, 2022
Britain’s only war crimes trial
35:55

Mike Anderson and Neil Hanson discuss the 1999 prosecution of a former Nazi collaborator – Britain’s only war crimes trial

Mike Anderson and Neil Hanson discuss Britain’s only war crimes trial, where a former Nazi collaborator was prosecuted for his involvement in the Holocaust, more than five decades after the events had occurred. In conversation with Rob Attar, they explore this landmark moment and consider the challenges of bringing perpetrators to justice after so much time has elapsed.

(Ad) Mike Anderson and Neil Hanson are the authors of The Ticket Collector from Belarus: An Extraordinary True Story of Britain's Only War Crimes Trial (Simon & Schuster, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B09QPKWCSB/ref=sr_1_3?adgrpid=127410484261&gclid=Cj0KCQiAip-PBhDVARIsAPP2xc36SxkExhIrmGJI5IQNxmArVxKUn7QkCYKVn55fcI7BYQyd6FQFU44aAhZdEALw_wcB&hvadid=566301370973&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=1006715&hvnetw=g&hvqmt=e&hvrand=3753860383860465962&hvtargid=kwd-1562441342634&hydadcr=10836_1789931&keywords=the+ticket+collector+from+belarus&qid=1642609045&sr=8-3&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 12, 2022
Extinct animals of medieval Britain
51:19

From beavers to whales, Lee Raye discusses wildlife found across medieval Britain that has since gone extinct from the region

In conversation with David Musgrove, Lee Raye discusses the animals that lived in medieval Britain but have since gone extinct from the region, from beavers and boars to whales and wolves – plus elusive big cats and birds.



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 11, 2022
Mexico’s ill-fated Austrian emperor
58:35

Edward Shawcross speaks to Elinor Evans about a little-known and disastrous attempt to install a Habsburg archduke, Ferdinand Maximilian, as emperor of Mexico in the mid-19th century, at a time when the US Civil War was raging.

(Ad) Edward Shawcross is the author of The Last Emperor of Mexico: A Disaster in the New World (Faber & Faber, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Last-Emperor-Mexico-Dramatic-Habsburg/dp/1541674197/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 09, 2022
Medieval masterclass 3: Rebirth 1216-1347
1:01:11
Dan Jones charts the rise of the Mongols in the twelfth century – a sharp and hideously brutal episode, in which an eastern empire achieved fleeting domination over half the world, at the cost of millions of lives. Speaking to David Musgrove, he also looks at other emerging powers in the ‘high’ Middle Ages. He introduces merchants who invented extraordinary new ways to make fortunes, scholars who revived the wisdom of the ancients and founded great universities, and architects and engineers who built the cities, cathedrals and castles that still stand 500 years on. 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 08, 2022
Georgian Britain: the highs and lows of a transformative age
55:02

Penelope J Corfield discusses the highs and lows of the Georgian era, from the abolition movement to the gin craze

The long 18th century saw Britain undergo colossal changes, from growing overseas expansion and the transformation of attitudes towards disability, to the sexualisation of popular culture. Penelope J Corfield speaks to Rhiannon Davies about this explosive era of British history.

(Ad) Penelope J Corfield is the author of The Georgians: The Deeds and Misdeeds of 18th Century Britain (Yale University Press, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Georgians-Deeds-Misdeeds-Century-Britain/dp/0300253575/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 07, 2022
Vichy France: everything you wanted to know
1:04:25

Shannon Fogg answers listener questions on the collaborationist regime created following France’s defeat by Nazi Germany

In the latest episode in our series on history’s biggest topics, Professor Shannon Fogg answers listener questions on the collaborationist French regime that was created following the country’s defeat by Nazi Germany. In conversation with Rob Attar, she examines the origins of Vichy France, explores its relationship with Nazi Germany and reveals what life was like for those who lived under Vichy rule.



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 06, 2022
Berlin’s tumultuous history
43:30

Barney White-Spunner discusses the extraordinary, absorbing and often tragic history of Germany’s capital

Barney White-Spunner tells Spencer Mizen why Berlin – a metropolis that was at the centre of the Reformation, the Thirty Years’ War, the Third Reich and the Cold War – has a history like no other city in the world.

(Ad) Barney White-Spunner is the author of Berlin: The Story of a City (Simon & Schuster, 2020). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fberlin%2Fbarney-white-spunner%2F9781471181535



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 05, 2022
Three female civil rights pioneers
31:08
Pamela Roberts discusses her research on Mary Church Terrell, Rosetta Lawson and Josephine Wilson Bruce – three women activists of Washington’s ‘black elite’ who visited Britain in the early 20th century and campaigned on issues including women’s rights, civil rights, temperance and education.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 04, 2022
America’s Cold War culture boom
28:01

From artistic experimentation to an explosion in pop music, Louis Menand speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about American art, culture and ideas between 1945-65. They touch on the Beatles making waves in the US, the rise of counterculture, and how silent compositions and messy canvases redefined the boundaries of art.

(Ad) Louis Menand is the author of The Free World: Art and Thought in the Cold War (HarperCollins, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-Histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-free-world%2Flouis-menand%2F9780007126873



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 02, 2022
Medieval masterclass 2: Domination 750-1215
1:02:48
Dan Jones and David Musgrove delve into the age of the Franks, who revived a Christian, pseudo-Roman empire in the west. They trace the rise of the dynasties who carved Europe into Christian royal realms and look at the new forms of cultural ‘soft’ power that emerged around the turn of the first millennium. This episode also explores how monks and knights came to play such an important role in western society during the Middle Ages – and how the fusion of their two mindsets gave birth to the crusades. 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Feb 01, 2022
Margery Kempe: medieval mystic
53:19

Anthony Bale discusses the sensational life of medieval mystic Margery Kempe, charting a story of unusual visions, spiritual revelations, turbulent emotions and religious controversies. Speaking with Emily Briffett, he explores how her autobiography, The Book of Margery Kempe, has enriched our understanding of the early 15th century.




See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 31, 2022
Greek myths: everything you wanted to know
59:46
In the latest episode in our series on history’s biggest topics, classicist Natalie Haynes tackles listener questions on Greek myths. Speaking to Rachel Dinning, she examines the tales of popular figures including Hercules and Aphrodite, and explores how these ancient stories have changed and evolved across history.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 30, 2022
Bloody Sunday: 50 years on
38:10
To mark the 50th anniversary of Bloody Sunday, Diarmaid Ferriter speaks about the event and its tangled legacy today To mark the 50th anniversary of Bloody Sunday, historian Diarmaid Ferriter speaks to Rhiannon Davies about the events of 30 January 1972 and their tangled legacy for the people and politics of Northern Ireland today.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 29, 2022
The BBC at 100: audio adventures in the 1920s
41:06

In the first episode of our new monthly series marking the centenary of the BBC, media historian David Hendy speaks to Matt Elton about the institution’s founding in the 1920s – a decade of innovation and ingenuity.

(Ad) David Hendy is the author of The BBC: A People’s History (Profile Books, 2022). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-bbc%2Fdavid-hendy%2F%2F9781781255254%3Fawaid%3D3787%26utm_source%3Dredbrain%26utm_medium%3Dshopping%26utm_campaign%3Dcss%26gclid%3DCj0KCQiAip-PBhDVARIsAPP2xc2PCYX_d_582jtZj6du6A-9dNO8d8xXvVkPhP_Jmh1FuEm7Mui3xSYaAvwiEALw_wcB



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 28, 2022
Elitism in cricket: a history
33:48

Duncan Stone argues that classism and racism have held back England’s summer sport for decades


Duncan Stone talks to Spencer Mizen about cricket’s history of elitism – a story that, he contends, has long seen the rich and powerful dominate the sport’s evolution and image.


(Ad) Duncan Stone is the author of Different Class: The Untold Story of English Cricket (Repeater, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon: 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Different-Class-Untold-English-Cricket/dp/1913462803/ref=asc_df_1913462803/?tag=googshopuk-21&linkCode=df0&hvadid=499348463277&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=9158678485622880103&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=1006476&hvtargid=pla-1294513684256&psc=1&th=1&psc=1&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-histboty

 



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 26, 2022
Medieval masterclass 1: Imperium 410-750
59:18
Dan Jones takes listeners on a journey through early medieval Europe, beginning with the Roman empire in a state of collapse, rocked by a changing climate and mass migration. He speaks to David Musgrove about the superpowers that emerged in Rome’s wake: the so-called “barbarian” realms that laid the foundations for the European kingdoms, the state of Byzantium and the first Islamic empires.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 25, 2022
Cold war mind games
36:45

Martin Sixsmith speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about his book The War of Nerves, which explores the role of psychology in the Cold War, from propaganda and paranoia to a divided mindset and unpredictable decisions made by unstable leaders.

(Ad) Martin Sixsmith is the author of The War of Nerves: Inside the Cold War Mind (Profile Books, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-war-of-nerves%2Fmartin-sixsmith%2F9781781259122



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 24, 2022
America’s “Roaring Twenties”: everything you wanted to know
1:05:02
Were the twenties really “roaring”? If so, who actually experienced the best of the era? And were the parties really as debauched as popular culture suggests? Speaking with Emily Briffett, historian Sarah Churchwell answers listener questions about life in the United States during the 1920s.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 23, 2022
Escaping slavery in the American South
34:00
How can we reconstruct the experiences of enslaved people? Historian Shaun Wallace speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about his work on the Fugitive Slave Database, which uses newspaper adverts for fugitive enslaved people from the American South to reconstruct the stories of those who escaped from slavery.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 22, 2022
Munich: the real history behind the new film
22:01
Author Robert Harris speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about Munich: The Edge of War, the new Netflix film adapted from his 2017 historical novel Munich. They discuss the real history behind the 1938 Munich conference, the challenges of reassessing Neville Chamberlain, and what it’s like seeing your book adapted for the screen.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 21, 2022
The Gothic: from Dracula to The Shining
41:11

Roger Luckhurst speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about how the idea of the Gothic has evolved and mutated over time, from medieval-inspired architecture and 19th-century vampire fiction to politicised horror films. He also reveals how the genre has been used as a vehicle to explore society’s anxieties over time, from sex and gender to race and colonialism. 


(Ad) Roger Luckhurst is the author of Gothic: An Illustrated History (Thames & Hudson, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fgothic%2Froger-luckhurst%2F9780500252512



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 19, 2022
Women of the Rothschild dynasty
33:37

Historian Natalie Livingstone chronicles the unexplored lives of the women who shaped the famous Rothschild banking dynasty. She speaks to Elinor Evans about how – though often excluded in a patriarchal society – they forged their own paths, from influential hostesses to pioneering scientists.

(Ad) Natalie Livingstone is the author of The Women of Rothschild: The Untold Story of the World's Most Famous Dynasty (John Murray, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Women-Rothschild-Untold-Worlds-Dynasty/dp/1529366712#:~:text=From%20the%20East%20End%20of,dawn%20of%20the%20nineteenth%20century/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-Histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 18, 2022
Queen Victoria’s spy network
43:41

Richard J Aldrich and Rory Cormac discuss Queen Victoria’s love of espionage and her network of royal intelligence agents

 

Historians Richard J Aldrich and Rory Cormac speak to Emma Slattery Williams about their book The Secret Royals, which explores the connections between espionage and the British monarchy, revealing how Queen Victoria utilised a large covert network of international spies.

 

(Ad) Richard J Aldrich and Rory Cormac are the authors of The Secret Royals: Spying and the Crown, from Victoria to Diana (Atlantic Books, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-secret-royals%2Frichard-aldrich%2Frory-cormac%2F9781786499127



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 17, 2022
Mao’s Cultural Revolution: everything you wanted to know
44:06
In the latest episode in our series on history’s biggest topics, Professor Rana Mitter answers your questions about one of the defining events of modern Chinese history. Speaking to Rob Attar, he explores the role of Chairman Mao in the Cultural Revolution, its impact on China’s population and its legacy today.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 16, 2022
How the Beatles were in tune with 60s Britain
38:46

Dominic Sandbrook explains how the Beatles reflected 1960s Britain, from the globalisation of pop culture to a fascination with mysticism 

 

The 1960s was a time of transformation, as the grey of postwar Britain gave way to a technicolour youth culture, with screaming teenage fans, an outpouring of merchandise and a deep obsession with pop music. Dominic Sandbrook speaks to Rhiannon Davies about how the Beatles provided the soundtrack to a rapidly changing society.   



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 15, 2022
Shining new light on medieval Europe
46:46

Matthew Gabriele and David M Perry speak to David Musgrove about their book The Bright Ages, which tackles the big themes of the Middle Ages and challenges some widely held views about the history of medieval Europe.


(Ad) Matthew Gabriele and David M Perry are the authors of 

The Bright Ages: A New History of Medieval Europe (HarperCollins, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-Histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-bright-ages%2Fmatthew-gabriele%2Fdavid-m-perry%2F9780062980892



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 14, 2022
A murder mystery in 19th-century Dublin
32:13

Thomas Morris speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about his book The Dublin Railway Murder, which reconstructs a strange historical cold case from 1856, revolving around a body discovered in a railway station office that was locked from the inside. 


(Ad) Thomas Morris is the author of The Dublin Railway Murder: The Sensational True Story of a Victorian Murder Mystery (Harvill Secker, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Dublin-Railway-Murder-Thomas-Morris/dp/1787302393/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-Histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 12, 2022
Trading and crusading in the Middle Ages
29:24
Mike Carr speaks to David Musgrove about Muslim-Christian relations in the medieval era, revealing how Papal-sanctioned trade was going on despite the background of the Crusades.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 11, 2022
The Demerara slave uprising
42:18

Thomas Harding discusses a little-known uprising by enslaved people in the British colony of Demerara in 1823

Thomas Harding speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about his new book, White Debt, which recounts the little-known uprising by enslaved people in the British colony of Demerara in 1823, as told through the experiences of four eyewitnesses.



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 10, 2022
The Age of Sail: everything you wanted to know
50:03

Naval historian Kate Jamieson tackles listener questions on the Age of Sail, when sailing ships dominated global trade and warfare

In the latest episode in our series on history’s biggest topics, naval historian Kate Jamieson tackles listener questions on the Age of Sail. Speaking to Kev Lochun, she covers subjects ranging from ghost ships and sea monsters to the rigours of life at sea.



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 09, 2022
Ancient Greek scientific thinking
16:59
Curator Jane Desborough talks to Ellie Cawthorne about a new Science Museum exhibition, Ancient Greeks: Science and Wisdom, which explores the ways in which Greek thinkers sought to understand the world around them – from the oceans and animals, to the cosmos and the human body.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 08, 2022
Hells, heavens and afterworlds: a traveller’s guide
29:35

Edward Brooke-Hitching explores the many heavens, hells and lands of the dead from civilisations across global history

Edward Brooke-Hitching speaks to Charlotte Hodgman about his latest book, The Devil's Atlas: An Explorer's Guide to Heavens, Hells and Afterworlds, exploring visions of the afterlife as imagined throughout history by cultures and religions around the world.



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 07, 2022
Women who served in WW2
58:56

In commemoration of the 80th anniversary of conscription for women, historian Tessa Dunlop has written a new book capturing the remarkable lives of the last surviving women who served in Britain’s armed forces during the Second World War. Speaking to Emma Slattery Williams, Tessa draws on individual stories to paint a picture of what it was like to be young, female and at war.

(Ad) Tessa Dunlop is the author of Army Girls: The secrets and stories of military service from the final few women who fought in World War II (Headline, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Farmy-girls%2Ftessa-dunlop%2F9781472282088



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 05, 2022
A forgotten witch hunt in New England
0
Malcolm Gaskill speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about his book The Ruin of All Witches, which chronicles a little-known 1651 witchcraft case from Springfield, Massachusetts, revealing how an irascible brickmaker and his wife found themselves accused of diabolical activity. (Ad) Malcolm Gaskill is the author of The Ruin of All Witches: Life and Death in the New World (Allen Lane, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:https://www.amazon.co.uk/Ruin-All-Witches-Death-World/dp/0241413389/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 04, 2022
Goods & globalisation: merchants in Tudor & Stuart England
32:55
Between 1550 and 1650, English trade flourished as thousands of merchants sought out trading ventures across the globe. In conversation with Emily Briffett, Edmond Smith tracks the experiences of England’s merchants and explores how their efforts as a community shaped England’s relationship with the rest of the world.(Ad) Edmond Smith is the author of Merchants: The Community that Shaped England's Trade and Empire, 1550-1650 (Yale University Press, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:https://www.amazon.co.uk/Merchants-Community-Shaped-Englands-1550-1650/dp/0300257953/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 03, 2022
The Jacobites: everything you wanted to know
42:51
Murray Pittock answers listener questions about the Jacobites, and their attempts to restore the Stuart dynasty to the throne. Speaking to Emma Slattery Williams, he discusses who the Jacobites were, why their risings failed, and how realistic the hit show Outlander is in its portrayal of the Jacobite cause.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 02, 2022
History’s greatest mysteries: what caused the medieval ‘dancing plague’?
21:38
On several occasions from the 14th to 16th centuries, hundreds of people in central Europe began moving their bodies in a strange uncontrollable fashion – often for days on end. What was behind this unusual behaviour? In the final episode of this series of History’s Greatest Mysteries, medieval historian Helen Carr describes the events of the ‘dancing plagues’ and considers the various explanations that have been put forward so far. 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jan 01, 2022
History’s greatest mysteries: why did Mao’s chosen successor flee China?
37:22
Fifty years ago, in September 1971, Lin Biao boarded a flight out of the country, only to crash in the Mongolian desert shortly afterwards. Was this the result of an aborted coup on Lin’s part? And where exactly was his plane heading? In the latest in our series on history’s biggest conundrums, historian Rana Mitter answers these questions and more about the mysterious “Lin Biao incident”.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 31, 2021
History’s greatest mysteries: was the Trojan War fact or fiction?
28:16
Thanks largely to Homer’s Iliad, the Trojan War is one of the most famous events in Greek mythology. But how much – if any – of the legend is actually true? In the latest in our series on history’s biggest conundrums, the author and classicist Daisy Dunn revisits the literary and archaeological sources to seek out evidence for the clash between the Greeks and the city of Troy.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 29, 2021
History’s greatest mysteries: what happened to the Roman Ninth Legion?
32:33
The Ninth Legion of the Roman army was last recorded in York in around AD 107. After that it simply vanished from history. To this day no-one knows what caused the destruction of this elite army unit, although many theories have been put forward. As we continue our series on history’s most puzzling events, Miles Russell explores the various possibilities and explains what he think is the most likely reason for the legion’s disappearance.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 28, 2021
History’s greatest mysteries: Agatha Christie disappears
30:34
In December 1926, crime writer Agatha Christie left her home and vanished without a trace. When she was discovered 11 days later, Christie claimed to have no memory of what had happened. As part of our series on history’s greatest mysteries, Dominic Sandbrook discusses the case that baffled the British public and triggered one of the largest manhunts ever mounted.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 27, 2021
The state of history in 2021
32:36
Anna Whitelock looks back on some key moments and trends that made the historical headlines in 2021. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, she covers topics including the “history wars”, cuts to university history courses and the best books published this year.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 26, 2021
Christmas feasts: WW2 rationing & postwar absurdity
27:03
Annie Gray looks back on festive food in the 20th century – from suspect dishes made under WW2 rationing to joyful postwar creations pickled in aspic and coated in piped green mayonnaise. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, for the final episode in our mini-series on Christmas food through history, she also touches on the best wartime cake recipes, Fanny Craddock, and putting bananas in Christmas pudding. (Ad) Annie Gray is the author of At Christmas We Feast: Festive Food through the Ages (Profile Books, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fat-christmas-we-feast%2Fannie-gray%2F9781788168199%23%3A~%3Atext%3DAt%20Christmas%20We%20Feast%3A%20Festive%20Food%20Through%20the%20Ages%20(Hardback)%26text%3D'A%20joy%20to%20immerse%20oneself%2Ctrimmings%2C%20pudding%20and%20brandy%20butter.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 24, 2021
Thomas Kendrick: MI6 spymaster who helped win WW2
37:29

Helen Fry speaks to Jon Bauckham about the remarkable life and career of Thomas Kendrick, an elusive MI6 intelligence officer who helped thousands of Jews escape Nazi-controlled Austria, before going on to mastermind the biggest Allied bugging operation of the Second World War.

(Ad) Helen Fry is the author of Spymaster: The Man Who Saved MI6 (Yale University Press, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Spymaster-Man-Who-Saved-MI6/dp/0300255950/ref=asc_df_0300255950/?tag=googshopuk-21&linkCode=df0&hvadid=499174488919&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=13204997830046097313&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=1006715&hvtargid=pla-1244937888688&psc=1&th=1&psc=1&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-Histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 22, 2021
Pearl Harbor episode 5: Chaos unleashed
37:02
In the final episode in our new series on the raid on Pearl Harbor, Ellie Cawthorne speaks to Robert Lyman about the attack’s immediate aftermath and long term legacy, charting the chaos the Japanese offensive unleashed and tracing events through to the present day.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 21, 2021
The Stuart princess who could have deposed Charles I
35:32

Elizabeth Stuart was beloved by Protestants and Catholics, English and Scots alike. Many clamoured for her to replace her brother, Charles I, on the throne, and one admirer even commissioned a treasonous painting of her wearing the Tudor crown. Nadine Akkerman speaks to Rhiannon Davies about this fascinating and now largely forgotten figure.

(Ad) Nadine Akkerman is the author of Elizabeth Stuart, Queen of Hearts (Oxford University Press, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Elizabeth-Stuart-Hearts-Nadine-Akkerman/dp/0199668302/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-Histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 20, 2021
Fascism: everything you wanted to know
37:44

Richard Bosworth answers listener questions on the authoritarian ideology that emerged in Italy a century ago

How was Mussolini able to seize control in Italy a century ago? What differentiated Italian Fascism from Nazism? And is the term “fascist” bandied around too much today? In the latest in our series answering your questions on history’s biggest subjects, Richard Bosworth speaks to Spencer Mizen about the history of the rightwing ideology.



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 19, 2021
Yugoslavia: the beginning of the end
1:05:31
Dejan Djokic reflects on the brief 1991 war that saw Slovenia secure independence and helped set in motion the bloody collapse of Yugoslavia. In conversation with Rob Attar, he explores the events both as a historian and through his own memories of being a Yugoslav conscript based in Slovenia at the time.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 18, 2021
Christmas feasts: Victorian merrymaking
0
From Twelfth cakes to creepy greetings cards and booze-soaked desserts, Annie Gray guides us through festive feasting in the Victorian era. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, for the third episode in our mini-series on Christmas food through history, she also touches on turkey, trifle and whether the Victorians really did “invent Christmas”. (Ad) Annie Gray is the author of At Christmas We Feast: Festive Food through the Ages (Profile Books, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fat-christmas-we-feast%2Fannie-gray%2F9781788168199%23%3A~%3Atext%3DAt%20Christmas%20We%20Feast%3A%20Festive%20Food%20Through%20the%20Ages%20(Hardback)%26text%3D'A%20joy%20to%20immerse%20oneself%2Ctrimmings%2C%20pudding%20and%20brandy%20butter.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 17, 2021
Triumph against the odds: the 1821 Greek Revolution
34:44

Historian Mark Mazower explains how the Greeks secured an unlikely victory against the Ottoman empire in their 1820s fight for freedom. Speaking to Rob Attar, he also reveals how the dramatic events of two centuries ago would have a profound impact on the future of the European continent.


(Ad) Mark Mazower is the author of The Greek Revolution: 1821 and the Making of Modern Europe (Allen Lane, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Greek-Revolution-Making-Modern-Europe-ebook/dp/B08W1TZMG9/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-Histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 15, 2021
Pearl Harbor episode 4: The day of the attack
32:01
In the latest episode in our new series on the raid on Pearl Harbor, Ellie Cawthorne and Gavin Mortimer chart how the attack unfolded on 7 December 1941, sharing the stories and eyewitness accounts of those involved, from Japanese pilots and US navy personnel to army nurses and top commanders.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 14, 2021
England’s last witches
49:38

John Callow discusses the tragic case of the Bideford witches, the last women in England to be executed for the crime of witchcraft


In 1682, three women – Temperance Lloyd, Susannah Edwards and Mary Trembles – became the last in England to be hanged for the crime of witchcraft. John Callow speaks to Kev Lochun about how circumstance and ill-fortune led the so-called “Bideford witches” to the gallows, and how history has rehabilitated them.


(Ad) John Callow is the author of The Last Witches of England: A Tragedy of Sorcery and Superstition (Bloomsbury, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-Histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-last-witches-of-england%2Fjohn-callow%2F9781788314398



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 13, 2021
Hadrian’s Wall: everything you wanted to know
1:01:04
As we approach the 1900th anniversary of the building of Hadrian’s Wall, Rob Collins answers listener questions on Britain’s most famous Roman fortification. Speaking to David Musgrove, he tackles the big issues about the boundary’s creation and purpose, as well as looking at everyday life on the wall. 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 12, 2021
Animals in space: from Laika to jellyfish & tortoises
46:13

Stephen Walker tells Rhiannon Davies about the history of animals in space, from fruit flies and monkeys to Laika the Soviet space dog 


Thousands of animals paved the way for human space travel. But for many of them, it was an incredibly painful – or deadly – experience. Stephen Walker tells Rhiannon Davies about this overlooked chapter of space exploration, from Soviet space dogs strapped to rockets and chimpanzees sent up by NASA, to two tortoises who orbited the moon. 


(Ad) Stephen Walker is the author of Beyond: The Astonishing Story of the First Human to Leave Our Planet and Journey into Space(HarperCollins, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-Histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fbeyond%2Fstephen-walker%2F9780008372507



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 11, 2021
Christmas feasts: Georgian elegance
23:48

Taking in glamorous dinner parties and decadent “wine-chocolate”, Annie Graytransports us back to a festive feast from the Georgian era. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, for the second episode in our mini-series on Christmas food through history, she also touches on dangerous parlour games and complaints about Christmas being “too commercial”.

(Ad) Annie Gray is the author of At Christmas We Feast: Festive Food through the Ages (Profile Books, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fat-christmas-we-feast%2Fannie-gray%2F9781788168199%23%3A~%3Atext%3DAt Christmas We Feast%3A Festive Food Through the Ages (Hardback)%26text%3D'A joy to immerse oneself%2Ctrimmings%2C pudding and brandy butter.



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 10, 2021
How US-Russian relations fractured in the 1990s
36:50

Mary Sarotte tells Spencer Mizen about her new book Not One Inch, which reveals how diplomatic missteps after the fall of the Berlin Wall soured US-Russian relations and fuelled the rise of Vladimir Putin.


(Ad) Mary Sarotte is the author of Not One Inch: America, Russia and the Making of Post-Cold War Stalemate (Yale University Press, 2022). Buy it now from Amazon:

​​https://www.amazon.co.uk/Not-One-Inch-Post-Cold-Stalemate/dp/030025993X/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-Histboty



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 08, 2021
Pearl Harbor episode 2: America on the eve of war
36:08
In the latest episode in our new series on the raid on Pearl Harbor, Dayna Barnes speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about the United States in the years and months leading up to the attack. They discuss the American perspective on the disintegrating relationship with Japan, get to grips with US thinking on the eve of the attack, and ask: why was the American public blindsided by the Japanese raid?

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 07, 2021
Pearl Harbor episode 3: Countdown to the raid
41:17
In the latest episode in our new series on the raid on Pearl Harbor, Steve Twomey speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about the immediate run-up to the attack, revealing how inch-perfect Japanese planning and complacent oversights by American military figures combined to leave Pearl Harbor naval base a sitting duck for Japanese bombers.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 07, 2021
Sex lives of medieval people
24:10

Were medieval attitudes to sex really that different from our own? Historian Katherine Harvey speaks to Elinor Evans about the sex lives of ordinary people in the Middle Ages – from how sexuality was governed by ideas about sin, to the “love magic” that was thought to trick people into bed.


(Ad) Katherine Harvey is the author of The Fires of Lust: Sex in the Middle Ages (Reaktion Books, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-Histboty&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-fires-of-lust%2Fkatherine-harvey%2F9781789144895



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 06, 2021
The Great Depression: everything you wanted to know
50:36
Historian David M Kennedy answers listener questions and online search queries about the Great Depression, the economic crash that devastated the United States and other countries across the globe in the 1930s. In discussion with Rhiannon Davies, he covers topics ranging from the fate of minorities to the staggering unemployment statistics of the time.  

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 05, 2021
Searching for WW1’s fallen soldiers
41:02

Robert Sackville-West describes attempts to identify the bodies of the dead after the devastating battles of the First World War 


Historian Robert Sackville-West describes the searches to identify – and in some cases, return – bodies of the dead after the devastating battles of the First World War: a service that provided important closure for many bereaved families. Speaking with Elinor Evans, he also explores how commemoration of the war dead has changed over the last century.

 

(Ad) Robert Sackville-West is the author of The Searchers: The Quest for the Lost of the First World War(Bloomsbury, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Searchers-Quest-Lost-First-World/dp/1526613158/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 04, 2021
Christmas feasts: Medieval & Tudor revelry
26:42

From brawn to plum pottage, Annie Gray takes us back to the raucous world of festive feasting in the medieval and Tudor eras. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, for the first episode in our new mini-series on Christmas food through history, she also touches on subversive merrymaking, spectacular dinnertime entertainments and hefty meat pies.


(Ad) Annie Gray is the author of At Christmas We Feast: Festive Food through the Ages (Profile Books, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fat-christmas-we-feast%2Fannie-gray%2F9781788168199%23%3A~%3Atext%3DAt%20Christmas%20We%20Feast%3A%20Festive%20Food%20Through%20the%20Ages%20(Hardback)%26text%3D'A%20joy%20to%20immerse%20oneself%2Ctrimmings%2C%20pudding%20and%20brandy%20butter.



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 03, 2021
Pearl Harbor episode 1: A gathering storm in Japan
42:47
In the first episode in our new series on the raid on Pearl Harbor, Chris Harding speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about Japan in the years running up to December 1941. They discuss the long-running historical factors that edged the country ever closer to war with the United States, and ask: what led Japan to embark on such a risky gamble?

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Dec 01, 2021
Colour: a human history
47:53

Colour has been hugely important to humans through history, with different cultures attaching their own meanings to all the hues of the rainbow. From the ancient societies who venerated purple to the modern political radicals who chose red as the colour of revolution, James Fox speaks to Rhiannon Davies about these fascinating associations. 


(Ad) James Fox is the author The World According to Colour: A Cultural History (Allen Lane, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

​​https://www.amazon.co.uk/World-According-Colour-Cultural-History/dp/1846148243/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 30, 2021
Stranger danger? Xenophobia’s unexpected history
38:01

Psychiatrist and historian George Makari speaks to Jon Bauckham about the origins of the term “xenophobia”, and the ways in which western thinkers have interpreted people’s fear of strangers, from the 19th century to the present day.

 

(Ad) George Makari is the author of Of Fear and Strangers: A History of Xenophobia (Yale University Press, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Fear-Strangers-History-Xenophobia/dp/0300259735/ref=asc_df_0300259735/?tag=googshopuk-21&linkCode=df0&hvadid=534924812094&hvpos=&hvnetw=g&hvrand=12591081103742328032&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=1006715&hvtargid=pla-1420993758651&psc=1&th=1&psc=1&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 29, 2021
The Irish famine: everything you wanted to know
50:43

Christine Kinealy answers listener questions on the devastating famine that struck Ireland in the mid-19th century


Christine Kinealy answers listener questions on the causes and consequences of the devastating famine that struck Ireland in the mid-19th century. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, she also discusses whether we should call it a “famine”, the role of aid and migration in the crisis, and if the British government can be blamed for what happened. 



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 28, 2021
How Shakespeare inspired terrorists
39:06

Shakespeare has been an obsession of extremist groups across the globe over the centuries. The Nazi Party held him up as a hero, while Osama Bin Laden condemned him as the ultimate symbol of the depraved west. Islam Issa speaks to Rhiannon Davies about the playwright’s tangled relationship with terror.


(Ad) Islam Issa is the author of Shakespeare and Terrorism (Routledge, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Shakespeare-Terrorism-Spotlight-Islam-Issa/dp/0367334836/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide




See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 27, 2021
How the Greeks changed the world
50:06

Historian Roderick Beaton ranges over 4,000 years of Greek history, from the glories of Mycenae to the life of a modern European nation. In discussion with Rob Attar, he picks out some of the key moments in this journey, including the triumphs of ancient Greece, the conquests of Alexander the Great and the 1820s battle for independence. 


(Ad) Roderick Beaton is the author of The Greeks: A Global History (Faber, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-greeks%2Fprofessor-prof-roderick-beaton%2F9780571353569



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 26, 2021
What can churches tell us?
49:52

Peter Stanford speaks to Emily Briffett about his new book, If These Stones Could Talk, which chronicles his journeys around Britain and Ireland’s churches, abbeys, chapels and cathedrals in a quest to understand how religion has defined our past and continues to shape our present. 


(Ad) Peter Stanford is the author of If These Stones Could Talk: The History of Christianity in Britain and Ireland through Twenty Buildings (Hodder & Stoughton, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fif-these-stones-could-talk%2Fpeter-stanford%2F9781529396423




See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 24, 2021
Sex work: a brief history
31:00

From the courtesans of Edo Japan and ancient Greece to the mollyhouses of Regency London, Kate Lister speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about her new book Harlots, Whores and Hackabouts, which charts the long, diverse and colourful history of sex work. 

 

(Ad) Kate Lister is the author of Harlots, Whores & Hackabouts: A History of Sex for Sale (Thames & Hudson, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fharlots-whores-and-hackabouts%2Fkate-lister%2Fwellcome-collection%2F9780500252444



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 23, 2021
The Ottoman “Age of Discovery”
29:58

The “Age of Discovery” is traditionally known as a period between the 15th and 16th centuries, when European Christian powers sailed west and encountered lands and peoples previously unknown to them. However, speaking to David Musgrove, Professor Marc David Baer contends that this narrative overlooks the influential role of the Ottoman empire.

 

(Ad) Marc David Baer is the author of The Ottomans: Khans, Caesars and Caliphs (Basic Books, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Ottomans-Khans-Caesars-Caliphs/dp/1473695708/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 22, 2021
Anglo-Scottish border wars: everything you wanted to know
43:15
How much blood was spilled in the border regions of England and Scotland from the 14th to the 16th centuries? Who were the Reivers? And why did the French get involved? Michael Brown talks to Spencer Mizen about the cross-border clashes that marred Anglo-Scottish relations for 200 years.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 21, 2021
A secret trial that transformed transgender rights
33:43

In 1965, Scottish aristocrat Ewan Forbes stood to inherit his family’s baronetcy but, as a transgender man, he soon became embroiled in a top-secret legal case which had consequences that still affect the lives of trans people today. Zoe Playdon explores this still largely unknown story, in conversation with Matt Elton.


(Ad) Zoe Playdon is the author of The Hidden Case of Ewan Forbes: The Transgender Trial that Threatened to Upend the British Establishment (Bloomsbury, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Hidden-Case-Ewan-Forbes/dp/152661913X/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 20, 2021
How to tell the story of WW2 in museums
26:47
What makes a good Second World War exhibit? How can we best share the story of the Holocaust? Two new galleries dedicated to these seismic events at London’s Imperial War Museum grapple with these questions and others. Historian Keith Lowe spoke to curators Vicki Hawkins, Kate Clements and James Bulgin about the challenges of creating them.  

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 19, 2021
How slavery & empire shaped epidemiology
36:06

Jim Downs speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about his book Maladies of Empire, which reveals how the conditions created by colonialism, war and slavery affected the study of disease and its spread in the 18th and 19th centuries. 


(Ad) Jim Downs is the author of Maladies of Empire: How Slavery, Imperialism, and War Transformed Medicine (Belknap Press, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/s?k=maladies+of+empire&adgrpid=130572957750&gclid=CjwKCAiA1aiMBhAUEiwACw25MVXIayiB36t6Q37ItDISGlC8aLKZyWNwGh6rUPr8g_WnL2PKKC-y3xoC2IAQAvD_BwE&hvadid=543075455219&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=1006715&hvnetw=g&hvqmt=e&hvrand=12263352264959276216&hvtargid=kwd-1262783386938&hydadcr=24404_1748884&tag=googhydr-21&ref=pd_sl_2iezca746i_e&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 17, 2021
George V: not so dull after all
32:31

Jane Ridley speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about the life and reign of George V. She reveals how the king, often unfairly dismissed as something of a dullard, in fact successfully steered the monarchy through a tumultuous era of British history.

(Ad) Jane Ridley is the author of George V: Never a Dull Moment (Chatto & Windus, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/George-V-Never-Dull-Moment/dp/0701188707/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 16, 2021
The man who made King Alfred great
41:45
As the author of the Life of King Alfred, the Welsh churchman Asser is in large part responsible for how the early medieval king was viewed, and the fact that he eventually got the moniker ‘the Great’. Speaking with our content director David Musgrove, Dr Robert Gallagher tells us about a new discovery he’s made about this monastic wordsmith.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 15, 2021
Espionage history: everything you wanted to know
55:28
When did espionage become professionalised? What ingenious gadgets did intelligence agents use in the past? And how have animals been used for spying? Speaking with Elinor Evans, Michael Goodman tackles listener questions and popular search queries on the history of espionage and intelligence.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 14, 2021
The St Brice’s Day Massacre of 1002
52:33
On 13 November 1002, the St Brice’s Day Massacre took place, when Danes living in England were killed, apparently on the orders of King Aethelred. But the extent of the violence and motivation behind it continues to be much debated by historians. In conversation with David Musgrove, Dr Benjamin Savill outlines his new theory that the massacre may have been planned specifically for the feast day of the exiled St Brice. 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 13, 2021
Medieval manuscript makers
47:10

Medieval manuscripts tell a story far greater than just what’s written inside them. In conversation with Emily Briffett, Mary Wellesley shares the hidden histories of the artisans, authors and owners behind these fragile and beautiful documents.


(Ad) Mary Wellesley is the author of Hidden Hands: The Lives of Manuscripts and their Makers (Quercus, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fhidden-hands%2Fmary-wellesley%2F9781529420883



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 12, 2021
Surviving hell on earth: Polar explorer Ranulph Fiennes on Shackleton
46:21

Ernest Shackleton looms large in the heroic age of exploration, making two bids to reach the South Pole and famously attempting to traverse the Antarctic continent, before his ship was crushed by pack ice. Fellow polar explorer Sir Ranulph Fiennes chronicles his dangerous exploits and reflects on his own expeditions in a conversation with Rhiannon Davies.


(Ad) Ranulph Fiennes is the author of Shackleton: A Biography (Michael Joseph, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Shackleton-Ranulph-Fiennes/dp/0241356717/ref=sr_1_1?adgrpid=118715083359&dchild=1&gclid=Cj0KCQjwt-6LBhDlARIsAIPRQcKRJILLUHRFfyslY6G2SY7Q2IWBFoJ617jPKW4rPHt0f2vvyQmAHZEaAgQOEALw_wcB&hvadid=506961849035&hvdev=c&hvlocphy=1006715&hvnetw=g&hvqmt=e&hvrand=14826065410558208685&hvtargid=kwd-1209672137750&hydadcr=24433_1816114&keywords=ranulph+fiennes+shackleton&qid=1635519967&qsid=257-7780269-8086666&sr=8-1&sres=0241356717%2C0340826991%2C0241977258%2C1785904868%2C0753809877%2C0099422433%2CB07C7RDKXQ%2C1509896120%2C1472907159%2CB09D4VQW4X%2C1774261995%2C0753522063%2C1909263109%2CB06WD53Q24%2C1976969964%2CB08PFSDJLB&srpt=ABIS_BOOK&tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 10, 2021
The CIA’s secret African missions
33:32

Historian Susan Williams discusses the United States’ covert programme to undermine the leaders of newly independent African nations in the 1950s and 1960s. Speaking to Rob Attar, she highlights the stories of Congo’s Patrice Lumumba and Ghana’s Kwame Nkrumah, both of whom were ultimately ousted from power.


(Ad) Susan Williams is the author of White Malice: The CIA and the Neocolonisation of Africa (C Hurst & Co, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fwhite-malice%2Fsusan-williams%2F9781787385559



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 09, 2021
The rebel who defied William the Conqueror
41:15
Matt Lewis tells Spencer Mizen about the extraordinary escapades of Hereward the Wake, who led a rebellion in the 1070s that drove William the Conqueror and the Normans to distraction.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 08, 2021
SALEM EPISODE 9: Conclusion
22:32
After the witch trials were over, Salemites had to resume life as normal and come to terms with what had happened. Suspected witches had to go back to living alongside those who had accused them. In our final episode we’ll be looking at the difficult legacy of the events at Salem, revealing how the beliefs that underlined them endured and asking: why did the witch trials happen?

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 07, 2021
SALEM EPISODE 8: Willful, weak-minded women?
29:02
Fourteen of the 19 people hanged for witchcraft at Salem were women. So could their gender – or perhaps their transgression of gender norms – be part of the reason they were targeted? And what about the five men hanged? In this episode we’ll try to unpick the complicated question of how gender impacted on the Salem witch trials.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 07, 2021
SALEM EPISODE 7: Quarrelsome neighbours & family tensions
22:49
Salem was made up of a dense web of social connections – not all of which were harmonious. In fact, it was a community riven with fault lines that threatened to open up into great chasms of conflict. In this episode we’ll investigate whether tensions between members of the community could help explain who was accused of demonic activity – and who accused them.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 07, 2021
SALEM EPISODE 6: Chaos in the courtroom
30:19
The list of failings that could be levelled against the Salem justice system is substantial – from the acceptance of so-called ‘spectral evidence’ to the chaotic scenes that unfolded in the courtroom. In this episode we’ll consider how suspected witches were tried, revealing how they were induced into giving confessions and even encouraged to implicate others.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 07, 2021
SALEM EPISODE 5: Satanic sabbaths and supernatural sins
24:46
From flying witches to demonic familiars and translucent cats, the Salem villagers believed themselves plagued by a spectrum of supernatural terrors. In this episode we’ll be investigating the long history of witchcraft beliefs that influenced accusations, from the first witches in the ancient world to the explosion of witch hunts triggered by fears of a satanic conspiracy in Early Modern Europe and America.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 07, 2021
From chariots to e-scooters: transformations in transport
54:27

Tom Standage traces technological advances in transport, from the invention of the wheel to the rise of the car


Tom Standage, author of A Brief History of Motion, speaks to Jon Bauckham about technological advances in transport, from the invention of the wheel to the rise of the car, and reveals why modern transport dilemmas echo those of the late 19th century.


(Ad) Tom Standage is the author of A Brief History of Motion: From the Wheel to the Car to What Comes Next (Bloomsbury, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Brief-History-Motion-Wheel-Comes/dp/1526608324/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 06, 2021
Giving birth in the 17th century
41:37

Dr Sara Read explores women’s experience of pregnancy and childbirth in early modern England. Speaking to Emma Slattery Williams, she discusses the research behind her recent novel, which tells the story of a midwife working during the Great Plague of 1665.


(Ad) Sara Read is the author of The Gossips’ Choice (Wild Pressed Books, 2020). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Gossips-Choice-Sara-Read/dp/1916489680/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 05, 2021
Cricket as a colonial weapon
36:06

Dr Souvik Naha reveals how the Victorians used cricket to export “British virtues” across the empire


For 19th-century imperialists, cricket wasn’t just a game, it was a means of exporting “British virtues” across the empire. Dr Souvik Naha tells Spencer Mizen about the sport’s great “civilising mission”.




See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 03, 2021
Living through the fall of communism
45:51

Professor Lea Ypi reflects on her childhood years, which witnessed the final years of communism in Albania and the fraught transition to capitalist democracy. In conversation with Rob Attar, she also considers what these experiences have taught her about the true nature of freedom.


(Ad) Lea Ypi is the author of Free: Coming of Age at the End of History (Penguin, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Ffree%2Flea-ypi%2F9780241481851



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 02, 2021
Black cowboys on screen
21:24
Historian Tony Warner talks to Elinor Evans about some of the real historical figures depicted in the new Netflix western The Harder They Fall, starring Idris Elba and Regina King, and tells us more about where the film sits in the genre of black westerns.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Nov 01, 2021
SALEM EPISODE 4: The pervasive power of Puritanism
22:37
Religion was a powerful force at play in the Salem settlement. It not only determined the villagers’ daily routine but their whole outlook on life, influencing how they saw their neighbours and giving shape to their fears about threats to their community. In this episode we’ll be investigating how the Puritanical mindset stirred up intense paranoia about the devil, and could have made people more inclined to confess to satanic corruption.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 31, 2021
SALEM EPISODE 3: A ‘new Jerusalem’ on the edge of a wilderness
26:41
In 1692, Salem was a colonial outpost teetering on the edge of a precipice. In this episode we’ll explore what life was like in the New England settlement, and consider whether environmental pressures – from the threat of attack to an inhospitable climate – could have played a role in the outbreak of accusations of witchcraft.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 31, 2021
SALEM EPISODE 2: How events spiralled out of control
31:15
In order to understand why the Salem witch trials happened, we need to get to grips with how exactly things unfolded over the course of 1692. In this episode, we piece together a timeline of the events that reveals how the strange behaviour of a couple of young girls spread like a virus, mutating and mushrooming into community-wide paranoia that ultimately culminated in multiple executions.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 31, 2021
SALEM EPISODE 1: Introduction
14:25
In 1692, 19 members of a small New England community were hanged for witchcraft. Over the course of the year, young girls convulsed and barked like dogs, women confessed to flying on poles to satanic sabbaths, and villagers recounted seeing ghostly apparitions and translucent cats. How can we explain these seemingly inexplicable events? With the help of experts, we’ll delve into the historical factors that were at play in Salem to get to grips with one of the most fascinating moments in American history.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 31, 2021
Ghosts, necromancy & the underworld in ancient Mesopotamia
38:42

Irving Finkel speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about his book The First Ghosts, which looks at what we can learn from the first written evidence of ghost beliefs. He reveals what ancient Mesopotamian cuneiform tablets can tell us about everything from necromancy and getting rid of troublesome spirits to demons and the underworld. 

 

(Ad) Irving Finkel is the author of The First Ghosts: Most Ancient of Legacies (Hodder & Stoughton, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-first-ghosts%2Firving-finkel%2F9781529303261



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 30, 2021
What would you ask a historian?
39:41

Greg Jenner talks about his latest book, Ask A Historian, which tackles 50 burning questions that people have about the past

 

Public historian Greg Jenner talks to Elinor Evans about his latest book, Ask A Historian, which tackles on 50 questions exploring some unexpected chapters of history that people have always wanted to know about – from whether people really ate powdered mummies, to the best historical figures to choose for an Oceans’ Eleven-style heist.

 

(Ad) Greg Jenner is the author of Ask A Historian: 50 Surprising Answers to Things You Always Wanted to Know (Orion, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fask-a-historian%2Fgreg-jenner%2F9781474618618



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 29, 2021
COMING SOON Salem: investigating the witch trials
0:56
Listen to our new podcast series delving into one of the most fascinating and mysterious events in American history. Find the first four episodes in your podcast feed from 31 October. 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 28, 2021
Windows: an illuminating history
32:41
We often focus on the views we can see through windows, but what about the windows themselves? Matt Elton speaks to cultural sociologist Rachel Hurdley to explore what windows can reveal about our past – from living conditions and architectural styles to wider issues of defence, politics and social change.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 27, 2021
How a ballerina survived the Gulag
52:55

Christina Ezrahi speaks to Elinor Evans about the story of Nina Anisimova, one of the most famous ballerinas in Stalin’s Soviet Union. After being arrested for supposed counter-revolutionary activity, Anisimova was transported to a forced labour camp, only to make a remarkable return to the stage.

 

(Ad) Christina Ezrahi is the author of Dancing for Stalin: A Dancer’s Story of Courage and Survival in Soviet Russia (Elliott & Thompson Ltd, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Dancing-Stalin-Dancers-Courage-Survival/dp/1783965576#:~:text=Dancing%20for%20Stalin%20is%20a,of%20courage%2C%20resilience%20and%20triumph.&text=of%20Bolshoi%20Confidential-,Nina%20Anisimova%20was%20one%20of%20Russia's%20most%20renowned%20ballerinas%20and,career%20concealed%20a%20dark%20secret./?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 26, 2021
Afghanistan: a history of instability
50:03

A panel of expert historians discuss how history can help make sense of current events in Afghanistan

 

The Taliban recently regained control of Afghanistan as US forces withdrew after two decades in the country. How can history help make sense of this seismic moment? Matt Elton joins a panel of experts – William Dalrymple, Rabia Latif Khan, Elisabeth Leake and Bijan Omrani – to explore how Afghanistan’s past can help us understand its present situation.



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 25, 2021
Egyptian pharaohs: everything you wanted to know
54:55
What did the word ‘pharaoh’ mean? How did you become an ancient Egyptian king? And what was that beard all about? Speaking with Emily Briffett, Joyce Tyldesley answers listener questions and top internet search queries about ancient Egypt’s royal rulers.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 24, 2021
Medieval ghost stories
31:33

Historian Dan Jones’s new book, The Tale of the Tailor and the Three Dead Kings, reimagines a medieval ghost story for modern audiences. He explains to Dave Musgrove what it tells us about attitudes to the afterlife in the Middle Ages.


(Ad) Dan Jones is the author of The Tale of the Tailor and the Three Dead Kings: A medieval ghost story (Head of Zeus, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-tale-of-the-tailor-and-the-three-dead-kings%2Fdan-jones%2F2928377065249



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 23, 2021
How dogs shaped city life
29:59

Chris Pearson talks to Elinor Evans about his latest book, Dogopolis, which explores how human-canine relationships shaped urban living in three cities – New York, Paris and London – in the late 19th and 20th centuries, from differing attitudes towards pets and strays, to their roles in modern security.


(Ad) Chris Pearson is the author of Dogopolis: How Dogs and Humans Made Modern New York, London, and Paris (Chicago, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fdogopolis%2Fchris-pearson%2F9780226798165 



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 22, 2021
African-American women’s battle for the vote
32:17

Martha S Jones discusses her Cundill History Prize-shortlisted book Vanguard, which charts African-American women’s long and determined fight for the vote. She speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about how the battle for suffrage connected to other issues and a wider struggle for political power.


(Ad) Martha S Jones is the author of Vanguard: How Black Women Broke Barriers, Won the Vote, and Insisted on Equality for All (Basic Books, 2020). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Vanguard-Black-Barriers-Insisted-Equality/dp/1541618610/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 20, 2021
Asia’s anti-imperial revolutionaries
34:53

Tim Harper speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about his Cundill History Prize-shortlisted book Underground Asia, which reveals how clandestine networks of anti-colonialist rebels operated across Asia in the early 20th century.

 

(Ad) Tim Harper is the author of Underground Asia: Global Revolutionaries and the Assault on Empire (Allen Lane, 2020). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Imperial-Underground-Harper-Tim/dp/1846145627/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 19, 2021
A family history of France
37:21

Following the fortunes of one extended family in a south-western French town in the 18th and 19th centuries, Emma Rothschild’s Cundill Prize-shortlisted book An Infinite History builds up a picture of what life was like for ordinary people in provincial France. She tells Rhiannon Davies how generations of the family survived revolution, wars and sweeping economic changes, to reveal a fascinating story of France’s history from below. 


(Ad) Emma Rothschild is the author of An Infinite History: The Story of a Family in France Over Three Centuries (Princeton, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fan-infinite-history%2Femma-rothschild%2F%2F9780691200309%3Fawaid%3D3787%26utm_source%3Dredbrain%26utm_medium%3Dshopping%26utm_campaign%3Dcss%26gclid%3DCjwKCAjwh5qLBhALEiwAioods2hTOQ1IkWOOFqRZBkpKLDUNCmQ6uocmn4hwJXCKU3gMq_sKt-QVPBoCSygQAvD_BwE



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 18, 2021
Apartheid: everything you wanted to know
51:33
Wayne Dooling answers listener questions on South Africa’s Apartheid regime. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, he covers subjects including the policy’s origins, the everyday experience of racial segregation, internal and international resistance, and the regime’s legacy on the country today. 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 17, 2021
Berbice: a slave rebellion that nearly succeeded
48:25

Historian Marjoleine Kars tells Elinor Evans about a little-known 1763 rebellion by enslaved people in Berbice, in present-day Guyana. Chronicled in her Cundill prize-shortlisted book Blood on the River, it was an event that revises our understanding of the actions of enslaved people at the dawn of the Age of Revolution.


(Ad) Marjoleine Kars is the author of Blood on the River: A Chronicle of Mutiny and Freedom on the Wild Coast (The New Press, 2020). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fblood-on-the-river%2Fmarjoleine-kars%2F9781620974599



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 16, 2021
Trial by combat: the real history behind The Last Duel
38:05

Hannah Skoda delves into the bloody and brutal spectacle of trial by combat in the Middle Ages 


To coincide with the release of new film The Last Duel, Hannah Skoda explores the bloody and brutal spectacle of trial by combat in the Middle Ages. Speaking to Ellie Cawthorne, she reveals how judicial violence was used to settle legal disputes, and recounts some of the most dramatic real cases. 



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 15, 2021
Liberty and racism: an interconnected history
43:22

Tyler Stovall speaks to Ellie Cawthorne about his Cundill prize-shortlisted book White Freedom, which explores how European and American ideas about ‘liberty’ and ‘freedom’ have been underpinned by racism since the Enlightenment.


(Ad) Tyler Stovall is the author of White Freedom: The Racial History of an Idea(Princeton, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-viewingguide&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fwhite-freedom%2Ftyler-stovall%2F9780691179469



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 13, 2021
George III: the tyrant who lost America?
45:24

Andrew Roberts discusses his landmark new biography of King George III and takes on some of the myths that have surrounded the monarch


Historian Andrew Roberts discusses his landmark new biography of King George III with Rob Attar. He takes on some of the myths that have surrounded the king, such as: Was he really a tyrant? Was his “madness” caused by porphyria? And how responsible was he for the loss of the American colonies?


(Ad) Andrew Roberts is the author of George III: The Life and Reign of Britain's Most Misunderstood Monarch(Allen Lane, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon: 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/George-III-Britains-Misunderstood-Monarch/dp/0241413338/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 12, 2021
At home with the Mongols
57:39

“The Horde” was an empire like no other, ruled by Nomadic Mongol Khans for three centuries. But how was the Mongol empire governed, and what was everyday life like within it? Marie Favereau speaks to David Musgrove about her Cundill prize-shortlisted book on the subject.


(Ad) Marie Favereau is the author of The Horde: How the Mongols Changed the World (Belknap Press, 2021) Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Horde-How-Mongols-Changed-World/dp/0674244214/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-viewingguide



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 11, 2021
Pompeii: everything you wanted to know
55:24
Archaeologist Sophie Hay responds to listener questions and popular search queries about the city that was destroyed by a volcanic eruption in AD 79 and has gone on to become one of our best sources of information about everyday Roman life. 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 09, 2021
Unexpected Edwardians
37:01

Nick Baker and John Woolf, writers of Stephen Fry’s Edwardian Secrets, discuss some lesser-known aspects of the Edwardian age


The Edwardians were not just about the afternoon tea and croquet on the lawn. Behind the Downton Abbey image of the age lies a much murkier reality. Nick Baker and John Woolf, writers of the new Audible series Stephen Fry’s Edwardian Secrets, discuss some of the lesser-known aspects of the era.



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 09, 2021
Plagues of our past
53:08

From when our ancestors first mastered fire to the rise of modern cities, humanity’s progress has been accompanied by a revolving door of parasites, bacteria and viruses, wreaking havoc on our health. Kyle Harper, author of Plagues Upon the Earth, discusses the sprawling history of infectious disease.  


(Ad) Kyle Harper is the author of Plagues Upon the Earth: Disease and the Course of Human History (Princeton, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:


https://www.amazon.co.uk/Plagues-upon-Earth-Princeton-Economic/dp/069119212X/?tag=radtim01-21&ascsubtag=radiotimes-social-viewingguide



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 08, 2021
Courage under fire: the story of a WW2 tank regiment
44:19

Military historian, author and broadcaster James Holland tells the story of the Sherwood Rangers, a British tank regiment which was in the thick of the action from the Allied assault on Normandy on D-Day until the final defeat of Nazi Germany.


(Ad) James Holland is the author of Brothers in Arms: A Legendary Tank Regiment's Bloody War from D-Day to VE Day(Transworld, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-hexpod&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fbrothers-in-arms%2Fjames-holland%2F9781787633940



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 06, 2021
How Hindustan became India
55:15

Manan Ahmed Asif discusses his book The Loss of Hindustan, the Invention of India, which has just been shortlisted for the Cundill History Prize


Historian Manan Ahmed Asif discusses his recent book The Loss of Hindustan, the Invention of India, which has just been shortlisted for the Cundill History Prize. He explores the historical concept of Hindustan and reveals how, through the colonial era, it came to be replaced with the modern idea of India.


(Ad) Manan Ahmed Asif is the author of The Loss of Hindustan, the Invention of India (Harvard, 2020). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Loss-Hindustan-Invention-India/dp/067498790X/?tag=radtim01-21&ascsubtag=radiotimes-social-viewingguide



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 05, 2021
The turbulent Stuart century
40:28

Dr Clare Jackson discusses her new book Devil-Land, which examines the insecurities and anxieties that plagued England between 1588 and 1688, from fears of a foreign invasion to paranoia over Catholic plots. 


(Ad) Clare Jackson is the author of Devil-Land: England Under Siege, 1588-1688 (Penguin, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Devil-Land-England-Under-Siege-1588-1688/dp/024128581X/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-hexpod



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 04, 2021
The Boer War: everything you wanted to know
35:29

Saul Dubow responds to listener questions on Victorian Britain’s bitter conflict with two southern African republics 

 

What triggered the Boer War? Why did it take Britain so long to bring its enormous resources to bear? And how did the war puncture the people of Britain’s confidence in the power of their armed forces? Professor Saul Dubow answers your questions on the bitter imperial conflict.

 

 



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 03, 2021
My father the Nazi
25:39

As governor-general of Nazi-occupied Poland, Hans Frank bore heavy responsibility for the abuse and murder of hundreds of thousands of Poles and millions of Polish Jews. His son, Niklas Frank, recounts his father’s role in the Nazi regime and explains why he’s made it his mission to ensure that his father’s murderous legacy is never forgotten.

 

(Ad) Niklas Frank is the author of The Father: A Revenge (Biteback Publishing, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Father-Revenge-Niklas-Frank/dp/1785906798/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-hexpod



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 02, 2021
Adventures of a Victorian actor
33:44

Helen Batten shares stories from her new biography of Victorian singer, stage performer and entrepreneur Emily Soldene, from a career in London’s rowdy music halls to adventures abroad and the bright lights of 19th-century Broadway.

 

(Ad) Helen Batten is the author of The Improbable Adventures of Emily Soldene: Actress, Writer and Victorian Rebel (Allison & Busby, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-hexpod&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-improbable-adventures-of-miss-emily-soldene%2Fhelen-batten%2F%2F9780749026578

 



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Oct 01, 2021
John of Gaunt: prince without a throne
38:16

John of Gaunt rose to become one of the most powerful figures of his age, yet was ultimately unable to secure a crown for himself. Historian, author and podcaster Helen Carr charts the eventful life of the 14th-century prince.

 

(Ad) Helen Carr is the author of The Red Prince: The Life of John of Gaunt, the Duke of Lancaster (Oneworld, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-hexpod&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-red-prince%2Fhelen-carr%2F9780861540822



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 29, 2021
Inside the prehistoric mind
1:01:06

How did prehistoric people in Britain view and understand the world around them? What did they smell, hear and see? Francis Pryor, one of Britain’s leading archaeologists and the author of Scenes from Prehistoric Life, delves into the sensory world of our prehistoric ancestors.

 

(Ad) Francis Pryor is the author of Scenes from Prehistoric Life: from the Ice Age to the Coming of the Romans (Head of Zeus, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-hexpod&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fscenes-from-prehistoric-life%2Ffrancis-pryor%2F9781789544145



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 28, 2021
How did the British royals survive WW1?
1:05:11

While many European royals faced abdications and revolutions during the First World War, the British monarchy not only survived the conflict, but was strengthened by it. Historian Heather Jones discusses her new book, For King and Country, which explores the royal family’s role during the war.

 

(Ad) Heather Jones is the author of For King and Country: The British Monarchy and the First World War (Cambridge University Press, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/King-Country-British-Monarchy-Cultural/dp/110842936X/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-hexpod



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 27, 2021
Medieval Wales: everything you wanted to know
1:19:16

Matthew Stevens tackles listener questions on the history of the Welsh regions during the Middle Ages

 

Matthew Stevens tackles listener questions and popular search queries on the history of Wales and the Welsh regions during the Middle Ages, from the Norman invasion and Edward I’s conquest to the Welsh roots of the Tudor dynasty.

 

 



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 26, 2021
A surprising history of the index
37:07

The index, the bit at the back of a book you mostly only turn to for reference, has a bit of a dowdy reputation – and it’s an unfair one. Dennis Duncan discusses the index’s surprising history – one that has saved heretics from the stake, kept politicians from office and proved a battleground for snarky academic rivalries. 

 

(Ad) Dennis Duncan is the author of Index, A Brief History of the (Allen Lane, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Index-History-Dennis-Duncan/dp/0241374235/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-hexpod



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 25, 2021
Why did medieval monks write histories?
44:34
Why did medieval monks and abbots write histories, and what does it tell us about the role of monasticism in the Middle Ages? Medievalist Dr Benjamin Pohl of the University of Bristol tells us more.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 24, 2021
India’s Suffragettes
40:02

Between 1917 and 1947, a group of Indian women fought for their right to vote. Sumita Mukherjee discusses their campaign, and reveals how Suffragettes were connected both to India’s wider struggle for independence, and women’s suffrage movements across the world.

 

(Ad) Sumita Mukherjee is the author of Indian Suffragettes: Female Identities and Transnational Networks(Oxford University Press, 2018). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Indian-Suffragettes-Identities-Transnational-Networks/dp/019948421X/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-hexpod



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 22, 2021
Jihad and the British empire
31:59

Neil Faulkner reveals how the Anglo-Arab Wars of 1870-1920 helped give rise to the first modern jihad

 

Neil Faulkner, author of Empire and Jihad, describes how Britain’s entanglements in the Middle East and north Africa in the decades leading up to the First World War helped trigger a radical Islamic insurgency.

 

(Ad) Neil Faulkner is the author of Empire and Jihad: The Anglo-Arab Wars of 1870-1920 (Yale, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Empire-Jihad-Anglo-Arab-Wars-1870-1920/dp/0300227493/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-hexpod

 



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 21, 2021
Transplant surgery: an eye-opening history
40:23

From transfusions of lambs’ blood to tooth replacements, Paul Craddock chronicles the strange history of transplant surgery

 

From lambs’ blood transfused into human veins, to tooth replacements and new noses crafted from forearm skin, Paul Craddock – author of new book Spare Parts – chronicles the strange history of transplant surgery.

 

(Ad) Paul Craddock is the author of Spare Parts: A Surprising History of Transplants (Fig Tree, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-hexpod&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fspare-parts%2Fpaul-craddock%2F9780241370254



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 20, 2021
The Paris Peace Conference: everything you wanted to know
1:00:55

Professor David Stevenson answers listener questions on the 1919-20 conference that sought to resolve the aftermath of the First World War

 

In the latest episode in our series on history’s biggest topics, Professor David Stevenson explores the 1919–20 conference that sought to resolve the aftermath of the First World War, and whose legacy has been fiercely debated ever since. Was the resulting Treaty of Versailles too harsh on Germany? Did the peacemakers create lasting problems in the Middle East? And what effect did the Spanish Flu have on proceedings? 



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 19, 2021
World history in 100 moments
44:05

Archaeologist and television presenter Neil Oliver discusses his new book, The Story of the World in 100 Moments, which explores the whole of human history through just 100 milestone events.

 

(Ad) Neil Oliver is the author of The Story of the World in 100 Moments (Bantam Press, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Story-World-100-Moments-bestselling/dp/1787633101/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-hexpod



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 18, 2021
Extraordinary hoaxes of the 18th century
43:47

Ian Keable describes some of the most audacious, bizarre and inventive pranks that fooled Georgian Britain 

 

From a woman who seemingly gave birth to rabbits to a man who claimed he could climb inside a wine bottle, Ian Keable – author of The Century of Deception – describes some of the most audacious, bizarre and inventive pranks that fooled Georgian Britain.

 

(Ad) Ian Keable is the author of The Century of Deception: The Birth of the Hoax in Eighteenth Century England (Westbourne Press, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-hexpod&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-century-of-deception%2Fian-keable%2F9781908906441



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 17, 2021
Maria Theresa: empress, warrior, matriarch
53:06

Nancy Goldstone discusses the 18th-century family saga of Habsburg empress Maria Theresa, and her equally formidable daughters 

 

Nancy Goldstone discusses the 18th-century family saga of Habsburg Empress Maria Theresa and her equally formidable daughters (including Marie Antoinette) who married into royal houses around Europe.

 

(Ad) Nancy Goldstone is the author of In the Shadow of the Empress: The Defiant Lives of Maria Theresa, Mother of Marie Antoinette, and Her Daughters (Little, Brown, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Shadow-Empress-Defiant-Antoinette-Daughters/dp/0316449334/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-hexpod



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 15, 2021
From Roman villas to Downton Abbey: Britain’s country houses
32:03

Clive Aslet, author of The Story of the Country House: A History of Places and People, reveals how Britain’s attitude to its stately piles has reflected the nation’s evolving political and economic landscape over the past 2,000 years.

 

(Ad) Clive Aslet is the author of The Story of the Country House: A History of Places and People (Yale, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-hexpod&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-story-of-the-country-house-a-history-of-places-and-people%2Fclive-aslet%2F%2F9780300255058



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 14, 2021
Hitler’s war on “degenerate art”
37:41

Journalist and author Charlie English shares the story of a remarkable collection of artworks by psychiatric patients in Weimar Germany and also explores the devastating impact of Nazism on modernist art and people with mental illnesses.

 

(Ad) Charlie English is the author of The Gallery of Miracles and Madness: Insanity, Art and Hitler’s first Mass-Murder Programme (William Collins, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Gallery-Miracles-Madness-Charlie-English/dp/0008299625/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-hexpod



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 13, 2021
The Borgias: everything you wanted to know
58:32

In the latest episode in our series on history’s biggest topics, Professor Jill Burke tackles listener questions and internet search queries on the Borgias, from rumours of incest and the Banquet of the Chestnuts to the forgotten triumphs Pope Alexander VI.




See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 12, 2021
Why the Tudors fell for courtly love
38:28

Sarah Gristwood considers how the Tudor monarchs used medieval ideas about courtly love for their own ends 

 

In medieval Europe, the nobility were entranced with courtly love, a genre of literature that saw chivalrous knights performing heroic deeds to protect and serve their lovers. But as Sarah Gristwood argues, these tropes later captured the hearts and minds of the Tudor dynasty, who used ideas about courtly love to further their own agendas. 

 

(Ad) Sarah Gristwood is the author of The Tudors in Love: The Courtly Code Behind the Last Medieval Dynasty (Oneworld, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-hexpod&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-tudors-in-love%2Fsarah-gristwood%2F9781786078940



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 11, 2021
Wedgwood: the radical potter
30:11

Tristram Hunt, author of The Radical Potter, discusses the life and work of Josiah Wedgwood (1730-1795), from his groundbreaking ceramic creations and enterprising business ventures to his political radicalism. 

 

(Ad) Tristram Hunt is the author of The Radical Potter: Josiah Wedgwood and the Transformation of Britain (Allen Lane, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Radical-Potter-Wedgwood-Transformation-Britain/dp/0241287898/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-hexpod



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 10, 2021
Aboriginal Australians: a modern history
44:42

Historian Richard Broome, author of Aboriginal Australians, discusses the experiences of Australia’s indigenous peoples after the arrival of white settlers, uncovering stories of exploitation and oppression, but also of agency and cultural independence.

 

(Ad) Richard Broome is the author of Aboriginal Australians: A History Since 1788 (Fifth Edition – Allen and Unwin, 2019). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Aboriginal-Australians-History-Since-1788/dp/1760528218/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-hexpod



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 08, 2021
Decolonisation to Covid-19: history education today
53:10
How does a history degree help you suss out fake news? How have history students been affected by covid-19? And are history degrees still valued as much as they once were? On today’s podcast, a panel of experts consider these questions and more, as they tackle the big issues facing history higher education in 2021.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 07, 2021
Seances, skis and secrets: an extraordinary WWI escape
41:41

Interned in a remote, forbidding prisoner of war camp at the height of the First World War, two British officers turned to an unlikely tool in their bid to escape – a ouija board. Margalit Fox, author of The Confidence Men: How Two Prisoners of War Engineered the Most Remarkable Escape in History, tells their story.

 

(Ad) Margalit Fox is the author of The Confidence Men: How Two Prisoners of War Engineered the Most Remarkable Escape in History (Profile, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-hexpod&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-confidence-men%2Fmargalit-fox%2F9781788162715



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 06, 2021
The Spanish Armada: everything you wanted to know
51:07
Why did the Spanish Armada set sail? What ships were used by the fleets? And did Queen Elizabeth I really give a famous speech at Tilbury? In our latest ‘Everything you wanted to know’ episode, Robert Hutchinson answers your questions on the Tudor era’s most famous maritime face-off.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 05, 2021
The Special Boat Service: WW2’s silent heroes
42:21

Historian Saul David discusses SBS – Silent Warriors, his new authorised history of the Special Boat Service in the Second World War. He explains how this daring maritime unit played a crucial role in Allied victory and highlights some of its most spectacular operations.

 

(Ad) Sauld David is the author of SBS - Silent Warriors: The Authorised Wartime History (HarperCollins, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones:

https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-hexpod&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fsbs-silent-warriors%2Fsaul-david%2F%2F9780008394523



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 04, 2021
The surprisingly modern Middle Ages
55:15

Dan Jones explores the similarities and differences between the medieval experience and our lives today

 

In what ways was the medieval era surprisingly modern? Dan Jones, whose latest book is Powers and Thrones: A New History of the Middle Ages, reveals the similarities and differences between the medieval experience and our lives today. 

 

(Ad) Dan Jones is the author of Powers and Thrones: A New History of the Middle Ages (Apollo, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Powers-Thrones-History-Middle-Ages-ebook/dp/B08M6KFTR1/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-hexpod

 

 



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 03, 2021
Why do things change?
25:37

David Potter, author of Disruption: Why Things Change, analyses the causes of huge events that altered human history and guides us on a tour of radical transformation in western history, taking in the Black Death, Adolf Hitler, the printing press and the perils of complacency.

 

(Ad) David Potter is the author of Disruption: Why Things Change (OUP, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Disruption-Things-Change-David-Potter/dp/0197518826/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-hexpod



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Sep 01, 2021
History in 2021, with Helen Carr and Suzannah Lipscomb
43:14

Sixty years ago EH Carr’s groundbreaking book, What is History?, explored how we should study the past. Now his great-granddaughter, Helen Carr, has teamed up with Suzannah Lipscomb to edit a new volume, What is History, Now?. Here, they discuss the importance and challenges of writing history in the 21st century.

 

(Ad) Helen Carr and Suzannah Lipscomb are the editors of What is History, Now? (Orion, 2021). Preorder it now from Waterstones: https://www.waterstones.com/book/what-is-history-now/suzannah-lipscomb/helen-carr/9781474622455



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 31, 2021
How Walter Scott’s stories shaped Scotland
23:42
An outpouring of bestselling novels and poems flowed from Walter Scott’s pen – from Waverley to Rob Roy. In fact, his writing was so influential that it helped overhaul the world’s view of Scotland, making it synonymous with the Highlands, romantic landscapes and clan honour. Annika Bautz discusses the writer’s work and the impact he had on perceptions of the country.  

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 30, 2021
Food history: everything you wanted to know
59:53
In the latest episode in our series on history’s biggest topics, Annie Gray tackles listener questions on culinary history, from Tudor breakfast and the oldest recipe books to long-forgotten foods and the surprisingly long history of vegetarianism.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 29, 2021
The rise of the Paralympics
25:07
From the Stoke Mandeville Games, which took place just after the Second World War, to this summer’s Paralympics, Ian Brittain describes how sport for disabled people has been on an incredible journey over the past 70 years.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 28, 2021
Behind the scenes of The Boleyns: A Scandalous Family
48:58
Through canny political manoeuvrings and passionate affairs, the Boleyns catapulted themselves from the sidelines of the Tudor court to the very apex of power. Dr Owen Emmerson, who recently appeared in the BBC docudrama The Boleyns: A Scandalous Family, traces the clan’s meteoric rise – and crushing fall.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 27, 2021
What’s next for period drama?
56:07
Which stories and historical periods should we be seeing dramatised on screen? What influence can historians have on how these stories are told? And how much does historical accuracy really matter to audiences? On today’s podcast, a panel of experts – Amanda-Rae Prescott, Anthony Delaney and Maddy Pelling – tackle the big questions surrounding period drama in the 21st century and ask: what’s next? 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 25, 2021
Vikings and Franks
50:13
The Vikings famously raided Britain and Ireland, but they also turned their attentions to Francia and Europe’s western seaboard. Christian Cooijmans explains what we know about interactions between the Franks and the Vikings.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 23, 2021
The forgotten matriarch of the Wars of the Roses
38:47

Cecily Neville, mother of Richard III, is typically glossed over in the story of the Wars of Roses. But behind the scenes, she fought her own war, using intrigue, manipulation and the power of words to support her family’s struggle for power. Annie Garthwaite discusses her new novel, Cecily, following the extraordinary life of this forgotten matriarch.

 

(Ad) Annie Garthwaite is the author of Cecily (Penguin, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-hexpod&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fcecily%2Fannie-garthwaite%2F9780241476871

 



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 23, 2021
British police history: everything you wanted to know
42:08
When did the first professional police force come into being? Why do the British police largely not carry guns? And what was the point of police boxes? In our latest ‘Everything you wanted to know’ episode, Chris Williams answers your questions on the history of law enforcement in Britain.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 22, 2021
The Windsors in exile
40:59

Andrew Lownie discusses his new book Traitor King, which delves into the lives of Edward VIII and Wallis Simpson after the abdication crisis of 1936. The discussion ranges from their sympathies for the agents and aims of Nazi Germany to their opulent and eccentric post-war lifestyle.

 

(Ad) Andrew Lownie is the author of Traitor King: The Scandalous Exile of the Duke and Duchess of Windsor (Bonnier Books, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-hexpod&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Ftraitor-king%2Fandrew-lownie%2F9781788704816



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 21, 2021
Working-class girlhood in 1930s Bolton
33:38

Hester Barron and Claire Langhamer discuss their new book, Class of ’37, which looks at what we can learn from essays written in 1937 by 12- and 13-year-old girls from Bolton.

 

(Ad) Hester Barron and Claire Langhamer are the authors of Class of '37: Voices from Working-Class Girlhood (Metro, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Class-37-Voices-Working-class-Girlhood/dp/1789464056/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-hexpod

 



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 20, 2021
Censorship: waging war on free speech
37:31

Eric Berkowitz describes the lengths to which rulers – from the first Chinese emperor to Henry VIII – have gone to suppress freedom of speech

 

Humans have been attempting to stamp out free speech for millennia. Eric Berkowitz discusses the inglorious history of censorship – from the first Chinese emperor to Henry VIII – and explains why he believes that attempts to silence others never work.

 

(Ad) Eric Berkowitz is the author of Dangerous Ideas: A Brief History of Censorship in the West, from the Ancients to Fake News (Westbourne Press, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-hexpod&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fdangerous-ideas%2Feric-berkowitz%2F9781908906427



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 18, 2021
The history hidden in British heritage sites
22:10

Fatima Manji talks about her new book Hidden Heritage: Rediscovering Britain’s Lost Love of the Orient, which explores the objects and landmarks that are often obscured by the traditional stories told in many heritage sites, and how they point to a more complex British history.

 

(Ad) Fatima Manji is the author of Hidden Heritage: Rediscovering Britain’s Lost Love of the Orient (Chatto & Windus, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Hidden-Heritage-Rediscovering-Britains-Orient/dp/1784742910/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-hexpod



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 17, 2021
Monarchs, fascists & communists: Romania’s modern history
38:39

Paul Kenyon discusses his book Children of the Night, which charts the story of modern Romania, and its colourful, chaotic and often corrupt leaders – from unstable playboy King Carol II, to communist dictator Nicolae Ceaușescu.

 

(Ad) Paul Kenyon is the author of Children of the Night: The Strange and Epic Story of Modern Romania (Head of Zeus, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-hexpod&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fchildren-of-the-night%2Fpaul-kenyon%2F9781789543162



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 16, 2021
Early Medieval Britain: everything you wanted to know
55:23

In the latest episode in our series tackling history’s biggest topics, Dr Rory Naismith, author of Early Medieval Britain, c500–1000, responds to listener questions and popular internet search queries on Britain in the early Middle Ages. 

 

(Ad) Rory Naismith is the author of Early Medieval Britain c500-1000 (Cambridge University Press, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Medieval-Britain-500-1000-Cambridge-History/dp/1108440258/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-hexpod



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 15, 2021
Bewitched cars & mail-order charms: witchcraft in modern France
33:46
From bewitched cars and mail-order charms to murder investigations, Will Pooley delves into the surprising history of witchcraft in France from the Revolution to the Second World War, revealing how supernatural beliefs adapted to a modernising society. 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 14, 2021
Witnesses to the Berlin Wall
1:19:34

As we approach the 60th anniversary of the Berlin Wall’s construction, Major General Sir Robert Corbett and journalists Mark Wood and Alastair Stewart discuss their memories of the divided city and the dramatic events of November 1989. The discussion is chaired by the author Iain MacGregor.

 

(Ad) Iain MacGregor is the author of Checkpoint Charlie: The Cold War, the Berlin Wall and the Most Dangerous Place on Earth (Constable, 2019). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Checkpoint-Charlie-Berlin-Dangerous-Place/dp/1472130588/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-hexpod



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 13, 2021
Robespierre’s brutal downfall
40:40

Colin Jones tells the story of Maximilien Robespierre’s fall from power – a dramatic 24 hours that ended with the revolutionary titan facing the guillotine

 

Maximilien Robespierre awoke on the morning of 27 July 1794 as arguably the most powerful man in Paris – the intellectual driving force behind the French Revolution. Twenty-four hours later he was languishing in a cell, condemned to die by the guillotine. Author Colin Jones tells the story of these fateful 24 hours in Robespierre’s life – a day that would alter the trajectory of the French Revolution.

 

(Ad) Colin Jones is the author of The Fall of Robespierre: 24 Hours in Revolutionary Paris (Oxford University Press, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-hexpod&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-fall-of-robespierre%2Fcolin-jones%2F9780198715955



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 11, 2021
How should we teach the slave trade?
32:08
Teachers Richard Kennett and Tom Allen discuss how they have worked with six other teachers to create a new textbook on this previously overlooked element of the city’s history, and its impact on Bristol today.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 10, 2021
Building utopia after WW1
43:16

Left traumatised by the horrors of the First World War, between the 1920s and 1940s people around the world set out to create “perfect” societies – with mixed results. Anna Neima, author of The Utopians: Six Attempts to Build the Perfect Society, charts their efforts.

 

(Ad) Anna Neima is the author of The Utopians: Six Attempts to Build the Perfect Society (Pan Macmillan, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-hexpod&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-utopians%2Fanna-neima%2F2928377056346

 



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 09, 2021
The Ottoman empire: everything you wanted to know
43:51

Eugene Rogan answers listener questions on one of history’s most powerful – and long-lasting – empires

 

How did the Ottomans dominate swathes of Europe, Asia and Africa for up to seven centuries? How did their sack of Constantinople in 1453 change the course of history? And why did they back the wrong horse in the First World War? Eugene Rogan answers your questions on one of the world’s greatest empires. 

 

(Ad) Eugene Rogan is the author of The Fall of the Ottomans: The Great War in the Middle East, 1914-1920 (Allen Lane, 2015). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Fall-Ottomans-Great-Middle-1914-1920/dp/1846144388/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-hexpod



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 08, 2021
Portraits, power and royal wigs
35:45

Sue Pritchard, curator of a new exhibition of royal portraits at the National Maritime Museum, discusses how wigs were used to convey royal power

 

Sue Pritchard, curator of Tudors to Windsors, a new exhibition of royal portraits at the National Maritime Museum, discusses how monarchs used wigs to convey royal power and spark fashions, from Elizabeth I’s fiery false locks, to Charles II’s luxuriant cascading curls. 



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 07, 2021
Wartime Britain’s mixed-race babies
32:46

During the Second World War, an estimated 2,000 babies were fathered by African-American GIs stationed in Britain. Lucy Bland reveals how these mixed-race children faced discrimination in the streets and ambivalence from the government, and why so many were given up by their mothers.

 

 (Ad) Lucy Bland is the author of Britain's ‘Brown Babies’: The Stories of Children Born to Black GIs and White Women in the Second World War (Manchester University Press, 2019). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Britains-%60Brown-Babies-Stories-Children/dp/1526133261/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-hexpod



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 06, 2021
The transformation of India’s glamorous golden couple
52:30

John Zubryzcki shares the story of the party-loving royals of the House of Jaipur, who turned to politics following Indian independence

 

In the 1950s and 60s, the House of Jaipur’s Jai and Ayesha were seen as India’s golden couple, rubbing shoulders with American film stars and British royalty. But as the princely states’ power was squeezed post-partition, the couple had to balance partying with politics. John Zubrzycki charts their tumultuous lives.

 

(Ad) John Zubryzcki is the author of The House of Jaipur: The Inside Story of India’s Most Glamorous Royal Family (C Hurst and co, 2021). Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/House-Jaipur-Inside-Indias-Glamorous/dp/1787385566/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-hexpod



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 04, 2021
Sarah Ferguson, Duchess of York, on historical fiction
26:31

Sarah Ferguson, Duchess of York, and Marguerite Kaye join us to discuss their new historical romance novel, Her Heart for a Compass, which follows Victorian aristocrat Lady Margaret Montagu Scott, as she seeks to shake off the suffocating restrictions of the time.

 

(Ad) Sarah Ferguson, Duchess of York and Marguerite Kaye are the co-authors of Her Heart for a Compass (HarperCollins, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-hexpod&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fher-heart-for-a-compass%2Fsarah-ferguson-duchess-of-york%2F9780008383602



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 03, 2021
Oliver Cromwell’s remarkable rise to power
25:11

Historian Ronald Hutton discusses Oliver Cromwell’s early life and career, exploring the brilliance and cruelty of the future Lord Protector and explaining how he rose from obscurity to become one of the dominant figures of the age.

 

(Ad) Ronald Hutton is the author of The Making of Oliver Cromwell (Yale, due to be published 10 August). Preorder on Amazon here: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Making-Oliver-Cromwell-Ronald-Hutton/dp/0300257457/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-hexpod



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 02, 2021
Modern Welsh history: everything you wanted to know
59:04

Martin Johnes tackles listener questions about the history of modern Wales, from the Industrial Revolution to devolution

 

In the latest episode in our series tackling major historical topics, Professor Martin Johnes answers listener questions about the history of modern Wales. He covers topics from the rapid industrialisation that transformed the nation’s landscape and culture in the 19th century to devolution at the turn of the 21st century. 



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Aug 01, 2021
George II: reassessing a much-forgotten monarch
36:27

Norman Davies introduces a long-maligned and overlooked monarch, George II, King of Great Britain and Ireland and Elector of Hanover, considering the legacy of his rule, the familial rifts that characterised his reign, and his role in the trade of enslaved people.


(Ad) Norman Davies is the author of George II: Not Just a British Monarch (Penguin, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-hexpod&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fgeorge-ii-penguin-monarchs%2Fnorman-davies%2F9780141978420



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 31, 2021
A hard-fought history of trespass
29:05

Nick Hayes discusses the contested history of land ownership in England, from William the Conqueror to the Kinder trespass

 

Nick Hayes, author of The Book of Trespass, discusses the contested history of land ownership in England, from William the Conqueror to the Kinder trespass. He recounts moments from history when people have come to blows over whether our natural resources should belong to the many, or be accessed only by a privileged few.

 

(Ad) Nick Hayes is the author of The Book of Trespass: Crossing the Lines that Divide Us (Bloomsbury, 2021)

 

Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-hexpod&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-book-of-trespass%2Fnick-hayes%2F9781526604729

 



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 30, 2021
Antwerp: city of innovation & intrigue
33:22

In the 16th century, Antwerp was a global centre of trade, talked about around the world. Michael Pye considers its rise and bloody fall

 

In the 16th century, Antwerp was a global city that was talked about around the world – a centre of commerce, trade, knowledge and innovation, plus one of scandal, murder, secrets and intrigue. Michael Pye, author of Antwerp: The Glory Years, considers its rise and bloody fall.

 

(Ad) Michael Pye is the author of Antwerp: The Glory Years (Allen Lane, 2021). Buy it now on Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Antwerp-Glory-Years-Michael-Pye/dp/0241243211/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-hexpod



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 28, 2021
How the 1964 Tokyo Olympics redefined Japan
36:33

With the Olympics underway in Tokyo, Chris Harding looks back at 1964 – the last time Japan hosted the competition

 

With the Summer Olympics underway in Tokyo, Chris Harding looks back to the 1964 games – the last time Japan hosted the competition. He explores how the competition redefined the nation on the world stage two decades after the Second World War. 

 

(Ad) Christopher Harding is the author of The Japanese: A History in 20 Lives (Allen Lane, 2021). Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-hexpod&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-japanese%2Fchristopher-harding%2F9780241434505



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 27, 2021
Australian bushrangers: folk heroes or common criminals?
43:51

Meg Foster discusses the bandits that lived outside the law in Australia’s bush – from Ned Kelly to surprising lesser-known figures 

 

Meg Foster discusses the bandits that lived outside the law in Australia’s bush, unpicking myth from reality in the stories of criminals who became folk heroes and national icons. She looks at the infamous bushranger Ned Kelly, and also shares surprising stories of lesser-known Aboriginal, black and women bushrangers.



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 26, 2021
Olympic history: everything you wanted to know
44:48

As the world’s best athletes congregate in Tokyo for the 29th Summer Games, David Goldblatt answers your questions on the history of the Olympics

 

How violent were the ancient Greek Olympics? How did the Nazis react to Jessie Owens’ incredible performance in Munich, 1936? And what ranks as the greatest achievement in the history of the Games? David Goldblatt, author of The Games: A Global History of the Olympics, answers your questions on Olympic history.

 

(Ad) David Goldblatt is the author of The Games: A Global History of the Olympics (W W Norton & Company, 2017). Buy it now on Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Games-Global-History-Olympics/dp/0393292770



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 25, 2021
Why were the Georgians fixated with fatness?
29:39

Dr Freya Gowrley reveals how Georgian satirists used images of fatness to comment on the anxieties of the age 

 

From Britain's heaviest man who became a much-loved celebrity, to rotund imperialists mocked in humorous prints, Dr Freya Gowrley reveals how Georgian satirists used images of fatness to comment on the anxieties of the age. 



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 24, 2021
How assassinations have changed history
25:19

Michael Burleigh discusses his book Day of the Assassins: A History of Political Murder, which considers what we can learn from looking at assassinations as a category of political violence. He also talks about some of the key assassinations through history, from Julius Caesar and Abraham Lincoln to the mysterious 1986 killing of the Swedish prime minister Olof Palme.

 

(Ad) Michael Burleigh is the author of Day of the Assassins: A History of Political Murder (Picador, 2021)


Buy it now on Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Day-Assassins-History-Political-Murder/dp/1529030137/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-hexpod



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 23, 2021
The slave trade: a family history
28:29

Alex Renton discusses his new book, Blood Legacy, which offers an unflinching account of his ancestors’ involvement in the slave trade. He also considers how best to deal with this unwanted inheritance, and how the long-lasting impact of slavery still affects the world today. 

 

(Ad) Alex Renton is the author of Blood Legacy: Reckoning With a Family’s Story of Slavery (Canongate, 2021)

 

Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-hexpod&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbooks%2Fsearch%2Fterm%2Fblood%2Blegacy



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 21, 2021
The piano: a musical history
32:34

For more than 300 years, the piano has captivated audiences, while composers have pushed the instrument’s boundaries. Susan Tomes, author of The Piano: A History in 100 Pieces, discusses some of the most impressive pieces of piano music ever written, and shares the stories of the composers who penned them. 

 

(Ad) Susan Tomes is the author of The Piano: A History in 100 Pieces (Yale, 2021)

 

Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-hexpod&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-piano%2Fsusan-tomes%2F9780300253924



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 20, 2021
Should they stand or fall? The great statue debate
44:44

As statues of controversial historical figures continue to hit the headlines, Alex von Tunzelmann – author of Fallen Idols: Twelve Statues that Made History – looks at some of the most illuminating examples from across the centuries. She explores why the debate has proven so divisive, and gives her take on what should happen to controversial statues.

 

(Ad) Alex von Tunzelmann is the author of Fallen Idols: Twelve Statues that Made History (Headline, 2021)


Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Fallen-Idols-Twelve-Statues-History/dp/147228187X/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-hexpod

 



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 19, 2021
The church in medieval England: everything you wanted to know
1:05:15

Did medieval people have sex in churches? What was a boy bishop? And why did women have to sit in the ‘safe side’ of a church in the Middle Ages? In the latest episode of our everything you want to know series, Professor Nicholas Orme responds to author questions and popular internet search queries about the church in medieval England.

 

(Ad) Nicholas Orme is the author of the upcoming book Going to Church in Medieval England (Yale University Press, due 27 July)


Preorder it now on Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Going-Church-Medieval-England-Nicholas/dp/0300256507/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-hexpod



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 18, 2021
Madness & misery in Antarctica
48:59

In 1897 the Belgian Antarctic Expedition set sail in search of the south magnetic pole, but their journey was scuppered by a long, arduous winter trapped in the pack ice. Malnourishment, madness, and the threat of murder loomed. Julian Sancton, author of Madhouse at the End of the Earth: The Belgica’s Journey into the Dark Antarctic Night, charts their extraordinary journey.

 

(Ad) Julian Sancton is the author of Madhouse at the End of the Earth: The Belgica’s Journey into the Dark Antarctic Night (Ebury, 2021)

 

Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-hexpod&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fmadhouse-at-the-end-of-the-earth%2Fjulian-sancton%2F9780753553442



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 17, 2021
The battle over the Benin Bronzes
32:43
Looted from Benin City in 1897, the Benin Bronzes are one of the most impressive collections of artworks ever created – and their future is under debate. While many of these artefacts are currently held in European museums and private collections, calls are being made to return them Nigeria. Bronwen Everill discusses the history of the bronzes, the culture that created them, and what their future might be.

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 16, 2021
Britain & France: enemies or economic partners?
44:59

From the Falklands to North America, British and French soldiers spent much of the 18th century locked in battle. Yet many influential thinkers believed that the two nations’ prospects were best served by cooperation not conflict. John Shovlin discusses the attempts to reset the dial on Anglo-French relations in the 18th century.

 

(Ad) John Shovlin is the author of Trading with the Enemy: Britain, France, and the 18th-Century Quest for a Peaceful World Order (Yale, 2021) 

 

Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Trading-Enemy-Britain-18th-Century-Peaceful/dp/0300253567/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-hexpod



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 14, 2021
Watergate in 100 days: how President Nixon fell
22:44

Author and former Washington Post journalist Michael Dobbs talks about his new book King Richard, which charts 100 pivotal days as the Watergate scandal gained a grip on Richard Nixon’s presidency, eventually leading to his infamous downfall.

 

(Ad) Michael Dobbs is the author of King Richard: Nixon and Watergate, an American Tragedy (Scribe, 2021) 

 

Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-hexpod&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fking-richard%2Fmichael-dobbs%2F%2F9781913348731



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 13, 2021
Contraception, consent & erotic connection: sex through history
36:05

Fern Riddell, author of Sex: Lessons from History, discusses what we can learn from looking at sexual culture in the past, and gives her thoughts on what we get wrong about the sex lives of our forebears, from contraception and sex work to the joy of sexual connection.

 

(Ad) Fern Riddell is the author of Sex: Lessons from History (Hodder & Stoughton, 2021) 

 

Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Sex-Lessons-History-Fern-Riddell/dp/1473666252/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-hexpod



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 12, 2021
The Highland Clearances: everything you wanted to know
45:30

Who was to blame for the Highland Clearances? Why did they happen? And what became of those who were forcibly evicted? In the latest episode in our series on history’s biggest topics, historian Sir Tom Devine, author of The Scottish Clearances: A History of the Dispossessed, responds to listener questions on the causes and consequences of one of the most notorious episodes of Scottish history.

 

(Ad) Tom Devine is the author of The Scottish Clearances: A History of the Dispossessed, 1600-1900 (Allen Lane, 2018) 

 

Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-hexpod&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-scottish-clearances%2Ft-m-devine%2F%2F9780141985930



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 11, 2021
Running to escape the horrors of war
46:10

Jonathan Westaway explores why there was a boom in the popularity of endurance running following the First World War

 

Following the First World War, endurance athletes in the English Lake District and elsewhere devoted themselves to smashing long-distance running records. Jonathan Westaway explores how endurance running’s boom in popularity was in part a reaction to the horrors of the global conflict. 

 

Read Jonathan Westaway’s article here: http://clok.uclan.ac.uk/7025/



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 10, 2021
The glamour & danger of Cairo’s 1920s nightlife scene
33:37

During its heyday in the roaring 20s, Cairo’s nightlife district was the place to go for a world-class night out – from glitzy variety shows in smoky clubs to Arabic operas performed to adoring audiences. Raphael Cormack, the author of Midnight in Cairo: The Female Stars of Egypt’s Roaring ‘20s, discusses this glamourous scene and some of the enterprising women who dominated it.

 

(Ad) Raphael Cormack is the author of Midnight in Cairo: The Female Stars of Egypt’s Roaring ‘20s (Saqi, 2021)

 

Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Midnight-Cairo-Female-Egypts-Roaring/dp/0863563139/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-hexpod



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 09, 2021
The Viking Great Army: the latest discoveries
55:24

Julian Richards discusses the Viking Great Army, which wreaked havoc on the kingdoms of Anglo-Saxon England from 865-878

 

From 865-878, the Viking Great Army wreaked havoc on the kingdoms of Anglo-Saxon England. Julian Richards, author of The Viking Great Army and the Making of England, reveals how new research can shed light on the story of Norse fighting force.

 

(Ad) Julian Richards and Dawn Hadley are the co-authors of The Viking Great Army and the Making of England (Thames & Hudson, 2021)

 

Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-hexpod&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fthe-viking-great-army-and-the-making-of-england%2Fdawn-hadley%2Fjulian-richards%2F9780500022016



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 07, 2021
Glee-man, high-deedy & bendsome: a language to save England
18:30
Poverty and riots racked 19th-century rural England, but one eccentric Victorian cleric was convinced he had the solution – inventing a new language. Siân Rees introduces us to Reverend William Barnes, who developed a new version of English stripped of foreign words, which he was convinced would bind the nation together and return England to a state of harmony. 

See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 06, 2021
Healthcare before the NHS
1:02:24

Professor Barry Doyle explains what kind of treatment you could expect If you were ill before the National Health Service was founded in 1948 

 

If you were ill before the National Health Service was founded, what kind of treatment could you expect? Professor Barry Doyle discusses what hospitals and healthcare were like in Britain before 1948, revealing a surprisingly extensive and accessible system.



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 05, 2021
The Medici: everything you wanted to know
43:05

How did the Medici influence the Renaissance? Just how rich were they? And what dark family secrets were lurking in their past? In the latest episode in our series on history’s biggest topics, historian Catherine Fletcher responds to listener questions and popular online search queries on the Florentine dynasty, covering everything from the family’s exorbitant wealth to their alleged scandalous affairs. 

 

(Ad) Catherine Fletcher is the author of The Beauty and the Terror: An Alternative History of the Italian Renaissance(Bodley Head, 2020)

 

Buy it now from Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Beauty-Terror-Alternative-History-Renaissance/dp/184792509X/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-hexpod

 



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 04, 2021
From hysteria to wandering wombs: women and medicine through history
42:37

Elinor Cleghorn discusses her new book Unwell Women, which traces the long history of the misdiagnosis and mistreatment of women’s health issues, and highlights some of the women who fought back against medical sexism.

 

(Ad) Elinor Cleghorn is the author of Unwell Women: A Journey Through Medicine and Myth in a Man-Made World (Orion, 2021) 

 

Buy it now from Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-hexpod&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Funwell-women%2Felinor-cleghorn%2F9781474616850



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 03, 2021
Hogarth: the chronicler of the 18th century
56:47

Jacqueline Riding discusses her new biography of William Hogarth, which charts the life and work of the famed artist and satirist. Hogarth was a larger-than-life figure whose many engravings and portraits highlighted the morals and vices of the 18th century.


(Ad) Jacqueline Riding is the author of Hogarth: Life in Progress (Profile, 2021). Buy it now at Waterstones: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-hexpod&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.waterstones.com%2Fbook%2Fhogarth%2Fjacqueline-riding%2F9781788163477



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jul 02, 2021
Digging into the Klondike gold rush
38:40

From grizzled gold miners to fresh-faced boys in search of adventure, 100,000 prospectors set out for the remote Yukon in search of gold. Stephen Tuffnell delves into the Klondike gold rush, which saw millions of dollars’ worth of gold pulled from the ground – and ended as abruptly as it began.    

 



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 30, 2021
The Cold War battle for Berlin
29:26

Any illusions that the wartime entente between the western Allies and the Soviet Union would flourish in the new postwar world were shattered when the two sides came face to face on the streets of Berlin in the summer of 1945. Author Giles Milton reveals how spiralling tensions between Josef Stalin and his counterparts in the west over the fate of the German capital fired the starting gun on the Cold War.


(Ad) Giles Milton is the author of Checkmate in Berlin: The Cold War Showdown that Shaped the Modern World (John Murray, 2021). But it now at Bookshop.org: https://go.skimresources.com?id=71026X1535947&xcust=historyextra-social-hexpod&xs=1&url=https%3A%2F%2Fuk.bookshop.org%2Fbooks%2Fcheckmate-in-berlin-the-cold-war-showdown-that-shaped-the-modern-world%2F9781529393156



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 29, 2021
The history and mystery of UFOs
44:36

Following the release of the Pentagon’s much anticipated report on UFOs, Dr David Clarke explains how the idea of extra-terrestrials in mysterious flying saucers developed from its origins in the Cold War to become an enduring modern myth.


(Ad) David Clarke is the author of How UFOs Conquered the World: The History of a Modern Myth (Aurum, 2015). Buy it now at Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/How-UFOs-Conquered-World-History/dp/1781313032/?tag=bbchistory045-21&ascsubtag=historyextra-social-hexpod



See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

Jun 28, 2021