Marketplace All-in-One

By Marketplace

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Subscribers: 1324
Reviews: 6

Spamolio
 May 26, 2021

harry
 Oct 23, 2020
no financial news just more biased politics.


 Sep 2, 2020

Magnificent Steve
 Nov 24, 2019

Paul
 Apr 27, 2019
Marketplace is an excellent source of information about the national and global economy, and why you should care. Well produced and timely, but it does not require an economics degree top understand.

Description

Marketplace® is the leading business news program in the nation. We bring you clear explorations of how economic news affects you, through stories, conversations, newsworthy numbers and more. The Marketplace All-in-One podcast provides each episode of the public radio broadcast programs Marketplace, Marketplace Morning Report®and Marketplace Tech® along with our podcasts Make Me Smart, Corner Office and The Uncertain Hour. Visit marketplace.org for more. From American Public Media. Twitter: @Marketplace


Episode Date
Biden expected to pledge charge toward future of electric vehicles
00:08:44

President Biden is scheduled to sign an executive order setting a new goal to get more electric vehicles on the roads. The order calls for half of the cars sold in this country to be electrified by 2030. Diane Swonk drops in to talk about low layoff numbers and what we might expect from Friday’s job report. We also examine the discussion around COVID booster vaccines, where there are questions involving vaccine equity and potential billions of dollars that could head to pharmaceutical companies.

Aug 05, 2021
One entrepreneur plans for a noteworthy back-to-school shopping season
00:08:11

The pandemic altered the concept of the school year, as many schools were forced to close and adapt an online path. One aspect of education that was hit hard? The school supply business. We hear from a small business owner preparing for the time classrooms start filling back up. We hear from the BBC as Australia could encounter another COVID-triggered recession. Also, we look at how suspensions on social media could prove to be costly for athletes.

Aug 05, 2021
With more local lockdowns, Australia could face a second COVID-19 induced recession
00:08:26

From the BBC World Service: Australia’s three largest cities, Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane, are all in lockdown as authorities work to tackle delta variant outbreaks and vaccine rollout lags behind many other developed countries. Some economists are pointing to the negative economic impact of repeated regional lockdowns. Plus, as Iran’s new president Ebrahim Raisi prepares to take office, he pledges to help improve the economy. And Dubai looks to cash in with remote-working visas. 

Aug 05, 2021
Is Uber turning Postmates into a zombie app?
00:08:35

We learned this week that Uber saw strong demand for its food delivery service in recent months, despite restaurants reopening. Late last year, the company bought its competitor Postmates for $2.6 billion dollars. Behind the scenes, Uber has been working to merge the two businesses, transitioning drivers away from the Postmates corporate app for months, with plans to completely shut it down as soon as next week. The consumer app will stick around. Marketplace’s Meghan McCarty Carino speaks with Alex Susskind, director of the Cornell Institute for Food and Beverage Management. He says even though Uber and Postmates are offering essentially the same foods from the same drivers, there’s a reason the brands are separate: consumers.

Aug 05, 2021
Pandemic pups have an economic effect
00:18:00

Like so many people hanging out at home in this pandemic, our listener Joel got a dog. He wants to know if enough people got new pets to make an economic impact. On today’s show, we’ll do the numbers and answer more of your questions about wildfires and vaccines, plus get an update from Kimberly’s Uncle Davids.

Here’s everything we talked about today:

Read the transcript here.

Our show needs your voice! Tell us what you think of the show or ask a question for our hosts to answer! Send a voice memo or give us a call at 508-82-SMART (508-827-6278).

Aug 05, 2021
Is the economy on track? Freight trains might clue us in.
00:28:00

When searching for economic indicators, some economists look to rail traffic. Intermodal train traffic, when products travel in containers from ships or trucks onto trains, is doing especially well this year as consumers demand imported goods. But congestion in U.S. ports and surges in COVID-19 could cut freight rail traffic — and complicate economic growth. Plus, New York City’s restaurant industry responds to vaccine mandates, the drop in flood insurance and the complex legacy Enron leaves behind.

Aug 04, 2021
Examining the cracks in the system of reporting sexual harassment
00:08:33

New York Governor Andrew Cuomo faces allegations of sexual harassment, according to a report from the New York attorney general. As a result, many officials, including President Biden, have called on Cuomo to resign. We take a look at the elements of reporting sexual harassment with employment law professor Marcia McCormick. We talk about the markets with Susan Schmidt. Also, staff shortages are taking their toll on the waste management industry.

Aug 04, 2021
The new eviction moratorium extends to October. Where’s the renters aid?
00:08:18

There’s a new eviction ban after plenty of back-and-forth about whether or not the Biden administration had the authority to make it happen. The ban lasts until Oct. 3, with officials hoping it gives state and local governments time to figure out how to distribute billions of dollars in unused federal aid. Also, the U.S. ranks dead last in health care affordability. We also discuss the state of the shortage-plagued construction industry with someone who has to deal with it every day.

Aug 04, 2021
A year after Beirut’s port explosion, an economy left in tatters and questions still unanswered
00:08:47

From the BBC World Service: One year after a port explosion in Lebanon’s capital, economic problems continue to plague the nation in which half the population now lives in poverty. Plus: Three million COVID-19 vaccines arrive in Southeast Asia. And, new Barbie dolls honor women who have worked the front lines during the pandemic.

Aug 04, 2021
Twitter wants bounty hunters to help fix its image-cropping algorithm
00:08:56

Back in May, Twitter partially disabled an algorithm that cropped photos posted by users in ways that revealed certain biases. A company audit, and plenty of people on the internet, found the algorithm preferred white faces over Black faces, and men over women. Now, as part of the hacker conference DEF CON, which starts tomorrow, the company is offering a cash bounty to help fix the problem. Marketplace’s Meghan McCarty Carino speaks with Rumman Chowdhury, director of Machine Learning Ethics, Transparency and Accountability at Twitter. Before that, she was founder and CEO of Parity, which helped other companies identify bias in their algorithms. Chowdhury says the cropping algorithm was based on data tracking where real people tended to look in photos.

Aug 04, 2021
The debt ceiling debate is more about politics than economics
00:31:00

The debt ceiling debate is full of contradictions. It’s real but it’s not real. It’s a problem but it’s not a problem. Congress missed the deadline to raise the federal borrowing limit before it went back into effect at over the weekend. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen has moved some money around as a short-term fix, but Congress needs to raise the limit, and soon. But America’s debt isn’t like other kinds of debt, or even other countries’ debts. On today’s show, Harvard economist Megan Greene explains it all as we prepare for that perennial partisan fight. Plus: “spiritual opium,” “Pokémon Go” and, oh yeah, that infrastructure spending bill.

Here’s everything we talked about today:

Read the transcript here.

Our show needs your voice! Tell us what you think of the show or ask a question for our hosts to answer! Send a voice memo or give us a call at 508-82-SMART (508-827-6278).

Aug 04, 2021
Beverage companies are racing to find the next “it” drink
00:28:00

PepsiCo is preparing to sell Tropicana and other juices to a private equity firm for $3.3 billion. Molson Coors is going to phase out 11 of its “economy” brands. Increasingly, beverage companies are looking for the next trendy drink of choice — which means ditching investments in sugary drinks and frat party favorites in favor of seltzer, kombucha and prebiotic soda. We also discuss the very slow recovery of business travel, how California’s drought could translate into higher costs for tomato products and how businesses decide to increase prices.

Aug 03, 2021
California’s child care providers are getting a raise
00:08:14

Months of negotiations have led to the California Child Care Providers union securing its first labor contract with the state. Next year, more than 40,000 family child care providers will see a raise in wages. We also discuss the markets with Lindsey Piegza of Stifel Financial. The self-storage industry is running out of space amid a wave of increased demand.

Aug 03, 2021
Research spotlights existence of racial discrimination in hiring process
00:08:09

We spoke to the University of Chicago’s Evan Rose about research that targets systemic racial discrimination in hiring among large U.S. employers. We look over the various retailers and restaurants that are re-instituting mask requirements. Also, vehicle shortages are still plaguing the car rental industry.

Aug 03, 2021
Chinese tech stocks plunge after online gaming is branded “spiritual opium”
00:06:41

From the BBC World Service: Shares of big online game makers including Tencent and NetEase fell more than 10% respectively after Chinese state media criticized the level of internet addiction among young people. Plus, farmers in eastern Kenya turn to sunflowers after neighbors banned exports of a popular cash crop. And Britain’s finance minister tells young people that networking in an office is important when it comes to advancing your career.

Aug 03, 2021
Do privacy “nutrition” labels stop us from eating the burger?
00:07:15

About seven months ago, Apple rolled out some new features that let users see exactly how apps collect data about us and share it with advertisers. The privacy “nutrition” labels run pretty much on the honor system: It’s up to the app makers to provide the information. Now, Google is revealing how its own labels might work for Android. Marketplace’s Meghan McCarty Carino speaks with Ashkan Soltani, a fellow at Georgetown Law’s Center on Privacy and Technology. He says we can get a sense of how effective Google’s labels might be by looking at how Apple’s have worked so far.

Aug 03, 2021
Why are jobs so important?
00:24:02

Having a job is how we earn money to pay for the things we need. Money is important but it’s not the only reason people work. This week we’re going out to the pizzeria, where we’ll learn how every job is connected to lots of other jobs — and how those connections keep our economy running. Plus we’ll hear from a bunch of people with cool jobs that you probably didn’t even know existed, and we’ll ask a group of kids to tell us about the jobs of their dreams. Got a money problem you need help solving? Tell us about it at Marketplace.org/million.

Aug 03, 2021
The eviction moratorium blame game
00:15:00

The federal eviction moratorium expired at the end of July, meaning potentially millions of struggling renters could lose their homes. On today’s show, we’ll pick apart the finger pointing between the White House and congressional leadership over who let the moratorium lapse, and what’s next for renters and landlords. Plus: The Ozarks, wolf turns and mysterious jetpack pilots.

Here’s everything we talked about today:

Read the transcript here.

Our show needs your voice! Tell us what you think of the show or ask a question for our hosts to answer! Send a voice memo or give us a call at 508-82-SMART (508-827-6278).

Aug 03, 2021
The infrastructure bill could create tons of jobs. But who will do them?
00:28:00

The $1 trillion Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act, if passed, could create anywhere from 650,000 to 1 million new jobs, economists predict. Though the bill has substantial bipartisan support, the U.S. labor force is short on construction workers, and the government may have to invest in citizen training or issue more visas for temporary, foreign workers to fill the positions. Later in the show, we’ll also examine the business of journalism, discuss how “buy now pay later” platforms work and talk about the implications of Walmart’s (partial) employee vaccine mandate.

Aug 02, 2021
UK prepares itself for American travelers
00:08:36

The United Kingdom has done away with the quarantine requirement for fully vaccinated Americans. One aspect of the U.K. that’s hoping to benefit is the theater industry, which had been ravaged by the pandemic. Julla Coronado stops in to talk about the markets and employment figures. We also chat about Square’s $29 billion purchase of Afterpay.

Aug 02, 2021
Australia’s Afterpay gets the nation’s biggest-ever corporate takeover deal
00:07:43

From the BBC World Service: Australian buy-now-pay-later company Afterpay has received the country’s biggest-ever corporate takeover offer from Jack Dorsey’s U.S. payments company Square. Plus, as quarantine requirements disappear for American travelers to the U.K., a look at how London’s West End theaters are trying to stay afloat and provide entertainment for those visiting from abroad.

Aug 02, 2021
Curious about how long the chip shortage will last? This Dutch company might tell us.
00:06:51

Dutch company NXP is one of the auto industry’s leading suppliers of computer chips. Its earnings report is being released after market close on Monday, and it could be an indicator on which direction the chip shortage is going to go. The BBC checks in with news on the ability to travel to the United Kingdom, and we also discuss the possibility of big amounts of federal money being set aside for clean energy.

Aug 02, 2021
An app to track home health care aides has unintended effects
00:10:37

They’re called electronic visit verification apps, or EVVs. They log the hours and the movements of home health care workers paid for by Medicaid. States are just starting to roll them out as part of an Obama-era program that promised to make managing the work of home aides more efficient and reduce fraud in the system. Marketplace’s Meghan McCarty Carino speaks with Virginia Eubanks, the author of “Automating Inequality: How High-Tech Tools Profile, Police, and Punish the Poor.” She’s been following Arkansas’ implementation of EVVs and co-wrote a story about it for the Guardian newspaper. Eubanks said the state’s app has been glitchy, which led to missed paychecks for aides.

Aug 02, 2021
Let’s do the numbers on those breakthrough COVID cases
00:18:43

A tiny fraction of 1% of vaccinated Americans have tested positive for COVID-19. But if you don’t read beyond the headlines, you might not know that. On this punchy happy hour episode, we’ll talk about why the media need to do better reporting on the delta variant. And speaking of failure … Congress went on summer break without extending the eviction moratorium. We’ll talk about it and play another round of our favorite game, “Half Full/Half Empty.”

Here’s everything we talked about today:

Click here to read the transcript.

Thanks to everyone who joined us live on YouTube for this episode! We’re live Fridays at 3:30 p.m. Pacific/6:30 p.m. Eastern for happy hour! Subscribe to our channel and sign up for notifications so you don’t miss it.

Jul 31, 2021
With surge of delta variant, will downtowns become ghost towns again?
00:28:00

With infections by the delta coronavirus on the rise, companies including Google, Lyft, Indeed and Apple are delaying their back-to-the-office plans. That worries commercial real estate pros and businesses that depend on office workers. Also on today’s show: consumer sensitivity to price hikes, long lines in Cape Cod and how chaos in the shipping business impacts a customs broker.

Jul 30, 2021
Delta variant concerns contribute to drop in consumer optimism
00:08:50

Consumer optimism has seen a sharp decline in recent weeks as news of the surging delta variant of COVID-19 has people reluctant to head out and populate businesses. Also, we look into how big oil companies plan to utilize their incoming wave of expected profits. Then we head over to France, where a “health pass” designed to keep the unvaccinated away from a variety of places is about to make the rounds.

Jul 30, 2021
Europe exits recession and begins trek to economic recovery
00:08:22

From the BBC World Service: Eurozone economies are starting to see a partial recovery from the pandemic as national lockdowns ease and households spend more money. Britain’s biggest dairy producer is unable to deliver to hundreds of supermarkets and shops as a shortage of truck drivers hits a “crisis’ point.” And Brazil’s indigenous communities are fighting back against palm oil plantations on their doorstep.

Jul 30, 2021
Renters everywhere prepare for the end of the federal eviction ban
00:06:59

The federal eviction moratorium is set to expire, which means a flood of delayed eviction cases will be resuming and renters will be scrambling. We take a snapshot of the situation with a story from Houston. Nova Safo checks in with us to talk about Amazon’s earnings report and whether or not it signals that a post-pandemic slowdown is coming for Big Tech as less people are shopping online and more people could be returning to the office.

Jul 30, 2021
The Activision Blizzard walkout could bring a reckoning for the video game industry
00:06:36

On Wednesday, hundreds of employees of video game company Activision Blizzard walked out. The protest followed a lawsuit from California regulators accusing the maker of World of Warcraft and Call of Duty of unfair pay and lack of advancement for women and a “frat boy drinking culture” at the company. Management eventually apologized for its initial, dismissive response to the lawsuit and promised to investigate. Sarah Needleman covers video games and technology for The Wall Street Journal. She said men have dominated the video game industry for years, despite a roughly 50-50 split among players.

Jul 30, 2021
A different kind of Hollywood superhero fight
00:15:21

It was bound to happen at some point. Scarlett Johansson, who’s played Black Widow in Marvel movies for a decade now, is suing Disney for breach of contract. After delaying it a year for the COVID-19 pandemic, the company released the “Black Widow” movie on Disney+ the same day it hit theaters. We’ll talk about the suit and what it says about the state of the movie industry. Plus: some vaccination history, the Steak-umm Twitter and a few technical difficulties, because why not?

Here’s everything we talked about today:

Join us on YouTube Fridays at 3:30 p.m. Pacific/6:30 p.m. Eastern for our live happy hour episode! Subscribe to our channel and sign up for notifications so you don’t miss it.

Our show needs your voice! Tell us what you think of the show or ask a question for our hosts to answer! Send a voice memo or give us a call at 508-82-SMART (508-827-6278).

Jul 30, 2021
Why some builders are intentionally constructing fewer homes
00:28:00

Prices are high, inventory is low — if you’re in the market for a new home, you know this has been the reality for a while now. Something else to add to house hunters’ chagrin? According to the research firm Zonda, 85% of homebuilders are purposely building fewer houses, given shortages of land, materials and workers. But first: the year of lost GDP. Later in the show: Bars grapple with the booze supply chain, and the Crocs CEO talks about the shoe many love to hate.

Jul 29, 2021
Robinhood is going public. Can its unusual plans for investors hold up?
00:08:26

Robinhood, the online brokerage with the app that grants commission-free trading to investors, is going public. However, its offering stands out because of its plan to make up to 35% of its shares available for investors to purchase. We speak with Erik Gordon, professor at the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business, about the Robinhood IPO. We also have a discussion about the Senate voting to start debate on a bipartisan infrastructure bill.

Jul 29, 2021
Smart home devices have entered the mainstream chat
00:08:40

In 2020, U.S. manufacturers shipped out more than 375 million smart home devices. The more we use them, the more they end up learning about us. Is that a good thing? We also discuss what’s going on with the Fed and what capital-starved small businesses are thinking about as PPP loan money starts running out.

Jul 29, 2021
Calls for global investment to solve pandemic-induced “education crisis”
00:06:44

From the BBC World Service: U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson is calling on global leaders to pledge $5 billion to prevent what he calls a “legacy of wasted talent” as a result of lockdown restrictions on education. Plus: Visitors to a new, nearly $3 million London tourist attraction aren’t happy with what they see.

Jul 29, 2021
When it comes to electric car charging, it’s all about location, location, location
00:07:32

Yesterday, the show focused on how the growing market for electric vehicles is affecting the supply chain for batteries. Today, how about where to charge all those batteries? Many people have electric cars, and a lot more will by 2025. Global sales will triple by 2025, according to IHS Markit. But it’s not just about the number of cars, it’s also about the number of available chargers. Marketplace’s Meghan McCarty Carino speaks with Jessika Trancik, a professor at MIT who recently co-wrote an article on charger placement for Nature Energy. Trancik says for the EV market to grow, we’re going to need more chargers in the right places, especially at home.

Jul 29, 2021
You can’t hide from Facebook
00:16:48

Facebook earnings are out, and one our listeners is looking for a little clarity in how exactly the company keeps beating expectations and bringing in tens of billions every quarter. We’ll get into the nuances of ad targeting, locking down your profile and how we create our own filter bubbles. Plus, more answers to your questions about the Congressional Budget Office, Navy planes and unemployment benefits.

Here’s everything we talked about today:

Read the transcript here.

Our show needs your voice! Tell us what you think of the show or ask a question for our hosts to answer! Send a voice memo or give us a call at 508-82-SMART (508-827-6278).

Jul 29, 2021
Millions could face eviction with the moratorium ending
00:28:00

More than 15 million people live in households that are behind on their rent, according to a new report from the Aspen Institute. And while Congress allocated $46 billion in federal assistance for renters during the pandemic, access to technology, language barriers and lack of information are proving to be hurdles for tenants behind on their rents. Also on today’s show: How London’s financial center is faring after Brexit, hints at a potential American hunger crisis and a resurgence in Alaska’s salmon industry.

Jul 28, 2021
Expected hiring “boom” fizzles out for states that stopped extra unemployment benefits
00:08:54

States that did away with $300 weekly unemployment benefits did so with the expectation that the loss of extra money would get more people to re-enter the workforce. That hasn’t happened. We talk about the Fed and inflation, and then we hear a listener tell the story of Pearl Paint, the New York art supply store that unified an artistic community.

Jul 28, 2021
What is going on with China’s stock markets?
00:08:19

Correspondent Jennifer Pak joins us to help make sense of where China’s stock markets stand after a rough start to the week. We also check in on Big Tech’s earnings. Then, we look into a child care entrepreneurship program that opens a path for immigrant women to re-enter the workforce.

Jul 28, 2021
Quarantine-free travel to England may soon be possible for Americans
00:06:39

From the BBC World Service: The U.K. government is meeting on Wednesday to discuss options for loosening travel restrictions on double-vaccinated American travelers to England. Plus, a look at how a change of power in Tanzania has led to a dramatically different policy on pandemic preparedness.

Jul 28, 2021
The road to an electric vehicle future is paved with lithium
00:06:12

The electric vehicle market, while still small, has grown rapidly this year. Of course, a global shortage of microchips could slow things down. In the long term, there’s also the issue of availability of lithium, a soft, silvery metal that’s the key component in electric car batteries. Marketplace’s Meghan McCarty Carino speaks to Chris Berry, a strategic metals consultant and president of House Mountain Partners. He says demand for lithium is expected to triple in the next five years which is why some automakers, like GM, have taken the unusual step of making deals with lithium mines directly.

Jul 28, 2021
WeWork’s whole bananapants story
00:29:15

Was WeWork a tech company? A trillion-dollar business? A way of life? With the benefit of hindsight it’s easy to say, emphatically, “No.” But looking back at the lofty goals and investor enthusiasm that propelled the We Co. to a $47 billion valuation, we’re left wondering if the people involved have learned anything. Here to talk with us about it is Wall Street Journal reporter Maureen Farrell, who co-wrote the new book “The Cult of We: WeWork, Adam Neumann and the Great Startup Delusion.” Plus: Simone Biles, the Food and Drug Administration and polyamory pedantics.

Here’s everything we talked about today:

Click here to read a transcript of this episode.

Our show needs your voice! Tell us what you think of the show or ask a question for our hosts to answer! Send a voice memo or give us a call at 508-82-SMART (508-827-6278).

Jul 27, 2021
Wall Street’s Sallie Krawcheck on the pandemic and the gender wealth gap
00:28:00

Sallie Krawcheck, CEO and co-founder of Ellevest, a digital financial company for women, discusses how COVID-19 exacerbated existing inequities between men and women. She also talks about why money causes stress and the future of her company. Also on today’s show: the continuing struggles of the travel industry, shifting language in home appraisals and what washing machine sales can teach us about consumer confidence.

Jul 27, 2021
Big Tech benefits from big spending
00:08:56

Apple, Alphabet (Google’s parent company), Microsoft and Amazon are reporting earnings this week, and they are all beneficiaries of a jump on corporate spending on IT. We’ll look at what companies are buying, and why. New York City and cities in California now have vaccination requirements for their respective workforces. We also take a look at where Chinese stocks stand.

Jul 27, 2021
China’s regulatory crackdown continues to send shivers through financial markets
00:08:00

From the BBC World Service: A third-straight day of losses across Asia stock markets amid Chinese regulatory crackdown. Plus: The most senior Roman Catholic official at the Vatican has gone on trial charged with financial crimes. And, a look at the meeting agenda as officials from the U.S. and India prepare to sit down for talks.

Jul 27, 2021
Explaining China’s anti-foreign sanctions law
00:07:10

China’s recently passed anti-foreign sanctions law carries a variety of potential effects for American businesses. We dive into what the law means. The Federal Open Market Committee starts a two-day meeting on interest rate policy. Also, PayPal is partnering with the Anti-Defamation League to help curb the activities of radical hate groups.

Jul 27, 2021
Why it’s so hard for biographies about women to stay on Wikipedia
00:08:32

When you search for someone notable on the internet, one of the first things that often pops up is a link to their Wikipedia page. But if you’re looking for a notable woman, that might not be the case. There are about 1.5 million biographies on Wikipedia. Only about 19% of them are about women. And those that do get published are much more likely to be targeted for deletion, compared to biographies of men. That’s according to research by Francesca Tripodi, a professor of sociology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Marketplace’s Kimberly Adams speaks to Tripodi about her recent paper, “Ms. Categorized: Gender, notability, and inequality on Wikipedia.”

Jul 27, 2021
What is the stock market?
00:24:00
Companies need money to grow, and there’s a way for them to get it: the stock market. They can sell a little piece of their company, called a share or stock, to regular people. If the company grows, those people get to keep some of the money it makes. Of course, there’s no guarantee that a company will grow — that’s what makes putting your money in the stock market risky. On this week’s episode, we’ll explain how it all works with the help of some Dutch spice traders, comfy sneakers, a bull … and a bear! Got a money problem? Tell us about it at Marketplace.org/million
Jul 27, 2021
We need to think about the unvaccinated differently
00:17:03

There are limits to personal freedom and responsibility — it runs out when you put others at risk. You can’t drive drunk, for example. But are people who aren’t vaccinated for COVID-19 as brazen as a drunk driver? Or are they victims, scammed by bad information? Sociology professor Brooke Harrington has a great thread trying to reconcile all this, and we’re going to unpack it a bit on today’s show. Plus: Olympics highs and lows, the Frito-Lay strike and a sneak peek of tomorrow’s bananapants episode.

Here’s everything we talked about today:

Read the transcript here.

Our show needs your voice! Tell us what you think of the show or ask a question for our hosts to answer! Send a voice memo or give us a call at 508-82-SMART (508-827-6278).

Jul 27, 2021
Why some towns might pay you to move there
00:28:00

Towns like Augusta, Maine; Bemidji, Minnesota; and Savannah, Georgia, are among the more than 40 communities in the U.S. incentivizing people to move there. They dangle perks like housing assistance, camping equipment or up to $20,000 in cash. The incentives are aimed at convincing remote workers to make a move, which can boost the economies of struggling locales. Also on the show: shipping bottlenecks in Chicago, the good some economists think inflation can bring and engineering restaurant menus for a QR code-friendly world.

Jul 26, 2021