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By National Committee on U.S.-China Relations

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The National Committee on United States-China Relations is a nonprofit, nonpartisan educational organization that encourages understanding and cooperation between the United States and Greater China in the belief that sound and productive Sino-American relations serve vital American and world interests. With over four decades of experience developing innovative programs at the forefront of U.S.–China relations, the National Committee focuses its exchange, educational and policy activities on politics and security, education, governance and civil society, economic cooperation, media and transnational issues, addressing these with respect to mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan.

Episode Date
Trouble in Afghanistan: U.S.-China Influence in the Heart of Asia | Derek Grossman, Niva Yau
35:29

The U.S. military is pulling out of Afghanistan, a process that should be complete by August 31. Both China and the United States face looming strategic challenges as a result. America’s presence has preserved a fragile balance of power in Central South Asia, benefitting both the United States and China. It has prevented terror activities from spilling over Afghanistan’s borders, as well as allowing for trade and facilitating the expansion of China’s BRI initiative into neighboring Pakistan. The U.S. foothold in Afghanistan has cost thousands of American lives and over two trillion dollars, but has also mitigated the threat of widespread terror activity, the initial impulse for going in in 2001. What will withdrawal mean for the security, politics, and economics of South Central Asia and for the U.S.-China relationship more broadly? 

In an interview conducted on August 19, 2021, Mr. Derek Grossman and Ms. Niva Yau discuss the implications of the American troop withdrawal from Afghanistan for U.S.-China relations in conversation with Dr. Daniel Markey.

Aug 24, 2021
The Shifting Military Balance across the Taiwan Strait | Lyle J. Goldstein, Oriana Skylar Mastro
01:01:23

What is happening across the Taiwan Strait? In March, Admiral Philip Davidson, then commander of U.S. forces in the Pacific (INDOPACOM), said in a hearing before Congress that a Chinese attack on Taiwan could take place within six years. His successor, Admiral John Aquilino, agreed that such an attack could occur sooner “than most think.” More recently, however, the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, General Mark Milley, testified that he believes that China has little intention to take Taiwan by force, and that the capability to do so remains a goal rather than a reality. On July 19, 2021, the National Committee hosted a virtual program with Lyle Goldstein and Oriana Skylar Mastro to discuss China/Taiwan/U.S. military relations. NCUSCR President Stephen Orlins moderated and NCUSCR Director Admiral Dennis Blair offered commentary.

Jul 28, 2021
The Biden Administration’s China Policy: Reflections on the First Six Months | Stephen Orlins, Jerome Cohen
01:06:31

At the sixth month mark, the Biden administration’s China policy differs only slightly from that of the previous administration. Relatively easy policy initiatives that could have benefited the American people seem to be on hold. The Senate has passed the Strategic Competition Act of 2021 which, if it becomes law as written, will restrict how the Executive Branch can deal with China.

On July 22, 2021, the National Committee hosted a virtual program with National Committee President Stephen Orlins in conversation with NYU’s U.S.-Asia Law Institute Founder and Faculty Director Emeritus Jerome Cohen. Mr. Orlins spoke in his personal capacity.

Jul 26, 2021
Forecast of China’s Economy for 2021 - Part II | Liang Hong, Xu Gao
01:16:58

Both the United States and China are seeing a rapid rebound from the economic damage brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. The World Bank’s recent report forecasts GDP growth of 8.5 percent in 2021 for China, leading the world’s economic recovery. Does this bullish outlook accurately reflect the reality of China’s economic development in the second half of 2021 and beyond? What are potential obstacles Beijing could face from challenging issues such as weak domestic consumption, trade imbalances, and income inequality?

On July 15, 2021, the National Committee, in partnership with Peking University’s National School of Development (NSD), held a virtual program with Dr. Liang Hong and Dr. Xu Gao to forecast China’s economy for the second half of 2021 and beyond.

Jul 22, 2021
The Trip that Changed the World: Commemorating Kissinger’s 1971 Secret Visit to China | Henry Kissinger, Wang Qishan
01:15:02

On July 8, 2021, The Chinese People's Institute of Foreign Affairs (CPIFA), with assistance from the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations, organized a multi-part event to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Dr. Henry Kissinger’s secret trip to China. The event took place at Beijing’s Diaoyutai State Guest House and featured live remarks by Dr. Kissinger and Vice President Wang Qishan. This video is an abridged version of the commemorative event, and includes the following components:

Keynote | Dr. Kissinger and Vice President Wang Qishan reflect on the significance of the July 1971 visit

Panel 1 | Eye Witnesses to History: Participants from the 1971 Kissinger secret trip and 1972 Nixon visit discuss the visit itself and its historical importance

- Chinese Panelists: Ambassador Lian Zhengbao and Ms. Nancy Tang

- American Panelists: Ambassadors Winston Lord and Chas Freeman

- Moderator: Ms. Jan Berris

Jul 22, 2021
High Stakes on the High Seas: The South China Sea under President Biden | Richard Heydarian, Isaac Kardon, Yan Yan
01:20:01

Approximately 20 to 33 percent of global trade passes through the South China Sea, and many of its land features are in dispute. In the last decade, tensions have escalated as China has grown increasingly assertive. Many in the international community perceive China to be violating international norms after it passed legislation this year allowing the China Coast Guard to fire on foreign vessels. What policies will the Biden administration adopt toward the region? Will tensions escalate? If so, what would be the impact on the economics and security of the region? What innovative policies could ease tensions and promote cooperation instead of confrontation?

On June 29, 2021, the National Committee hosted a virtual program with Prof. Richard J. HeydarianDr. Isaac B. Kardon, and Dr. Yan Yan, as they discussed recent developments in the South China Sea and areas for cooperation.

Jul 09, 2021
The Chinese Communist Party at 100: How the CCP Tells its Story | Denise Ho, Karrie Koesel, Maria Repnikova
01:13:31

The July 2021 centennial of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) will be an important milestone in China, accompanied by media fanfare and celebration. As the Party promotes the story of its successes and accomplishments to its people and the world, what does it choose to minimize or ignore? Through the lenses of museums, traditional and new media, and political education in schools, we examined how China projects its image in a rapidly shifting global landscape. On June 24, 2021, the National Committee hosted a virtual discussion with Denise Ho, Karrie Koesel, and Maria Repnikova as they explored how the Chinese Communist Party shapes and projects its identity to its own people and beyond.

Jun 30, 2021
Middle Class Shanghai: Reshaping U.S.-China Engagement | Cheng Li
01:07:43

Cheng Li’s Middle Class Shanghai argues that American policymakers should pay attention to the dynamism and diversity in contemporary China. Its developing class structure and cosmopolitan culture, exemplified and led by Shanghai, could reshape U.S.-China engagement. Both countries should build on the deep cultural and educational exchanges that have bound them together for more than forty years. On June 17, 2021, the National Committee hosted a virtual program with Cheng Li as he discussed China’s middle class and the constructive impact of exchanges between China and the United States.

Jun 24, 2021
Small & Medium-sized Enterprises and the Sino-American Relationship | Gary Biehn, Ron Bracalente, Amy Celico, Linda Mysliwy Conlin
01:15:55

Small and medium-sized enterprises have provided crucial ballast to the U.S.-China bilateral relationship for decades. While the Biden administration’s “foreign policy for the middle class” is a departure in tone from President Trump’s “America First” rhetoric, we have not yet seen substantive changes in China trade policy. With tariffs remaining in place and the path forward for SMEs uncertain, what does the future hold?

On June 10, 2021, the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations, in partnership with the World Trade Centers Association hosted a webinar with Amy Celico of Albright Stonebridge, and Gary BiehnRon Bracalente, and Linda Mysliwy Conlin of the World Trade Center of Greater Philadelphia, as they discussed the prospects for U.S.-China economic and trade relations.

Jun 18, 2021
Higher Education & U.S.-China Relations | Mary Gallagher, Margaret Lewis, Rory Truex, Jacques deLisle
01:17:05

On May 21, 2021, the National Commitee hosted a virtual program with Mary GallagherMargaret Lewis, and Rory Truex, in conversation with Jacques deLisle, as they discussed these issues and what lies ahead in Sino-American academic relations.

This program was held in partnership with the Penn Project on the Future of US-China Relations, sponsored by the University of Pennsylvania’s Center for the Study of Contemporary China.

May 28, 2021
U.S.-China Investment: 2021 Report Launch | Thilo Hanemann, Anna Ashton, Timothy Stratford
01:16:18

On May 19, 2021 the National Committee held a virtual program with report author Thilo Hanemann (Rhodium Group), Anna Ashton (US-China Business Council), and Timothy Stratford (Covington & Burling LLP Beijing) for the annual Two-Way Street report launch and discussion of the latest two-way investment data and analysis.

May 27, 2021
Our Shared Technological Future: Smart Cities in the U.S. and China | Zhengzhen Tan, Sarah Tatsis, Weiping Wu
01:00:59

In recent years, smart city technology has become increasingly present in our lives. New developments in 5G, AI, and the Internet of Things allow municipalities to collect and share data, improving management and services, while raising questions about privacy and security.  

On May 10, 2021, the National Committee hosted a virtual program with Ms. Zhengzhen Tan and Ms. Sarah Tatsis, as they discussed smart cities and areas for potential cooperation in a conversation moderated by urban planning expert Dr. Weiping Wu.

May 18, 2021
China’s Belt and Road: Implications for the United States | Jennifer Hillman, Jacob Lew, Gary Roughead, David Sacks
01:18:12

According to a recent report published by the Council on Foreign Relations, "China’s Belt and Road: Implications for the United States," the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), President Xi Jinping’s signature foreign policy undertaking and the world’s largest infrastructure program, poses a significant challenge to U.S. economic, political, climate change, security, and global health interests. The United States has a clear interest in adopting a strategy that both pressures China to alter its BRI practices and provides an effective alternative.

On May 4, 2021, the National Committee hosted a virtual program with report co-chairs Jacob Lew and Gary Roughead and co-authors Jennifer Hillman and David Sacks, as they discussed recommendations for an effective United States response to BRI.

May 12, 2021
The United States, China, and Taiwan: A Strategy to Prevent War | Robert Blackwill, Philip Zelikow, Shelley Rigger
01:00:07

On April 30, 2021, the National Committee held a virtual program with Robert Blackwill (Council on Foreign Relations) and Philip Zelikow (University of Virginia), moderated by leading Taiwan authority Shelley Rigger (Davidson College), to discuss U.S. policy options for a productive relationship with Taiwan.

May 07, 2021
Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of Ping Pong Diplomacy | Jan Berris, Judy Hoarfrost, Doug Spelman, Alex DeAngelis
01:11:33

On April 28, 2021, the National Committee hosted a virtual celebration of the 50th anniversary of ping pong diplomacy. Ms. Jan Berris, vice president of the National Committee who accompanied the Chinese ping pong delegation on its travels; Ms. Judy Hoarfrost, a former United States table tennis champion who visited China with the U.S. team; and Dr. Doug Spelman, a retired foreign service officer and academic who served as an interpreter for the Chinese team discussed ping pong diplomacy – how it came to be, its historical and political context, and its significance then and now. The conversation was moderated by Mr. Alex DeAngelis, a staff member at the Committee on Scholarly Communication with the People’s Republic of China for much of the 1970s, who then moved to the National Science Foundation, based in Washington and Beijing.

May 06, 2021
U.S.-China Climate Cooperation: The Path Forward | Angel Hsu, Joanna Lewis, Jonas Nahm, Alex Wang
01:15:19

On April 22, 2021, the National Committee held a virtual program with Angel Hsu, Jonas Nahm, and Alex Wang to discuss the future of U.S.-China climate cooperation in a conversation moderated by China energy expert Joanna Lewis. The program was held in partnership with the Penn Project on the Future of US-China Relations, which is sponsored by the University of Pennsylvania’s Center for the Study of Contemporary China.

Apr 29, 2021
Stronger: Adapting America’s China Strategy in an Era of Competitive Interdependence | Ryan Hass
01:03:40

In his new book, "Stronger: Adapting America’s China Strategy in an Era of Competitive Interdependence," Ryan Hass examines the relative advantages of the United States as he considers U.S.-China relations. On April 19, 2021, the National Committee held a virtual program with Ryan Hass of the Brookings Institution, in which he provided an analysis of how the United States might productively approach its relationship with China.

 

Apr 26, 2021
Confronting Anti-Asian Racism: Anti-China Foreign Policy and Legislative Change 
01:30:19

While violence toward Asian Americans has always existed in the United States, the community has faced racist violence and hate crimes at a much higher rate over the last year. Between March 2020 and February 2021, Stop AAPI Hate reported 3,795 hate incidents nationwide. Experts argue this phenomenon has been fueled by Sinophobia, anti-China foreign policy, and xenophobic political rhetoric unleashed during the Covid-19 pandemic. On April 12, 2021, the National Committee held a virtual two-part program in which Jessica J. Lee and Ian Shin discussed the impact of anti-China political rhetoric on the current domestic U.S. climate, and Congresswoman Judy Chu addressed anti-Asian racism through legislative change. Learn more about anti-Asian racism in the United States, and what you can do to help: https://www.ncuscr.org/anti-racism

Apr 20, 2021
Our Shared Technological Future: Autonomous Vehicles in the United States and China | John Wall, Michael Yuan, Karlyn Stanley
01:14:09

In recent years, autonomous vehicles (AV) have moved from the world of science fiction to reality. While fully self-driving cars may be a decade or two away, robotaxis and driverless buses are already here. The advent of AVs offers enormous opportunities, but will also bring great disruption to the overall transportation market. China and the United States are both moving rapidly to take advantage of these exciting changes. What are the major innovations we will see over the next ten years? How can U.S. and Chinese corporations collaborate in this growing market? And how can our two governments, at the local and national levels, handle the challenges AVs present?

On March 22, 2021, the National Committee held a virtual program with Mr. John WallMr. Michael Yuan, and Ms. Karlyn Stanley to discuss the state of autonomous vehicle development and regulation in the United States and China.

Mar 30, 2021
Demystifying China’s Economy: The Latest Data | Leland Miller
59:35

Leland Miller of China Beige Book discussed the current state of China's economy, based on fresh data from the world's largest private in-country data collection network tracking the Chinese marketplace. The data are gathered from thousands of firms throughout China across various sectors and industries. What does the state of the Chinese economy suggest for effective U.S. policy? What should the United States be looking at as it considers China’s growth, labor, inflation, credit, and banking, among other factors? How should economic policy fit into the larger bilateral relationship? Where is the Biden administration likely to take policy next?

The National Committee held an event on March 25, 2021 with Mr. Leland Miller, where he explored the latest developments in China’s economy and their impact on the Sino-American relationship and Biden administration policy.

Mar 29, 2021
Digital War: How China’s Tech Power Shapes the Future of AI, Blockchain, & Cyberspace | Winston Ma
01:01:42

On March 9, 2021, the National Committee hosted a virtual program with Mr. Winston Ma, where he explored how China’s innovation ecosystem drives next generation unicorns and its young netizens participate in the evolving digital economy, and what emerging markets can learn from China as they dive headlong into the mobile-first economy.

Winston Ma, most recently managing director and head of the North America office of China Investment Corporation (CIC), is the author of, The Digital War: How China’s Tech Power Shapes the Future of AI, Blockchain, and Cyberspace.

Mar 18, 2021
The Faces of Fentanyl: China, the United States, and Those In-Between | Vanda Felbab-Brown, Emily Feng, Ben Westhoff
01:16:44

The National Committee held a virtual program on February 24, 2021 with Dr. Vanda Felbab-Brown and Mr. Ben Westhoff, moderated by Ms. Emily Feng, who discussed the current status of the opioid epidemic, bilateral efforts to curb the supply of fentanyl in the United States, and the prospects for progress moving forward.

Mar 05, 2021
Sixty Years of China Watching | Jerome Cohen
01:23:04

In a belated celebration of his 90th birthday and his extraordinary contributions to the development of law in China and U.S.-China relations, the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations hosted a virtual discussion with America’s leading expert on Chinese law, Jerome A. Cohen, on February 16, 2021. Professor Cohen conversed with his former student, Steve Orlins, who is now president of the National Committee, about his experiences over the last sixty years of studying Chinese law, government, and society. Topics included living in China, prospects for the future of law in China, and directions in Sino-American relations.

Feb 24, 2021
Remembering Ezra Vogel | Graham Allison, Thomas Gold, Melinda Liu, Michael Szonyi
01:30:19

The National Committee held a virtual program on February 10, 2021 with Dr. Graham Allison, Dr. Thomas Gold, Ms. Melinda Liu, and Dr. Michael Szonyi to celebrate and remember teacher/mentor/public servant/friend Professor Ezra Vogel.

Feb 23, 2021
Forecast of China's Economy for 2021 | Hu Yifan, Huang Yiping, Yao Yang
01:30:57

The National Committee, in partnership with Peking University’s National School of Development (NSD), held a virtual program on February 2, 2021 with Dr. Hu Yifan, Dr. Huang Yiping, and Dr. Yao Yang to forecast China’s economy in the coming year. The panel was moderated by NCUSCR President Stephen Orlins. Topics included: China’s growth trajectory in 2021 and beyond, the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the Chinese and global markets, progress and challenges in structural reform, expected reforms in China in 2021, developments and challenges in the private sector, cross-border capital flows, and U.S.-China trade frictions.

Feb 05, 2021
Understanding the Scope: U.S.-China Financial Investment | Rhodium Group
01:28:59

The National Committee held a virtual event on January 26, 2021 where Rhodium Group’s Daniel Rosen and Adam Lysenko rolled out the latest addition to the Two-Way Street report series to increase the transparency of this portfolio investment discussion. In a conversation moderated by National Committee President Stephen Orlins, Rosen and Lysenko were joined by KPMG Chief Economist Constance Hunter and BlackRock Senior Managing Director Mark Wiedman to discuss the report's implications.

Jan 29, 2021
Toxic Politics: China’s Environmental Health Crisis Challenges the Chinese State | Yanzhong Huang
01:00:16

Environmental degradation in China has not only brought about a wider range of diseases and other health consequences than previously understood, but has also taken a heavy toll on China’s society, economy, and the legitimacy of the party-state. In Toxic Politics: China’s Environmental Health Crisis and Its Challenge to the Chinese State, Yanzhong Huang presents evidence of China's deepening health crisis and challenges the widespread view that China is winning its war on pollution. Although there has been some progress, policy enforcement measures have not substantially reduced pollution or improved public health. Dr. Huang argues that the failures lie in the institutional structure of the Chinese party-state, with conflicting incentives for officials and limited capacity of the state to deliver public goods. Toxic Politics describes a political system that is remarkably resilient but fundamentally flawed, and the implications for China's future, domestically and internationally.

   

On January 11, 2021, the National Committee held a virtual program with Dr. Yanzhong Huang to discuss the capacity of the Chinese party state to address its serious environmental and public health challenges.

Jan 19, 2021
China as a Twenty First Century Naval Power | Michael McDevitt
01:07:57

China’s President Xi Jinping is committed to two primary military ambitions: he wants China to become a great maritime power by 2035 and a world-class armed force by 2050. In China as a Twenty First Century Naval Power, retired U.S. Navy Rear Admiral Michael McDevitt focuses on China's navy and its recent and continuing transformation into a formidable force.

Mr. McDevitt begins the book by exploring the strategic rationale behind President Xi's objectives. He then examines the PLA Navy's role in the South China Sea and the Indian Ocean, and concludes with a forecast of what President Xi's vision of a "world-class navy" might look like in the next fifteen years as the 2035 deadline approaches.

On December 22, 2020, the National Committee held a virtual program with Rear Admiral Michael McDevitt, USN (retired), where he described the development of China’s navy, implications for the U.S. military and policy-makers more broadly.

Jan 04, 2021
Recent Developments in Hong Kong | Christine Loh, Kurt Tong
01:19:12

In mid-November 2020, China’s National People’s Congress passed a resolution allowing Hong Kong authorities to expel legislators deemed a threat to national security or failing to pledge allegiance to Hong Kong without having to go through the judicial system. Shortly thereafter, the Hong Kong government disqualified four pro-democracy legislators. Reaction within and outside of Hong Kong was swift: fellow pan-democrat Legislative Council (LegCo) members resigned in protest; the U.S. national security advisor said that the Chinese Communist Party had “flagrantly violated its international commitments” while the British foreign minister saw the expulsions as an assault on Hong Kong’s freedoms. By contrast, Chief Executive Carrie Lam proclaimed the dismissals both necessary and legal. In early December, protesters were sentenced to prison for activities during the 2019 demonstrations.  What do the most recent developments tell us about “One Country, Two Systems”? About the strength of Hong Kong’s judiciary? What changes in U.S. policy may emerge from the new Biden administration when it takes over next month?

On December 17, 2020, the National Committee held a virtual program with Ambassador Kurt Tong and Ms. Christine Loh to discuss the latest developments in Hong Kong and implications for U.S.-Hong Kong and U.S.-China relations.

Dec 23, 2020
China’s Fintech Explosion: Disruption, Innovation, and Survival | Sara Hsu
33:10

In China’s Fintech Explosion, Sara Hsu and Jianjun Li explore the transformative potential of China’s fintech industry, describing the risks and rewards for participants as well as the impact on consumers. They cover many subsectors of the industry: digital payment systems, peer-to-peer lending and crowdfunding, credit card issuance, internet banks, blockchain finance and virtual currencies, and online insurance. Offering analysis of market potential, risks, and competition, the authors describe major companies including Alipay and Tencent, and other leading fintech firms.

Dec 17, 2020
Views from Former Governors: U.S.-China Subnational Relations
01:22:31

National politics have grabbed the headlines over the last few months; less publicized are the challenges taking place at the local levels. Nine former Governors gathered this fall to discuss the toll a deteriorating U.S.-China relationship has had on their states.

 

 On December 7, 2020, the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations and the U.S. Heartland China Association (USHCA) invited former governor and current chairman and CEO of USHCA Bob Holden (Missouri, D, 2001-2005), along with former governors Jon Huntsman, Jr. (Utah, R, 2005-2011), Gary Locke (Washington, D, 1997-2005), and Rick Snyder (Michigan, R, 2011-2019) to discuss the consequences of bilateral tensions in each of their respective states and how revitalizing subnational relationships and cooperation can help pave a path forward.

Dec 16, 2020
Where Great Powers Meet: America & China in Southeast Asia | David Shambaugh
01:06:55

Renowned China scholar David Shambaugh describes the broad-gauged and global competition for power, especially in Asia, underway between the United States and China in his new book, Where Great Powers Meet. Concentrating on Southeast Asia, Professor Shambaugh notes that the two countries constantly vie for position and influence across this highly significant area; the outcome of the contest may determine whether Asia leaves the American orbit after seventy years and falls into a Chinese sphere of influence. 

On December 1, 2020, the National Committee held a virtual program with Professor David Shambaugh as he looks at the geopolitical future of Southeast Asia amidst the possibility of renewed great power competition in the region.

Dec 08, 2020
Health & Climate | CHINA Town Hall 2020
01:00:07

About CHINA Town Hall: ncuscr.org/CTH. 

 Confronting the global challenges of climate change and communicable disease cannot be achieved by any single country, but must be met by constructive cooperation among nations. Although the United States and China will compete in many areas, it is imperative they join forces to face these universal problems that affect global stability and endanger the world's most vulnerable people. 

 On November 18, 2020, the National Committee held a discussion with Margaret Hamburg (National Academy of Medicine), Ryan Hass (Brookings Institution), and Angel Hsu (Yale-NUS) to consider the roles of the United States and China in addressing these two major transnational issues. The conversation was moderated by Merit Janow (Columbia School of International and Public Affairs).

Dec 01, 2020
Economics & Trade | CHINA Town Hall 2020
01:01:41

About CHINA Town Hall: www.ncuscr.org/CTH

 Robust bilateral economic and trade ties have been the greatest source of strength and foundation for engagement in the U.S.-China relationship for decades. Yet in recent years those ties have been frayed by an ongoing trade war, the threat of decoupling, and a global economic and public health crisis brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. 

 The National Committee held a conversation on November 17, 2020 with Amy Celico (Albright Stonebridge Group), Huang Yiping (Peking University), and Andy Rothman (Matthews Asia), moderated by NCUSCR President Stephen Orlins, to discuss the current trade tensions, prospects for economic growth during and after COVID-19, and the future of U.S.-China economic ties.

Dec 01, 2020
Society & Culture | CHINA Town Hall 2020
01:00:08

 

Learn more at ncuscr.org/CTH. 

 Starting with ping-pong diplomacy in 1971, cultural diplomacy has played a pivotal role in facilitating mutual understanding between the peoples of the United States and China. This event will gather leading cultural figures to discuss how, despite sometimes turbulent political and economic relations, food and film continue to reveal our shared humanity and connect us through culture. 

 On November 12, 2020, the National Committee held a discussion with Raymond Chang (Major League Baseball China), Lucas Sin (Junzi Kitchen), and Janet Yang (Janet Yang Productions) on the importance, challenges, and future of cross-cultural learning between the United States and China. NCUSCR Public Intellectuals Program fellow Alison Friedman (Performing Arts of West Kowloon Cultural District Authority) moderated the event.

Nov 18, 2020
Ray Dalio | CHINA Town Hall 2020
01:02:16

Sign up for more CHINA Town Hall 2020 events: http://www.ncuscr.org/CTH  

Renowned investor, philanthropist, and best-selling author Ray Dalio discusses today's most important issues, and the critical roles the United States and China play in an era of rapid global change, at the 14th annual CHINA Town Hall Keynote on Tuesday, November 10, 2020. Ray Dalio and his family have been deeply involved in business and philanthropic efforts in China for 35 years. He is the author of the best-selling "Principles: Life and Work" and "The Changing World Order: Why Nations Succeed and Fail," which will be released this winter.

Nov 12, 2020
Invisible China: How the Urban-Rural Divide Threatens China’s Rise | Scott Rozelle
01:18:40

As its glittering urban skylines attest, China has apparently quickly transformed itself from a place of stark poverty into a modern, urban, technologically savvy economic powerhouse. Scott Rozelle and Natalie Hell show in Invisible China, however, that the truth is much more complicated and perhaps deeply concerning.

China’s growth has relied heavily on unskilled labor. Most of the workers who have fueled the country’s rise come from rural villages and have never attended high school. The unskilled wage rate has been rising for more than a decade, inducing companies inside China to automate at an unprecedented rate and triggering an exodus of those seeking cheaper labor elsewhere.

Drawing on extensive surveys on the ground in China, Dr. Rozelle and Ms. Hell demonstrate that its labor force has one of the lowest levels of education of any country with a similarly large economy. The limited education of so many workers may leave them unable to find work in the formal workplace as China’s economy changes and manufacturing jobs move elsewhere. In Invisible China, the authors speak not only to an urgent humanitarian concern but also to a potential economic crisis that could upend economies and foreign relations around the globe.

On November 2, the National Committee hosted a virtual program with Professor Scott Rozelle and commentator Dr. Qin Gao.

Nov 10, 2020
American Officials Visit Taiwan | Margaret Lewis, Shelley Rigger
01:18:05

In August 2020, U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Secretary Alex M. Azar II visited Taiwan, the highest level American cabinet officer to do so since the establishment of diplomatic relations with the PRC. A month later Under Secretary of State Keith Krach followed, representing the U.S. government at former President Lee Teng-hui’s funeral. What do these high-level visits suggest about the Trump administration’s policies toward Taiwan and the PRC, and about cross-strait relations?

The National Committee held a virtual program with Professors Margaret K. Lewis and Shelley Rigger on October 27.

Nov 08, 2020
China from a U.S. Policy Perspective | Eric Heikkila
01:01:46

How does the rise of China alter the context in which U.S. policy should be assessed? In China from a U.S. Policy PerspectiveProfessor Eric Heikkila divides policy into three broad areas: economics, sustainability, and geopolitics. In each one, he analyzes key policy issues, demonstrating how a growing China exerts pressure on American policy, not explicitly through lobbying or negotiation, but implicitly through the reality it creates. Dr. Heikkila argues that at a time of increasing bilateral tensions, it is critical for American policymakers to focus on the many policy questions affected by China’s rise.

The National Committee held a virtual program on October 26, 2020 with Professor Eric Heikkila.

Nov 04, 2020
The Deer and the Dragon: Southeast Asia and China in the 21st Century | Donald Emmerson, Ann Murphy
01:14:29

At a meeting of the ASEAN Regional Forum in 2010, the Chinese foreign minister, angered by a question about the South China Sea dispute, declared: “China is a big country and other countries are small countries, and that is just a fact.” The authors whose essays are collected in The Deer and the Dragon examine the nature, dynamics, and implications of that fact – and the inequality that has resulted between China and the countries of Southeast Asia.

 

What does the history of Sino-Southeast Asian relations tell us about future possibilities? Do economic relations already suggest dependence? How do the countries of Southeast Asia view China and its intentions, and how does China see the region? What is the role of ASEAN?  How does U.S. policy affect the relative influence of China and the United States in Southeast Asia? 

 

The National Committee held a virtual program with Dr. Donald Emmerson featuring commentary from Dr. Ann Marie Murphy on October 22, 2020. Stanford University’s Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Research Center and the New York Southeast Asia Network co-sponsored the event.

Nov 02, 2020
U.S.-China Maritime Conflict and Dispute Management in the South China Sea
01:28:33

Tensions between the United States and China regarding the South China Sea are rising along with the recent broader breakdown of bilateral relations. The legitimacy of historical rights claims, entitlements and rights of other claimant states such as the Philippines and Vietnam, and the boundaries of freedom of navigation operations are among the central issues. Despite their differences, both the United States and China wish to avoid conflict and uphold professionalism at sea.

Is there any significant space for cooperation in South China Sea interactions beyond military engagement, including biodiversity protection and Coast Guard activities? What role do maritime and international law play in the rapidly evolving bilateral relationship? How is China likely to respond to the upcoming U.S. election in its maneuvers in the South China Sea?

On October 20, 2020, the National Committee hosted a virtual program featuring Peter DuttonM. Taylor FravelTabitha MalloryWu Shicun, and Zhu Feng. The five experts discussed the challenging bilateral issues, and provided their assessments of South China Sea development including maritime engagement of China and other claimants and its impact on South China Sea development, mechanisms for U.S.-China maritime military conflict management, and the role of the United States and China in rulemaking and building security protocols.

Oct 28, 2020
Rivers of Iron: Railroads and Chinese Power in Southeast Asia | David Lampton
01:07:16

In 2013, Chinese President Xi Jinping announced the One Belt One Road policy, later known as the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), a global development strategy involving infrastructure projects and associated financing around the world. While the Chinese government frames the plan as one promoting transnational connectivity, critics see it as part of a strategy to achieve global dominance. 

Rivers of Iron examines one aspect of the BRI: China’s effort to create an inter-country railway system connecting China and its seven Southeast Asian neighbors (Cambodia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Singapore, Thailand, and Vietnam). The book explores the political strengths and weaknesses of the plan, as well as the capacity of the countries involved to resist, shape, and perhaps take advantage of China’s actions. The authors seek to explain how domestic politics in the eight Asian nations shape their varying responses and behaviors. How does China wield power using infrastructure? Do smaller states have agency? How should we understand the role of infrastructure in broader development? Does industrial policy work? How should other global powers respond? 

The National Committee held a virtual program on October 14, 2020 with Professor David M. Lampton.

Oct 22, 2020
Tensions in the Himalayas: The India-China Border Dispute
01:16:47

Recent border disputes between China and India began in April, escalating to a deadly clash on June 15. Indian authorities reported that 20 troops died in the hand-to-hand combat using clubs and rocks; the Chinese side has not released casualty information. In August, India accused China of provoking military tensions; China claimed that the stand-off was entirely India’s fault. The following month, China accused India of firing shots at its troops; India in turn accused China of firing shots in the air. If the allegations are true, it would be the first time that shots had been fired in 45 years.

 

There have been 17 rounds of talks since June, including a meeting of the two countries’ defense and foreign ministers on the sidelines of the Shanghai Cooperation Organization summit in Moscow in September. What is behind the tensions along the 2,100-mile border some 21,000 feet above sea level in the rugged Himalayas? How likely is a resolution before the harsh winter arrives in a few weeks? What are the implications for China, India, and the United States?

 

On October 9, 2020, the National Committee held a virtual program with Ambassador Nirupana Rao, Dr. Arunabh Ghosh, and Dr. Shen Dingli.

Oct 15, 2020
Has China Won?: The Chinese Challenge to American Primacy | Kishore Mahbubani
01:01:59

China and the United States are the world powers of the 21st century. With many differences in political philosophy and diplomatic methods, they approach each other warily and communicate poorly. In Has China Won?: The Chinese Challenge to American Primacy, Ambassador Kishore Mahbubani, a former Singaporean diplomat and prolific scholar with access to policymakers in Beijing and Washington, has written a guide to the deep fault lines in the relationship, an assessment of the risks of confrontation, and an appraisal of the strengths and weaknesses, and superpower eccentricities, of the United States and China.

 

The National Committee held a virtual program on October 5, 2020 with Professor Kishore Mahbubani.

Oct 15, 2020
China’s Gilded Age: The Paradox of Economic Boom & Vast Corruption | Yuen Yuen Ang
01:04:15

How has China grown so fast for so long despite extensive corruption? In China's Gilded Age, Yuen Yuen Ang argues that although all corruption is harmful, it does not always hurt growth. Different forms of corruption have disparate impact; certain types actually stimulate investment and development while simultaneously posing serious risks for economic and political systems. Using a range of sources, Dr. Ang explains the evolution of Chinese corruption, how it differs from that of the West and other developing countries, and how President Xi Jinping's anti-corruption campaign could affect growth and governance.

On September 30, 2020, the National Committee hosted a virtual program with Professor Yuen Yuen Ang.

Oct 09, 2020
When the Red Gates Opened: A Memoir of China’s Reawakening
01:02:06

Dori Jones Yang was among the first American correspondents to cover China at the beginning of the reform era. Her memoir, When the Red Gates Opened, follows her rise from rookie reporter to experienced journalist. Her cross-cultural romance gave her deeper insights into how Deng Xiaoping’s reforms led to hopes for better lives. This sense of possibility reached its peak in 1989, when peaceful protesters filled Tiananmen Square, demanding democracy, among other things. On the ground in Beijing, Ms. Yang shared that hope, as well as the despair that followed. After Tiananmen, she returned to the United States, continuing to watch closely as China’s growth resumed.

The National Committee held a virtual program with author Ms. Dori Jones Yang on September 23, 2020 to discuss her book.

Oct 05, 2020
Feminist & Inclusive Foreign Policy and the U.S.-China Relationship
01:16:08

At a time when prominent voices in the U.S. foreign policy community – from both sides of the aisle – are calling upon the United States to take a new approach towards China, many are putting forward new ideas to define what a "new era" would look like. An increasingly timely discussion has revolved around making more direct connections between gender equality and national security – a "Feminist Foreign Policy."

On September 18, 2020, the National Committee held a virtual Congressional staff briefing with Stephenie FosterSarah Kemp, and Wenchi Yu, about feminist foreign policy and what its implementation could mean for the evolving U.S.-China relationship.

Sep 25, 2020
Pandemic and Politics: U.S.-China Investment in 1H 2020
01:17:11

On September 17, 2020, Rhodium Group’s founding partner Daniel Rosen and its "Two-Way Street" report authors Thilo Hanemann and Adam Lysenko joined National Committee President Stephen Orlins to discuss their latest report, a mid-year review of the latest trends in U.S.-China investment and an analysis of the political dynamics and market developments behind them.

Read the new mid-year report on ncuscr.org

Sep 22, 2020
America in the World by Robert Zoellick
01:14:12

Starting with Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton, and Thomas Jefferson, and concluding with Henry Kissinger, Ronald Reagan, and James Baker, with comments on the foreign policies of Presidents Trump and Obama, in /America in the World/ Robert Zoellick tells the story of U.S. diplomacy.

The National Committee held a virtual program on September 15, 2020 with Ambassador Robert Zoellick in conversation with Financial Times editor and correspondent Lionel Barber. The event was hosted by National Committee Vice Chair Evan Greenberg and National Committee President Stephen Orlins.

Sep 22, 2020
Superpower Interrupted: The Chinese History of the World | Michael Schuman
57:57

Just as world maps look different depending on where they are produced, so narratives of world history vary according to who is telling the story. In /Superpower Interrupted/, Michael Schuman describes how the Chinese view their own and world history and how those perceptions shape China's economic policy, attitudes toward the world, relations with its neighbors, positions on democracy and human rights, and notions of good governance. The National Committee held a virtual program with author Michael Schuman on September 10, 2020.

Sep 19, 2020
Fateful Decisions: Choices that Will Shape China’s Future | Thomas Fingar, Jean C. Oi
01:15:04

China faces major demographic, economic, social, political, and foreign policy challenges. The experts whose analyses make up Fateful Decisions examine the choices facing China’s leaders. President Xi Jinping has laid out ambitious goals with little in the way of detailed policy to explain how they will be achieved. A s China’s economy slows and population ages, the demand for and costs of health care, elder care, education, and other social benefits are increasing. At the same time, global ambitions and an increasingly assertive military compete for funding and attention. The contributors to the volume examine what is at stake, possible options, and resulting outcomes. The National Committee held a virtual program with Dr. Thomas Fingar and Dr. Jean Oi on August 20, 2020 to discuss their edited volume, Fateful Decisions: Choices that Will Shape China’s Future.

Aug 28, 2020
How Can Diplomacy Avert a New Cold War with China? | Susan Thornton, Beatrice Camp
01:19:28

On August 17, 2020, the National Committee hosted a virtual program with retired American diplomats Susan Thornton and Beatrice Camp to discuss the place of diplomacy in U.S. policy toward China and beyond.

Aug 25, 2020
A Sensational Encounter with High Socialist China | Paul Pickowicz
01:05:22

Paul Pickowicz, long a professor of Chinese history at the University of California, San Diego, was among the first Americans to go to China after the People’s Republic of China was established in 1949. He kept a detailed journal and took nearly a thousand photographs during his four-week stay, some of which are collected in A Sensational Encounter with High Socialist China, a recollection of the historic visit. Professor Pickowicz uses the five senses to draw the reader into his experiences.

The National Committee hosted a virtual program on August 11, 2020 with Dr. Paul Pickowicz to discuss his book and the very different China and era in U.S.-China relations that it portrays.

Aug 19, 2020
Bilateral Breakdown: Science and Education in the Crossfire | Philip Bucksbaum, Bradley Farnsworth
01:14:12

As U.S.-China relations continue to deteriorate, two components of the relationship that have been successful in the past are increasingly coming under attack: higher education and scientific collaboration.

On August 6, 2020, the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations, Lieberthal-Rogel Center for Chinese Studies, and Michigan-China Innovation Center held the final in a series of “Bilateral Breakdown” webinars exploring U.S.-China relations through the lens of disengagement. Speakers Philip Bucksbaum, who holds several positions at Stanford University and its SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and is also the current president of the American Physical Society, and Bradley Farnsworth, vice president of the American Council on Education, discussed the effects the downturn in U.S.-China relations is having on American innovation and competitiveness, international students and universities, and research and development. Mary Gallagher, director of the University of Michigan’s International Institute and the Amy and Alan Lowenstein Professor in Democracy, Democratization, and Human Rights, moderated the discussion.

Aug 18, 2020
Tiktok, Wechat, and U.S.-China Decoupling | Melissa Hathaway, Gary Rieschel
01:15:35

Recent Executive Orders banning transactions with ByteDance and Tencent in 45 days have left the future of Tiktok and WeChat in the United States in question. What do they mean for U.S.-China technology decoupling and two-way venture capital investing? What are the implications for U.S.-China relations?

The National Committee held an urgent discussion with cybersecurity expert Ms. Melissa Hathaway and tech investor Mr. Gary Rieschel on August 13, 2020 to discuss the reasons for the Executive Orders and the potential outcomes.

Aug 17, 2020
Anti-Asian Racism in the United States: Current Issues and Sino-U.S. Relations
01:16:55

On August 5, 2020, the National Committee hosted a virtual program with - Anla Cheng, founder & CEO of SupChina - Erika Lee, Regents Professor of American History and director of the Immigration History Research Center at the University of Minnesota - Nancy Yao Maasbach, president of the Museum of Chinese in America - Jerry Yang, National Committee board member and co-founder and former CEO of Yahoo! The speakers discussed discrimination, generational divides, the model minority myth, and Sino-American relations.

Aug 17, 2020
The Scientist and the Spy: China, the FBI, and Industrial Espionage | Mara Hvistendahl
01:01:02

In September 2011, sheriff’s deputies noticed three ethnic Chinese men near an Iowa cornfield. What started as a trespassing inquiry turned into a two-year FBI operation in which investigators bugged the men’s rental cars, used a warrant intended for foreign terrorists and spies, and flew surveillance planes over corn country – all to protecting Monsanto and DuPont Pioneer trade secrets. In The Scientist and the Spy, Mara Hvistendahl describes the unusually far-reaching investigation, which pitted a veteran FBI special agent assigned to fight a national-security priority against Florida resident Robert Mo, who after his academic career faltered took a questionable job with a Chinese agricultural company as a way to support his family.

Industrial espionage by Chinese companies, a real issue, is among the reasons that the Trump administration gives when explaining the genesis of the U.S.-China trade war, and a top counterintelligence target of the FBI. Have efforts to address the problem been successful?  With what collateral damage?

Author Mara Hvistendahl joined the National Committee on July 30, 2020 for a virtual program to discuss her book and the issues it raises for the United States, Sino-American collaboration in the sciences, and U.S.-China relations. The event was moderated by National Committee board member and Dorsey & Whitney attorney, Mr. Nelson Dong.

Aug 11, 2020
Lessons Learned Amid a Pandemic: How the United States and China can Collaborate on Global Health Crises
01:31:55

In mid-July 2020, the National Committee convened a virtual session of its U.S.-China Track II Dialogue on Healthcare.  Coming in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, the participants focused on how our two nations can work together on global health crises in such areas as public health reforms, containment strategies, and healthcare delivery.

On July 30, 2020, the National Committee hosted a virtual public event to hear takeaways and lessons learned from the Healthcare Dialogue discussions. National Committee President Stephen Orlins led a conversation with George Gao, Director, China's Center for Disease Control and Prevention; Margaret Hamburg, Foreign Secretary, National Academy of Medicine and former Commissioner, Food and Drug Administration; Gordon Liu, PKU BOYA Professor of Economics, Ministry of Education Yangtze River Scholar Professor of Economics, National School of Development, Peking University; former FDA Commissioner Mark McClellan, Director, Robert J Margolis Center for Health Policy and Margolis Professor of Business, Medicine and Health Policy, Duke University; and Julia Spencer, Associate Vice President, Global Vaccine Public Policy, Partnerships and Government Affairs, Merck.

Aug 10, 2020
Perspectives from Rural China | Matthew Chitwood, Mei Lan
01:13:57

In October 2015, during the Fifth Plenary Session of the 18th Chinese Communist Party Central Committee, the Party committed to eliminating rural poverty by 2020. The goal was reiterated at the 19th National Party Congress in 2017. Now that we are halfway through 2020, what is the state of poverty elimination in rural China? What has been the impact of COVID-19? How are “left behind” children doing, especially now that some migrant laborers have been unable to return to their urban jobs because of the coronavirus? How do environmental issues, cultural preservation, and ethnic tourism fit in?      

On July 23, 2020, the National Committee held a virtual program with Ms. Mei Lan, born and raised in a Chinese village, and Mr. Matthew Chitwood, an American who lived in the Chinese countryside until late last year, to discuss the current situation in rural China.

Jul 28, 2020
Amy Qin, Olivia Qi Zhang | Behind the Byline: A Crossroads for U.S.-China Journalism

The past few months have seen drastic restrictions on American journalists in China and Chinese journalists in the United States. On July 16, 2020, The National Committee’s Young China Professionals (YCP) held an event to go behind the byline and hear candid reflections from two journalists who have been at the front lines of reporting in the United States and China. Olivia Zhang is the chief U.S. correspondent for Caixin Media and Amy Qin is a China correspondent for The New York Times. They reflected on how they have navigated a tightening media landscape, shed light on the costs of politicizing journalism, and predicted potential impacts on international reporting.

Jul 20, 2020
Deborah Brautigam, Jendayi Frazer | China, Africa, and American Policy
01:17:35

In April 2020, reports about the poor treatment of African residents in Guangzhou were published around the world, including in the United States. COVID-19 had exacerbated the sometimes tense relationship between Africans and Chinese in China. China has invested in the manufacturing and agriculture sectors across Africa in recent decades, as well as in infrastructure development through loans, export credits, and official development assistance. What is the nature of the financing, and of the relationships between China and African nations? What does Chinese policy toward Africa mean for the United States, its bilateral relationship with China, and its relationships with the countries of Africa?

On June 24, 2020, the National Committee held a virtual program with Professor Deborah Bräutigam, one of the world’s foremost experts on China and Africa and a National Committee board member, and Ambassador Jendayi Frazer, former U.S. ambassador to South Africa and former assistant secretary of state for African affairs, to discuss China, Africa, and U.S. policy.

About the speakers: https://www.ncuscr.org/event/china-africa-american-policy

Jul 02, 2020
Frank H. Wu | High Stakes for Higher Education
46:50

On June 18, 2020, the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations hosted a webinar with Frank H. Wu, President of Queens College and former President of the Committee of 100. In a moderated conversation with NCUSCR President Steve Orlins, Mr. Wu discussed the impact that coronavirus and the U.S. Department of Justice's China Initiative will have on higher education and the future of Chinese students in the United States. He also elaborated on the continuing importance of educational exchange.  

This program was originally held exclusively for participants from the National Committee’s next generation leadership initiatives, including alumni of the U.S. Foreign Policy Colloquium, the Student Leaders Exchange, and the Schwarzman Scholars Program. The event was designed not only as a unique opportunity to hear from Mr. Wu, but also for the Committee's network of program participants and alumni to connect across the United States and China.  

About Frank H. Wu: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_H._Wu

Jul 02, 2020
Yingyi Ma | Ambitious and Anxious: How Chinese Undergraduates Succeed and Struggle in American Higher Education
01:02:37

In her new book, "Ambitious and Anxious: How Chinese Undergraduates Succeed and Struggle in American Higher Education," based on research conducted both in the United States and in China, Yingyi Ma argues that Chinese college student experiences of American education spring from the enormous social changes in China of the last few decades, creating both ambition and anxiety. She offers some policy suggestions to American educators and administrators, starting with the recruitment process, running through classroom practices, and concluding with career services. On June 23, 2020, the National Committee held a virtual program with Dr. Ma where she discussed her book. Speaker bio: ncuscr.org/event/ambitious-and-anxious

Jul 01, 2020
James Carter | Champions Day: The End of Old Shanghai
59:19

What were some of the forces roiling Shanghai, and by extension, China as a whole, in the early 1940’s? In Champions Day: The End of Old Shanghai, Dr. James Carter describes the many worlds of Shanghai on the eve of World War II, focusing on the city’s famed race track a few weeks before the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.  

In capturing the confluence of these three disparate, coexisting worlds on November 12, 1941, Professor Carter explores the multi-faceted history of old Shanghai and the various international influences, characters, and events that shaped the city’s evolution and its profound schisms. He joined the National Committee on June 16, 2020 for a virtual program to discuss his new book.  

Speaker bio: https://www.ncuscr.org/event/carter-champions-day

Jun 29, 2020
Margaret Lewis | The U.S. Department of Justice's China Initiative
01:00:39

The Department of Justice launched the China Initiative in November 2018 to counter national security threats emanating from the People’s Republic of China (PRC). In February 2020, the Federal Bureau of Investigation announced that it had launched about a thousand active investigations under the Initiative; the China Initiative is gaining momentum.   

In a forthcoming article, Seton Hall University Law Professor Margaret K. Lewis argues that using “China” as the glue connecting cases under the Initiative’s umbrella creates an overly inclusive conception of the threat, and attaches a criminal taint to entities that have an even tangential connection to China. A better path would be to discard the “China Initiative” framing, focus on cases’ individual characteristics, and broaden the Department of Justice’s interactions with non-governmental experts.   

On June 9, 2020, the National Committee hosted a virtual program with Margaret Lewis where she discussed her article.

Jun 11, 2020
Jennifer Ho, John Pomfret | The Coronavirus, Anti-Asian Racism in the United States, and Sino-American Relations
01:14:48

With the spread of COVID-19 in the United States, reports of racism against Asian-Americans have risen sharply, drawing renewed attention to issues of bias, immigration, and the place of Asian-Americans in society. The current surge of anti-Asian incidents highlights a troubling history, and reinforces the urgent need to examine, understand, and confront these issues that affect the lives of Asian-Americans, influence American perceptions of China, and ultimately affect Sino-American relations on the global stage.  On June 2, 2020, the National Committee hosted a virtual discussion with Jennifer Ho, professor of ethnic studies at University of Colorado and president of the Association for Asian American Studies, and John Pomfret, former Washington Post correspondent and author of The Beautiful Country and the Middle Kingdom: America and China, 1776 to the Present, on the history of anti-Chinese/Asian racism in the United States, the impact of coronavirus-related racism, and the importance of uniting across our communities to stand up against all forms of discrimination. For more on the coronavirus and its social impacts on the people of the United States and China, please visit ncuscr.org/coronavirus.

Jun 10, 2020
Jude Blanchette, Sun Yun | Two Sessions, Two Directions, Many Challenges
01:16:41

The 2020 annual meetings of the National People’s Congress (NPC) and the Chinese People’s Political Consultative Conference (CPPCC), known as the “Two Sessions” or “Lianghui,” were originally scheduled to begin in Beijing on March 5. The meetings were postponed due to the novel coronavirus outbreak, and new dates were announced in late April: the CPPCC meeting began instead on May 21 and the NPC on May 22. 

At past Two Sessions, the leadership unveiled its target for GDP growth for the year, presented a road map for the year ahead, and closed with a news conference during which the premier took vetted questions from Chinese and foreign journalists. Given the impact of COVID-19, objectives, formats, and announcements were very different this year. 

On May 29, 2020, the National Committee held a virtual program with Mr. Jude Blanchette, Freeman Chair of China Studies at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, and Ms. Sun Yun, senior fellow and co-director of the East Asia Program and director of the China Program at the Stimson Center, both members of the Committee’s Public Intellectuals Program, to reflect on key takeaways from the 2020 Two Sessions.

Jun 09, 2020
Coronavirus Crisis: Prospects for U.S.-China Cooperation in Combatting the Global Economic Downturn
01:29:16

As the COVID-19 pandemic presents unprecedented challenges to every level of the global economy, the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations is bringing together leading American and Chinese experts on economics and trade to share analysis and projections on the issues. We invite you to join us for a series of virtual programs, Coronavirus Crisis: What it means for U.S.-China Economic & Trade Relations, over the next month. 

The final program in the series, Coronavirus Crisis: Prospects for U.S.-China Cooperation in Combatting the Global Economic Downturn, was held on May 27, 2020. The speakers included: Nicholas R. Lardy, Senior Fellow, Peterson Institute for International Economics; Robert E. Rubin, Former U.S. Treasury Secretary; Lu Feng, Director, China Macroeconomic Research Center, Peking University; Yao Yang, Boya Chair Professor and Dean, National School of Development, Peking University.  

For more information on the potential economic, social, and political impacts of the coronavirus outbreak, and its long-term implications for U.S.-China relations, please visit https://www.ncuscr.org/coronavirus 

Jun 09, 2020
Laura Silver | American Views on China: A Pew Research Center Survey
57:29

The Pew Research Center has been polling American adults on their perceptions of China since 2005. The latest report, based on interviews conducted in March 2020, shows that growing numbers of Americans have become increasingly negative about China. For the first time, more than half of Americans between the ages of 18 and 29 held unfavorable views of China.

The National Committee held a virtual program on May 14, 2020, with Pew Research Center Senior Researcher Dr. Laura Silver to discuss the study’s findings.

May 27, 2020
Amb. Robert Zoellick | 2020 Annual Members Program FULL EVENT
01:17:46

The National Committee on U.S.-China Relations was pleased to host a virtual conversation on May 19, 2020, with Ambassador Robert Zoellick, former U.S. Trade Representative and president of the World Bank, among other positions in and outside of government. Fifteen years have passed since his “responsible stakeholder” speech at the National Committee’s 2005 Gala dinner. Ambassador Zoellick offered reflections on his 2005 speech and the policy implications of his approach for the United States when considering the current Sino-U.S. relationship. National Committee Chair Ambassador Carla A. Hills provided introductions and President Stephen Orlins moderated the event.

May 27, 2020
Amb. Robert Zoellick | “Responsible Stakeholder” Fifteen Years Later
15:03

This speech is an excerpt from the National Committee 2020 Members Program. To hear NCUSCR Chair Ambassador Carla Hills introduction, as well as the extensive q&a with NCUSCR President Stephen Orlins, please listen to the next episode, "Amb. Robert Zoellick | 2020 Annual Members Program FULL EVENT." 

The National Committee on U.S.-China Relations was pleased to host a virtual conversation on May 19, 2020, with Ambassador Robert Zoellick, former U.S. Trade Representative and president of the World Bank, among other positions in and outside of government. Fifteen years have passed since his “responsible stakeholder” speech at the National Committee’s 2005 Gala dinner. Ambassador Zoellick offered reflections on his 2005 speech and the policy implications of his approach for the United States when considering the current Sino-U.S. relationship.

May 26, 2020
Coronavirus Crisis: Prospects for U.S.-China Economic and Trade Relations
01:22:43

As the COVID-19 pandemic presents unprecedented challenges to every level of the global economy, the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations is bringing together leading American and Chinese experts on economics and trade to share analysis and projections on the issues. We invite you to join us for a series of virtual programs, Coronavirus Crisis: What it means for U.S.-China Economic & Trade Relations, over the next month. 

The second program in the series, Coronavirus Crisis: Prospects for U.S.-China Economic and Trade Relations, was held on May 13, 2020. The speakers included: Tu Xinquan, Dean, China Institute for WTO Studies, University of International Business and Economics; Xu Gao, Chief Economist, Bank of China International Co. Ltd; Barry Naughton, So Kwanlok Chair of Chinese International Affairs, University of California, San Diego; and Daniel Rosen, Founder and China Practice Leader, Rhodium Group. 

For more information on the potential economic, social, and political impacts of the coronavirus outbreak, and its long-term implications for U.S.-China relations, please visit https://www.ncuscr.org/coronavirus 

May 22, 2020
U.S.-China Investment: 2020 Report Launch
01:28:15

A deteriorating bilateral relationship and growing regulatory scrutiny have changed the trajectory of capital flows between the United States and China over the past three years. The COVID-19 pandemic threatens to further disrupt two-way investment, as weak Chinese consumption and supply chain risks make U.S. companies re-think their China footprint, and Chinese investors face continued headwinds from domestic restrictions on outbound capital flows and U.S. regulators wary of opportunistic foreign buyers.

The National Committee held a virtual event with report authors Thilo Hanemann and Daniel Rosen, both of Rhodium Group; Ker Gibbs, president, AmCham Shanghai; Rebecca Fannin, founder/editor, Silicon Dragon Ventures; and National Committee President Stephen Orlins to launch our new Two-Way Street: 2020 Update report and discuss the latest two-way investment data and analysis on May 11, 2020.

May 16, 2020
Anja Manuel, Paul Triolo | China’s Tech Rise: Critical Technology Regulation and its Industry Impact
01:15:21

As the impact of technology gains increasing strategic importance in the U.S.-China relationship, the National Committee hosted the second session of Navigating China's Technological Rise, a series of virtual programs on the critical issues and policies affecting the technology industry and its impact on Sino-American ties. 

  The second program of the series, Critical Technology Regulation and its Industry Impact, which took place on May 8, 2020, featuring discussion and Q&A with NCUSCR Director Anja Manuel, co-founder and principal of Rice, Hadley, Gates & Manuel LLC, and Paul Triolo, head of the geo-technology practice at Eurasia Group. 

  Ms. Manuel and Mr. Triolo discussed the policies that contributed to China’s technological rise, the geopolitical implications of this rise, how U.S. firms should approach this new order, and how recent developments, such as the Phase I trade agreement and COVID-19 pandemic, have affected technological collaboration.

May 14, 2020
Coronavirus Crisis: The Short- and Long-Term Economic Impact in China and the United States
01:31:24

As the COVID-19 pandemic presents unprecedented challenges to every level of the global economy, the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations is bringing together leading American and Chinese experts on economics and trade to share analysis and projections on the issues. We invite you to join us for a series of virtual programs, Coronavirus Crisis: What it means for U.S.-China Economic & Trade Relations, over the next month.

The first program in the series, Coronavirus Crisis: The Short and Long-Term Economic Impact in China and the United States, was held on April 29, 2020, and featured: Gao Shanwen, Chief Economist, Essence Securities Co., Ltd.; Huang Yiping, Professor of Economics and Deputy Dean, National School of Development, Peking University; Catherine Mann, Global Chief Economist, Citi; Mark Zandi, Chief Economist, Moody's Analytics.

May 12, 2020
COVID-19 and the U.S.-China Relationship: Lessons for Collaboration in Global Health
01:13:48

The arrival of the coronavirus in both China and the United States has further strained an already frayed bilateral relationship. Yet, if the world is to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic and prepare for future health crises, the two nations must work together to confront the immediate issues of medical treatment and equipment, and the longer-term need to develop and produce necessary vaccines.

On April 28, 2020, the National Committee hosted a virtual program where Joan Kaufman of Schwarzman Scholars moderated a conversation with two leading medical experts: Margaret Hamburg of the National Academy of Medicine and Winnie Yip of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, during which they discussed the potential for collaboration between the United States and China on global health strategies.

For more information on the coronavirus's impact on U.S.-China relations, visit www.ncuscr.org/coronavirus.

 

May 07, 2020
Adm. Dennis Blair | Navigating China’s Technological Rise: Charting a Course from Competition to Collaboration
01:09:02

As the impact of technology gains increasing strategic importance in the U.S.-China relationship, we launched Navigating China's Technological Rise, a series of virtual programs featuring conversations with leading experts on the critical issues and policies affecting the technology industry and its impact on Sino-American ties.

Former National Intelligence Director and Commander in Chief of the U.S. Pacific Command Admiral Dennis Blair was the featured speaker for the first event in the series, “Charting a Course from Competition to Collaboration,” on April 23, 2020. Admiral Blair, also a National Committee director, discussed the rise of China's technological capabilities, the related strategic challenges, and how a U.S. approach can best balance regulation and collaboration. The discussion and Q&A was moderated by NCUSCR President Stephen Orlins

May 04, 2020
Graham Allison | In War Against Coronavirus: Is China Foe – or Friend?
01:15:37

In its fight against the coronavirus, should the United States consider China an enemy or a partner? “Viruses carry no passports, have no ideology, and respect no borders,” write Dr. Graham Allison and Mr. Christopher Li of Harvard University in a March essay in The National Interest, but our response to the pandemic will affect domestic and global economic growth, confidence in governments, and national standing around the world. Despite great differences between the United States and China, there are potential areas of collaboration in the battle against the coronavirus including in data collection and sharing, diagnostics and public health measures, and biomedical research.

On April 22, 2020, the National Committee hosted a virtual program with Graham Allison where he discussed prospects for cooperation in the fight against the coronavirus. 

May 01, 2020
M. Taylor Fravel | Active Defense: China’s Military Strategy Since 1949
01:07:23

Since the establishment of the People’s Republic of China in 1949, China’s leaders have devised nine different military strategies, also known as ‘strategic guidelines.’ In "Active Defense: China’s Military Strategy since 1949," M. Taylor Fravel explores the range and intensity of threats faced by the country, illuminating China’s past and present military goals and how it has sought to achieve them.

Dr. Fravel shows why transformations in military strategy were pursued at some times and not others. He focuses on the military strategies adopted in 1956, 1980, and 1993—all moments during which the PLA was attempting to wage war in a new way—to show that China has pursued major change in its strategic guidelines when there has been a significant shift in the conduct of warfare in the international system and when China’s Communist Party has been united.

On October 10, 2019, Dr. Taylor Fravel presented his findings and discussed the implications for China’s current military behavior.

Apr 30, 2020
Yuen Yuen Ang, Amy Celico, Elizabeth Knup | COVID-19 and the U.S.-China Relationship: Collision or Collaboration?
01:27:10

As the novel coronavirus and resulting illness, COVID-19, spread across China and now the United States and much of the world, national governments have had to scramble to address this unprecedented health threat. At the same time, the pandemic has caused an enormous strain in U.S.-China relations at a time when the two countries are contending with an on-going trade war and other sources of friction.

On April 14, 2020, the National Committee hosted a virtual program with three experts: Yuen Yuen Ang of the University of Michigan, Amy Celico of the Albright Stonebridge Group, and Elizabeth Knup of the Ford Foundation. Committee president Steve Orlins moderated the conversation as they considered how the rampant spread of the virus is affecting the U.S.-China relationship, and what the long-term impact may be in the political, economic, and social realms.

Apr 24, 2020
Ely Ratner | Rising to the China Challenge: Renewing American Competitiveness in the Indo-Pacific
01:18:15

According to an assessment prepared for Congress as mandated by the FY2019 National Defense Authorization Act, the United States and China are “locked in a strategic competition over the future of the Indo-Pacific.” The authors of the report, including Ely Ratner, executive vice president and director of studies at the Center for a New American Security, describe competing visions for the rules, norms, and institutions that will govern international relations in the future and make more than 100 policy recommendations.

The United States is free and open; by contrast, China has, in recent years, turned in an increasingly closed and illiberal direction. If China should succeed in its efforts in the Indo-Pacific, the result would be less regional security and prosperity, and the United States would be less able to exert power and influence in the world.

The National Committee hosted a virtual event on March 31, 2020, with Ely Ratner to discuss these issues. He presented recommendations to address the critical areas of U.S. policy toward China that could be more consistent, coordinated, and productive.

Apr 23, 2020
The Age of Mutual Disillusionment: China and the United States
01:28:25

How have the views of Chinese people who may in the past have been attracted to the United States changed over the last 20 years? How have American perspectives on China shifted during the same period? National Public Radio (NPR) correspondent Frank Langfitt gained insights on many aspects of a changing China as he talked with passengers during taxi rides he provided for free in Shanghai. The NPR radio series that resulted inspired his first book, The Shanghai Free Taxi: Journeys with the Hustlers and Rebels of the New China.

On March 24, the National Committee hosted a webinar with Frank Langfitt where he discussed what he learned from his passengers in Shanghai and beyond.

Mar 30, 2020
David Zweig | China's "Reverse Migration" Strategies Under Attack: The 1000 Talents Plan
01:13:47

In recent years China has been appealing to scholars who went overseas to study and remained abroad to return to China. Among its “reverse migration” policies is the Thousand Talents Plan, initiated in 2008 to encourage “strategic scientists or leading talents who can make breakthroughs in key technologies or can enhance China’s high-tech industries and emerging disciplines” to accept positions at leading Chinese universities (Recruitment Program of Global Experts). The U.S. government has taken exception to the program, claiming that it encourages economic espionage and intellectual property theft.

On January 27, 2020, the National Committee hosted a program to discuss China’s "reverse migration" efforts, presenting the Thousand Talents Plan as a case study. Dr. David Zweig, professor of political science emeritus at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, shared his research findings.

Mar 03, 2020
Amb. Robert Blackwill on Implementing Grand Strategy Toward China
16:38

In this podcast, Ambassador Robert Blackwill sits down with NCUSCR President Steve Orlins to discuss his recent report, "Implementing Grand Strategy Toward China: Twenty-Two U.S. Policy Prescriptions," published by the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) in January 2020. Ambassador Blackwill shares how his report has been received by both critics and proponents of engagement with China, and expands on his analysis of China's increasingly assertive international presence.  

On February 13, 2020, Ambassador Blackwill presented his report during a program at the National Committee. The full video can be found at www.ncuscr.video/ambblackwill.  

Ambassador Blackwill is the Henry A. Kissinger senior fellow for U.S. foreign policy at CFR and the Diller-von Furstenberg Family Foundation Distinguished Scholar at the Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies.  

Ambassador Blackwill was deputy assistant to the president and deputy national security advisor for strategic planning under President George W. Bush; he also served as presidential envoy to Iraq. Dr. Blackwill joined the National Security Council after serving as the U.S. ambassador to India from 2001 to 2003.

Feb 20, 2020
Ambassador Robert Blackwill | Implementing Grand Strategy Toward China
54:50

Over the past few years, China has lost some of the key constituents that have supported constructive U.S.-China relations in recent decades, from the business sector to the academic field. As China has grown stronger economically, politically, and militarily, its increasingly muscular foreign policy has given many Americans pause.

On February 13, the National Committee held a program with Ambassador Robert Blackwill during which he discussed how the United States should respond, as per the twenty-two policy prescriptions that form his proposed "Grand Strategy Toward China." The program was based on Blackwill's report of the same name, published by the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR) in January 2020.

Robert Blackwill is the Henry A. Kissinger senior fellow for U.S. foreign policy at CFR and the Diller–von Furstenberg Family Foundation Distinguished Scholar at the Henry A. Kissinger Center for Global Affairs at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies.

Ambassador Blackwill was deputy assistant to the president and deputy national security advisor for strategic planning under President George W. Bush; he also served as presidential envoy to Iraq. Dr. Blackwill joined to the National Security Council (NSC) after serving as the U.S. ambassador to India from 2001 to 2003.

Feb 20, 2020
Daniel Rosen | The Phase-One Deal and China's Evolving Economic Model
07:16

Leading Chinese and American economists convened in New York City on January 9 at the Forecast of China's Economy for 2020, hosted by the National Committee and the China Center for Economic Research.

During the Forecast’s first panel, Daniel Rosen presented a preliminary analysis of the phase-one trade deal in light of China’s ongoing negotiation between statism and industrial policy, capitalism and the free market. Daniel Rosen is a founding partner of Rhodium Group.

Feb 12, 2020
Nicholas Lardy | China's Economic Slowdown
05:47

Leading Chinese and American economists convened in New York on January 9 at the Forecast of China's Economy for 2020, hosted by the National Committee and the China Center for Economic Research.

During the Forecast’s first panel, Dr. Nicholas Lardy presented an overview of his research on China’s economic slowdown. Dr. Lardy is the Anthony M. Solomon Senior Fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, and a Vice Chair on the National Committee’s board of directors.

Feb 06, 2020
The Power of Place: Contentious Politics in Twentieth-Century Shanghai and Bombay
01:14:12

What do patterns of political contention look like? Over the course of the twentieth century, protests and social movements in Shanghai and Bombay changed with the commodification of urban land. In his new book, The Power of Place: Contentious Politics in Twentieth-Century Shanghai and BombayMark Frazier examines changes in political geographies and patterns of popular protest in the two cities, analyzing debates over ideology, citizenship, and political representation, and comparing clashes over housing, jobs, policing, and public space.

On October 3, 2019, Dr. Mark Frazier presented his analysis, updating his findings with comparison to the recent protests in Hong Kong.

Dec 17, 2019
Jude Blanchette | China’s New Red Guards: The Return of Radicalism and the Rebirth of Mao Zedong
01:10:06

In his recent book, China’s New Red Guards: The Return of Radicalism and the Rebirth of Mao ZedongJude D. Blanchette argues that China’s growing authoritarianism draws directly from the Mao era.

Under President Xi Jinping, state control over the economy is increasing, civil society is shrinking, and the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) is expanding its reach in new ways. As Mr. Blanchette describes, nationalist intellectuals and activists have fed a populism that rejects Western notions of political pluralism, the rule of law, and a market economy. They draw on Mao’s writings and policies in support of a powerful CCP overseeing every aspect of Chinese society and politics.

On September 18, 2019, the National Committee hosted a conversation with Jude Blanchette about his new book and Mao’s influence on contemporary Chinese politics and society. Watch event video.

Jude D. Blanchette is the Freeman Chair of China Studies at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C. He is also a senior advisor at Crumpton Group, a geo-political risk advisory in Arlington, VA. He serves as an adjunct fellow of the Asia-Pacific Security Program at the Center for a New American Security, and is a National Committee on U.S.-China Relations Public Intellectuals Program fellow. Read full bio

Oct 17, 2019
Matt Sheehan | The Transpacific Experiment: How China and California Collaborate and Compete for Our Future
01:19:39

Entrepreneurs, students, local politicians, and others in California and China are forging connections across a wide array of fields. Who are these people? What do their activities mean for the bilateral relationship and the world in the 21st century? Journalist Matt Sheehan tells the stories of some of the individuals tying our two countries together in his new book, The Transpacific Experiment: How China and California Collaborate and Compete for Our Future. Mr. Sheehan selects a few people in the real estate, film, AI, and electric vehicle industries to illustrate the relationship’s complexity.

On September 10, 2019, Matt Sheehan discussed his new book, and offered his analysis of how individuals on both sides of the Pacific compete as well as cooperate.

Matt Sheehan is a fellow at the Paulson Institute’s think tank, MacroPolo, where he leads the team’s work on U.S.-China technology issues, specializing in artificial intelligence. Based in Oakland, he was formerly the China correspondent for The WorldPost. From 2010 to 2016, Mr. Sheehan lived and worked in Xi’an and Beijing. He then moved back to the Bay Area to work as an analyst, consultant, and writer on topics connecting China and California. In 2018, he was selected as a finalist for the Young China Watcher of the Year award.

His work has been published in The Atlantic, Vice News, Foreign Policy, The WorldPost, The Huffington Post, MIT Technology Review, and elsewhere. He has been quoted or cited in numerous media outlets, including Reuters, The Financial Times, The New York TimesThe San Francisco ChronicleThe Diplomat, Dagens Nyheter, and The South China Morning Post, among others.

Oct 07, 2019
Dr. Ezra Vogel | China and Japan: Facing History
49:45

Professor Ezra F. Vogel begins his new book on China and Japan in the sixth century when the Japanese adopted basic elements of Chinese civilization. Throughout the ensuing centuries, China generally took the leading role. Tables turned by the end of the 19th century, when Japan’s modernization efforts surpassed those of China, leading to Japanese victory in the 1895 Sino-Japanese war. Despite recent efforts to promote trade and even tourism, the bitter legacy of World War II has made cooperation difficult.

In China and Japan: Facing HistoryDr. Vogel argues that the two nations must forge a new relationship as the world confronts transnational issues including climate change, disaster relief, global economic development, and scientific research. Without acknowledging and ultimately transcending the frictions of the past and present, tense relations between China and Japan jeopardize global stability.

On September 4, 2019, Dr. Ezra Vogel presented his findings on how the history of Sino-Japanese relations informs the present, and on the need for a reset for the future.

Professor Ezra F. Vogel is the Henry Ford II Professor of the Social Sciences Emeritus at Harvard University. He has had a long association with Harvard, receiving his Ph.D. in sociology there in 1958, and then teaching at the university from 1967 to 2000.

In 1973, Dr. Vogel succeeded John Fairbank to become the second director of Harvard’s East Asian Research Center. He also served as director of the U.S.-Japan Program, director of the Fairbank Center, and founding director of the Asia Center. He was also director of the undergraduate concentration in East Asian Studies from its inception in 1972 until 1991. He taught courses on Chinese society, Japanese society, and industrial East Asia.

From 1993 to 1995, Dr. Vogel took a two-year leave of absence from Harvard to serve as the National Intelligence Officer for East Asia at the national intelligence council in Washington. In 1996 he chaired the American Assembly on China and edited the resulting volume, Living With China. The following year, Dr. Vogel began serving on the board of directors of the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations. He rotated off in 2002 after serving two terms.

His book Japan As Number One (1979), in Japanese translation, became a bestseller in Japan, and his book Deng Xiaoping and the Transformation of China (2011), in Chinese translation, became a bestseller in China. Among his other works are Japan's New Middle Class (1963), Canton Under Communism (1969), Comeback (1988), One Step Ahead in China: Guangdong Under Reform (1989), and The Four Little Dragons: The Spread of Industrialization in East Asia (1991).

Professor Vogel has spent a total of more than five years in Asia conducting research. He lectures frequently in Asia, in both Chinese and Japanese as well as English. He directs a weekly speaker series for the Fairbank Center on “Critical Issues Confronting China.” He has received numerous honors, including eleven honorary degrees.

Oct 01, 2019
Winston Lord | Kissinger on Kissinger: Reflections on Diplomacy, Grand Strategy, and Leadership
01:00:12

In the 1970s, President Richard Nixon’s national security advisor, Dr. Henry Kissinger, steered U.S. foreign policy through challenging times, reshaping the country’s policies on China, Vietnam, the Soviet Union, and the Middle East. Working by his side throughout was Ambassador Winston Lord, then special assistant to the national security advisor and director of the State Department’s policy planning staff. In a new collection of interviews, Kissinger on Kissinger: Reflections on Diplomacy, Grand Strategy, and Leadership, Ambassador Lord chronicles Dr. Kissinger’s diplomatic adventures. Understanding Dr. Kissinger’s thoughts on leadership and strategy provides a timely lens through which to view today’s challenging geopolitical landscape.


Winston Lord has had a long and varied career in and out of government, serving as special assistant to the national security advisor (1970-73) and director of the State Department policy planning staff under President Nixon (1973-77), ambassador to China for Presidents Reagan and the first President Bush (1985-89), and assistant secretary of state for East Asian and Pacific affairs under President Clinton (1993-97). Earlier in his career he held many positions in the State Department as a foreign service officer, and served on the policy planning staff of the Defense Department.
Between government postings Ambassador Lord was a board member of many non-partisan, non-government organizations related to global issues. These include his service as president of the Council on Foreign Relations, co-chair of the International Rescue Committee, chair of the National Endowment for Democracy, and chair of the Carnegie Endowment National Commission on America and the New World. He is a member and former director of the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations.

Ambassador Lord earned a B.A. from Yale (magna cum laude) and an M.A. from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy (first in his class). He has received several honorary degrees, the State Department’s Distinguished Honor Award, and the Defense Department’s Outstanding Performance Award. Ambassador Lord has appeared on all major U.S. media networks, and his writings include articles in the New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, Time, Newsweek, and Foreign Affairs.

Jun 13, 2019
Ambassador Thomas Pickering: 2019 U.S. Foreign Policy Colloquium Keynote Address
33:09

In his keynote speech at the U.S. Foreign Policy Colloquium on May 30, 2019, Ambassador Thomas Pickering explains the shift towards multi-polarity in the current world order and highlights seven key issues, from growth and development to weapons of mass destruction, confronting U.S. foreign policy. He discusses how some of these issues can be potential areas for collaboration between the U.S. and China, including climate change and cyberspace.

The annual U.S. Foreign Policy Colloquium (FPC) is an exclusive four-day program designed to provide 75 Chinese graduate students from universities across the United States with a deeper and more nuanced understanding of the complex forces that shape American foreign policy and inform the U.S.-China relationship. The program is run annually by the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations and gives participants rare access into some of the capital's most important foreign policy-making institutions, such as the Department of State and the National Security Council, where they meet with individuals responsible for crafting and influencing policy.

Ambassador Thomas Pickering is vice chair of Hills and Company, an international consulting firm providing advice to U.S. businesses on
investment, trade, and risk assessment issues abroad. Ambassador Pickering served as the U.S. ambassador and representative to the United Nations under President George H.W. Bush, where he led the U.S. effort to build a global coalition during and after the first Gulf War. He also served as the U.S. undersecretary of state for political affairs under President Bill Clinton.

Jun 07, 2019
Susan Thornton: Prospects for Co-evolution in Sino-American Relations
01:50:48

Susan A. Thornton delivered the 2019 Barnett-Oksenberg Lecture on Sino-American Relations in Shanghai on Wednesday, May 15. Now in its twelfth year, this annual lecture affords the opportunity for a frank and forthright discussion of current and potential issues between the two countries; it is the first and only ongoing lecture series on U.S.-China relations that takes place on the Mainland.

Susan A. Thornton is a retired senior U.S. diplomat with almost 30 years of experience with the U.S. State Department in Eurasia and East Asia. She is currently a senior fellow and research scholar at Yale Law School's Paul Tsai China Center.

Until July 2018, Thornton was acting assistant secretary for East Asian and Pacific Affairs at the Department of State and led East Asia policy making amid crises with North Korea, escalating trade tensions with China, and a fast-changing international environment. In previous State Department roles, she worked on China and Korea policy and served in leadership positions at U.S. embassies in Central Asia, Russia, the Caucasus, and China. She speaks Russian and Mandarin Chinese.

View more information on the Barnett-Oksenberg Lecture here: https://ncuscr.news/barnett-oksenberg

Jun 04, 2019
2019 Annual Members Program | The State of U.S.-China Relations: A Conversation
01:33:26

The National Committee on U.S.-China Relations (NCUSCR) hosted a conversation with four former White House officials who have served under Republican and Democratic administrations as the senior director for Asian Affairs on the National Security Council (NSC) – Kenneth Lieberthal, Evan Medeiros, Douglas Paal, and Daniel Russel – and Susan Thornton, the former acting assistant secretary of state for East Asian and Pacific Affairs. NCUSCR Chair Carla Hills provided the introductions and President Stephen Orlins moderated. The discussion focused on how the two countries have moved from strategic cooperation to strategic competition, and what can be done to help ease bilateral tensions.

View speaker bios: https://www.ncuscr.org/event/2019-annual-members-program

 

May 23, 2019
Denise Ho, Louisa Lim, and Jeffrey Wasserstrom: Hong Kong's Shifting Status, 1997-2019
37:33

As the twentieth century drew to a close, Hong Kong, recently transformed into a Special Administrative Region of the PRC, seemed a city totally unlike any of its neighbors. Many observers were surprised by how light a touch Beijing seemed to be exerting in the wake of the 1997 handover, and the striking contrast between what could be said, done, and published in Hong Kong, compared to mainland metropolitan cities such as Shanghai and Shenzhen. Since the 20th anniversary of Hong Kong's return to Chinese rule in 2017, controls have tightened dramatically amid fears of tighter political censorship and enhanced self-censorship. However, with the anniversary of the June 4th Massacre approaching, Hong Kong is still the only place on PRC soil where it can be discussed and marked in public. In 2019, what was once a chasm between civic life in Hong Kong and cities such as Guangzhou and Beijing is rapidly closing.

What does the future hold for Hong Kong? Will it become just another Chinese city that makes up the Greater Bay Area? The speakers, who have been tracking issues relating to higher education, journalism, protest, and the arts, address Hong Kong's future under Chinese rule.


Denise Y. Ho is assistant professor of twentieth-century Chinese history at Yale University. She is an historian of modern China, with a particular focus on the social and cultural history of the Mao period (1949-1976). Her first book, Curating Revolution: Politics on Display in Mao’s China, appeared with Cambridge University Press in 2018. She is also co-editing a volume with Jennifer Altehenger of King’s College London on the material culture of the Mao period. Dr. Ho is currently at work on a new research project on Hong Kong and China, entitled Cross-Border Relations.

Louisa Lim is an award-winning journalist who grew up in Hong Kong and reported from China for a decade for NPR and the BBC. She is a senior lecturer in audiovisual journalism at the University of Melbourne, and is currently a visiting fellow at the University of Hong Kong. She also co-hosts The Little Red Podcast, a podcast about China beyond the Beijing beltway, which won the News & Current Affairs award at the 2018 Australian Podcast Awards. Her writing about Hong Kong has appeared in the anthology Hong Kong 20/20: Reflections from a Borrowed Place, as well as The New York Times and The New Yorker, and she is the author of The People’s Republic of Amnesia: Tiananmen Revisited (Oxford University Press, 2014), which was shortlisted for the Orwell Prize and the Helen Bernstein Award for Excellence in Journalism.

Jeffrey Wasserstrom is Chancellor’s Professor of History at UC Irvine. His most recent book is the third edition of China in the 21st Century: What Everyone Needs to Know (Oxford, 2018), which he coauthored with Maura Cunningham. In addition to contributing to academic venues, he has written many reviews and commentaries for newspapers, magazines, and journals of opinion, including pieces on Hong Kong that have appeared in The Atlantic, The Nation, the Los Angeles Times, and the Los Angeles Review of Books. He is on the editorial board of Dissent magazine, serves as an academic editor for the China Channel of the Los Angeles Review of Books, and is a former member of the Board of Directors of the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations.

May 14, 2019
U.S.-China Investment: 2019 Report Launch
01:24:20

Recent policy changes and a deteriorating bilateral relationship have greatly impacted cross-border investment flows between the United States and China. Chinese FDI in the United States has dropped to the lowest level seen in seven years, and was even negative if divestitures are taken into account. American FDI in China has held up better, but recent Chinese liberalization has not yet sparked a big rush by U.S. companies. Two-way flows of venture capital, on the other hand, have reached new record levels in both directions.

At this release event for a new report detailing two-way investment flows between the United States and China, report authors Thilo Hanemann and Daniel Rosen, both of Rhodium Group, present their findings, followed by a discussion with Constance Hunter (KPMG), Stephen Orlins (NCUSCR), and Catherine Pan-Giordiano (Dorsey & Whitney LLP).

Learn more at https://ncuscr.news/inv19

 

 

May 09, 2019
David P. Willard: The Future of U.S.-China Economic Relations
01:04:15

Amid the ongoing trade tensions between the United States and China, David P. Willard, founder and CEO of 52 Capital Partners, explores the primary issues now affecting the U.S.-China economic relationship, including national security risks, heightened regulatory scrutiny, and legal barriers for cross-border mergers and acquisitions.

 

David P. Willard is the founder, chief executive officer & managing partner of 52 Capital Partners, LLC., responsible for all major aspects of the firm’s executive management, strategy, client development, investment process and thought leadership. Throughout his career, Mr. Willard has executed and participated in major M&A transactions and other corporate matters at firms in the United States, Europe, and Asia, including Goldman, Sachs & Co. and Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP, closing 53 transactions totaling over $150 billion in aggregate value.

A recognized expert on China, Mr. Willard speaks regularly on U.S.-China mergers and acquisitions, as well as other investment topics. He received his B.A. in East Asian Studies from Princeton, and his J.D. from the New York University School of Law. Mr. Willard is a member of the National Committee on United States-China Relations.

Apr 29, 2019
Nicholas Lardy: The End of Economic Reform in China?
01:12:40

In a new book, NCUSCR Vice Chair Nicholas R. Lardy of the Peterson Institute for International Economics draws upon new data to trace how Chinese President Xi Jinping's support of state-owned enterprises has begun to diminish the role of the market and private firms in China's economy. Dr. Lardy argues that China has the potential to match growth rates from previous decades, but only if it returns to a path of market-oriented reforms. At a National Committee corporate member luncheon on March 8, 2019, Dr. Lardy discussed the impact of revived state control over China's economy, and prospects for future growth.

Nicholas R. Lardy is the Anthony M. Solomon Senior Fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics. He joined the Institute in March 2003 from the Brookings Institution, where he was a senior fellow from 1995 until 2003. Before Brookings, he served at the University of Washington, where he was the director of the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies from 1991 to 1995. From 1997 through the spring of 2000, he was also the Frederick Frank Adjunct Professor of International Trade and Finance at the Yale University School of Management. He is an expert on the Chinese economy.

Dr. Lardy's most recent books are The State Strikes Back: The End of Economic Reform in China? (2019), Markets over Mao: The Rise of Private Business in China (2014), Sustaining China's Economic Growth after the Global Financial Crisis (2012), The Future of China's Exchange Rate Policy (2009), and China's Rise: Challenges and Opportunities (2008). In 2006, he contributed chapters on China's domestic economy and China in the world economy to China: The Balance Sheet (Public Affairs, 2006). In 2004, he coauthored Prospects for a US-Taiwan Free Trade Agreement with NCUSCR director Daniel Rosen. His previous book, Integrating China into the Global Economy, published in January 2002, explores whether reforms of China's economy and its foreign trade and exchange rate systems following China's WTO entry will integrate it much more deeply into the world economy.

Dr. Lardy is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and of the editorial boards of Asia Policy and the China Review.

He received his BA from the University of Wisconsin and his PhD from the University of Michigan, both in economics.

Mar 12, 2019
Weijian Shan: Out of the Gobi
01:01:00

As the chaos of the Cultural Revolution engulfed China, Weijian Shan, age 15, endured years of manual labor in the remote Gobi Desert. Passionate about his education, Shan lost a decade of schooling. Yet, as he describes in his remarkable new autobiography, Out of the Gobi: My Story of China and America, he never gave up on studying.

Having only completed elementary school, Dr. Shan attended prestigious academic institutions in the United States beginning in the early 1980’s. Dr. Shan shared his amazing story with the National Committee on January 28. 

 

Dr. Weijian Shan is chairman and CEO of PAG, one of the largest private equity firms in Asia. Before joining PAG, he was a partner of TPG, a private equity firm based in San Francisco, and co-managing partner of TPG Asia (formerly known as Newbridge Capital). At TPG, Dr. Shan led a number of landmark transactions including the acquisitions of Korea First Bank and China’s Shenzhen Development Bank, both of which made his investors billions of dollars in profits and were made into case studies of Harvard Business School. Previously, Dr. Shan was a managing director of JP Morgan, a professor at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, and laborer in Inner Mongolia.

Despite not attending secondary school, Dr. Shan received an M.A. and Ph.D., both in economics, from the University of California, Berkeley, and an M.B.A. from the Univer­sity of San Francisco. He studied English at the Beijing Institute of Foreign Trade (now the Beijing University of International Business and Economics), where he also taught.

Feb 01, 2019