Talkhouse Podcast

By Talkhouse

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Description

Talkhouse is a media company and outlet for musicians, actors, filmmakers, and others in their respective fields. Artists write essays and criticism from firsthand perspectives, speak one-on-one with their peers via the Talkhouse Podcast and Talkhouse Live events, and offer readers and listeners unique insight into creative work of all genres and generations. In short— Talkhouse is writing and conversations about music and film, from the people who make them.

Episode Date
Revisited: Reggie Watts with Chino Moreno (Deftones)
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To celebrate the release of the new Deftones album Ohms, we paired frontman Chino Moreno with his old friend and tourmate — and long-time Deftones fan! — comedian/musician Reggie Watts for a Talkhouse Podcast conversation. The guys were very psyched to catch up, and their freewheeling talk took in the making of the new Deftones LP; the ups and downs of long-term collaborations; their very different writing and recording approaches; and… bikes. Turns out they're both waaay into bikes. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer For this week’s episode, everyone you hear recorded themselves. Our producer is Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Aug 11, 2022
Introducing: Listening
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In Listening, a new series from Talkhouse and Mailchimp Presents, we invite some of the world’s most beloved and inventive musicians to create new compositions that allow us to intimately experience a time and a place in their lives. We’ll join each artist to hear about the creation of their piece, how deeper listening informs their process and how that practice can enrich all of our lives. Subscribe today!
Aug 08, 2022
Davey von Bohlen (Promise Ring) with Jim Adkins (Jimmy Eat World)
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On this week’s Talkhouse Podcast we’ve got two old friends whose bands started around the same time, and who’ve had very different albums hit the 20-year-mark recently: Jim Adkins of Jimmy Eat World and Davey von Bohlen of the Promise Ring. I had the idea to pair these guys after seeing a bunch of “best of emo” lists floating around the internet ether lately, and it reminded me of the heady days of the late ‘90s and early 2000s, and how many fond memories I have of those times. I saw the Promise Ring and Jimmy Eat World plenty of times back then; full disclosure: I was then and am now friends with the guys in the Promise Ring. It occurred to me that while the two bands had been on similar trajectories back then, that they diverged right around 20 years ago in a really interesting way. I figured it’d be fun to reconnect them and see what they had to say about it. The Promise Ring were at the top of the emo heap in the late 1990s, though everybody hated that word with a passion back then. They were early fans of Jimmy Eat World’s music, and the bands toured together a few times over the years. By the end of the century, The Promise Ring had hit a weird rough patch: Von Bohlen had surgery for a brain tumor, and the band was naturally forced to slow down considerably. When they returned with their much anticipated fourth album, Wood/Water, it represented what felt at the time like a pretty intense left turn: The songs were slower and more melodic—not necessarily what fans were expecting, though the album has gotten a rightful reappraisal in the 20 years since its release. The Promise Ring split up soon after its release, and Davey went on to form the band Maritime with Promise Ring drummer Dan Didier, and they released a string of great records. Jimmy Eat World also found themselves at a crossroads 20 years ago; having parted company with a major label, they self-funded a new album. That album, 2001’s Bleed American, spawned a leftfield hit for the band, a song called “The Middle.” It launched Jimmy Eat World into the mainstream before they knew what hit them, and it’s one of those songs that to this day you might hear on the radio. It was a blip, of course, in a consistently fantastic career: Jimmy Eat World kept making records and touring—their latest is 2019’s Surviving.  So it was an interesting point in time for both of these guys, who as you’ll hear remain fast friends after all these years. Playing music isn’t a huge part of von Bohlen’s life anymore, though he does point out that Maritime is technically still a band. These two chat about their 20-ish-year-old records, fatherhood, drinking, touring in the ‘90s, and lots more. Davey tells a great story I hadn’t heard before about the Promise Ring’s insane pact with each other in their earliest days. Sadly, Jim and Davey never get around to talking about Davey’s guest vocals on Bleed American, but maybe we’ll just have to have them chat again sometime. Enjoy. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks to Davey von Bohlen and Jim Adkins for chatting. If you liked what you heard, please follow Talkhouse on your favorite podcasting platform, and check out all the great written pieces elsewhere on this very site. This episode was produced by Myron Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range. See you next time!
Aug 04, 2022
Joe Pera with Dan Wriggins (Friendship)
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On this week’s Talkhouse Podcast we’ve got a comedian and a musician who recently joined forces to make a music video: Joe Pera and Dan Wriggins. Joe Pera is a stand-up comedian who’s best known as the star and creator of Joe Pera Talks With You, the Adult Swim TV show about the beautifully modest existence of a middle-school choir instructor in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. It’s a show unlike anything else on TV, past or present, and it’s a direct reflection of Pera’s unassuming comedic persona: In other words, it’s hard to tell where Joe Pera the character ends and Joe Pera the guy begins. It’s also insightful, weird, and decidedly sweet. And while the show just finished its three-season run recently, it won’t be the last the world sees of Pera. In fact, he’s in the midst of a stand-up tour right now, and you can find dates at joepera.com. Oh, and he also just landed the role of James Bond, which you can hear all about on his recent Seth Meyers appearance. Seems like kind of a big deal. Yet Pera still has time to help out indie bands like Friendship, whose singer and songwriter Dan Wriggins is the other participant in today’s chat. Friendship is made up of old friends—no surprise there—though the band is actually named after a town in Maine near where they grew up. They’re currently based in Philadelphia, though Wriggins Zoomed in for this chat from Little Cranberry Island, Maine, where he also spent time as a kid. That island is also where Friendship and Joe Pera shot the video for “Hank,” from the band’s brand new album, Love The Stranger. It’s the band’s fourth full-length and first for the always reliable Merge Records. It’s a beautiful record full of straightforward but nuanced observations about life and love. Check out the video for "Hank" right here, which comes up in this chat quite a bit. As I said earlier, that “Hank” video comes up in this conversation, and it leads to Joe and Dan talking about craftsmanship, lobster fishing, and lots more. They talk about touring as a comedy act versus touring as a band, and about how each of them works hard to make their respective art look easy. Oh, and at the end of the chat, Joe finally reveals who his celebrity spouse is, so stay tuned for the whole thing! Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks to Joe Pera and Dan Wriggins for chatting. If you liked what you heard, they’re both on tour—separately—right now. Please follow Talkhouse on your favorite podcasting platform, and check out all the great written features we’ve got on Talkhouse.com. This episode was produced by Myron Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range. See you next time!
Jul 28, 2022
Taylor Bennett with Matt Johnson (Matt and Kim)
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On this week’s Talkhouse Podcast, we’ve got what might seem at first to be an unusual pairing, but that has its genesis in some serious fandom: Taylor Bennett and Matt Johnson. Taylor Bennett is a musician, entrepreneur, and community activist who has helped guide the career of his older brother Chance the Rapper while also busting genres on his own records. Bennett is a restless musician, rarely content to make the same moves twice. He raps and sings, and has proudly been sample-free on his last few records. A few years back, he released Be Yourself, a manifesto of sorts that championed inclusivity and positivity—he also told the world around the same time that he’s proudly bisexual. For this year’s Coming of Age, Bennett once again found inspiration in all different kinds of music, even bringing in some guests from various areas on the musical spectrum. One guest he was particularly excited to work with was Matt Johnson of Matt and Kim, the New York indie duo behind some of the past two decades’ most invigorating songs. Johnson contributed vocals to “Kick Back,” from Coming of Age—check out that song right here. As I said, Matt Johnson is half of Matt and Kim—you can probably guess which half—the life-affirming duo behind one really big hit, “Daylight,” a breakthrough music video that you’ll hear about in this chat, the end-credits song in a Lego movie, and perhaps most importantly, the sort of we-did-it-our-way career that should be the envy of their peers. Matt and Kim have released six albums in their two decades together, and they’ve built a relationship with their audience through undeniably joyous live shows and a sense of gratitude you don’t always see in bands. Their energy is, to use a true rock cliche, infectious, and it’s a big part of their appeal—along with damn catchy songs, of course. The inability to get out in front of his fans has made Matt a little itchy over the past couple of years, which you’ll hear about in this chat. Johnson and Bennett also talk about giant dildos in this podcast, so prepare yourself for that. If that’s not enough to pique your interest, the two also talk about trying to separate the art from the artist, about the real reason to remain independent, and about what it’s like to get completely naked in Times Square in the dead of winter for a video shoot. It’s a lot of fun, and I hope you enjoy listening to it as much as I did. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks to Taylor Bennett and Matt Johnson for chatting. If you like what you heard, please follow Talkhouse on your favorite podcasting platform, and check out our great written pieces and vast podcasting network on this very site. This episode was produced by Myron Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range. See you next time!
Jul 21, 2022
Sharon Van Etten with Jonathan Meiburg (Shearwater)
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On this week's Talkhouse Podcast we’ve paired up a couple of old friends and onetime tourmates, Sharon Van Etten and Jonathan Meiburg. This pairing was especially fun for me, since I had the pleasure of putting these two together in a different context many years ago, when I was editor of The A.V. Club: Sharon and Jonathan performed an amazing version of the Tom Petty/Stevie Nicks duet “Stop Draggin’ My Heart Around” for the site’s A.V. Undercover series. Seeing their faces together brought back that fun memory, and it was great seeing them reconnect. Van Etten is a singer and songwriter who’s been making records for the past decade plus, growing and changing and taking chances in exactly the way you hope truly talented people will. Her amazing early records were quietly intense, very confessional affairs, but she burst from the seams with subsequent releases. In 2019, she released Remind Me Tomorrow, which brought in bigger sounds and colors and an entirely different kind of confidence to her songwriting and performance. She gives partial credit in this chat to producer John Congleton, who was recommended to Van Etten by none other than Jonathan Meiburg. Earlier this year, Van Etten released another incredible album called We’ve Been Going About This All Wrong, which puts into intense songs some of the feelings we’ve all been feeling the past couple of years. You know what I’m talking about. Check out “Mistakes” from that new album, and check out Van Etten on the Wild Hearts tour over the next few months, with Angel Olsen and Julien Baker.  Today’s other guest, Jonathan Meiburg, is best known in the music world as the driving force behind the band Shearwater, which he started way back in the late ‘90s as an offshoot of his previous band, Okkervil River. But under this name, Meiburg has created a vast and varied catalog that combines his writerly mind with sometimes-moody, sometimes-joyous music. Shearwater just released their first album in six years: It’s called The Great Awakening, and it’s what a lazy podcast host might refer to as a return to form—or at least more austere earlier vibes. Don’t let that six-year gap fool you, though: Meiburg has been plenty busy. He’s got another band called Loma with the members of Cross Record, and they’ve got a third album on the way. Oh, and Meiburg wrote and released an incredible book called A Most Remarkable Creature: The Hidden Life and Epic Journey of the World’s Smartest Birds of Prey, which rolls up history, science, and travel into one really beautifully written piece. (Around Talkhouse HQ, we like to brag that Meiburg has written a bunch of pieces for us over the years.) As you’ll hear in this conversation, he’s already started working on another book. Check out “Empty Orchestra” from The Great Awakening. As you’ll hear, Van Etten and Meiburg are old friends who toured together long ago, but hadn’t seen each other in person until very recently, when Van Etten’s tour took her to Hamburg, where Meiburg is currently living. They talk about writing songs—and specifically about how gibberish can become lyrics, which I always find interesting. Meiburg remarks on Van Etten’s transformation as a stage performer over the years, and they even chat about Sharon’s son—specifically his relationship to the movie Cool Runnings. Enjoy. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks to Sharon Van Etten and Jonathan Meiburg for chatting. If you liked what you heard, please do follow Talkhouse on your favorite podcasting platform. This episode was produced by Myron Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range. See you next time.
Jul 14, 2022
Revisited: Carly Rae Jepsen with mxmtoon
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This week we’re revisiting a Talkhouse episode that was originally released in October of 2020, when perhaps you missed it because you had other things on your mind. It happens. This one features a great chat between two women at different phases in their careers: Carly Rae Jepsen and mxmtoon. You might recognize mxmtoon’s name from her podcast 365 Days, which is part of the Talkhouse Podcast Network. Speaking of, did you know we have a network full of other great shows, including Aquarium Drunkard Transmissions, Sing for Science, Craig Finn’s brand new podcast That’s How I Remember It, and What Had Happened Was with Open Mike Eagle? We do! Anyway, just before this episode, Carly Rae and mxmtoon had just collaborated on a track called “Ok on your own,” and they dove right into a great conversation about songwriting and much, much more. Check it out, and we’ll be back with a brand new episode next week!   To celebrate Carly Rae Jepsen and mxmtoon's rad collab track "ok on your own," we paired the pop stars for what turned out to be a deep dive into the art of making music and learning to thrive in the complicated music industry. In this very warm and insightful conversation, Carly and Maia each share their (very different!) origin stories, and explore both the art of songwriting and live performance. Carly also shares clutch career wisdom. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. Plus, ICYMI: mxmtoon just kicked off her yearlong podcast project 365 days with mxmtoon in collab with Talkhouse, which features quirky stories from history that occurred on each day, old diary entries and more; it’s really fun, and like eight minutes long.  —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer  For this week’s episode, Carly was recorded by Nick Theodorakis, and everyone else you hear recorded themselves. Our producer is Mark Yoshizumi.  The Talkhouse Podcast theme song was composed and performed by The Range. 
Jul 07, 2022
Jonathan Davis (Korn) with Danny Brown
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On this Talkhouse Podcast, we’ve got one of those chats that feels like it’s going to lead to something bigger down the road: Jonathan Davis and Danny Brown. Neither of these guys probably needs an introduction, but here goes anyway: Jonathan Davis is the frontman of the band Korn, which basically invented a sound and subsequent genre about 30 years ago. I’m not sure if people still say “nu metal,” but whatever you want to call it, it never really seemed to leave the cultural zeitgeist once it took hold. Korn always seemed to have a wider variety of influences than some of their peers, taking bits and pieces from goth, metal, and hip-hop to make a strange new brew. They’ve released an impressive 14 albums, taking stylistic turns like 2011’s The Path of Totality, which incorporated dubstep and drum-and-bass elements. The band’s latest is Requiem, which was written and recorded during Covid’s enforced ban on touring. It’s a bit of a return to their classic sound, and it’s gotten incredibly positive reviews from fans and critics. Danny Brown is a rapper and, more recently, a comedian who broke out of his hometown of Detroit around 2010, and has released a series of groundbreaking, incredible records that never seem to sit still—just like him. He’s had huge singles and collaborated with everybody from Eminem to Purity Ring to Kendrick Lamar to A$AP Rocky. And though he hasn’t put out a proper album since 2019’s killer U Know What I’m Sayin’, Brown has kept busy making music, making his stand-up comedy debut, doing the hilarious Danny Brown Show on YouTube, and allegedly prepping a new record with the working title Quaranta. He’s described the record as “all over the place,” which makes sense considering Brown’s varied list of influences—one of which is Korn, which is how we got here in the first place. This genesis of this conversation, Davis and Brown’s first, was Brown covering Korn’s classic “Freak on a Leash” live in concert last year. Like I said, this is the first real conversation that Brown and Davis have ever had, and they get along great—great enough that they’re instantly talking about meeting up in person to collaborate at Davis’ Bakersfield, California studio. They get into Korn’s songwriting process, Covid-inspired depression, and how the internet provides the kind of instant rejection you had to work harder for in the old days. It’s a great chat, I hope you enjoy it. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks to Jonathan Davis and Danny Brown for chatting. If you liked what you heard, please subscribe via your favorite podcasting app, and while you’re already there, go ahead and rate us. This episode was produced by Myron Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range. See you next time!
Jun 30, 2022
Stuart Murdoch (Belle and Sebastian) with Ramesh Srivastava (Voxtrot)
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On this week’s Talkhouse Podcast we’ve got a pair of musicians who both suffer from the effects of LSD—that’s lead singer disease—Stuart Murdoch and Ramesh Srivastava. Ramesh was and is now again the lead singer and chief creative force behind the Austin, Texas band Voxtrot, which burned bright but maybe too quick in the early 2000s. They released a series of rapturously received EPs and one LP that were beloved by fans of deeply British institutions like Sarah Records and The Smiths. But the band had split by 2010, and Ramesh went on to release a pair of solo albums that didn’t quite have the impact his band did. For a while, he was content to leave Voxtrot in the past, but gathering material for two reissues gave him the spark to get thing going again. The next few months will see the release of both Early Music—which gathers the band’s beloved EPs—and Cut from the Stone, which features rarities and B-sides. And then, like some unstoppable force of nature, Voxtrot will tour the U.S. again. Dates can be found at voxtrot.net. And in case you’re not familiar, here’s a great Voxtrot song called “The Start of Something.” Do you hear a bit of Belle and Sebastian in that song? They’re a pretty clear influence on Voxtrot, and Srivastava met Stuart Murdoch while living in Glasgow in his younger days—you’ll hear about their meet-cute in this conversation. Belle and Sebastian, of course, have had an incredible career over the past quarter century or so. They started life as a school project for Murdoch, a shy young man whose feelings spilled out into his gentle songs in a way that seemed then—and now—to be almost magical. Over the years, Belle and Sebastian developed from a sort of bedroom-pop project to a massive pop machine, while never losing that spirit of playfulness and sincerity that Murdoch has always projected. The band recently released their ninth studio album, called A Bit of Previous. The title is a bit tricky in that it seems to reference the good old days but also Murdoch’s longtime interest in Buddhism, which he explored in greater depth during the pandemic. In this conversation, you’ll actually hear a bit about how both Ramesh and Stuart approach spirituality, both Christianity and Buddhism. You’ll hear how being a “gay brown person” pushed Ramesh away from religion for a long time. They talk about the aforementioned “lead singer disease,” and how that affects everyday life. And we get to hear about a young Stuart Murdoch making his way to the London flat of one of his musical heroes, but then deciding not to actually knock on his door. Enjoy. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks to Ramesh Srivastava and Stuart Murdoch for chatting. If you like what you heard, please follow Talkhouse on your favorite social channels and check out talkhouse.com for lots of great written pieces, too. This episode was produced by Myron Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range. See you next time.
Jun 23, 2022
Martin Courtney (Real Estate) with Tim Darcy (Ought, Cola)
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On this week’s Talkhouse Podcast we’ve got a pair of songwriters who are meeting for the first time, which we haven’t had in an episode in quite a while. Martin Courtney and Tim Darcy. Until recently, Darcy was the frontman of the band Ought, which released three fantastic, brainy art-punk albums from their home base of Montreal—despite the fact that Darcy is, in fact, “secretly American.” Ought split up pre-pandemic but that wasn’t really public news until the announcement of the existence of Darcy’s new band, Cola, which he started just a couple of years ago along with Ought bassist Ben Stidworthy and Weather Station/US Girls drummer Evan Cartwright. Just last month, Cola released their debut album, Deep In View, and it feels like a sort of back-to-basics take on their old band—but still fresh and exciting. Darcy is a guy who takes his lyrics seriously, and though he clearly had a great time making the record, there’s a darkness to it that recalls the best post-punk and trebly art-rock of the past 40 years, from Talking Heads to Parquet Courts. Martin Courtney is the singer and guitarist of Real Estate, the New Jersey-born band that has released five albums of songs that battle gently the urges toward pop-song structure and a slight psychedelic haze. Real Estate had particularly bad timing luck with regard to that worldwide pandemic we’ve all talked so much about over the past couple of years, releasing an album just weeks before the world shut down, resulting naturally in canceled tours and other plans. Instead of diving into another Real Estate album during the lockdown, Courtney decided to take a path of less resistance and record his second solo album. As he jokes in this conversation, most solo albums tend to be an excuse for an artist to indulge their more out-there impulses, but his impulses tend to lead him back toward more structured pop songs. He came up with a killer batch for this record, which is called Magic Sign. Darcy and Courtney hadn’t met before this chat, but that doesn’t stop them from getting into a great conversation: They talk about how podcasts might be boring—and how that’s okay (!?). They get into Courtney’s slight sense of disillusionment with music in general. Then they bring it back to creative desires: They are both guys itching with ideas and ready to get them out to the world. And, as fate would have it, both are going to be touring this summer, god willing. So get out there and see them, but first, check out this chat. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks to Tim Darcy and Martin Courtney for chatting. If you liked what you heard, please follow Talkhouse on your favorite podcast platform, and check out the great new records by both of this week’s guests. This episode was produced by Myron Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range. See you next time!
Jun 16, 2022
Podcast Preview: Craig Finn's 'That's How I Remember It' featuring Patterson Hood
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Hello Talkhouse listeners and readers. We’ve got a special treat for you this week: Instead of the usual Talkhouse Podcast, we’re featuring the debut episode of a podcast called That’s How I Remember It. Craig Finn, as you hopefully already know, is the singer of The Hold Steady as well as a solo artist. He’s got an excellent new solo record called A Legacy of Rentals, and it inspired him to start a new podcast that explores the intersection of memory and creativity. The Talkhouse gang helped him put it together, and we’re happy to present the first episode here. If you like it, which you undoubtedly will, please subscribe! Here it is, the first episode of That’s How I Remember It, featuring Craig in conversation with Patterson Hood of Drive-By Truckers. Enjoy, and we’ll be back to regular Talkhouse episodes next week! Subscribe to That’s How I Remember It to catch future episodes with Brian Koppelman, Fred Armisen, and many more.
Jun 09, 2022
Revisited: Michelle Zauner (Japanese Breakfast) with Rostam
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Hello Talkhouse listeners; this week we’re resurfacing a talk featuring a frequent Talkhouse contributor who seems to be having yet another career moment: Michelle Zauner, aka. Japanese Breakfast. You may have caught Zauner and her band on the season finale of SNL, or playing your local theater, or on every playlist worth a dang. This talk, which originally ran on June 3, 2021—around the time the latest Japanese Breakfast album, Jubilee, came out—features Zauner in conversation with Rostam, the musician and producer best known as part of Vampire Weekend. If you like what you hear, there are two more Zauner-led Talkhouse Podcasts in the archives, one with Alex Cameron, and the other with Rachel Goswell of Slowdive. --------  Today’s Talkhouse Podcast started with a little bit of serendipity in the form of album release dates: Both of our guests, Michelle Zauner of Japanese Breakfast and producer/musician/former Vampire Weekend guy Rostam, have excellent records coming out on June 4. They’re also fans of each other’s work, so we figured it made plenty of sense to put them together. Zauner’s album, her third under the Japanese Breakfast name, is called Jubilee, and as you’ll hear in this conversation, it took a deliberate turn toward slightly happier themes than her first two. It comes hot on the heels of Zauner’s first book, a heartbreaking memoir called Crying In H Mart, that deals with her mother’s death—also a theme in her early music—and food, lots of food. It’s a really touching read, and an ideal companion to her musical catalog, which grew in really compelling ways with Jubilee. Rostam is best known as a founding member of Vampire Weekend, and even though he officially left the band a few years ago, he still contributes some songwriting and production work. He’s kept plenty busy otherwise, producing records and writing songs with an incredible array of other artists, from Hamilton Leithauser to HAIM to Clairo. His first proper solo album is the gentle, string-filled, fantastic Half-Light, which came out in 2017, and now he’s releasing Changephobia, which as you’ll hear ditches the string section and brings in a sax, among other things. These two jump right into a conversation that flits around from silly to deep: On one hand, they talk about childhood loves of chess and fencing and the importance of song five on an album. On the other, Zauner gets rightfully annoyed at interview questions she gets that other people don’t, and Rostam talks about being Persian in a band that was sometimes pegged as particularly white. It’s a funny, smart chat. Enjoy. This episode was produced by Melissa Kaplan. The Talkhouse theme was composed and performed by The Range.  
Jun 02, 2022
Sofi Tukker with The Knocks
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On this week’s Talkhouse Podcast we’ve got a pair of electronic-music duos whose histories, as you’ll hear, are intimately intertwined: The Knocks and Sofi Tukker. The Knocks—consisting of James Patterson and Ben Ruttner—just released their third album, and it’s once again dancefloor-ready and heavy on the collaborations with indie icons. It’s called History, and it’s their first since 2018’s New York Narcotic, which featured the massive Foster the People collaboration “Ride or Die.” The guys used the extra time granted them by the pandemic to refocus and make History exactly what they wanted it, and it shows. The album includes guest spots from Cold War Kids, Cannons, and another jam with Foster the People. Check out “Slow Song,” which features Dragonette. Speaking of features and collaborations, The Knocks have worked with Sofi Tukker—the duo consisting of Sophie Hawley-Weld and Tucker Halpern—a bunch over the years, and as you’ll hear in this conversation, Sofi Tukker might not even be a chart-topping outfit at all without the help and influence of James and Ben. Together they scored a bit hit with “Best Friend,” though if you only know one Sofi Tukker song it’s probably the massive “Drinkee.” But the duo has a brand new record out with the provocative title Wet Tennis, and they’re about to embark on a massive tour that includes two huge California shows with the Knocks as special guests. Check out “Kakee” from Wet Tennis. In this conversation, these four talk about their shared history in New York, right down to a specific building that the Beastie Boys used to own. They talk about the old days playing college shows and the new days playing the massive Greek Theatre. And you’ll hear them graciously compliment each other on their latest songs. It’s a regular lovefest. Enjoy. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks to Sophie, Tucker, Ben, and James for chatting. If you like what you heard, please follow Talkhouse on your favorite social channels and podcasting platforms. This episode was produced by Myron Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range. See you next time!  
May 26, 2022
Dana Margolin (Porridge Radio) with Joseph Mount (Metronomy)
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On this week’s Talkhouse Podcast we’ve got a pair of musicians from the UK who recently collaborated for the first time, Dana Margolin and Joseph Mount. Mount has been the driving force behind Metronomy since 1999, and he’s found success not only with a series of winning electro-pop records, but also by remixing tracks for big names like Franz Ferdinand, Gorillaz, and Lady Gaga. If you’re unfamiliar with Metronomy, a good place to start is 2008’s Nights Out, which is a sort of concept album about, as you might guess, a night out. But Metronomy’s catalog is intriguingly all over the map; the band’s latest is called Small World, and it features a much gentler side of Mount’s songwriting personality overall. It also features a stunning duet with the other side of today’s conversation, Dana Margolin of Porridge Radio. Like Metronomy, Porridge Radio really started out as a solo project but grew into more of a band situation—though each is still the brainchild of one person. Margolin started recorded under the Porridge Radio name back in 2015, but it was her second proper studio album, 2020’s Every Bad, that really made the world stand up and take notice. It’s a powerful, intense record that stands alongside current heatseekers like Dry Cleaning and Wet Leg, but that has a stamina all its own. Margolin is just about to release the follow up to Every Bad, an equally bracing and incredible set of songs called Waterslide, Diving Board, Ladder to the Sky, once again on the Secretly Canadian label. In this conversation, Mount and Margolin talk about their collaboration, about the time that Mount almost but didn’t quite catch Margolin performing, and about the importance of lyrics—you’ll hear how eczema factors into a new song. They also get to Kierkegaard, Michael Stipe, and Margolin’s desire to—but inability—to write a “nice little love song.” Enjoy. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast and thanks to Dana Margolin and Joseph Mount for chatting. If you like what you heard, please follow Talkhouse on your favorite podcast platform and all social media channels. This episode was produced by Myron Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range. See you next time!
May 19, 2022
John Doe (X) with Shirley Manson (Garbage)
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On this week’s Talkhouse Podcast, we’ve got a pair of guests who I can call legends without hesitation: Shirley Manson and John Doe. Doe is a founding member of the insanely influential punk band X, which started life way back in 1977 Los Angeles. They were part of a scene that leaned into hardcore punk, but X set itself apart by sneaking elements of country and Americana into their blistering records and live sets. And the chemistry between Doe and his co-lead singer Exene Cervenka was legendary: In fact, it still is. Though the band has split a few times over the years, they’re still actively rocking all these years later, and in fact released a really great record in 2020, called Alphabetland—it was their first in about 20 years. Doe has also been an active solo artist as well, and he’s got a great new album coming out May 20, 2022: It’s called Fables in a Foreign Land, and it’s a concept record whose tales take place in the 1890s. It’s dark and folky, and includes some songwriting help from a bunch of amazing folks, including today’s other guest, Shirley Manson. Manson of course is the singer and frontperson of Garbage, which she’s been a part of steadily since the early 1990s. Garbage was formed by producer Butch Vig—he of Nirvana’s Nevermind fame—and was a massive success right out of the gate, with hits like “Queer,” “Stupid Girl,” and “Only Happy When It Rains.” They even did one of the best James Bond themes in recent memory, “The World is Not Enough.” The band has released a steady stream of great records over the years, including last year’s No Gods No Masters. A bonus track from that album, “Destroying Angels,” was written with and features both John Doe and Exene Cervenka, and an entirely different version of it also appears on this great new John Doe record. In this chat, Manson grills Doe on his intentions as a songwriter, and he asks her about Garbage’s process as well. Manson wants to know whether Doe considers himself a singer or songwriter first, and she refers to Butch Vig more than once in her charming Scottish accent as "Butchie." They also talk about the afterlife, and how playing new music for the people closest to you can be a little deflating. Enjoy. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks to Shirley Manson and John Doe for chatting. If you like what you heard, please follow Talkhouse on your favorite podcast platform and all social media channels. This episode was produced by Myron Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range. See you next time! CORRECTION: May 12, 6:17 PM Shirley claims via Twitter that she never referred to Vig as “Butchie,” and upon further review of the tapes, it seems I was misinterpreting a breath as another syllable. Apologies to Ms. Manson!
May 12, 2022
Mike Campbell with Margo Price
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On this week’s Talkhouse Podcast we’ve got a legendary guitarist and songwriter in conversation with one of our favorite repeat guests: Mike Campbell and Margo Price. Campbell is best known as Tom Petty’s right-hand man, a position he proudly held for five decades until Petty’s untimely death in 2017. Together they wrote some of the Heartbreakers’ best known songs, including “Refugee,” “Here Comes My Girl,” and “You Got Lucky.” Campbell also produced a bunch of Petty solo and Heartbreakers songs, and has contributed his playing and writing skills to lots of other artists, too. I was surprised to learn just recently that Campbell co-wrote Don Henley’s massive “Boys of Summer,” too. Who knew? But even before the end of the Heartbreakers’ run, Campbell would spend time with his side band, the Dirty Knobs, where he not only plays guitar but also sings and writes the lyrics. The band recently released their second studio album, External Combustion, which is where today’s other guest comes in. Margo Price is a firecracker of a singer and songwriter who doesn’t exactly fit neatly into the world of country—which is perhaps why she’s been so embraced by folks outside of that world. Jack White’s Third Man Records released Price’s first two albums, including her killer debut from 2016, Midwest Farmer’s Daughter, and though she lives in Nashville, her sound is more old-school country than new. Her last album is 2020’s That’s How Rumors Get Started, though as you’ll hear in this chat, she’s been working on both new music and an upcoming memoir. She pulls no punches, so both should be great. Oh, and she found some time to help out with some vocals on The Dirty Knobs’ latest, specifically on a song called “State of Mind.” As a longtime fan of Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, she was excited as hell to work with Campbell, and the feeling was mutual. Check out “State of Mind” here. Classic sounding, right? In this chat, Campbell and Price talk about getting back on the road after so long away. They talk about songwriting with other people: Price thinks it can be more personal than sleeping with someone. Campbell gets Price excited by revealing that he’s being joined on some dates by old-school Heartbreakers drummer Stan Lynch. And the two make plans to meet up on the road, specifically when they’re both opening huge amphitheaters for Chris Stapleton in June. Enjoy! Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks to Margo Price and Mike Campbell for chatting. If you like what you heard, please follow Talkhouse on your favorite podcasting platforms and social media channels. This episode was produced by Myron Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range. See you next time!
May 05, 2022
Melody Prochet (Melody's Echo Chamber) with Lila Ramani (Crumb)
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On this week's Talkhouse Podcast we’ve got two leading lights of modern psychedelic indie-rock, Melody Prochet and Lila Ramani. Prochet is the creative force behind Melody’s Echo Chamber, whose evocative name is taken from a dream she once had. Her debut album under the name, which Prochet recorded with help from Tame Impala’s Kevin Parker, was released in 2012. She has since released two more full-lengths while bouncing around the planet and raising children. The new one, Emotional Eternal, was partly inspired by Prochet’s move from Paris to the idyllic quiet of the Swiss Alps. It features assists from members of the Swedish band Dungen, though it’s more spare and stripped down than that might suggest—and more spare than her past work, too. There are bits of psych in there, along with echoes of bands like Stereolab. Lila Ramani of the New York band Crumb shares some of those influences, and Melody Prochet’s music influenced what Ramani wanted to do in her band, too. Crumb got going while its members were still in college in 2016, but really picked up speed with their debut full length, Jinx, which came out in 2019. Crumb released a second album, Ice Melt, in 2021, further incorporating jazzy rhythms into their psychedelic stew. In this conversation, the mutual admirers talk about their personal lives, including Prochet’s side gig as an art therapist as well as Ramani’s childhood growing up near the Gowanus Canal. They chat about Coachella, “grinding vs floating,” and Prochet’s favorite American city—which will almost certainly surprise you. Enjoy. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks to Melody Prochet and Lila Ramani for chatting. If you liked what you heard, please subscribe to Talkhouse on your favorite platform, and tell your friends that we’re the best. This episode was produced by Myron Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range. See you next time! View the full transcript of this podcast here.
Apr 28, 2022
Joe Goddard (Hot Chip) with Eno Williams (Ibibio Sound Machine)
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On this week’s Talkhouse Podcast, we’ve got a lovefest between two musicians who came together to create one of the year’s most electrifying records: Eno Williams of Ibibio Sound Machine and Joe Goddard of Hot Chip. Ibibio Sound Machine has been mashing up sounds for just under a decade now, blending elements of Afrobeat and electronic music into a fierce combination that inspires dancing, chanting, and sweating—at least when they’re allowed to hit the road. Williams is a force of nature on their newest album, Electricity. She was born in London but grew up in Nigeria—specifically the Ibibio region—and was exposed to those incredible regional sounds before moving back to London for school and steeping herself in the electronic music happening there. Electricity captures her vision pretty perfectly, thanks at least in part to today’s other guest, Joe Goddard of Hot Chip. As you’ll hear in this chat, Goddard was a fan of Ibibio Sound Machine, having seen one of their incredible live performances at a festival, and the feeling was mutual. Goddard and his Hot Chip collaborators came in to produce Electricity, which was the first time Ibibio had used an outside producer. You can hear the Hot Chip fingerprints all over the record; it’s an amazing collaboration that both sides are clearly very happy with, as evidenced by this chat. And just moments ago—for me, anyway, it will be later for you—Hot Chip announced a brand new album as well. Freakout/Release will be out in August, and Hot Chip will play the second weekend of Coachella this Saturday.  In this podcast, Goddard and Williams get deep into musical influences, including Nigerian electronic music pioneer Wiliam Onyeabor, Afrobeat legend Fela Kuti, and more. They also talk about how sometimes the audience doesn’t know you’re having a bad show, and about the “super synth power” they found while working together. Enjoy. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks to Eno Williams and Joe Goddard for chatting. If you like what you heard, please follow Talkhouse on your favorite podcasting platform. This episode was produced by Myron Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range. See you next time! View the full transcript of this podcast here.
Apr 21, 2022
Blake Schwarzenbach (Jawbreaker) with J. Robbins (Jawbox)
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On this week’s Talkhouse Podcast, we’ve got two veterans of ‘90s rock who went on to form bands that referenced air travel in their name and whose biggest bands both start with Jaw: Blake Schwarzenbach of Jawbreaker and J. Robbins of Jawbox. Sorry if that was confusing, I’ll clear it up for you. Blake Schwarzenbach was and is the singer and guitarist of the band Jawbreaker, which had its initial run from 1986 until 1996, at which time they acrimoniously splintered after longtime fans turned their backs on 1995’s Dear You, mostly because these dogmatic listeners were mad that the band had signed to a major label. These things were a big deal then, which seems kind of quaint now. History was incredibly kind to both Jawbreaker and Dear You, so much so that in 2017 they reformed to headline Chicago’s massive Riot Fest, and they’ve been playing together on and off ever since. In the intervening years, Schwarzenbach also played in other great bands, most notably Jets to Brazil, which is what I was referencing earlier. Jawbreaker is on tour now, and they’re bringing along some of their favorite bands to open, which brings us to… Jawbox, which followed a sorta similar trajectory to Jawbreaker. They came together in the late ‘80s, released a couple of incredible albums for a respected independent label, and then moved into the big leagues, with all the baggage and joy that might bring. Jawbox split in 1997, and Robbins went on to form Burning Airlines—are you seeing a pattern here?—but Jawbox reconvened in 2019. Those two bands certainly aren’t the beginning and end of Robbins’ amazing contributions to the world of music, though: Prior to Jawbox he was in Government Issue—you’ll hear them referred to as GI in this chat—he’s served as producer for a number of bands over the years, including Jets to Brazil, the Promise Ring, the Dismemberment Plan, Against Me, and other bands that make my 1990s heart sing. I hope you’ll notice I haven’t said emo once yet. In this conversation, J. and Blake talk about what it feels like to play shows together again after all these years—and all this pandemic. Blake compliments J. on his psychedelic guitar playing, and J. isn’t sure what to make of that. And we learn—I think for the first time—that Jawbox briefly considered calling themselves Jawbreaker, before J. discovered Jawbreaker’s first single at a record store and crossed it off his list. Enjoy. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks to J. Robbins and Blake Schwarzenbach for chatting. This episode was produced by Myron Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range.
Apr 14, 2022
Sondre Lerche with AURORA
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On this week’s Talkhouse Podcast, we’ve got a pair of Norwegian friends who both have excellent new records out this year: Sondre Lerche and AURORA.  Lerche started writing gorgeous pop songs while he was still a teen in the suburbs of Bergen, Norway. It wasn’t too long before his music started finding its way out into the world, and he’s released a bunch of albums since the early 2000s. Though clearly starting from a pop background—his songs are incredibly catchy—Lerche has nimbly moved through various permutations over the years, flirting with jazzy sounds, more intimate acoustic numbers, touches of Brazilian sounds, and the occasional out-and-out new wavey rock. Not long before the pandemic, Lerche recorded Patience, which he intended to tour behind, but instead he ended up moving back to Norway from Los Angeles and recording another excellent album, called Avatars of Love. For this one, his tenth, Lerche recruited a bunch of friends to help out, including another Norwegian star from a younger generation, AURORA. Here’s a bit of the sensual duet they performed together for the album, it’s called “Alone in the Night.” As you can hear, AURORA has a kind of otherworldly quality to her voice, though on her own records it’s more often set against a more electronic backdrop: You may have heard her killer single “Cure for Me,” which came out last year and appears on her latest album, which came out earlier this year. It’s called The Gods We Can Touch, and she’s once again—like Lerche—supremely interested in lyrics, this time around going heavy on love and relationships.  You’ll hear the two of them chat about the importance of love in this podcast, as well as their native Norway, earlobe hair, and more. One minute they’re deep into how music can help us overcome grief, and the next they’re talking about how religion and music are both like penises, in that they are beautiful and lovely, but you shouldn’t shove any of them in someone’s face. Enjoy. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks to AURORA and Sondre Lerche for letting us listen in on their fun. If you liked what you heard, please follow Talkhouse wherever you get your podcasts. This episode was produced by Myron Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range. See you next time!
Apr 07, 2022
From Broken Record: Anthony Kiedis and John Frusciante of The Red Hot Chili Peppers Reunite
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I’m thrilled to share a special preview of the Broken Record podcast from Pushkin Industries. In honor of the Red Hot Chili Peppers new album, Unlimited Love, the band members sit with their legendary producer Rick Rubin to share exclusive insights about the band’s dynamic. In this preview, Rick, John, and Anthony discuss John rejoining the band after a 10 year hiatus and how right it felt to be playing together again. You can hear the full episode, and more from Broken Record at https://podcasts.pushkin.fm/brokenrecordrhcp?sid=talkhouse. 
Apr 05, 2022
Ben Folds with Neil Hannon
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On this week’s Talkhouse Podcast we’ve got a pair of songwriters who share a serious dedication to the craft, a slightly sardonic outlook on life, and deep, incredible catalogs: Neil Hannon and Ben Folds. Neil Hannon is from Northern Ireland, and it’s safe to say that he and the band that he’s fronted for the past 30 years, the Divine Comedy, are a bit better known in Europe than in the States. Under the Divine Comedy name, Hannon has released a dozen delightfully clever albums, the latest of which is 2019’s Office Politics. If you’re a newbie and that seems far too much to catch up on, you’re in luck: Just this year, the Divine Comedy released a fantastic greatest-hits set called Charmed Life. Hannon has also kept himself busy over the years writing an opera of sorts, as well as composing the theme songs to two beloved British sitcoms, The IT Crowd and Father Ted—the latter show comes up at the beginning of this conversation. Another thing you’ll hear Hannon reference in this chat is “Wonka money”—he’s referring to the fact that he’s composing the music for the upcoming Willy Wonka movie starring Timothee Chalamet. Not too shabby. Here’s a little bit of the Divine Comedy’s “The Best Mistakes.” Ben Folds, as you’ll hear in this conversation, is a huge fan of Hannon and his music. They’ve played together in the past and they plan to again; you’ll even hear them chatting about an orchestral series of concerts that Folds helps produce at the Kennedy Center. Folds, of course, is the piano-playing maestro who led the Ben Folds Five during the ‘90s, then struck out on his own for a vastly varied career in music. In addition to more pop-oriented albums, he’s collaborated with everyone from William Shatner to Weird Al; he’s written a piano concerto for the Nashville Symphony, released a well received memoir, and started a podcast in which he interviews interesting folks from various walks of life. Another guest who makes us all feel lazy. Damn it, Folds! For this chat, the old friends were in vastly different time zones: Hannon in Ireland and Folds in Australia, the former ready for bed and the latter just waking up. They talk about their admiration for each other—and how they don’t really understand current pop music, because they know they’re not supposed to. They talk about the downsides of ProTools and the upsides of the pandemic. And you get to hear Ben Folds say the phrase “getting on fucking Talkhouse and kissing ass,” which made my week. Enjoy. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks to Ben Folds and Neil Hannon for chatting. If you liked what you heard, please follow Talkhouse on your favorite podcasting platform. This episode was produced by Myron Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range. See you next time!
Mar 31, 2022
Revisited: Alana Haim with Sasha Spielberg (Buzzy Lee)
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Sometimes Talkhouse Podcast participants have never met, sometimes they're acquainted, and on rare occasions, they know each other really well. For this week's chat, it became clear pretty quickly that Sasha Spielberg—a.k.a. Buzzy Lee—and Alana Haim already spoke the same language. As it turns out, and you'll hear this in the conversation, they're close enough to share a Hulu account. The occasion for this conversation is the debut full-length from Buzzy Lee, the excellent Spoiled Love, which is out now. And of course, it's not too late to enjoy the latest album from HAIM, Women In Music Pt. III, which came out in 2020. The two old friends talk about young love, bat mitzvahs, "cozy boys," and songwriting. It's charming as hell.
Mar 24, 2022
Steve Albini with Max Collins (Eve 6)
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On this week’s Talkhouse Podcast we’ve got a funny pairing that proves that good things do occasionally result from the existence of social media: Steve Albini and Max Collins. You almost certainly know Steve Albini’s name and probably some of his work, too, but I’ll share this brief summary anyway: As a musician, he has played in some incredibly influential bands, most notably Big Black and Shellac. As a producer/engineer/studio owner, he has helped make records by thousands of small independent bands and several huge mainstream ones, most notably Nirvana, with whom he recorded In Utero. (Other notable credits include PJ Harvey, Pixies, and the list goes on.) Albini is also a poker enthusiast who holds a World Series bracelet, though that part of his life doesn’t come up here. Throughout his career, Albini has been an outspoken champion of independence from the major-label system, and even penned a widely shared essay way back in the day about the general shittiness of the mainstream music business. Which makes it kind of funny that he’s speaking today with Max Collins, frontman for the band Eve 6, who were sort of a prime example of the major-label machinery in the ‘90s—though through no fault of their own. Signed to a huge deal just out of high school, the band had a pretty massive hit with a song called “Inside Out,” whose chorus features the phrase “heart in a blender.” Eve 6 largely disappeared after the turn of the century, but Collins found a hilarious new way to connect with fans during the pandemic: Twitter. His no-holds-barred tweets are funny and self-effacing, and they gained him an instant following. He refers to himself frequently—even once during this podcast—as the “heart in a blender guy,” and he openly shares his stories about other alt stars of the ‘90s, his opinions on current and older bands, and even some of his personal life. Albini, no stranger to no filter himself, became a fan after the two started playfully sparring about the relative merits of Counting Crows. A Twitter beef was born. If you don’t like that phrase, this is not the episode for you. Eve 6 has since started recording and releasing new music, and the two talk a bit about that in this episode. They also get into Eve 6’s financial history, the evils of major-label deals in the ‘90s, and for brief moment of non-playfulness, the idea of art as the antidote for the hellscape we all live in. Then there’s talk of starting a new beef, this time with Dave Grohl. Enjoy. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks to Steve Albini and Max Collins for chatting. If you liked what you heard, follow Talkhouse on your favorite podcasting platform, and please rate us—it actually does help. This episode was produced by Myron Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range. See you next time!
Mar 17, 2022
Ben Gibbard (Death Cab for Cutie) with Meg Remy (U.S. Girls)
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On this week’s Talkhouse episode, which we recorded as part of the On Air Festival, we’ve got a kind of unusually focused conversation about another person entirely: It’s Ben Gibbard of Death Cab for Cutie along with Meg Remy of U.S. Girls, talking at length about legendary artist Yoko Ono. It’s not just out of nowhere, though: Ben Gibbard, who you almost certainly know as the frontman of Death Cab For Cutie, whose impressive catalog has shaped indie-rock over the past two decades, recently curated a compilation that pays tribute to Ono’s music. He’s a man on a mission, which as you’ll hear is not to re-evaluate Yoko Ono’s vast catalog, but really to evaluate it in the first place. What people tend to know about Ono’s music doesn’t reflect the variety of her output, and her narrative as the villain in the Beatles story is ridiculous. To that end, Gibbard gathered a killer lineup to cover Ono’s songs for an album called Ocean Child. Musicians features in the collection include David Byrne with Yo La Tengo, Sharon Van Etten, Jay Som, Japanese Breakfast, the Flaming Lips, and of course Death Cab for Cutie themselves. Also included on Ocean Child is U.S. Girls, the musical project of Meg Remy. She’s been making music under the name for the past 15 years or so, amassing an impressive collection of records up to an including 2020’s Heavy Light–a Pitchfork best new music designee. She’s a perfect fit for a tribute to and conversation about Yoko Ono, since she’s not only a huge fan but clearly influenced by Ono’s sonic and political fearlessness. Before they get to chatting Yoko, Gibbard and Remy talk about Covid—there were some positives in it for Remy, who also gave birth to twins recently—and hotel notepads. Then it’s on to Yoko, whom they both deeply admire: They talk about her records, her art, and how the recent Get Back documentary kind of exploded the narrative on her vis a vis the Beatles. It’s a great chat about a worthy, misunderstood subject. Enjoy. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks to Meg Remy and Ben Gibbard for chatting. If you like what you heard, check out Ocean Child. And if you enjoyed the podcast, please follow, like, and rate Talkhouse on your favorite podcasting platform. This episode was produced by Myron Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range. See you next time! View the full transcript of this podcast here.
Mar 10, 2022
Lou Barlow (Sebadoh, Dinosaur Jr.) with Ben Bridwell (Band of Horses)
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This week's Talkhouse Podcast features a bit of a lovefest between two titans of the indie-rock world, Lou Barlow and Ben Bridwell. It’s a cliche, sure, but Lou Barlow probably doesn’t need an introduction around here. A founding member of Dinosaur Jr., he played on that band’s formative 1980s albums before not very amicably parting ways with frontman J Mascis. But Barlow found plenty of subsequent success in the 90s with Sebadoh, whose 1994 masterpiece Bakesale is referenced in this chat. Barlow also, weirdly, had kind of a mainstream hit with his side project Folk Implosion—and there’s some very interesting, unexpected Folk Implosion news in this podcast that I won’t spoil for you. Barlow eventually rejoined Dinosaur Jr. in 2005, and the band has found a fruitful third life, making vital new records. Speaking of vital records, the prolific Barlow has also found time to make new Sebadoh music and solo records. The latest Lou Barlow record came out just last year, and it’s called Reason to Live, and there was also an excellent Dinosaur Jr. album from 2021 called Sweep it Into Space. As Ben Bridwell points out in this chat, Lou Barlow has been making music in public for damn near 40 years, while the group that Bridwell leads, Band of Horses, is approaching 20 years now. As you’ll hear in this conversation, Bridwell moved from the South to various other cities, ending up in Seattle—and specifically at the legendary Crocodile Cafe—where he played in bands and listened to lots of music. He loved Sebadoh, as did pretty much everybody in the 90s, and it was one of the inspirations for Bridwell to launch Band of Horses, which subsequently found its own substantial fanbase—no surprise considering Bridwell’s passionate voice and fantastic songs. Band of Horses hasn’t put out a full length in more than five years—blame the pandemic for at least some of that delay—but is just now releasing a great new record that feels a bit more like their early stuff, and they’re about to head out on a huge tour supporting the Black Keys. The new album is called Things are Great. It’s clear from the very start of this conversation what a huge fan of each other these two guys are—and also that neither of them are very good at accepting compliments. Barlow talks about the magical moment he connected with Bridwell’s voice, Bridwell talks about discovering the power of that voice, they talk about how a Camel cigarettes tour brought them together, and eventually, Bridwell makes up his own segment for the Talkhouse Podcast called “rapid fire.” It’s a delight. Enjoy. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks to Lou Barlow and Ben Bridwell for chatting. If you like what you heard, please follow Talkhouse on your favorite podcasting platform and social media service. Oh, and rate us, too—it really does help! This episode was produced by Myron Kaplan and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range. See you next time!
Mar 03, 2022
Chris Carrabba (Dashboard Confessional) with Jim Adkins (Jimmy Eat World)
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As a music fan of a certain age, I can be a bit partial to the 1990s, and to that era’s emo-rock in particular, so this week’s Talkhouse pairing speaks to me: It’s Jim Adkins of Jimmy Eat World and Chris Carrabba of Dashboard Confessional. Jimmy Eat World started life in 1993 in Arizona, pretty much straight out of high school. Before they knew what hit them, they had a major label deal with Capitol and a hearty underground following for their catchy, raw songs. A rollercoaster of a career eventually led to a massive radio hit in 2001: “The Middle”—you know it, believe me—which launched them to new heights but didn’t really change the band’s fundamentals. They’ve continued making excellent records since, up to and including 2019’s Surviving. One of that album’s best songs is the focus of part of today’s podcast, too: “555.”  Dashboard Confessional, which is the product of singer-songwriter Chris Carrabba, started life a little later in the ‘90s, but also with a bang. His heart-on-sleeve lyrics almost immediately inspired sold-out shows and tear-stained singalongs. In other words, the “emo” tag actually makes some sense for once. The pandemic cut short Carrabba’s touring look back at 20 years of Dashboard Confessional, but it allowed him to finish a brand new album called All the Truth That I Can Tell. Now Carrabba and Adkins aren’t just here because they’re pals and they come from similar backgrounds. They’re also bringing their bands together through March on a co-headlining tour dubbed “Surviving The Truth" and then both bands will be part of the When We Were Young festival in Las Vegas in October. All the dates can be found on either band’s website, naturally. Adkins and Carrabba chat a lot about songwriting here, specifically about techniques for letting a song find itself. They also ponder whether it’s better to have a big radio hit, like Jimmy Eat World did, or to be associated with a huge Spider-Man movie, as Dashboard Confessional was. And both seem delighted, even after all this time, to be able to make music their living. Enjoy.  Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks to Chris Carrabba and Jim Adkins for chatting. If you liked what you heard, check out Talkhouse on your favorite podcasting platform and social channels. This episode was produced by Myron Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range. See you next time!
Feb 24, 2022
BadBadNotGood with Laraaji
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This week’s episode, while not particularly hilarious, might set a new Talkhouse record for the sheer amount of laughter. You’ll see why when you listen: It’s the members of BadBadNotGood in conversation with Laraaji.  BadBadNotGood is a Canadian band that straddles the line between jazz and instrumental hip-hop, but has gone well beyond those two things in the last decade, incorporating electronic elements, Brazilian sounds, and much more. They’ve collaborated with everyone from Kendrick Lamar, who sought them out after seeing them at Coachella, to Tyler the Creator to Ghostface Killah to Future Islands’ Samuel Herring. The list goes on and on. BadBadNotGood returned last year after a five-year album gap with a collection called Talk Memory. On it, they proved more collaborative than ever, bringing in a bunch of incredible musicians to expand their sound. One of the musicians they called on was the legendary yet under the radar Laraaji, who’s had a remarkable career over the past 40 years or so. After a winding road that included acting and stand-up comedy, Laraaji was eventually discovered while busking in Washington Square Park by none other than Brian Eno, who produced and released Laraaji’s Day of Radiance album as part of his Ambient series. Since then, he’s released dozens more recordings. Laraaji’s main instrument is an electrified zither, which as you’ll hear in this conversation, came to him in kind of a magical way. Once you hear him talk, though, that won’t surprise you: He’s obviously open to whatever experiences the world wants to bring him. On record that most recently includes a collaboration with the improvisational ensemble NOUS and his old friend Arji OceAnanda called Circle of Celebration. In this conversation, you’ll hear Laraaji laughing a lot, because in addition to his music, he leads laughter workshops—which are exactly what you might think they are. You’ll also hear about Laraaji’s past, about the brain that exists inside your abdomen, creative trances, and why the color orange has played a big part in his life. Enjoy. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks to Laraaji and the members of BadBadNotGood for chatting. If you liked what you heard, please follow Talkhouse on your favorite podcasting platform. This episode was produced by Myron Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range. See you next time!
Feb 17, 2022
Britt Daniel (Spoon) with Billy Gibbons (ZZ Top)
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On this week's Talkhouse Podcast, we’ve got an unlikely pairing of two performers who share a home state, but it would seem at first glance not too much else—though that’s just first glance: Britt Daniel of Spoon and Billy Gibbons of ZZ Top. Now the genesis of this conversation was actually a comment that Britt Daniel made around the time the band announced its new album, Lucifer on the Sofa. About the song “The Hardest Cut,” he simply said that he’d been listening to a lot of ZZ Top in the years leading up to the album’s recording. And while the song is certainly no tribute to ZZ Top, you can hear the snarl and bite coming through in its tones and lyrics as well as on a few other place on this collection. It’s album number 10 for Spoon, who have had an incredibly strong run over the past almost three decades. Lucifer on the Sofa is out this week, and it stands among their best—catchy, considered, and a bit more raw than recent records. Maybe that’s because they recorded it back in Britt’s home state, which of course is where the legendary ZZ Top was born as well. Billy Gibbons formed the band with Dusty Hill and Frank Beard way back in 1969, and the original trio rocked consistently for five decades until Hill’s death in 2021. The blues-inspired rock band gained traction in the ‘70s with songs like “La Grange” and “Tush,” then took off in the ‘80s as they became superstars of the early MTV era with “Sharp Dressed Man” and “Legs.” They were shoo-ins for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, of course, and not even Hill’s death could stop them: His guitar tech and friend Elwood Francis stepped in, and ZZ Top will play shows with Cheap Trick this April—all the dates, naturally, are at ZZTop.com. Daniel and Gibbons talk a lot about what they have in common, which is the state of Texas and specifically its myriad Mexican restaurants. Daniel asks about the legendary photo inside ZZ Top’s classic 1973 album Tres Hombres, and Gibbons gets a chance to talk about some of his contemporaries and friends, including Roky Erickson of the 13th Floor Elevators and Bo Diddley, with whom he collaborated on a guitar design, among other things. Enjoy.  If you liked what you heard, please follow Talkhouse on your favorite podcasting platforms and social media channels. This episode was produced by Myron Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range.
Feb 10, 2022
Nathan Stocker (Hippo Campus) with Yasmin Williams
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On this week’s Talkhouse Podcast, we’ve got the guitarist-singer of a great young-ish band from Minneapolis in conversation with a hotshot guitarist who’s just starting to make a name for herself: Nathan Stocker of Hippo Campus and Yasmin Williams. Hippo Campus formed just under a decade ago, while Stocker and his bandmates were still in high school. They came out of the gate just as you might expect: eager and excited, releasing a series of EPs followed by a bang-bang pair of excellent albums and inspiring crowds at pretty much every festival you could think of. After touring behind 2018’s Bambi, Hippo Campus took some time to stretch their legs, with each member heading off into side projects of various sounds and sizes. But the band reconvened with fresh motivation and a clearer-eyed outlook last year, and they came up with a powerhouse of an album with the simple title of LP3. It’s slightly more mature in the best ways, but still incredibly catchy and true to their sound. There’s a lot of inward looking existential lyrics, but wrapped in fantastic hooks. It was Stocker’s idea to chat with guitarist Yasmin Williams, who he had recently come across via NPR’s long-running, always reliable Tiny Desk concert series. That performance was particularly captivating, because you’re not just hearing what Williams can do with an acoustic guitar, but you’re seeing it as well. She takes the foundation built by fingerstyle masters like John Fahey and Michael Hedges but brings a modern sensibility to it: In this conversation, she talks a lot about her love of metal and math-rock, bits of which you can almost hear in her beautiful playing. Williams has released two albums so far, and as you’ll also hear in this chat, she’s working on a third. The latest is Urban Driftwood. Williams and Stocker didn’t know each other at all prior to this chat, but it turned out that she’s a Hippo Campus fan. The two talk about gear nerd stuff, YouTube videos by Andy McKee, being in competition with yourself, and of course the inspiration for Williams’ interest in music to begin with: a little game called Guitar Hero 2. Enjoy. This episode was produced by Myron Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range.
Feb 03, 2022
Harry Melling with Amanda Kramer
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, highly acclaimed actor Harry Melling and writer-director Amanda Kramer chat over Zoom from their respective homes in London and Los Angeles. The two recently collaborated as star and filmmaker on Kramer’s latest feature, Please Baby Please, which also stars Andrea Riseborough and Demi Moore and is the opening film at 2022 International Film Festival Rotterdam. In a wide-ranging conversation, Kramer and Melling touched on many subjects, from making Please Baby Please during COVID in Montana, to Harry’s love of dancing, why Amanda almost had a breakdown on set, actors’ misplaced obsession with playing real people, how Amanda expanded Harry’s love and knowledge of English cinema, and much more. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast.
Jan 27, 2022
Hrishikesh Hirway with Jay Som
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This week’s Talkhouse conversation features a pair of indie musicians—one of whom is known a bit better for another career—who recently collaborated on a song, and who have lots to say about creativity and the current state of the music biz: Hrishikesh Hirway and Melina Duterte, aka. Jay Som. If you recognize Hirway’s name, chances are good it’s from one of his popular podcasts: The best known is probably Song Exploder, on which Hirway and a guest break down a single song, spending time to get at its component parts and to explore the creative process. (Perhaps it goes without saying that it shares some DNA with the Talkhouse Podcast.) Guests over the years have included Bjork, Spoon, St. Vincent—the list goes on and on. Song Exploder became a Netflix series in 2020, with Hirway acting host on the TV version as well. In addition to that, he’s behind some other great podcasts, including the fun pandemic-era food chat show Home Cooking, which he co-hosts with Samin Nusrat. With all of that on his plate, it’s easy to overlook that Hirway spent many years making gentle, melancholy indie music under the name The One AM Radio. That part of his life took a backseat to his other pursuits, but music called him back, and he spent some time over the pandemic recording some songs that he’s slowly releasing under his own name. The first was a collaboration with famed cellist Yo-Yo Ma, and just this week came the second: a collaboration with today’s other guest, Melina Duterte, who’s better known by her project’s name, Jay Som. The two met because Duterte was a guest on Song Exploder, where she spoke about her song “Tenderness.” Though he didn’t actually host that episode, Hirway loved what he heard, and the two struck up a friendship that led to Duterte guesting on the touching song “Home.” If you like what you hear, the Jay Som catalog is thoroughly fantastic. Her last album under the name was 2019’s Anak Ko, but she’s spent time producing and collaborating with other folks over the past couple of years, including production duties for the latest album by Julia Shapiro of Chastity Belt—a recent guest on this very podcast. Jay Som’s music is often called “bedroom pop,” but after people hear this conversation, they may have to start calling it “attic pop,” since Duterte recently relocated to a private top floor of her own. Elsewhere in this conversation, she and Hirway talk about the hot mess that is the music industry, the software they sometimes use, and the alt-rock band that Duterte obsessed over as a pre-teen. Enjoy. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks to Hrishikesh Hirway and Melina Duterte for chatting. Check out their collaborative song, “Home,” and be sure to follow them both—and Talkhouse!—on your favorite social media channels. See you next time!
Jan 20, 2022
Lex Luger with Michael Vincent Waller
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For the first new Talkhouse Podcast episode of the new year, we’ve got an unlikely pairing—which is one of our favorite kinds of pairings. But it wasn’t exactly our idea to connect Michael Vincent Waller and Lex Luger, it was theirs. The contemporary classical composer and the extremely prolific hip-hop producer made a really cool record together that came out in 2021, called Classic$. Waller is not your typical classical composer, he’s a real musical searcher. His compositions range from avant-garde to minimalist to slightly more classic-sounding classical music. But over his career he hasn’t stayed in one place musically for very long. He made a record back in 2019 with electronic producer JLin, which you may have read about in an interview with the pair right on this very website. So maybe it’s no surprise at all that Waller didn’t let genre get in the way of his love for hip-hop when he reached out to Luger for an assist on Classic$—which I should note is credited to MVW, rather than Waller’s full name, in case you have trouble finding it on your favorite streaming service. The two collaborated on the music, as you’ll hear, and they brought in a bunch of voices to help flesh things out.  Luger has had an incredible career in hip-hop. For the last decade-plus, he’s been a go-to producer for some huge names, starting with Waka Flocka Flame—who he connected with via MySpace—and Rick Ross, but running through tracks by Jay-Z, Kanye West, and Snoop Dogg, among many, many others. He famously used to make hundreds of beats at a stretch: If you didn’t like one of his spooky trap sounds, he had a dozen others ready for you. I guess the place that Luger and Waller might intersect is that Luger’s beats often feature symphonic elements: They can sound, at times, like horror-movie scores. In this conversation, Luger and Waller talk about how working together affected them: It was more than just another job for Luger, who feels like he learned something valuable from Waller’s acoustic-first approach. They also talk about what music actually means to them, which is a very Talkhouse-friendly subject. They clearly want to work with one another again, which says something about the deep connection they made on Classic$. Enjoy. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks to Lex Luger and Michael Vincent Waller for chatting. Be sure to follow Talkhouse on your favorite podcasting services and social media outlets. This episode was produced by Melissa Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by The Range. 
Jan 13, 2022
Revisited: Matt Berninger with Aimee Mann
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This week we’re resurfacing a delightful episode that originally ran in April of 2020, and which features two of our favorite songwriters/performers: Matt Berninger of The National and Aimee Mann. Their chat was inspired by the release of an excellent documentary about Other Music, the revered New York record store that closed in 2016. The conversation veers into many other areas as well, including creativity during the pandemic. The challenges of the past couple of years were no match for these two: Berninger released a solo album called Serpentine Prison last year, and Mann just released Queens of the Summer Hotel, a set of new songs inspired by the book Girl, Interrupted. Enjoy, and we’ll be back with a brand new episode next week. —Josh Modell This week on the show, we celebrate the wonderful Other Music documentary with two Grammy-winning artists: singer-songwriter Aimee Mann and the National's Matt Berninger. The two discuss the iconic record store and the creative importance of having physical spaces dedicated to musical community, plus we hear how they're managing to work during the pandemic, and Matt reveals that he's both writing a musical and launching a label imprint. The Other Music doc features many wonderful artists that have appeared on our show — TV on the Radio, the Magnetic Fields, Superchunk, Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Jason Schwartzman, Animal Collective, William Basinski, Frankie Cosmos and more — this is truly a #talkhousecore film! Other Music is currently being screened via a "virtual theatrical release," with more than 200 independent record shops and movie theaters offering it to rent, and splitting the profits 50/50. This is a wonderful chance to support your local purveyor of brilliant art, and catch one of the must-see music films of the year. Click here to find your local favorite store or theater that's screening it! (Our producer Mark Yoshizumi rented it from his alma mater Reckless Records in Chicago; Talkhouse Film's Editor-in-Chief Nick Dawson supported Permanent Records in L.A., and I went with Record Grouch in Brooklyn, where I've spent many and many a happy hour amongst the hallowed racks.) Enjoy today's show, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast, including upcoming talks like Jarvis Cocker (Pulp) with the Magnetic Fields’ Stephin Merritt, and Black Belt Eagle Scout with Sasami. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer This week’s show was recorded by Aimee Mann, Matt Berninger, Nick Dawson, and myself in our respective #stayhome studios. The Talkhouse Podcast's co-producer is Mark Yoshizumi. Our theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Jan 06, 2022
Aaron Dessner with Julien Baker
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We’ve hosted some incredible Talkhouse conversations in 2021, and for our final brand-new episode of the year, we’ve got two people responsible for some of the best records of this year: Julien Baker and Aaron Dessner. Baker released her third album, Little Oblivions, back in February, and it’s a doozy. Expanding her sonic palette massively, Baker delivered her powerful, vulnerable songs with much bigger sounds. That might have felt like a gamble, but it paid off massively—she produced it herself and pushed herself into new spaces. Dessner is of course a founding member of the National, with whom he’s played for the past 20+ years. While his main band slowed down over the past couple of years, Dessner has been operating at hyperspeed. He was one of the main co-writers and producers on Taylor Swift’s Folklore and Evermore albums. He won an Album of the Year Grammy for the former, and was nominated for five more Grammys for the latter. He somehow also found time to release a new album with Bon Iver’s Justin Vernon under the name Big Red Machine called How Long Do You Think It’s Gonna Last? In addition to loads of guest singers, that record features Dessner on occasional lead vocals. These two have a fantastic conversation about creativity and, specifically, production: Aaron has done a lot of producing for other artists, and Julien is just getting into it. Julien talks about what it’s like to have a full live band backing her, rather than being a quote-unquote masochist and playing alone. They talk about what it was like to be deprived of live audiences for so long, and Aaron gets into how his studio setup has changed over the years. Also, they both know what it’s like when music can make you cry—that’s the kind of thing we love here at Talkhouse. Enjoy. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast and thanks to Julien Baker and Aaron Dessner for having such a wonderful chat. If you liked what you heard, please follow Talkhouse on your favorite podcasting service and social media channels--we’re everywhere. This episode was produced by Melissa Kaplan and Keenan Kush, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range. See you next time!
Dec 16, 2021
Steve Earle with Jay Farrar
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This week’s Talkhouse episode features a pair of legends from the alt-country or country or No Depression or Americana worlds—you pick. It’s Jay Farrar of Son Volt along with singer-songwriter (and many other things) Steve Earle. Jay Farrar started his career as part of the seminal band Uncle Tupelo alongside another noted songwriter (and frequent Talkhouse guest) Jeff Tweedy. After their split, Tweedy went on to Wilco while Farrar formed the band Son Volt, which has since released an impressive catalog—their tenth and latest album was recorded during pandemic downtime, and you can hear it in the deliberateness of the songs. It’s called Electro Melodier. Steve Earle is one of those guys who makes you feel lazy. He’s not only an incredibly accomplished singer and songwriter with literally dozens of albums to his credit, he’s also a producer, an actor—most notably on The Wire—a novelist, a Sirius XM DJ, and as you’ll hear here, an aspiring TV show creator. His 2020 album Ghosts of West Virginia was spun off from an off-Broadway show he worked on, while this year’s J.T. is a tribute to his talented son, Justin Townes Earle, who passed away just last year. As you’ll hear, he’s got even more projects in the works, including a tribute to singer-songwriter Jerry Jeff Walker. As you’ll hear, Steve Earle loves to chat, while Jay Farrar is a bit more subdued—a fact that these friends acknowledge right off the bat. But they get into a great conversation about their favorite subject: music—what they listened to growing up, the great shows that Earle saw as a kid, and even selling some weed to Leslie West of Mountain. Steve talks about missing the whole genesis of alt-country for good reason—he was in jail—but catching up with it, and with Son Volt in particular. Enjoy. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast and thanks to Jay Farrar and Steve Earle for chatting. If you liked what you heard, please follow Talkhouse on all your favorite podcasting services and social media channels. This week’s episode was produced by Melissa Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range. See you next time!
Dec 09, 2021
Jeff Tweedy with Mountain Man
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On this week's Talkhouse Podcast, we’ve got a lively conversation between some people whose relationship got off to kind of a rocky start, but who’ve since become friends: Jeff Tweedy of Wilco and all three members of Mountain Man: Amelia Meath, Alexandra Sauser-Monnig, and Molly Sarle. Now the occasion for this conversation is the recent reissue of the first Mountain Man record, 2010’s Made the Harbor, which features new liner notes written by Tweedy. This gorgeous, strange record was made back when these three women were just getting to know each other as college students in Vermont. Somehow, as if by magic—you’ll hear about that in this chat—their voices perfectly intertwined, and some of the very first songs that any of them wrote ended up becoming these timeless little gems. And then they went their separate ways for quite a long time: Meath ended up as half of Sylvan Esso, most notably. They’ve since regrouped for shows and more excellent music, most recently a live album called Look at Me, Don’t Look at Me. The members of Mountain Man first met Jeff Tweedy when they played Wilco’s Solid Sound Festival—and apparently snubbed Tweedy when he introduced himself. No offense was taken and a friendship was eventually formed, though as you’ll hear, Tweedy still finds himself a little intimidated in their presence. Tweedy’s latest entry in an incredibly prolific career is a deluxe edition of Love is the King, the album he recorded and released during the first part of the pandemic. It’s now getting a bonus disc called Live is the King, which as you may have guessed, features live renditions of these excellent songs. Tweedy and Mountain Man will meet again in person in January during Wilco’s Sky Blue Sky festival in Mexico. Presumably they will recognize him this time. In this funny, winding conversation, they begin by talking about seasonal depression, pivot quickly to a discussion of candy, and then move on to the serious business of creating music—and what that means to them. So we’ve got everything from Mountain Man’s magical discovery of their own voices—like a unicorn in the woods—to Jeff’s story about the time he thought he could lose weight by eating only Snickers. One minute, Amelia Meath is talking about sexy lumberjacks on TikTok, the next Jeff Tweedy is pining for an honorary Bachelor’s Degree. Won’t somebody give him one? We’re looking at you, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville. Enjoy. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks to Jeff Tweedy and Mountain Man for chatting. If you liked what you heard, follow Talkhouse on your favorite podcasting platform and all relevant social channels. This episode was produced by Melissa Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range. See you next time.
Dec 02, 2021
Revisited: Joe Talbot (IDLES)
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Hey Talkhouse friends, this week we’re re-surfacing an episode that originally ran in May of 2020. Unlike most Talkhouse Podcast episodes, which feature two or more creative folks in conversation, this one is mostly just one guy talking: Joe Talbot of the band IDLES. It was recorded in front of a live audience in Glasgow, just before the pandemic hit, and it’s a fascinating look at an incredible artist—Talbot is a guy who’s unafraid to put it all out there, in both interviews and in his music. Speaking of music, part of the reason we’re re-promoting this episode this week is that Idles just released another incredible album: Crawler is the British band’s fourth, and it’s unsurprisingly being met with pretty ecstatic reviews. Check out this fascinating chat with Joe and a live audience, and have a great Thanksgiving. —Josh Modell ---- This week's show is a bit different from usual Talkhouse Podcast episodes. While it's nominally hosted by the legendary Alan McGee of Creation Records — the man who signed The Jesus and Mary Chain, My Bloody Valentine, and a lil ol' band called Oasis — it's not at all a two-person conversation. Instead, this episode features Joe Talbot, frontman of the incredible post-punk group IDLES, in one of the funniest, most viscerally honest live audience Q&A's I've ever witnessed. Both Joe and the attendees are willing to go to deep and often uncomfortable areas: Buckle up for a discussion of toxic masculinity, the role of violence in IDLES' music, and the difficult process of developing one’s own artistic language. We also hear about Joe collabing with Mike Skinner of The Streets, turning Sleaford Mods’ taunts into a song, putting human ashes into vinyl records, and... we even get an unexpected lesson on mindfulness. This Q&A was recorded at the wonderful Barras Art & Design in Glasgow. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast, including upcoming talks like Helado Negro with Buscabulla, Julien Baker and Katie Harkin (Harkin, Sleater-Kinney), Black Belt Eagle Scout with Sasami, and Scott Avett (The Avett Brothers) with Eef Barzelay (Clem Snide). — Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s show was recorded in Glasgow by Nadar Shahzad of Blue Audio (thx Nadar!). Our co-producer is Mark Yoshizumi. Thanks so much to Matt Sadowski of Alt Waves Records and to Barras Art & Design for allowing us to share this event. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Nov 25, 2021
Bush Tetras with Thurston Moore and Jim Jarmusch
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On this week’s Talkhouse Podcast, we’ve got a roundtable of old friends who are also, as it happens, all New York City legends: Cynthia Sley and Pat Place of Bush Tetras with Sonic Youth’s Thurston Moore, and director Jim Jarmusch. Cynthia and Pat — vocalist and guitarist, respectively — started the “groove-centric” post-punk band Bush Tetras in 1979 with Laura Kennedy on bass and Dee Pop on drums. They broke up just a few years later, but over the decades they’ve reunited periodically, and are back in action now — though, sadly, without Kennedy, who died in 2011, and Dee Pop, who passed away last month after the recording of this conversation. But as Cynthia told the New York Times, “Bush Tetras is a force that cannot be stopped.” Their pioneering work lives on, archived in a new box set called Rhythm and Paranoia: The Best of Bush Tetras, which came out on Wharf Cat last week and includes three LPs and a booklet featuring essays by Moore, Jarmusch, members of The Clash and Gang of Four, and many others. Thurston Moore was a founding member of Sonic Youth. Now based in London, he performs and records solo — his latest album is last year's By The Fire. Jim Jarmusch is the director of films like Stranger Than Paradise, Down By Law, Coffee and Cigarettes, and so many more. He’s also a musician, and currently performs with the avant-rock band SQÜRL. As Cynthia says at the beginning of their conversation, they have about 40 years of friendship between the four them, but this is the first time all four of them have gotten to talk together. Their decades-in-the-making conversation covers a lot, including Pat’s influence on Thurston as a guitarist, Tier 3 and Mudd Club memories, and an era of New York when there were still chicken slaughterhouses on Prince Street. Enjoy. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks to Bush Tetras, Thurston Moore, and Jim Jarmusch for chatting. This episode was produced by Melissa Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range. See you next time!
Nov 18, 2021
Rosario Dawson with Talia Lugacy
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, longtime friends and collaborators Rosario Dawson and Talia Lugacy sit down for a chat, on the occasion of the release of their latest film together, This is Not a War Story, the moving drama about combat trauma which Lugacy wrote, directed and stars in and Dawson executive produced. In a wide-ranging conversation, the two started off by talking about the recent tragic death of Halyna Hutchins on the set of Rust and how it connects with persistent problems in both indie and studio filmmaking, and moved on to touch on everything from the human aspect of cinema, art as therapy and Rosario’s thoughts on directing, to their time as teenagers at the Lee Strasberg Institute with Scarlett Johansson and Hayden Christensen, the changing of the guard that is currently taking place in Hollywood, and the journey they have taken together, both creatively and personally. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. This episode was produced by Melissa Kaplan. The Talkhouse Podcast theme music is composed and performed by the Range.
Nov 11, 2021
Nick Lowe with Matthew Houck (Phosphorescent)
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On this week’s Talkhouse Podcast, we’ve got a little more focused conversation than usual, as Matthew Houck—the driving force behind the band Phosphorescent—chats with legendary songwriter Nick Lowe, largely about Lowe’s recently reissued 2001 album The Convincer. Even if Nick Lowe’s name isn’t super familiar to you, some of his songs almost certainly are. He’s had an incredible career that stretches back to the late 1960s, with his biggest mainstream moment coming via his dear friend Elvis Costello, who covered Lowe’s “(What’s so Funny ‘Bout) Peace Love and Understanding” and made it a hit. Lowe also produced Costello’s first five albums, as well as a bunch of other classic British records, in addition to his solo work and his time with the band Rockpile. Today’s conversation is focused largely on Lowe’s 2001 album The Convincer, which was something of an artistic rebirth for him. He wanted to age gracefully and continue to challenge himself, which he did with a trilogy of albums that ended with this one. It’s a beautifully written and performed set of songs that didn’t set the commercial world on fire, but which has quietly found its way into many people’s hearts over the past two decades. The song “I’m A Mess” is the reason for this conversation. Matthew Houck, who has been making incredible music of his own under the name Phosphorescent since the early aughts, is an obsessive fan of The Convincer, so much so that he’s been working on a cover of “I’m A Mess.” A mutual friend of Houck and Lowe’s sent Lowe a copy of the song, which isn’t available yet, and they chat about it here. The most recent Phosphorescent release is the BBC Sessions EP, and it strips a set of Houck’s songs down to their barest essentials—much of his studio material is far more gussied up, and this is a great chance to hear them naked. As you’ll hear in this conversation, Houck is a huge fan of Lowe’s, and specifically of The Convincer. They get into specifics about a bunch of the songs—and you’ll find out if Lowe agrees that this was indeed his finest hour. You’ll also hear about how The Bodyguard soundtrack changed Lowe’s fortunes forever, how his onetime girlfriend Margot Kidder made her way into a song, and how Wilco helped him win fans in Indianapolis. Enjoy.   Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast and thanks to Nick Lowe and Matthew Houck for chatting. If you like what you heard, please follow Talkhouse on your favorite podcasting services and social media outlets. This week’s episode was produced by Melissa Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by The Range. See you next time!
Nov 04, 2021
Patterson Hood (Drive-By Truckers) with Buffalo Nichols
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On this week’s Talkhouse Podcast, we’ve put together a pair of tourmates—past and present—who are separated by decades but united by a deep respect of American music: Patterson Hood and Carl Nichols. Patterson Hood has been in rock bands since he was a pre-teen, and he’s been the co-leader of Drive-By Truckers since 1996. The band has explored the sounds and ideas of Southern rock—Hood is from Alabama—over the years, with sounds and lyrics that stretch the boundaries well beyond the world of Lynyrd Skynyrd. As you’ll hear in this conversation, Hood is a nuanced thinker and writer. You’ll also hear that, of course, on his records, both as a solo artist and a Drive-By Trucker. The band actually released two albums last year, The Unraveling back in January, and then its companion, The New OK, in October. Carl Nichols, aka Buffalo Nichols, toured with Drive-By Truckers in the past, and he’s in the midst of another touring opening for them now. Nichols, as you’ll hear, has an interesting musical history of his own—he’s been more of a genre jumper than his friend Patterson, playing in punk bands early on and then in the Milwaukee folk-ish duo Nickel and Rose. He just released his debut as Buffalo Nichols, and it takes a turn toward what Rolling Stone called “existential blues.” It’s just out on the venerated Fat Possum label. Nichols and Hood—that sounds like a great name for a duo, come to think of it—talk here about the protests in Portland, where Hood now lives; how Hood’s politics drove off a certain percentage of his audience; and a mutual love of Outkast. Enjoy. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks to Patterson Hood and Carl Nichols for chatting. This episode was produced by Melissa Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range. See you next time.
Oct 28, 2021
Tim Burgess (The Charlatans) with Joan Wasser (Joan as Police Woman)
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This week’s Talkhouse conversation features a pair of performers who came up in the ‘90s, and who have followed each other’s careers since: Tim Burgess of the Charlatans, and Joan Wasser, aka. Joan as Police Woman. Tim Burgess has had a fascinatingly diverse career: He first came to prominence as singer of the Charlatans, who were part of the early '90s Madchester scene along with the likes of The Stone Roses and Happy Mondays. But unlike many of their contemporaries, the Charlatans have had a long and prosperous career, releasing more than a dozen albums in addition to Burgess’ solo output. This week sees the release of a massive Charlatans box set called A Head Full Of Ideas that spans their career and includes hits and rare tracks. In addition to the box set, a Charlatans tour that’s just about to start, and a solo album slated for next year, Burgess has kept himself busy through the pandemic with a fun concept he named Tim’s Twitter Listening Party. It’s simple enough: He coaxes other musicians to essentially live-tweet their own albums, and it’s resulted in literally hundreds of sessions with everyone from his UK contemporaries like Oasis and Blur to a session with Sir Paul McCartney himself. A hundred of those parties have now been gathered into a hardcover book, which also includes rare photos from the participants and lots more. One of those hundred is Joan Wasser, who also got her start in a ‘90s band—the Dambuilders—and subsequently launched an incredibly varied career. She was in Antony and the Johnsons for a bit, and she’s recorded a bunch of great records under the name Joan As Police Woman. The first of those, 2006’s Real Life, knocked Tim Burgess over when he first heard it—as you’ll hear in this conversation. Wasser is just about to release an incredible collaborative album that she made with Dave Okumu and Afrobeat pioneer Tony Allen, not long before Allen’s death last year. It’s called The Solution is Restless, which is a pretty perfect title, and it’ll be out in November. These two have a great chat: Tim is super chill and loves to meditate; Joan is a total firecracker. They talk about how Joan’s album “knocked Tim for six,” the myth of Lou Reed—Tim met him as a fan, Joan toured with him—and how Tim, in addition to everything else, has a coffee business. Sort of. Enjoy. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast and thanks to Tim Burgess and Joan Wasser for chatting. If you like what you heard, please follow Talkhouse on your favorite podcasting services and social media outlets. This episode was produced by Melissa Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range. See you next time!
Oct 21, 2021
Kurt Vile with Julia Shapiro (Chastity Belt)
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For this week’s Talkhouse Podcast episode, we rounded up a pair of friends who deeply admire each other’s playing and songwriting—and who ultimately met because of a different episode of the Talkhouse Podcast: Kurt Vile and Julia Shapiro. Kurt Vile first came into music fans’ consciousness as part of The War On Drugs, though it wasn’t long before he decided to dedicate his time to his solo material. He’s released a string of incredible albums since, including 2013’s instant classic Wakin’ On A Pretty Daze and 2018’s Bottle It In. As you’ll hear in this conversation, he’s been hard at work, writing "too many" songs for a new album. In 2017, Vile collaborated with Australian singer Courtney Barnett on an album called Lotta Sea Lice, and it was Barnett who turned him onto Julia Shapiro and her band Chastity Belt. When Barnett and Shapiro chatted on this very podcast back in 2017, that sealed the deal for Vile, who became a huge Chastity Belt fan—and eventual friend of Shapiro’s. Now Chastity Belt, which started life about a decade ago in Washington State, has released four powerful albums over the years, most recently a self-titled set in 2019. But the occasion for this conversation is actually Shapiro’s second album as a solo artist. It’s called Zorked, a word that means kind of what you might think: extremely stoned, or maybe just completely out of it. That’s how Shapiro felt after moving to Los Angeles at the beginning of the pandemic, where her social circle was smaller and the world kind of closed in on her. The result is a weird, incredible set of songs Shapiro co-produced with her roommate Melina Duterte—aka Jay Som. That might sound a little serious, but Julia and Kurt have a fun chat here, talking about how they met, how Kurt mistook Chastity Belt for another band at first, how Julia once crowdsurfed at one of Kurt’s shows, and Julia’s love of TikTok. She even tries to convince Kurt to sign up. Enjoy. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks to Kurt Vile and Julia Shapiro for chatting. If you liked what you heard, please follow Talkhouse on your favorite podcast and social media outlets. This episode was produced by Melissa Kaplan and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range. See you next time!
Oct 14, 2021
A. C. Newman (The New Pornographers) with Liam Kazar
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On this week’s Talkhouse Podcast we’ve got a pair of songwriters separated by a generation, but united by a serious dedication to the craft: Carl Newman and Liam Kazar. Carl Newman—aka. AC Newman—is best known as the gravitational center of The New Pornographers, the lark of a supergroup that he started back in 1997 but that quickly found great enough success that it became his main gig. As you perhaps already know, the band also features the prodigious talents of Neko Case and Destroyer’s Dan Bejar, though Newman does the vast majority of the songwriting. The band’s latest album is 2019’s In The Morse Code of Brake Lights, but as you’ll hear—maybe for the first time?—in this conversation, they’ve spent part of the pandemic working on a new one. If that’s not enough, the band’s classic debut Mass Romantic has just been reissued on vinyl, and in November and December the New Pornographers will do a tour on which they perform both that album and 2005’s Twin Cinema in their entirety. Newman has also been spending some time on Twitter in the past couple of years, and that’s how he heard about Liam Kazar’s song “Shoes Too Tight.” Another Talkhouse guest from this year, Eric Slick, tweeted about the song, and Newman heartily endorsed it. It’s from Kazar’s debut solo album Due North, which came out earlier this year on Kevin Morby’s new label, Mare Records. And while it may be his first album as a solo artist, it’s far from the first thing Kazar has done: He was part of the Chicago collective Kids These Days, which also featured Vic Mensa, and he’s part of the band Tweedy with his pal Spencer Tweedy and Spencer’s famous dad, Jeff. But Due North is the first time that Kazar has been front and center as a songwriter, and he sounds like an old soul. Newman and Kazar talk a lot about songwriting on this podcast, and they also get into social media, Liam’s talented family, and lots more. Enjoy. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks to Carl Newman and Liam Kazar for chatting. If you liked what you heard, please follow Talkhouse on your favorite podcasting services and social media channels. Today’s episode was produced by Melissa Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range.
Oct 07, 2021
Tiller Russell with Kevin Willmott
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, Tiller Russell – the man behind both the doc series The Night Stalker: The Hunt for a Serial Killer and real-life drama Silk Road – sits down with Oscar winner Kevin Willmott, Spike Lee’s screenwriting partner on BlacKkKlansman, Chiraq and Da 5 Bloods and a fine director in his own right om films such as C.S.A: Confederate States of America and The 24th. In a fascinating conversation, the two filmmakers discuss the parallels between their work, the theme of duality that runs through Willmott’s movies, making work that resonates in a post-January 6th world, how Errol Morris changed Tiller’s life, Kevin’s path to becoming Spike Lee’s collaborator, and much more. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast.
Sep 30, 2021
Mac McCaughan (Superchunk) with Amber Tamblyn
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On this week’s Talkhouse Podcast we’ve got a couple of friends who both happen to have new but very different projects out this month: Amber Tamblyn and Mac McCaughan. Tamblyn is an actor-writer-director-poet-activist with a wildly diverse resume. She may be best known for roles on Joan of Arcadia and Two and a Half Men, but that’s only the tip of a pretty incredible iceberg. She’s written well received books of poetry—including 2015’s Dark Sparkler. She directed the 2016 film Paint it Black, which features a score by today’s other guest. She’s one of the founders of the Time’s Up movement and the author of a book about feminism and activism called Era of Ignition. And now she’s starring the FX/Hulu adaptation of the comic book Y: The Last Man, in which every man on earth suddenly dies—except one. It’s pretty awesome so far, and she’s great in it. Mac McCaughan also wears many hats, chiefly as singer-guitarist of the long-running band Superchunk and co-owner of the righteously vaunted independent record label Merge. During the pandemic—after suffering a sort-of writer’s block—McCaughan wrote and recorded a solo album, though he didn’t exactly do it alone. The Sound of Yourself features a bunch of guests that Mac wrangled over the internet—one of the only good uses for that damn thing—including Mackenzie Scott of Torres, Michael Lerner of Telekinesis, and many more. It’s a quietly contemplative record that mixes McCaughan’s perfect pop with some more ambient instrumental passages—something he and Tamblyn talk about in this podcast. Elsewhere in this lively conversation, we get to hear about how Mac and Amber didn’t quite cross paths during the pandemic, when he graciously loaned his house to Amber, her husband David Cross, and their young daughter. They also chat about writer’s block, and whether that exists, what it was like for Tamblyn to play an ultra-conservative in Y The Last Man, and their other recent projects, which include the score for Amy Poehler’s movie Moxie (for Mac), and a bunch of new books (for Amber). They also connect about ambient music and the sheer power of Bob Mould. Enjoy. This episode was produced by Melissa Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range. See you next time!
Sep 23, 2021
Kathy Valentine (The Go-Go's) with Sadie Dupuis (Speedy Ortiz)
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On this week's Talkhouse Podcast, we’ve got a fabulous cross-generational conversation between two women separated by a good number of years but united by a punk spirit: Kathy Valentine of The Go-Go’s and Sadie Dupuis of Speedy Ortiz and Sad13. It’s no overstatement to say that Kathy Valentine has a massive place in music history as part of The Go-Go’s, who burst from the L.A. punk scene of the late ‘70s and into the musical mainstream in the early ‘80s. They were the first (and still only!) all-woman band who wrote and performed their own songs to top the Billboard charts, and their debut album Beauty And The Beat remains a classic to this day.  It’s been an amazing career for Valentine and her band, some of which she recalls in her excellent memoir, called All I Ever Wanted, which came out last year. If you’re more of a viewer than a reader, there’s also a great Go-Go’s documentary on Showtime that covers the remarkable band’s career. This year—finally, after being eligible for 15 years—the Go-Go’s have been voted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. They’ll be inducted next month alongside Foo Fighters, Todd Rundgren, Jay-Z, Tina Turner, and Carole King. Good company. These days, Valentine lives in Austin, makes her own music when she’s not writing or doing charitable work, and occasionally gigs with The Go-Go’s. Sadie Dupuis lived in Austin very briefly—the two get into that—not long before she started the band that would launch her career, Speedy Ortiz, in Massachusetts. With Speedy, she’s released three albums—the latest is 2018’s Twerp Verse—and as Sad13, she’s released another two, including last year’s fully vibing Haunted Painting. She’s also released a book of poems called Mouthguard, and perhaps most importantly, she’s been dissecting every episode of the Gossip Girl reboot exclusively for the Talkhouse newsletter. Yes, you should subscribe. Valentine and Dupuis have a great conversation about everything from Sadie’s punk-rock parents—and her dad’s odd connection to the Rock Hall—to the Greenbrier alternative school to the soundtrack that Valentine created to go along with her book. Enjoy. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks to Kathy Valentine and Sadie Dupuis for chatting. If you like what you heard, please follow Talkhouse on all your favorite podcast providers and social media channels. This episode was produced by Melissa Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme was composed by the Range. See you next time!
Sep 16, 2021
Revisited: Joe Pera with David Bazan (Pedro The Lion)
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Comedian Joe Pera (Joe Pera Talks With You) and singer-songwriter David Bazan (Pedro The Lion) have elevated self-aware open-heartedness and detailed observation of humanity into, well, art. When David discovered Joe's show, he fell for it hard, and reached out to Talkhouse to see if we could arrange a convo. We loved the idea, and think you'll really enjoy the result. Joe and David discuss a lot, including: their granular writing techniques; appreciating the gentle joys of life, like wearing green hats on St. Patrick’s day; how some performers only achieve their maximum authenticity onstage; and why live performers must be doms. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast.
Sep 09, 2021
Margo Price with Tristen
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On this week’s Talkhouse Podcast, we’ve got a lively conversation between a pair of Nashville friends who also happen to be incredible songwriters and performers: Margo Price and Tristen. Price grew up in small town Illinois, but made her way to Music City and played in a couple of pop-leaning bands before giving into the allure of country music. (It can be hard not to, and she’s great at it.) After going solo, Price released a pair of albums on Jack White’s Nashville-based Third Man Records and built up a loyal fanbase with amazing songs and even better live shows. For album number three, she moved to a new label and engaged some incredible session musicians to help her out, including Benmont Tench, Matt Sweeny, Pino Palladino, and her old pal Sturgill Simpson, who co-produced. It’s called That’s How Rumors Get Started. Tristen also grew up in Illinois and made her way to Nashville, though her musical journey has taken her to more out of the way sounds than her friend Margo over the course of five albums. She’s one of those songwriters and performers absolutely beloved by other musicians, and for good reason. She’s a risk-taker in the studio, venturing out into unknown territory and pretty much always finding something at least interesting, and often incredible. Her latest album is this year’s Aquatic Flowers. Tristen and Margo get into it right away, talking about the financial realities of today’s music industry, how working with their significant others works, and “the trick of capitalism at its core.” That might sound heavy, and sometimes it is, but it’s also super informative and fun. Enjoy. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks to Margo and Tristen for chatting. If you liked what you heard, definitely check out their recent records—and of course check out Talkhouse on all your favorite social channels. This episode was produced by Melissa Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range. See you next time!
Sep 02, 2021
beabadoobee with Nina Persson (The Cardigans)
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This week on the Talkhouse Podcast we’ve got one of those fun conversations where the reverence is on full display from the get-go. When we asked singer-songwriter Beabadoobee who she’d be interested in speaking with for the podcast, she immediately responded Nina Persson of The Cardigans—one of her heroes, as you’ll hear. For those unfamiliar with Beabadoobee, she was born in the Philippines, raised in London, and found fame over the past couple of years via social media platforms like TikTok. Canadian rapper Powfu built his song “Death Bed” around Bea’s song “Coffee,” giving her a huge hit with what was essentially the first song she ever wrote. She followed that with a string of really strong EPs, and then dropped her proper debut album, called Fake It Flowers, in October of last year. It’s a fantastic set of fuzzy pop songs that clearly found a ton of inspiration in the music of the 1990s—bands like The Sundays, Pavement, Belly, and even Daniel Johnston have bandied about in reviews. Beabadoobee is hitting the road this year with her fantastic labelmates Blackstar Kids; you can see all the tour dates down below. And maybe if you’re listening closely you’ll hear a little bit of the Cardigans in there as well, another band that found fame in those alternative-nation days. The Swedish band had a huge hit in 1996 with the song “Lovefool,” whose chorus was imprinted on a generation, and released a string of excellent albums right up through 2005, when they went into a sort of semi-retirement, emerging occasionally to play shows. At the front of the band was charming lead singer Persson, who went on to form a band called A Camp, as well as release a solo album. She’s also, admiringly, enjoying not being all that busy. She plays the occasional show but also teaches and does pottery. Sounds nice. Bea and Nina had a really lively cross-generational conversation: You can hear the admiration in Bea’s voice, and the real interest from Nina about how things are different as a twentysomething woman in the music business now versus when she was topping the charts. They also talk about social media, Nina’s favorite moments from the Cardigans catalog, red pandas, and gross hotel rooms with shag carpet, sperm, and toenails. Yuck. Enjoy. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks to Nina and Bea for chatting. If you like what you heard, please follow Talkhouse on your favorite podcasting platforms and social channels, and don’t forget to check out all the great written content at Talkhouse.com. This episode was produced by Melissa Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range. See you next time! 
Aug 26, 2021
Richard Marx with Jakob Dylan (The Wallflowers)
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This week’s Talkhouse Podcast features a couple of names you almost certainly know, because each of these guys has had a pretty incredible career in music: Richard Marx and Jakob Dylan. Marx, of course, wrote and performed some of the most indelible pop hits of the late ’80s and early ’90s, including “Endless Summer Nights,” “Hold on to the Nights,” and the super smash “Right Here Waiting,” which comes up in this conversation. But even as the era of mullets and frosted jeans faded, Marx couldn’t be stopped—or rather Marx’s songs couldn’t be stopped. He’s continued releasing music over the years, and his influence can be felt deeply to this day: Just check out the audio and visual vibe of John Mayer’s latest album, which basically pays tribute. And it’s not just music: Marx recently released a funny, candid memoir called Stories To Tell, in which he details some of the incredible memories he’s made in the music business over the years. And that’s where Jakob Dylan enters the picture, as you’ll hear. Though the two didn’t know each other, Dylan went on Joe Rogan’s podcast to praise Marx’s book, and a friendship was born. Dylan is no slouch in the music department, either—you can’t be, with that family name. He’s been the main creative force behind the Wallflowers for the past 30 years, releasing seven Wallflowers albums, two solo sets, and criss-crossing the globe. The latest Wallflowers record, Exit Wounds, just came out, and its lyrics and vibe are reflective of the times we’re living in, which is to say it’s a bit harrowing but also incredibly catchy. A bunch of the songs feature Shelby Lynne on backing vocals as well, which is a great bonus. In this chat, the two songwriters talk about process, about how writing a book is different than writing a song, a special moment Marx recently dedicated to his ailing mother, and how Barbra Streisand has no regrets about not recording Marx’s biggest hit. Enjoy. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks to Richard Marx and Jakob Dylan for chatting. If you liked what you heard, please follow Talkhouse on your favorite podcasting service as well as all your favorite social media services. This episode was produced by Melissa Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range.
Aug 19, 2021
Max Richter with Perfume Genius
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On this week's Talkhouse Podcast, we’ve got a great conversation between two guys who don’t necessarily have a ton in common musically, but who approach creativity in similar ways—and who happen to be great fans of each other’s work: Mike Hadreas of Perfume Genius, and composer-performer-multi-hyphenate Max Richter. Hadreas, whom you’ve hopefully heard on the Talkhouse Podcast in the past, has been recording and performing under the name Perfume Genius since 2008, and he’s one of those artists whose music just inexplicably gets better with each passing day—even when you think it couldn’t. His records are this incredible combination of fearlessness and joy, whether he’s singing about dealing with homophobia or just making bodies move. The latest Perfume Genius record, which came out right as Covid was entering the world’s consciousness, bears the fantastic title Set My Heart On Fire Immediately. Perfume Genius will start playing shows again next month; check out perfumegenius.org for dates. As for Max Richter, it would take far more than this limited space allows just going over his resume. From contributing to a classic Future Sound of London album back in the ‘90s through his incredible score for HBO’s The Leftovers to a dozen other things, the musician/composer has an incredibly full plate. He composed an eight-hour minimalist classical piece called Sleep, which was performed for audiences that were provided with beds and encouraged to, y’know, fall asleep. (It’s now an app, too!) His latest release, just out last week, is called Exiles, and it features a lengthy new track that he composed for a ballet alongside some reimaginings of pieces he’s composed over the years. In this conversation, Richter and Hadreas talk about how making music is about articulating what can’t otherwise be articulated, where to start when you’re working on a soundtrack, and the joys of being influenced by other music. Enjoy. This episode was produced by Melissa Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme was composed and performed by the Range. See you next time!
Aug 12, 2021
John Darnielle (The Mountain Goats) with Maggie Smith
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This week’s episode of the Talkhouse Podcast began somewhere not particularly known for good or fruitful ideas: Twitter. That’s where the poet Maggie Smith dropped a funny notion, which songwriter John Darnielle of the Mountain Goats picked up and ran with. Smith, whose was in the process of splitting up with her husband, suggested a photo essay in which she’d take her old wedding dress on a tour of the country, Weekend at Bernie’s style, only the dead thing isn’t a guy—it’s her marriage. Never one to shy away from life’s darkest moments, Darnielle jokingly suggested—or at least it seemed like a joke—that there was a song in Smith’s idea, and he suggested calling it “Picture of My Dress.” And then, wouldn’t you know it, he went and wrote the song, releasing it on last year’s excellent album Getting Into Knives. It probably shouldn’t come as a surprise that Darnielle came up with the song: He’s so prolific that it makes the average person—meaning me—really jealous. The Mountain Goats released two studio albums and a live album in 2020, and another new album this year, called Dark In Here. He’s also an accomplished novelist and served as a judge for the 2020 National Book Awards. Speaking of writers, Maggie Smith had the unusual distinction of being a poet who broke through to the wider world with a poem called “Good Bones” back in 2016. Last year, she released the well received essay collection Keep Moving: Notes on Loss, Creativity and Change, and just last month released a poetry collection called Goldenrod. All are well worth your time, and Smith is on a sort of virtual book tour at the moment: You can check out the details on that at her site, maggiesmithpoet.com. In this conversation, Darnielle and Smith talk about the unusual nature of their kinda-sorta collaboration, a delightful thing she calls “the cake sound,” John’s failed attempt at writing a song about NASCAR, and much more. Enjoy. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks to Maggie Smith and John Darnielle for chatting. If you liked what you heard, please follow us wherever you get your podcasts and/or your social media. This week’s episode was produced by Melissa Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range. See you next time!
Aug 05, 2021
Mike Mills (R.E.M.) with Jason Narducy (Superchunk, Bob Mould)
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Jason Narducy is a Chicago guy, but he spends a ton of his time—or at least he used to—on tour, playing bass for both Bob Mould and Superchunk. In early 2020, a local theatre mounted a production of a musical called Verboten, which was based on Jason’s life—specifically his time as a pre-teen in a punk band. As a grown-up, in addition to providing the low end for those other great folks, he fronts his own band, Split Single. Under that moniker, Narducy writes the songs and recruits incredible musicians to record and play with him. For the excellent new Split Single album, Amplificado, Narducy once again asked Superchunk’s Jon Wurster to play drums, and he summoned the bassist from a certain famous Athens, Georgia band to play as well. That’d be R.E.M.’s Mike Mills, who fleshes out the Split Single sound with his bass and backing vocals on Amplificado, which the trio recorded here in Chicago before the pandemic ground everything to a halt. Mills has kept himself busy since R.E.M. split up about ten years ago, playing with the Baseball Project and playing golf, as you’ll hear. (He’s earned it, right?) In this conversation, he also talks about a long-gestating solo album, a project that incorporates classical music, and his rescue pooch. In case you missed it, Mills’ R.E.M. bandmate Michael Stipe was on the Talkhouse Podcast just six weeks ago—we’re two for four! Elsewhere in this conversation, Mills and Narducy talk about the pandemic, of course, as well as hope for the future, passing the baton to the next generation, and the majesty of working with excellent drummers—specifically Jon Wurster and Bill Berry. Enjoy. This episode was produced by Melissa Kaplan. The Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by The Range. Thanks for checking it out!
Jul 29, 2021
Chet Faker (Nick Murphy) with Soulwax
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Nick Murphy is best known for his downtempo electronic project Chet Faker, which is confusing because it also sounds like a guy’s name—but which released one of the best albums of 2014, Built On Glass. But as you’ll hear in this Talkhouse chat, Murphy put the Chet Faker name on a shelf at the height of its popularity in order to go in a more organic route under his own name. He subsequently released a pair of albums—including one initially through a meditation app, which is very 21st century and awesome. This year, he decided to bring the Chet Faker name and sound out of the attic, and he’s just released a killer new record called Hotel Surrender. And that’s where the Belgian musicians/DJs Stephen and David Dewaele come in. The two are the principal players in a band called Soulwax, but they’ve made a massive second career as a DJ duo called 2 Many DJ’s. Back in the early aughts, 2 Many DJ’s reignited the mash-up trend with a classic mix called As Heard on Radio Soulwax Part 2. That’s right, they incorporate the name of their band right in with their other lives as DJs. They also recently opened a studio called DeeWee. Oh, and did I mention that they’re super in-demand, Grammy-nominated remixers as well? They are. And they remixed a song from the new Chet Faker album called “Whatever Tomorrow," which is what brought them together for this chat. This intercontinental conversation—Murphy is Australian but lives in New York, the Dewaele brothers are from Belgium—gets into a lot of great stuff really quickly, including the confusing but smart way both acts can diversify, how Murphy initially found the whole idea of EDM distasteful, and a little something called “spacebar energy.” I won’t tell you what it is, but I’ll say that you probably want your songs to have it.  Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast and thanks to Nick, Stephen, and David for chatting. Check out their various guises—you won’t be disappointed. This week’s episode was produced by Melissa Kaplan, and special thanks to Keenan Kush for stepping in to record it. The Talkhouse theme song is composed and performed by the Range.
Jul 22, 2021
Dorian Electra with Claud
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On this week’s Talkhouse Podcast, we’ve got a pair of incredible young songwriter-performers whose music isn’t super similar, but who both embrace a sort of ultra-modern mish-mash of styles: Dorian Electra and Claud. Claud was the first performer signed to Phoebe Bridgers’ new label, Saddest Factory, after spending some time in a duo called Toast. Claud’s debut album, Super Monster, is most often described as “bedroom pop”—that term is brought up in this chat—but that’s only a small part of it. There are hints of all kinds of sounds here, from vaguely Latin-esque to pop-punkish on the delightful “That’s Mr. Bitch to You.” Dorian Electra has been at it a bit longer than Claud, having made a splash around ten years ago with playful, politically charged songs about money and gender fluidity, among many other things. Electra was featured on the Charli XCX track “Femmebot” a few years back, and in 2020 released their second album, My Agenda, which features everyone from Pussy Riot to Village People. Electra and Claud have a great conversation, tackling everything from the importance of Spotify playlists—which played a role in each of their success—to college to the complicated commercialization of Pride Month. Enjoy. This episode was produced by Melissa Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range. See you next time!
Jul 15, 2021
Liz Phair with Zella Day
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Liz Phair crashed into the indie-rock world in a huge way in the early ‘90s with her instant classic album Exile In Guyville, and she was already the talk of the town—in this case Chicago—before she had even performed publicly. It was an auspicious start to a fascinating career that went from indie-world stardom to Lilith Fair to composing for films and TV to a consciously pop-leaning album to a fantastic memoir called Horror Stories. And it comes full circle, sort of, with her new album Soberish, which she created with the help of producer Brad Wood, with whom she worked on her early albums, including Exile.  Zella Day took a very different path in her music life, starting out very young—at age 15—trying to write songs and make it in Nashville. That led to a revelation that she’d rather perform herself, and eventually a record deal and 2015’s pop-centric album Kicker. She played Coachella and other huge festivals, but wasn’t fully satisfied with where she was artistically, as you’ll hear in this chat. After relocating to L.A., she fell in with a slightly more serious crowd, included pals like Lana Del Rey and Weyes Blood, and her music shifted a bit. She’s currently working on an album with producer Jay Joyce, and recently released a song with Natalie Mering of Weyes Blood called “Holocene.” Phair and Day hit it off right away in this conversation, diving right into a conversation about restarting their careers post-COVID—Phair’s dad is a retired infectious diseases expert, which gave her some unique insight—as well as the challenges of not giving too much of yourself during an album’s promotional cycle. They also tackle the meaning of the word “sober-ish,” which is pretty great. Enjoy. Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks to Liz Phair and Zella Day for chatting. This episode was produced by Melissa Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme was composed and performed by the Range. See you next time!
Jul 08, 2021
Morgan Simpson of Black Midi with Bill Bruford (King Crimson, Yes)
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This week on the Talkhouse Podcast we’ve got a special treat for the drummers and drum geeks out there: a conversation between Morgan Simpson of Black Midi and Bill Bruford of, as he says in their chat, about 101 bands. That number for Bruford isn’t too far from reality. Over a 40+ year career, he played with some incredible names in the world of progressive music, most notably Yes and King Crimson, but also his own projects, including Earthworks. He’s an astoundingly versatile and musical drummer, and we were delighted to hear that he’s still got his ear to the ground all these years later, as a fan of the relatively young band Black Midi. You can hear it in Morgan Simpson’s voice that he’s both pleased and excited to make Bruford’s acquaintance as part of the podcast—and it’s actually the first episode we’ve recorded in quite some time where the participants are in the same room with each other! Simpson pays Bruford the ultimate drummer compliment when he says that he can recognize his playing within a couple of seconds, and Bruford isn’t shy about his love for Black Midi. He even compares them—rightfully so—to King Crimson. Bruford himself actually retired from performing about 10 years ago, while Black Midi is just getting started. The band released their second album, Cavalcade, in May, and it’s a massively eclectic, fantastic collection of songs—a little more focused than their first, perhaps, but no less rangy and striking. They’ll hit the road for a huge tour this fall, kicking off with a slot at Pitchfork Fest in Chicago. Bruford and Simpson have a lot of fun, as you’ll hear, talking about other drummers—Phil Collins, Billy Cobham, etc—as well as the similarities in their own playing. If you’ve never realized that a snare drum could sound like you’re quote “being slapped around the head with a wet kipper,” then this conversation is for you. Enjoy.   Thanks for listening to the Talkhouse Podcast, and thanks so much to Bill Bruford and Morgan Simpson for chatting. If you like what you heard, follow Talkhouse on your favorite podcasting service, and all available social channels. This episode was produced by Melissa Kaplan, and the Talkhouse theme was composed and performed by the Range.
Jul 01, 2021
Michael Stipe with Jim McKay
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, former REM frontman Michael Stipe talks with veteran indie director Jim McKay about the production company they’ve run together since the late 1980s, C-Hundred Film Corp, and the amazing work that has come out of it. In a fascinating conversation, the two best friends not only walk us through the history of the company – its humble beginnings in Athens, GA, to creating PSAs with KRS-One and Natalie Merchant, and Michael making the *original* Orange is the New Black at the Sundance Film Festival back in the ’90s – but also touch on their latest projects (McKay’s new film, and the photography book which Stipe just published) and how the pandemic has affected them, both creatively and personally. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast.
Jun 24, 2021
Edgar Wright with Ron and Russell Mael (Sparks)
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, director Edgar Wright chats with musicians Ron and Russell Mael of the beloved cult band Sparks, who are the subject of Wright’s deeply enjoyable new documentary, The Sparks Brothers. In a wide-ranging conversation, the friends and collaborators veer from gripping discussions about food to in-depth explorations of the Mael brothers’ longstanding love of their other creative passion, cinema, which finally resulted in Leos Carax directing their film Annette – which opens the Cannes Film Festival next month! They also discuss record-store hijinks, the genesis of past projects, compare notes on trailers, and much, much more. A veritable smorgasbord of an episode, it’s a real pleasure to listen to three people who so obviously relish each others company. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. This episode was produced by Melissa Kaplan. The Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range.
Jun 17, 2021
Meghan Trainor with VINCINT
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Meghan Trainor burst into the public consciousness with her 2014 hit “All About That Bass,” which was accompanied by a triple-platinum album and loads of subsequent success. Two more albums followed, as did judging roles on the British version of The Voice, and perhaps more important to this conversation, a singing competition called The Four, where she was on a panel with Sean Combs and DJ Khaled. That show is where Trainor first encountered the spectacular singing voice of VINCINT, who wowed her and the other judges with his incredible stylistic range, culminating in a cover of Radiohead’s “Creep” that was all around the internet a couple of years ago. VINCINT has since released a bunch of songs, and he’s finally ready to drop a proper debut album: There Will Be Tears is packed with what sound like future hits, and includes guest spots from Tegan and Sara, Parson James, Qveen Herby, and more. You’ll be hearing a ton more from VINCINT this month and year: He’s going to be on the Today Show, as you’ll hear in the chat, and he’s headlining HBO Max’s Pride programming. Trainor is awfully busy herself, having recorded and released a holiday album during quarantine and, in bigger news, signed a huge cross-platform deal with NBCUniversal that will include a comedy series at NBC. But she was so psyched about VINCINT’s album that she made some time to chat about it with him, and about their favorite songwriters, mutual acquaintances, and advice on dealing with stardom. Enjoy. This episode was produced by Melissa Kaplan. The Talkhouse theme was composed and performed by The Range.
Jun 10, 2021
Michelle Zauner (Japanese Breakfast) with Rostam
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Today’s Talkhouse podcast started with a little bit of serendipity in the form of album release dates: Both of our guests, Michelle Zauner of Japanese Breakfast and producer/musician/former Vampire Weekend guy Rostam, have excellent records coming out on June 4. They’re also fans of each other’s work, so we figured it made plenty of sense to put them together. Zauner’s album, her third under the Japanese Breakfast name, is called Jubilee, and as you’ll hear in this conversation, it took a deliberate turn toward slightly happier themes than her first two. It comes hot on the heels of Zauner’s first book, a heartbreaking memoir called Crying In H Mart, that deals with her mother’s death—also a theme in her early music—and food, lots of food. It’s a really touching read, and an ideal companion to her musical catalog, which grew in really compelling ways with Jubilee. Rostam is best known as a founding member of Vampire Weekend, and even though he officially left the band a few years ago, he still contributes some songwriting and production work. He’s kept plenty busy otherwise, producing records and writing songs with an incredible array of other artists, from Hamilton Leithauser to HAIM to Clairo. His first proper solo album is the gentle, string-filled, fantastic Half-Light, which came out in 2017, and now he’s releasing Changephobia, which as you’ll hear ditches the string section and brings in a sax, among other things. These two jump right into a conversation that flits around from silly to deep: On one hand, they talk about childhood loves of chess and fencing and the importance of song five on an album. On the other, Zauner gets rightfully annoyed at interview questions she gets that other people don’t, and Rostam talks about being Persian in a band that was sometimes pegged as particularly white. It’s a funny, smart chat. Enjoy. This episode was produced by Melissa Kaplan. The Talkhouse theme was composed and performed by The Range.
Jun 03, 2021
Chris Gethard with Jeff Rosenstock
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Chris Gethard is a comedian whose stories are often so serious and touching that they make people cry, and Jeff Rosenstock writes and sings heartfelt songs that are also witty and funny enough to make you laugh. So it’s no wonder that these two are friends and comrades in arms: From practically the moment they met, they could tell they were on the same page. Gethard has had a boundary-defying career that I’ll try and fail to quickly encapsulate here. He’s been a stand-up comedian, but perhaps more importantly the host of a public access show bearing his name that eventually ran for three seasons on a couple of different cable networks and was, to put it bluntly, kind of insane. He spun his stand-up into an off-Broadway show about depression, alcoholism, and suicide called Career Suicide, which later became an HBO special produced by Judd Apatow. Somewhere in there, he started several podcasts, the most popular of which is Beautiful/Anonymous, wherein he spends an hour with an anonymous stranger telling him their deepest secrets. I have yet to mention his books, his other podcasts, his appearances in movies and TV shows like Broad City and The Office, and more. The occasion for this conversation is the release of Gethard’s newest thing, called Half My Life, which is sort of a hybrid tour documentary and stand-up special that he recorded at ten venues around the country, including one with an audience of live alligators. It’s available on demand starting June 1. Jeff Rosenstock has been making music in various guises and with lots of people since the late 1990s, when he was in a ska-punk band called the Arrogant Sons of Bitches. He went on to greater renown in Bomb the Music Industry before launching a pretty incredible solo career, in which he combines super thoughtful, personal and political lyrics with catchy, genre-blending sounds. So maybe it shouldn’t have been a surprise when, earlier this year, he released a song-for-song reworking of his 2020 album No Dream called Ska Dream, on which he re-recorded every track… but ska. He roped in amazing guests, too—from Angelo Moore of Fishbone to members of PUP and Deafheaven. In this conversation, Gethard and Rosenstock are, unsurprisingly, both funny and serious. They’ve got doubts about whether audiences will be there when they return from lockdown, but they’ve also got a relentless desire to create art and to do the right thing. It’s refreshing, and I hope you enjoy it. This episode was produced by Melissa Kaplan. The Talkhouse theme was written and performed by The Range.
May 27, 2021
Nick Sanborn (Sylvan Esso) with Blake Mills
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Blake Mills has the kind of resume that might make the average person feel really lazy. Not only is he an active musician, but also a Grammy-winning producer (for Alabama Shakes’ 2015 album Sound and Color), a collaborator to the stars—including the likes of Fiona Apple and Bob Dylan—and most recently, one of the guys in charge of the legendary Sound City studio in L.A. Mills’ newest musical project is a collaboration with legendary bassist Pino Palladino called Notes With Attachments. Just prior to that, it was the Pitchfork Best New Music designee Mutable Set, from 2020. Nick Sanborn is half of Sylvan Esso, along with Amelia Meath. The duo recorded their third and latest album, the excellent Free Love, while they were constructing a brand new studio, called Betty’s, on their farm in North Carolina. The album came out in September of last year, which obviously meant touring was off the table, but Sanborn got plenty busy with production work, including helping to create the most recent Flock of Dimes record with recent Talkhouse guest Jenn Wasner. Since the album’s release, Nick and Amelia have kept busy, releasing videos, a killer remix of their song “Numb,” and a live album called WITH. And now they’ve rescheduled a big tour for this fall, kicking off at Bonaroo, where they’ll host the Super Jam. Check out sylvanesso.com for tour dates. Sanborn and Blake get right into it in this conversation, covering the intimate relationships that make for good records, the joy and trepidation about returning to public stages, and even how weird it is to do the Talkhouse Podcast. Enjoy. This episode was produced by Melissa Kaplan. The Talkhouse Podcast theme is composed and performed by the Range.
May 20, 2021
Revisited: Mac DeMarco with Dayglow
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This week, we revisit a chat from last year, featuring Mac DeMarco and Dayglow's Sloan Struble. The second Dayglow album, Harmony House, comes out May 21. Check it out! ------------------- On this week’s show, a young gun picks a veteran’s brain. A youngish veteran, admittedly — Mac DeMarco’s only 30, but compared to 21 year old Spotify-wunderkind Sloan Struble, aka Dayglow, he’s already spent a lifetime in the music industry trenches. The two take in a lot in this conversation. We hear Mac’s origin story, and get a nice overview of his career. We get insight into what it’s like finding fast fame online in 2020, and the two dissect the term “DIY” and the changing definition of “indie.” Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast.  —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer This week’s talk was originally produced by Mark Yoshizumi and Elia Einhorn. This episode was produced by Melissa Kaplan. The Talkhouse Podcast theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
May 13, 2021
Mary Lattimore with Sarah Neufeld (Arcade Fire)
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The way that Mary Lattimore and Sarah Neufeld met is kind of a rock and roll dream. Lattimore went to see Neufeld’s band, Arcade Fire, before they were huge stars, and they got to talking. When Lattimore mentioned that she’d be moving to Philadelphia soon, Neufeld and her bandmates asked her to perform with them—so her first time playing on stage outside a more classical setting was in front of a huge Arcade Fire crowd, and it gave her the performing bug. Both Neufeld and Lattimore have released fantastic records recently: Lattimore’s Silver Ladders came out last year on the Ghostly International label, and it met with widespread acclaim. Sarah Neufeld’s brand new record, Detritus, was born via a collaboration with Canadian dancer Peggy Baker. Neufeld wrote the songs that would become this album to accompany Baker’s choreography, and she even went on the road to accompany the dance performances. She later went into the studio and, with help from her Arcade Fire bandmate Jeremy Gara, set to recording them. It’s an incredible collection that blends her primary instrument with ambient electronics, drums, and other sounds.  In this conversation, Neufeld and Lattimore talk about the night they met and subsequent nights they don’t remember, a harp that lives in Prague, writing music to accompany dance, and how a harp might actually help induce labor in an expecting mother. Enjoy. This episode was produced by Melissa Kaplan. The Talkhouse theme was composed and performed by The Range.
May 06, 2021
Ben Gibbard with Teenage Fanclub's Norman Blake
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It’s no secret that Death Cab For Cutie's Ben Gibbard deeply admires Norman Blake’s band, Teenage Fanclub. In fact, he’s called 1991’s masterpiece Bandwagonesque his favorite album of all time; he loves it so much that just a few years ago, he recorded and released a cover of the entire thing. With that album turning 30 this year, and with a fantastic new Teenage Fanclub album, Endless Arcade, out this week it seemed the perfect time to get the two together. For this conversation, the two old friends dive into what their pandemic lives have been like, which includes lots of songwriting and record collecting. They also talk about the joy that comes from being a lifer in the rock and roll business, how streaming has affected all of the above, and how deeply emotional a return to rocking is likely to be for both of them. Enjoy.
Apr 29, 2021
Jenn Wasner (Wye Oak, Flock of Dimes) with Merrill Garbus (tUnE-yArDs)
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Merrill Garbus and Jenn Wasner released monumental records just a week apart this year: Tune-Yards fifth album—sixth if you count their score to Boots Riley’s film Sorry to Bother You—is called Sketchy, and it’s as puzzling and progressive as you’ve hopefully come to expect. Garbus and bassist Nate Brenner are never content to rest on their past glories: They’re always searching for new modes of thought and expression, and Garbus’ lyrics meld the personal and political into one fiery concoction. Jenn Wasner is best known for singing and playing guitar in Wye Oak, and she’s also released albums with Dungeonesse and solo style under the name Flock of Dimes, in addition to being a recent touring member of Bon Iver. It’s her Flock of Dimes project that’s garnering some incredible, well deserved attention this year, including a huge feature in the New York Times. It makes sense, considering that the album she’s promoting is so extraordinary: Head of Roses will be both familiar to her fans and unexpected, with new sounds, textures, and lyrical motivations. The story is that it’s an album about heartbreak, but it’s so much more. It's a great conversation between two great friends. Enjoy.
Apr 22, 2021
Bonnie McKee with Carlson Young
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, we have two artists who recently became writer-directors after finding success in other creative fields: singer-songwriter Bonnie McKee and actor Carlson Young. McKee, a Grammy-nominated hit songwriter best known for her collaborations with Katy Perry, is now on the festival circuit with her powerful and very personal short April Kills the Vibe, while her friend Young, who broke through on the small-screen version of Scream in 2015, just made her feature debut with The Blazing World, which world premiered at Sundance this past January. In their compelling conversation, the two talk about their journeys behind the camera, their COVID experiences, making movies as a form of psychodrama, Bonnie’s upcoming music-inspired film project, Carlson’s recent nightmare experience with a moving scam, and much, much more. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast.
Apr 15, 2021
Revisited: Kevin Parker (Tame Impala) with Dan Snaith (Caribou)
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It might feel like a lifetime ago, but it was just over a year ago in February of 2020 when we got new albums from both Tame Impala and Caribou. For Kevin Parker, The Slow Rush was his fourth full-length record following an extended break after Currents. Caribou fans had a slightly longer wait for Dan Snaith's tenth record, Suddenly. Now both artists have rereleases in 2021. Kevin Parker and company recently celebrated ten years since their debut record, Innerspeaker. There's a new behind-the-scenes short film chronicling the 2010 recording process, a box set, and an upcoming livestream performance later this month, April 21 (more info on tickets here), of the full album from the Wave House. Dan Snaith has also been in the news recently, releasing Suddenly Remixes, featuring reworked tracks by Toro y Moi, Four Tet, Floating Points, and others. This conversation, which originally aired in October of 2020, never has a dull moment and features the pair chatting about how and when they first met, having confidence as an artist, and their "de facto lockdown albums." Don't forget to subscribe to the Talkhouse Podcast wherever you get your podcasts. —Keenan Kush, Talkhouse Director of Operations This week's talk was originally produced by Mark Yoshizumi and Elia Einhorn. This episode was produced by Melissa Kaplan. The Talkhouse Podcast theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Apr 08, 2021
Sharon Van Etten with Jamie Stewart (Xiu Xiu)
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Sharon van Etten and Jamie Stewart met a few years ago, when producer John Congleton recommended the Xiu Xiu frontman as a contributor to the singer-songwriter's 2019 album, Remind Me Tomorrow. Though their music isn't super similar sounding, each traffics in a kind of emotional honesty that's difficult to pull off but incredibly rewarding. Van Etten contributed vocals to the song "Sad Mezcalita" on Xiu Xiu's new all-duets album, OH NO, and the two chat about that collaboration here, along with the creative process, being open in their songwriting, and much more. This episode was produced by Melissa Kaplan. The Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range.
Apr 01, 2021
Future Islands with Dan Deacon
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In this week's Talkhouse Podcast, we hear from old friends Dan Deacon and the members of Future Islands. Both came up in the super fertile Baltimore scene, and both released new albums in 2020. Future Islands asked Deacon to remix their recent track "For Sure," and he took it to epic new heights, which they discuss on this chat—along with the reality of staying home during the pandemic, what their writing/road-testing/recording processes are like, and a brand new genre that they hope to create when this is all over. Sports Jazz! Enjoy. This episode was produced by Kevin O’Connell. The Talkhouse Podcast theme was composed and performed by The Range.
Mar 25, 2021
Michael Ian Black with Jen Spyra
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Two very funny people have a very funny conversation on this week's Talkhouse Podcast: Michael Ian Black and Jen Spyra. Black you probably know as part of the sketch-comedy troupe The State, or from his many podcasts—the latest is Obscure—or maybe one of his books, including last year's more serious A Better Man. Jen Spyra just released her first book, a collection of darkly hilarious short stories called Big Time. The two were fans of each other's work before their chat, but you can hear them get to know each other better. They talk about their writing processes, self-doubt, Michael's poker playing and Cameo birthday-ing, and lots more. Enjoy.
Mar 18, 2021
Andrew Bird with Jimbo Mathus (Squirrel Nut Zippers)
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Andrew Bird and Jimbo Mathus have known each other for decades, going back to the beginning of Bird's solo career and Mathus' earliest days with Squirrel Nut Zippers. Most of their work together has been assistive—Bird would add his fiddle to the Zippers' records, and Mathus would return the favor with some horns. But a couple of years back, the old friends decided to write some songs together, and the result is These 13, a truly collaborative album featuring just their voices, guitar, and fiddle, for the most part. It's spare and surprising. In this Talkhouse conversation, they chat about the old days and the new, as well as a shared love of Charley Patton. Enjoy. —Josh Modell, Executive Editor This episode was produced by Kevin O'Connell. The Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by the Range.
Mar 11, 2021
Todd Rundgren with Eric Slick (Dr. Dog)
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Todd Rundgren is a legendary musician and producer whose list of credits is impressive as the man himself is down to earth. He had his own string of pop hits—including the novelty song “Bang on the Drum All Day”—and experimental albums, both as a solo artist and with the Nazz. He produced Meat Loaf’s Bat Out of Hell, one of the biggest-selling albums of all time, as well as New York Dolls’ self-titled debut, one of the most influential. This month, he’s been on the “Clearly Human” tour, which—due to obvious reasons—is all virtual. As a tech pioneer, he’s doing things a bit different, as you’ll hear in the podcast. Eric Slick is a fellow Philly boy and longtime fan of Rundgren’s who was excited to chat with him. Slick is best known as the drummer in the excellent Dr. Dog, and he’s also a frequent Talkhouse contributor. If that’s not enough, Slick recently released a magnificent solo record called Wiseacre. The two chat about making records, playing shows, and—of course—a certain former president. This episode was produced by Kevin O’Connell. The Talkhouse theme is composed and performed by The Range.
Mar 04, 2021
Mike Ness (Social Distortion) with Ben Nichols (Lucero)
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Mike Ness and Ben Nichols both front bands that blur the already-blurry genre lines between punk, Americana, country, and more—so it's no surprise that the two get along. Nichols' band, Lucero, opened for Ness' band, Social Distortion, on a tour about a decade ago, and the two hit it off. Since then, Lucero returned the favor by taking out Jade Jackson's band—which features Ness' son Julian on guitar. The occasion for this Talkhouse conversation is the release of Lucero's newest album, When You Found Me. The two songwriters talk about their craft, their kids, and how to write a song that makes a statement without getting political. —Josh Modell, Executive Editor This episode was produced by Kevin O’Connell. The Talkhouse Podcast theme was composed and performed by The Range.
Feb 25, 2021
Julia Jacklin with Tamara Lindeman (The Weather Station)
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Tamara Lindeman and Julia Jacklin are spending the pandemic thousands of miles away from each other, but you’d never know if from the closeness of this Talkhouse chat. Lindeman, who’s based in Canada, just released her fifth album as The Weather Station—and Ignorance is already making waves. It got the coveted Best New Music designation from Pitchfork, as well as a five-star review in The Guardian, both well deserved. Jacklin, who’s from Australia, finished touring her last album, Crushing, not long before the lockdown hit. Here, they discuss the ins and outs of how much they share in their songs, what they’re looking forward to when normalcy returns, and Joni Mitchell. This episode was produced by Kevin O’Connell. The Talkhouse Podcast theme was composed and performed by The Range.
Feb 18, 2021
McIntosh "for the love of music..." — Gregory Porter
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In the third episode of McIntosh's "for the love of music..." podcast series presented by Talkhouse, Elia Einhorn spoke with one of the most recognizable names in popular jazz and soul: Gregory Porter. Gregory has been using his powerful baritone on both Broadway and concert stages for decades. His smooth take on classic American pop forms has earned him critical accolades, and fans the world over. The multiple Grammy-winning singer-songwriter has long had an intense touring schedule, and while the pandemic has forced him off the road, he’s been staying very busy. Gregory has a podcast of his own—called The Hang—and recently released a new album of original music, All Rise, which was nominated for Best R&B Album at this year’s Grammys. In this episode, Gregory talks about writing songs in the sky, English accents in gospel music, recording in some of the coolest studios in the world, and much more. 
Feb 11, 2021
Jenny Lewis with Serengeti
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Jenny Lewis—she of Rilo Kiley, The Postal Service, and numerous excellent solo albums—met Chicago rapper Serengeti when they were both performers at the PEOPLE Festival in Berlin, back in 2018. They struck up a fast friendship that led to Serengeti asking Lewis to provide some music—a very specific amount of music—for him to rhyme over. They’ve since released two excellent songs together via Lewis’ Love’s Way label, “Unblu” and “Vroom Vroom,” and there are more on the way, as you’ll hear in their conversation. There’s also a mysterious appearance by Mr. Peanut. This episode was produced by Kevin O’Connell. The Talkhouse theme was composed and performed by The Range.
Feb 11, 2021
Viggo Mortensen with Alix Lambert
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, the iconic actor Viggo Mortensen sits down with his longtime friend and fellow filmmaker Alix Lambert. The occasion for their talk is the release of Falling, Mortensen’s debut as writer-director, an intense family drama starring Lance Henriksen, Laura Linney and Mortensen himself. In a fascinating, wide-ranging conversation, Mortensen and Lambert discuss not only Falling and the pandemic, but also Viggo’s musical collaborations with the guitarist Buckethead, the various cinematic exploits of Mortensen’s son Henry, Lambert’s current non-fiction project, the shared love that Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny and Mortensen have for a very surprising TV show, and much more. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast.
Feb 04, 2021
Alana Haim with Sasha Spielberg (Buzzy Lee)
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Sometimes Talkhouse Podcast participants have never met, sometimes they’re acquainted, and on rare occasions, they know each other really well. For this week’s chat, it became clear pretty quickly that Sasha Spielberg—a.k.a. Buzzy Lee—and Alana Haim already spoke the same language. As it turns out, and you’ll hear this in the conversation, they’re close enough to share a Hulu account. The occasion for this conversation is the debut full-length from Buzzy Lee, the excellent Spoiled Love, which is out this week. And of course, it’s not too late to enjoy the latest album from HAIM, Women In Music Pt. III, which came out last year. The two old friends talk about young love, bat mitzvahs, “cozy boys,” and songwriting. It’s charming as hell.
Jan 28, 2021
Robin Pecknold (Fleet Foxes) with Elijah Wolf
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On this week’s Talkhouse Podcast, we bring together a pair of singer-songwriters who share a love of intimate, thoughtful compositions and recordings. Robin Pecknold has been the chief creative mind behind Fleet Foxes since the band’s beginnings back in 2005; the latest Fleet Foxes album was surprise-released in September of 2020, and Shore was met with lots of well-deserved love. Elijah Wolf is just starting out on his career. The Brooklyn-based singer-songwriter was raised in upstate New York, and was a fan of Fleet Foxes before a chance meeting with Pecknold in a New York guitar shop. Wolf, who was working at Crandall Guitars, was playing music by a band called Holy Hive in the store, and it turned out that both Pecknold and Wolf were friends with that band. They got to know each other and started sharing works-in-progress with each other during the pandemic. Pecknold’s songs would end up on Shore, and Wolf’s would become his first album, Brighter Lighting, which is due out February 26 on Trash Casual Records. Both records, funnily enough, feature drummer Josh Jaeger—it’s a small world after all. The two songwriters get into a great chat about their process, their pandemic work strategies, and the idea of what defines an album. Enjoy the talk, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes. This week’s episode was produced by Kevin O’Connell, and the Talkhouse Podcast theme is composed and performed by The Range.
Jan 21, 2021
Alexi Pappas with Robin Tunney
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, actress Robin Tunney chats with multihyphenate extraordinaire Alexi Pappas, the filmmaker and Olympic athlete whose excellent new memoir, Bravey: Chasing Dreams, Befriending Pain and Other Big Ideas, is out now through Random House. Tunney, most recently seen in ABC’s The Fix and best known for her roles in Empire Records, The Craft and TV’s The Mentalist, is not only one of Pappas’ mentors, but she’s also her cousin by marriage, and their familial ease with each other is evident in a very open, insightful and sometimes funny conversation that takes in such topics as the shadow of mental illness, the challenges of finding the balance between career and family, bonding with others over trauma, how the thing we’re best at may still give us discomfort or pain, and much more. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast.
Jan 14, 2021
Bootsy Collins with Mix Master Mike
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On this week's Talkhouse Podcast, we bring together a pair of legends from different generations: Bootsy Collins and Mix Master Mike. Collins is of course best known for his long stints with Parliament-Funkadelic and James Brown's band, and Mike for his unstoppable contributions to the Beastie Boys. But each musician has spread his wings much farther than those Hall Of Fame acts, up to an including powerful new music. For Bootsy, it's The Power of the One, and for Mix Master Mike, it's Beat Odyssey 2020—what those albums share, beyond a spiritual connection to creativity itself, is a long list of collaborators, because these guys love to find new connections. This chat is one of those connections: Mike is clearly a fan of Bootsy's, and they get deep into conversation about history, music, and—eventually—some more cosmic topics. I wouldn't be the slightest bit surprised if this meeting leads to a collaboration between the two in the future. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes. This week's episode was produced by Kevin O'Connell, and the Talkhouse Podcast theme is composed and performed by The Range. —Josh Modell, Executive Editor
Jan 07, 2021
Jeff Tweedy with Nick Offerman
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This week’s show is presented in collaboration with The Hideout and Seminary Co-op Bookstore. Big thanks and love to both of those Chicago institutions! To celebrate the release of his new book How To Write One Song: Loving The Things We Create and How They Love Us Back, Jeff Tweedy (Wilco) caught up with his friend and collaborator, comedian Nick Offerman. Their funny and illuminating conversation is followed by an audience Q&A, and an exclusive solo performance by Jeff. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. Plus be sure to check our Soundcloud archives for recent shows featuring Tame Impala with Caribou, Carly Rae Jepsen with mxmtoon, Diplo with Charlie Crockett, and Jeff Tweedy with Norah Jones. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer For this week’s episode, Nick recorded himself and Jeff was recorded in Chicago by Mark Greenberg. Our producer is Mark Yoshizumi. The researcher for this episode was Reese Higgins. The Talkhouse Podcast theme song was composed and performed by The Range. PEEEEEAAAACE!
Dec 17, 2020
Jeff Tweedy with Norah Jones
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This week's show is presented in collaboration with Murmrr and Community Bookstore. We give big thanks and love to those two Brooklyn institutions! To celebrate the release of his new book How To Write One Song: Loving The Things We Create and How They Love Us Back, Jeff Tweedy (Wilco) sat down with his friend and collaborator Norah Jones for a deep dive into the creative process. Their warm and insightful conversation is followed by an audience Q&A, and an exclusive solo performance by Jeff. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast, including Jeff Tweedy again(!), this time with comedian Nick Offerman, and Bootsy Collins (it's Bootsy, baby!) with Mix Master Mike (Beastie Boys). Plus be sure to check our Soundcloud archives for recent shows featuring Tame Impala with Caribou, Carly Rae Jepsen with mxmtoon, Diplo with Charlie Crockett, and loads more. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer   For this week’s episode, Norah recorded herself, and Jeff was recorded in Chicago by Mark Greenberg. Our patient producer is Mark Yoshizumi. The researcher for this episode was Reese Higgins. The Talkhouse Podcast theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol, and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com. I adore hearing from you guys. And, I mean, how long do we all stay in the same place, right? Who knows where I'll be, come 2021...
Dec 10, 2020
Revisited: Black Belt Eagle Scout with SASAMI (and Guest Host Vagabon)
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On this week's episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, we share a deep-diving conversation about the idea of space for BIPOC folks in indie rock venues — a discussion with the explicit intent "to talk about brown voices, and to talk about how we can uplift them." Black Belt Eagle Scout — real name Katherine Paul — is a self-described “radical indigenous queer feminist” who grew up on the Swinomish Indian Reservation in Northwest Washington state. KP, as she's known, is Swinomish and Iñupiaq (a Native community in Alaska). Here, she speaks with Sasami Ashworth, aka SASAMI, a Korean-American singer/songwriter and musician based in Los Angeles. Sasami made her name playing synth in Cherry Glazerr before going solo in 2018. Our special guest-host is Vagabon, or Lætitia Tamko, a Cameroonian-born singer/songwriter/producer. This episode was inspired by the Twitter backlash after a conversation Black Belt Eagle Scout had with Ailsa Chang on the NPR show All Things Considered. With Chang, KP discussed feeling uncomfortable with so many white people at her shows, as her music is intended for BIPOC folks, and stated: "It's for people of color, for indigenous people, for queer people, and white men are so fragile when I say stuff like that. It's because of white privilege and they don't often get told that." KP was obviously not advocating for banning white men from her shows, but for there to be more room at each performance for her community. Still, of course, a number of fragile white men took to Twitter calling KP racist, and hating on the show for having her on. I saw Lætitia and Sasami tweeting support for KP, with Sasami doing full on UFC-style e-battle with some trolls! I reached out the next day to offer the platform of the Talkhouse Podcast for an extended convo on the topic, one without journalists or "fragile white men" involved. This talk was recorded back in March, just before Covid-19 slammed the States, and before the Black Lives Matter movement's incredible recent strides. Keep it locked to hear about issues of safety and space in DIY touring, the importance of land acknowledgments, and actionable things that bands and fans can do. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer     For this week’s episode, Sasami Ashworth was recorded by Eric Rennaker at bedrock.LA; Katherine Paul, Lætitia Tamko and I each recorded ourselves. Our producer extraordinaire is Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol, and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com.
Dec 03, 2020
Phoebe Bridgers with Bettye LaVette
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On this week's show, we pair in conversation the artists behind two of 2020's best albums: soul and blues legend Bettye LaVette and indie wunderkind Phoebe Bridgers. Though separated by five decades in age, when the two met backstage at a Tibet House US benefit at Carnegie Hall earlier this year, they immediately developed a mutual friend crush. Now that we've gotten them reconnected here, it appears something very dope is on the horizon... but more on that in the talk! Their warm, freewheeling convo takes in a lot, including: a wonderful overview of a career Bettye calls “tenuous at best”; the unexpected benefits of promoting a new album during the pandemic; and privilege in the music industry. We also get to hear about making Pete Townshend cry, quirky Little Stevie Wonder, and learn the answer to Bettye's query "What is a Princess Nokia?" Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast, including Norah Jones with Jeff Tweedy, and then Jeff again(!) with comedian Nick Offerman, and Bootsy Collins (Bootzilla, baby!) with Mix Master Mike (Beastie Boys). Plus be sure to check our Soundcloud archives for recent shows featuring Tame Impala with Caribou, Carly Rae Jepsen with mxmtoon, Diplo with Charlie Crockett, and loads more. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer For this week’s episode, Bettye LaVette was recorded by her adoring hubby Kevin Kiley, and Phoebe Bridgers by her pal Marshall Vore. Our long-suffering producer is Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Dude released gorgeous new music this year — check it out! Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol, and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com. Seriously, I love hearing from you guys. And if we're honest with ourselves, isn't the end always sneaking up on us?
Nov 24, 2020
Jude Law with Sean Durkin and Arcade Fire’s Richard Reed Parry
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, three of the creative talents behind the new movie The Nest – writer-director Sean Durkin, actor Jude Law and composer Richard Reed Parry – sit down for a deep-dive conversation about their work together and their respective artistic processes. Over the course of their talk, the trio discuss how their deeply collaborative creative approaches aligned in creating a collective vision for The Nest, how Sean and Richard met and became friends and collaborators, how Richard approached writing music for The Nest (and how Sean was able to “find” the film through the music), the way Jude and Sean together sketched a backstory for Jude’s protagonist Rory, the ways in which they each “submitted to the moment” while making the movie, and much more. For more filmmakers and musicians in conversation, visit Talkhouse at talkhouse.com. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast.
Nov 19, 2020
Phish's Mike Gordon with Leo Kottke
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For this week's show, we pair two truly virtuosic musicians — legendary fingerstyle guitarist Leo Kottke and Phish bassist-extraordinaire Mike Gordon. Their wonderful new collaborative album Noon just came out on CD and vinyl, so we knew we had to get these brilliant musical minds together for a deep-diving Talkhouse convo. Tune in to hear the guys share their superhero origin stories; what The Grateful Dead’s Bob Weir taught Mike about rock & roll; Leo’s tricks to never playing predictably; the importance of violating one's own musical expectations; Trey Anastasio's literary recommendation; and so much more. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast, including Norah Jones with Jeff Tweedy, and then Jeff again(!) with comedian Nick Offerman, and Bootsy Collins (Bootzilla, baby!) with Mix Master Mike (Beastie Boys). Next week's show features actor Jude Law with director Sean Durkin and composer Richard Reed Parry (The Arcade Fire) discussing their film The Nest. Plus be sure to check our Soundcloud archives for recent shows featuring Tame Impala with Caribou, Carly Rae Jepsen with mxmtoon, Diplo with Charlie Crockett, and loads more. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer For this week’s episode, Mike Gordon was recorded by Jared Slomoff, and Leo Kottke by Miles Hanson. Our incredible producer is Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol, and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com. Seriously, I love hearing from you guys, and I won't be around forever.
Nov 12, 2020
Tegan and Sara with Dehd
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It turns out that Tegan and Sara, Talkhouse Podcast producer extraordinaire Mark, and lil ol' me all share a favorite new band: Dehd. Hailing from Chicago, the jangle-tastic indie-rocking three-piece recently released their second LP Flower of Devotion, a tour de fookin' force of boy/girl vocals, Sarah Records-worthy guitar, and lyrics that make you wonder if the tears in your eyes are from loneliness or laughter. When we saw Sara tweeting her, um, devotion to the band, we knew a Talkhouse convo was in order! Keep it locked to hear about the vicissitudes of intense intra-band relationships; how musical joy isn't necessarily part and parcel of "success"; and pets as surrogate babies, tourmates, and social media fodder. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast, including Phish‘s Mike Gordon with Leo Kottke, Norah Jones with Jeff Tweedy, and then Jeff again(!) with comedian Nick Offerman. And be sure to check our Soundcloud archives for recent shows featuring Tame Impala with Caribou, Carly Rae Jepsen with mxmtoon, Diplo with Charlie Crockett, and loads more. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer For this week’s episode, each band recorded themselves. Our long-suffering producer is Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol, and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com. Seriously, I love hearing from you guys.
Nov 05, 2020
Reggie Watts with Chino Moreno (Deftones)
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To celebrate the release of the new Deftones album Ohms, we paired frontman Chino Moreno with his old friend and tourmate — and long-time Deftones fan! — comedian/musician Reggie Watts for a Talkhouse Podcast conversation. The guys were very psyched to catch up, and their freewheeling talk took in the making of the new Deftones LP; the ups and downs of long-term collaborations; their very different writing and recording approaches; and… bikes. Turns out they're both waaay into bikes. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast, including Tegan and Sara with Dehd, Phish‘s Mike Gordon with Leo Kottke, and Norah Jones with Jeff Tweedy. And be sure to check our Soundcloud archives for recent shows featuring Tame Impala with Caribou, Carly Rae Jepsen with mxmtoon, Diplo with Charlie Crockett, and loads more. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer For this week’s episode, everyone you hear recorded themselves. Our producer is Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol, and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com.
Oct 29, 2020
Revisited: Dev Hynes (Blood Orange) with Beverly Glenn-Copeland
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Devonté Hynes, aka Blood Orange, had an incredible 2019. He dropped the mixtape Angel's Pulse; scored the critically acclaimed film Queen and Slim; released a classical album with Third Coast Percussion; directed a music video for Beck; and, as a fan, finally saw the brilliant composer/vocalist Beverly Glenn-Copeland live. Glenn-Copeland (as he prefers to go by in his day-to-day life) had his own amazing year: At the age of 74, he had his first international tour, released the new LP Primal Prayer, and saw his previously obscure, decade-spanning seven album catalog finally embraced in music communities around the world. And he met Dev, whose music he adores. We introduced Dev and Glenn right here on the Talkhouse Podcast, and the ensuing convo was warm, vulnerable, funny, and potent. The two sat on a sofa at Hook and Fade Studio in Brooklyn, and instantly formed a world all their own; they stared into each other's eyes, and spoke so softly that it was difficult to hear them from even a few feet away. In their wide-ranging conversation, Glenn and Dev discuss discovering parts of themselves by traveling out of their home countries; the way they each approach their songwriting; and the story behind Glenn’s seminal 1986 album Keyboard Fantasies. We also learn the importance of nature and its role in their music; how recently Dev began to honor music as the foundation of all his creativity; and the trick Glenn’s mother used to make him a musician while still in utero. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today's show was engineered and co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. Additional editing by Katie Lau. Research by Reese Higgins. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol, and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com.
Oct 22, 2020
Kevin Parker (Tame Impala) with Dan Snaith (Caribou)
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TAME IMPALA AND CARIBOU ARE ON THE SHOW THIS WEEK!!! Sorry, I tried to write a more "professional" first line, but this is just SO DOPE! Tame Impala's Kevin Parker and Caribou's Dan Snaith are two of the most fascinating artists working today, and when the Talkhouse Podcast discovered they're also huge fans of each other's work, we knew we had to get them together to chop it up. In this warm and open conversation, the guys get into their very different creative processes; the pluses and minuses of having confidence in your artistic output; the clutch piece of gear Kevin uses to help get that sweet sweet Tame Impala sound; and much more. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast, including Tegan and Sara with Dehd, Deftones‘ Chino Moreno with comedian Reggie Watts, and Phish's Mike Gordon with Leo Kottke. And be sure to check our Soundcloud archives for recent shows featuring Mac DeMarco with Dayglow, Carly Rae Jepsen with mxmtoon, Diplo with Charlie Crockett, and loads more. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer For this week’s episode, everyone you hear recorded themselves. Our producers are Mark Yoshizumi and Elia Einhorn. The Talkhouse Podcast theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol, and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com.
Oct 15, 2020
Carly Rae Jepsen with mxmtoon
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To celebrate Carly Rae Jepsen and mxmtoon's rad collab track "ok on your own," we paired the pop stars for what turned out to be a deep dive into the art of making music and learning to thrive in the complicated music industry. In this very warm and insightful conversation, Carly and Maia each share their (very different!) origin stories, and explore both the art of songwriting and live performance. Carly also shares clutch career wisdom. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast, including Tame Impala’s Kevin Parker with Caribou’s Dan Snaith, and Deftones‘ Chino Moreno with comedian Reggie Watts. Plus, ICYMI: mxmtoon just kicked off her yearlong podcast project 365 days with mxmtoon in collab with Talkhouse, which features quirky stories from history that occurred on each day, old diary entries and more; it’s really fun, and like eight minutes long. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer For this week’s episode, Carly was recorded by Nick Theodorakis, and everyone else you hear recorded themselves. Our producer is Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol, and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com.
Oct 08, 2020
Mac DeMarco with Dayglow
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On this week’s show, a young gun picks a veteran’s brain. A youngish veteran, admittedly — Mac DeMarco’s only 30, but compared to 21 year old Spotify-wunderkind Sloan Struble, aka Dayglow, he’s already spent a lifetime in the music industry trenches. The two take in a lot in this conversation. We hear Mac's origin story, and get a nice overview of his career. We get insight into what it's like finding fast fame online in 2020, and the two dissect the term "DIY" and the changing definition of “indie.” Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast, including Tame Impala’s Kevin Parker with Caribou’s Dan Snaith, Carly Rae Jepsen with mxmtoon, and Deftones' Chino Moreno with comedian Reggie Watts. Follow @talkhouse across socials to catch upcoming installments of Talkhouse Podcast Live On Insta. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer For this week’s episode, everyone you hear recorded themselves. Our producer is Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol, and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com.
Oct 01, 2020
Bob Mould with Alicia Bognanno (Bully)
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For this week's episode of the show, we paired two brilliant rockers from different generations, each of whom has a fantastic new record out: Bob Mould (Hüsker Dü, Sugar) and Bully's Alicia Bognanno. They chop it up about a lot, including the making of their new albums; how the music industry has changed since Bob’s early days in the game; the ups and downs of sharing one's life — including familial and mental health issues — with the public; and so much more. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast, including Tame Impala's Kevin Parker with Caribou's Dan Snaith, and Mac DeMarco with Dayglow. Follow @talkhouse across socials to catch upcoming installments of Talkhouse Podcast Live On Insta. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer For this week’s episode, everyone you hear recorded themselves. Our producer is Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol, and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com.
Sep 24, 2020
Deerhoof with Wadada Leo Smith
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To celebrate the release of their collaborative live LP To Be Surrounded By Beautiful, Curious, Breathing, Laughing Flesh Is Enough, experimental indie rockers Deerhoof and avant garde trumpeter Wadada Leo Smith chop it up on the Talkhouse Podcast. Recalling the shows they've played together — including the one at Le Poisson Rouge here in New York that the record captures — they discuss the magic of collaboration, improvisation, and other matters of cosmic music philosophy. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast, including Bob Mould with Bully's Alicia Bognanno and Mac DeMarco with Dayglow. Follow @talkhouse across socials to catch upcoming installments of Talkhouse Podcast Live On Insta. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer For this week’s episode, everyone you hear recorded themselves. Our producer is Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol, and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com.
Sep 17, 2020
McIntosh "for the love of music..." — Ben Blackwell (Third Man Records)
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In the second episode of the McIntosh "for the love of music..." podcast series presented by Talkhouse, Elia Einhorn spoke with Ben Blackwell, head honcho and co-founder of the world-renowned Third Man Records alongside Jack White, and drummer of Detroit band the Dirtbombs. In the talk, Blackwell discusses Third Man's approach to the music industry — their business model, their philosophy, and the decisions behind their curation process. He also touches on Third Man's commitment to integrity and "doing things the old fashioned way;" tells the story of Neil Young and a very old (and expensive) recording booth; and gives a full rundown on the gear that he and Jack White use to listen to records.
Sep 16, 2020
Paul Banks (Interpol, Muzz) with Shepard Fairey (Obey)
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For this week's show, we paired two game-changing artists working in different mediums who are obsessed with each other's output: musician Paul Banks (Interpol, Muzz) and visual artist/designer Shepard Fairey (Obey). Originally aired as part of our Talkhouse Podcast Live On Insta series, their talk takes in a lot, including the evolution of their art; the thrills and intricacies of collaborating; the direct and passive political work they're involved in; and, of course, Paul's new Muzz LP! Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast, including Bob Mould with Bully's Alicia Bognanno, Deerhoof with Wadada Leo Smith, and Mac DeMarco with Dayglow. Follow @talkhouse across socials to catch upcoming installments of Talkhouse Podcast Live On Insta. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Our producer is Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol, and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com.
Sep 10, 2020
Mike Hadreas (Perfume Genius) with Jeremy O. Harris (Slave Play)
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Singer/songwriter Perfume Genius — aka Mike Hadreas — and playwright Jeremy O. Harris (Slave Play) are each boundary-shattering artists. Their takes on queer sexuality, trauma, and, in Jeremy's case, race have seen them deified in their respective fields. They're also massive fans of one another's work, and while the two have been "internet friends" for a while, we were truly thrilled to pair them for their first-ever conversation right here on the Talkhouse Podcast. In this insightful discussion, they share their artistic processes, including consciously pushing boundaries and avoiding comfort zones by showing the world one’s metaphorical — and literal — asshole. They also share deets on the amazing celebs Mike has written with, and who Jeremy is getting ready to work with. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast, including Bob Mould with Bully‘s Alicia Bognanno, Deerhoof with Wadada Leo Smith, and Mac DeMarco with Dayglow. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer For this week’s episode, everyone you hear recorded themself. Our producer is Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol, and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com.
Sep 03, 2020
Diplo (Major Lazer) with Charley Crockett
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Here's the mark of a great Talkhouse Podcast pairing: For this week's show, we introduced legendary producer Diplo (Major Lazer) and rising country star Charley Crockett, and by the end of the talk, the two had decided to work together! In this wonderful conversation, Charley and Diplo go deep on the connections between country music and hip hop, their love of flashy cowboy fashion, the changing looks and sounds of country, and much more. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast, including Perfume Genius with Jeremy O. Harris (Slave Play), Bob Mould with Bully‘s Alicia Bognanno, Deerhoof with Wadada Leo Smith, and Mac DeMarco with Dayglow. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer For this week’s episode, Charley Crockett was recorded by Gary Calhoun James at King Electric in Austin, and everyone else recorded themself at their #stayhome studios. Our producer is Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol, and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com.
Aug 27, 2020
Alejandro Jodorowsky with Darren Aronofsky
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, we reunite two filmmaking greats who first talked on the show back in 2017: Alejandro Jodorowsky and Darren Aronofsky. The iconic directors this time spoke on the occasion of the release of Jodorowsky’s new documentary about the therapy he created, Psychomagic: A Healing Art (now available on Alamo on Demand), with the 91-year-old maestro Skyping from his home in Paris and Aronofsky from New York. The two discussed a variety of subjects including, of course, psychomagic, but also touched upon the “idiot moment” of the current pandemic, how Jodorowsky maintains his physical and spiritual health, his desire to live many hundreds of years, how he would script the end of 2020, and much, much more. For more filmmakers talking film, visit Talkhouse Film at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast.
Aug 20, 2020
Bruce Hornsby with James Mercer (The Shins, Broken Bells)
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On this week's show, we present a deep dive conversation between mutual fans — and newly minted collaborators! — Bruce Hornsby and James Mercer (The Shins, Broken Bells). To celebrate Bruce's single "My Resolve," which features James, the guys sat down for a talk that takes in each of their earliest musical moments, right up to their new collab. Tune in for some wonderful stories of the roles Sir Elton John, Modest Mouse’s Isaac Brock, Zach Braff, and even the musical The Music Man played in their careers. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast, including Diplo with Charley Crockett, Bob Mould with Bully's Alicia Bognanno, Deerhoof with Wadada Leo Smith, and Mac DeMarco with Dayglow. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer For this week’s episode, everyone you hear recorded themself at their #stayhome studios. Our producer is Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast theme song was composed and performed by The Range. (But not, you know, Bruce Hornsby's The Range...) Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol, and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com.
Aug 13, 2020
Phil Elverum (Mount Eerie, The Microphones) with Mirah
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To celebrate the 20th anniversary deluxe reissue of Mirah's iconic debut You Think It's Like This But Really It's Like This as well the surprise return of The Microphones with The Microphones in 2020, today's show pairs Phil Elverum (also of Mount Eerie) and Mirah in conversation. The dear old friends and collaborators share memories — and explore the act of remembering — in this touching, often very funny talk. Stay tuned for insights into the incredible Olympia, WA music scene of the late '90s/early '00s; why Phil is recording as The Microphones again; and metaphorically — as well as literally — carrying your trash around with you. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast, including Bob Mould with Bully's Alicia Bognanno, Deerhoof with Wadada Leo Smith, and Mac DeMarco with Dayglow. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer For this week’s episode, everyone you hear recorded themself at their #stayhome studios. Our producer is Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol, and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com.
Aug 06, 2020
Hanif Abdurraqib with Adia Victoria
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Today’s show, originally aired as part of our Talkhouse Podcast Live on Insta series, features a thoughtful and often hilarious conversation between poet Hanif Abdurraqib and singer/songwriter/poet Adia Victoria. Tune in for a celebration of Little Richard, the history and context of the blues (including why Beyonce is a blues artist!), a nuanced view of Flannery O’Connor, and so much more. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast, including Bob Mould with Bully‘s Alicia Bognanno, Deerhoof with Wadada Leo Smith, and Phil Elverum (The Microphones, Mount Eerie) with Mirah. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer For this week’s episode, everyone you hear recorded themself at their #stayhome studios. Our producer is Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol, and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com.
Jul 30, 2020
Shamir with Liza Anne
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This week’s show pairs up newly minted friends — and mutual fans — Shamir and Liza Anne. Originally broadcast on our Talkhouse Podcast Live on Insta series, we now present their hilarious and thoughtful convo in podcast form for your listening pleasure! Keep it locked for their deep dive into religion and spirituality, including why Shamir longs to act the part of “the evil queer person in a corny low budget Christian movie.” They also take in finding one’s literal — or metaphorical — New York; Liza Anne’s determined focus on mental health; and which folk star Shamir was in a past life. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast, including Bob Mould with Bully's Alicia Bognanno, Hanif Abdurraqib with Adia Victoria, and Phil Elverum (The Microphones, Mount Eerie) with Mirah. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer For this week’s episode, everyone you hear recorded themself at their #stayhome studios. Our producer is Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol, and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com.
Jul 23, 2020
Revisited: Jarvis Cocker with Stephin Merritt (the Magnetic Fields)
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Surprise! Jarvis Cocker has moved his wonderful new LP Beyond The Pale's release date up two months to... tomorrow! Get ready for it with a listen to this rebroadcast of Jarvis' fantastic Talkhouse conversation with The Magnetic Fields' Stephin Merritt.   ~~~   On this week's show, we pair two of the greatest living songwriters, artists who've reimagined what the form can look like, and what it can accomplish. The Magnetic Fields' Stephin Merritt and ex-Pulp frontman Jarvis Cocker each have great new music in the world; when I heard the latter was coming to NYC, I instantly knew I had to try to get these two together in person for a Talkhouse Podcast convo. Thankfully, when presented with the idea, both were psyched! Over cups of tea at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn (before the pandemic), the guys sat down for a delightfully freewheeling conversation about songwriting — and how they both love to subvert its norms in different ways — as well as the vastly different approaches they took to making their new LPs. But of course with these two, there's so much more here, including (but not limited to!): a moving discussion of reunions with their showbiz fathers who had abandoned them; the bad omen that nearly caused Jarvis to quit music in the year 2000; why Stephin’s new sexual fetish might be a “one time only” experience; and their shared love of that "hippy writer" Richard Brautigan. This episode is dedicated to all you "mis-shapes, mistakes, misfits" — enjoy! Pick up The Magnetic Fields' Quickies here, and Jarvis's Beyond The Pale here. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast, including upcoming talks like Helado Negro with Buscabulla and Black Belt Eagle Scout with Sasami. Make sure to revisit Stephin Merritt and Daniel Handler (aka the author Lemony Snicket)'s 2019 look back on 69 Love Songs on its 20th anniversary. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer This week’s show was recorded by the Talkhouse Podcast's producer Mark Yoshizumi. Josh Modell and I recorded ourselves in our respective #stayhome studios. Our theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol, and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com.
Jul 16, 2020
Julien Baker (boygenius) with Katie Harkin (HARKIN, Sleater-Kinney)
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This week’s show pairs friends, tourmates, and mutual fans Julien Baker (boygenius) and Katie Harkin (HARKIN, Sleater-Kinney). Originally broadcast to kick off the Talkhouse Podcast Live on Insta series, we now present Julien and Katie’s insightful and hilarious convo in podcast form for your listening pleasure! Keep it locked to hear about the unwelcome expectation that artists be creative during quarantine; elitism in the already intimidating world of synthesizers; and the importance of taking control of your own work. Plus — of course, with these two! — John Milton and dick pics… Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast, including Bob Mould with Bully‘s Alicia Bognanno, Shamir with Liza Anne, and Hanif Abdurraqib with Adia Victoria. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer For this week’s episode, everyone you hear recorded themself at their #stayhome studios. Our producer is Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol, and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com.
Jul 09, 2020
Black Belt Eagle Scout with SASAMI
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On this week’s episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, we share a deep-diving conversation about the idea of space for BIPOC folks in indie rock venues — a discussion with the explicit intent “to talk about brown voices, and to talk about how we can uplift them.” Black Belt Eagle Scout — real name Katherine Paul — is a self-described “radical indigenous queer feminist” who grew up on the Swinomish Indian Reservation in Northwest Washington state. KP, as she’s known, is Swinomish and Iñupiaq (a Native community in Alaska). Here, she speaks with Sasami Ashworth, aka SASAMI, a Korean-American singer/songwriter and musician based in Los Angeles. Sasami made her name playing synth in Cherry Glazerr before going solo in 2018. Our special guest-host is Vagabon, or Lætitia Tamko, a Cameroonian-born singer/songwriter/producer. This episode was inspired by the Twitter backlash after a conversation Black Belt Eagle Scout had with Ailsa Chang on the NPR show All Things Considered. With Chang, KP discussed feeling uncomfortable with so many white people at her shows, as her music is intended for BIPOC folks, and stated: “It’s for people of color, for indigenous people, for queer people, and white men are so fragile when I say stuff like that. It’s because of white privilege and they don’t often get told that.” KP was obviously not advocating for banning white men from her shows, but for there to be more room at each performance for her community. Still, of course, a number of fragile white men took to Twitter calling KP racist, and hating on the show for having her on. I saw Lætitia and Sasami tweeting support for KP, with Sasami doing full on UFC-style e-battle with some trolls! I reached out the next day to offer the platform of the Talkhouse Podcast for an extended convo on the topic, one without journalists or “fragile white men” involved. This talk was recorded back in March, just before Covid-19 slammed the States, and before the Black Lives Matter movement’s incredible recent strides. Keep it locked to hear about issues of safety and space in DIY touring, the importance of land acknowledgments, and actionable things that bands and fans can do. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast; next week’s is Julien Baker with Katie Harkin. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer For this week’s episode, Sasami Ashworth was recorded by Eric Rennaker at bedrock.LA; Katherine Paul, Lætitia Tamko and I each recorded ourselves. Our producer extraordinaire is Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol, and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com.
Jul 02, 2020
McIntosh "for the love of music..." — Janet Furman
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In this inaugural episode of the McIntosh "for the love of music..." podcast series presented by Talkhouse, Elia Einhorn caught up with former Grateful Dead electronics outfitter, and renowned music gear creator, Janet Furman. Janet grew up in New York City, graduating from Columbia University in the late 1960s with an engineering degree before moving to San Francisco and finding work with Alembic, the Grateful Dead’s preferred recording studio and sound crew. Janet recorded the Dead’s live sets on multiple tours, as well as engineering sessions for other rock stars like Steve Miller. She went on to found her own pro audio equipment manufacturing company, Furman, whose products are used in almost every studio and live venue around the world, and which we here at Talkhouse work with every day. Janet shared some amazing stories about working for Owsley Stanley, touring Europe with the Dead and recording some of their most famous work, and even commandeering a helicopter in order to save a massive rock festival… with McIntosh amplifiers.
Jun 19, 2020
Jehnny Beth with Jenny Hval
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Sexuality, violence, gender, anger, technology, love. Singer/actress/writer Jehnny Beth (Savages) and Norwegian experimental pop musician and author Jenny Hval are both aesthetically very dark artists who brilliantly dissect these topics in their respective music and erotic novels. On this week's show, we introduce the mutual fans for the very first time; what follows is a powerful, deep dive conversation. Zola Jesus joins me as special guest host. I recently woke up at 5:30AM to set up this conversation between Jehnny's home in Paris, and Jenny's in Oslo. A couple hours later, my almost-three-year-old daughter Conwy woke up just after the talk ended; I took her out of her crib and told her "Dada just listened to a fantastic conversation between two very strong and talented women!" And it really is a fantastic conversation. With Jehnny Beth's debut solo LP To Live Is To Love out just last week, and her book of erotic fiction and photography, Crimes Against Love Memories dropping in early July, and Jenny's new single "Bonus Material" out now and second novel Girls Against God coming later this year, they had a lot to talk about. The two chop it up on their complex relationships with their countries of origin, and the powerful role of language in self-identity; their reasons for functioning primarily outside of the mainstream; and the artist's necessary freedom to express the darker sides of their humanity. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast, including upcoming shows featuring Black Belt Eagle Scout with Sasami, Fusilier with Bartees Strange, and Julien Baker with Katie Harkin. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer This week’s show was recorded by Jehnny Beth, Jenny Hval, Zola Jesus, and myself at our respective #stayhome studios. The Talkhouse Podcast’s co-producer is Mark Yoshizumi. Our theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Research assistance was provided by Samantha Small. Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol, and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com.
Jun 18, 2020
Scott Avett (The Avett Brothers) with Eef Barzelay (Clem Snide)
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Did you catch the first of our two podcasts this week? It featured Yrsa Daley-Ward reading her powerful new poem "Making The End," and Helado Negro in convo with Buscabulla. Check it out on talkhouse.com Today's show sees The Avett Brothers' Scott Avett chop it up with Eef Barzelay of Clem Snide. The friends and collaborators cover a lot, including: the role of faith in their music; being true to their art even when it hurts; and some amazing stories about Jason Molina and David Berman. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast, including upcoming shows featuring Black Belt Eagle Scout with Sasami, Jehnny Beth with Jenny Hval, and Julien Baker with Katie Harkin. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer This week’s show was recorded by Scott, Eef, Talkhouse’s Executive Editor Josh Modell, and myself at our respective #stayhome studios. The Talkhouse Podcast’s co-producer is Mark Yoshizumi. Our theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Research assistance was provided by Samantha Small. Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol, and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com.
Jun 11, 2020
Helado Negro with Buscabulla
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Today's show opens with poet Yrsa Daley-Ward reading her new work "Making The End." Helado Negro and Buscabulla kicked off the Talkhouse Podcast Live on Insta series last month with this warm, thoughtful conversation. The old friends and regular collaborators each have wonderful new music out: Helado Negro recently dropped the single "I Fell In Love" featuring Xenia Rubinos, while Puerto Rican art-poppers Buscabulla just released their hotly tipped debut LP Regressa. As flags from across Latin America and beyond were posted in the comments, they chopped it up on a lot: The experience of releasing music during quarantine; the tight community of “everybody in New York that makes weird music in Spanish”; why Nick Hakim is really Neo from The Matrix; and lots more. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast, including upcoming shows featuring Black Belt Eagle Scout with Sasami, Jehnny Beth with Jenny Hval, and Julien Baker with Katie Harkin. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer This week’s show was recorded by Buscabulla in Aguadilla, Puerto Rico, Helado Negro in Marfa, Texas, Talkhouse’s Executive Editor Josh Modell in Chicago, and myself in Philadelphia. The Talkhouse Podcast's co-producer is Mark Yoshizumi. Our theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Research assistance was provided by Samantha Small. Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol, and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com.
Jun 09, 2020
Joe Talbot (IDLES)
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This week's show is a bit different from usual Talkhouse Podcast episodes. While it's nominally hosted by the legendary Alan McGee of Creation Records — the man who signed The Jesus and Mary Chain, My Bloody Valentine, and a lil ol' band called Oasis — it's not at all a two-person conversation. Instead, this episode features Joe Talbot, frontman of the incredible post-punk group Idles, in one of the funniest, most viscerally honest live audience Q&A's I've ever witnessed. Both Joe and the attendees are willing to go to deep and often uncomfortable areas: Buckle up for a discussion of toxic masculinity, the role of violence in Idles' music, and the difficult process of developing one’s own artistic language. We also hear about Joe collabing with Mike Skinner of The Streets, turning Sleaford Mods’ taunts into a song, putting human ashes into vinyl records, and... we even get an unexpected lesson on mindfulness. This Q&A was recorded at the wonderful Barras Art & Design in Glasgow. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast, including upcoming talks like Helado Negro with Buscabulla, Julien Baker and Katie Harkin (Harkin, Sleater-Kinney), Black Belt Eagle Scout with Sasami, and Scott Avett (The Avett Brothers) with Eef Barzelay (Clem Snide). — Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s show was recorded in Glasgow by Nadar Shahzad of Blue Audio (thx Nadar!), and in Philadelphia and Chicago by Elia Einhorn and Josh Modell. Our co-producer is Mark Yoshizumi. Thanks so much to Matt Sadowski of Alt Waves Records and to Barras Art & Design for allowing us to share this event. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Research assistance was provided by Samantha Small. Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol, and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com.
May 28, 2020
Revisited: Fred Armisen and Mary Lynn Rajskub with Lindsey Jordan (Snail Mail)
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We here at the Talkhouse Podcast have been nominated by the International Academy of Digital Arts and Sciences for a Webby Award! Woo hoo! It’s in the "Best Live Podcast Recording” category, and we got the nod for our musical episode with Snail Mail, Fred Armisen, and Mary Lynn Rajskub. The show took place last summer at FORM Fest in Arcosanti, Arizona, and the three of them play, sing, and talk… at the same time. In case you missed it the first time around, or are in the mood to crack up again, check it out!  ~~~  BREAKING NEWS! Indie rock it-band Snail Mail has an all-new lineup! Don't worry, Lindsey Jordan is still there — only now, so is Fred Armisen and comedian Mary Lynn Rajskub (24, It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia). On our second Talkhouse Podcast episode recorded backstage at the wonderful FORM Fest, the three form a group on the spot, then, with instruments in hand, improvise songs about: How they’re actually the new Snail Mail lineup; Chef Boyardee; Neil Young; "lemon squares that Mommy made"; Jesus’ selective saving tendencies (that one's titled called “Here Comes The Son”), and loads more. We also witness spoofs of Queen and Beyonce; hear thoughts on fergiepeepants.jpg; learn about foot fetishists and Wikifeet; take in some sarcastic breakdancing; consider gentle piss modulators; and find out why Mary Lynn is convinced Lindsey needs to get pregnant immediately. This Talkhouse Podcast and video was recorded in the Conservatory backstage at FORM Fest in Arcosanti, Arizona. Pulp Arts and Patreon teamed up to co-present The Conservatory, a rad backstage visual arts installation and recording studio. Talkhouse recorded six episodes there throughout the weekend, so subscribe to make sure to catch upcoming shows, including: Kelsey Lu & Yrsa Daley-Ward Julianna Barwick & Mary Lattimore American Football & Pelican L’Rain & Melanie Faye You can also check out the just-released first episode from the fest, featuring jazz and hip hop legend Robert Glasper with a giant of African music, Malian guitarist Vieux Farka Touré, plus an appearance by Lonnie Holley. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer  Today’s episode was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. It was recorded at FORM Festival in Arcosanti, Arizona, and at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn by Mark Yoshizumi, Danny Clifton and Ian Jones.  Research assistance was provided by Madalyn Feltus.  The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
May 14, 2020
Jarvis Cocker with Stephin Merritt (the Magnetic Fields)
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On this week's show, we pair two of the greatest living songwriters, artists who've reimagined what the form can look like, and what it can accomplish. The Magnetic Fields' Stephin Merritt and ex-Pulp frontman Jarvis Cocker each have great new music in the world; when I heard the latter was coming to NYC, I instantly knew I had to try to get these two together in person for a Talkhouse Podcast convo. Thankfully, when presented with the idea, both were psyched! Over cups of tea at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn (before the pandemic), the guys sat down for a delightfully freewheeling conversation about songwriting — and how they both love to subvert its norms in different ways — as well as the vastly different approaches they took to making their new LPs. But of course with these two, there's so much more here, including (but not limited to!): a moving discussion of reunions with their showbiz fathers who had abandoned them; the bad omen that nearly caused Jarvis to quit music in the year 2000; why Stephin’s new sexual fetish might be a “one time only” experience; and their shared love of that "hippy writer" Richard Brautigan. This episode is dedicated to all you "mis-shapes, mistakes, misfits" — enjoy! Pick up The Magnetic Fields' Quickies here, and Jarvis's Beyond The Pale here. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast, including upcoming talks like Helado Negro with Buscabulla, Black Belt Eagle Scout with Sasami, and comedian Chris D'Elia with filmmaker Amanda Kramer. Make sure to revisit Stephin Merritt and Daniel Handler (aka the author Lemony Snicket)'s 2019 look back on 69 Love Songs on its 20th anniversary. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer  This week’s show was recorded by the Talkhouse Podcast's producer Mark Yoshizumi. Josh Modell and I recorded ourselves in our respective #stayhome studios. Our theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol, and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com.
May 07, 2020
Matt Berninger with Aimee Mann
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This week on the show, we celebrate the wonderful Other Music documentary with two Grammy-winning artists: singer-songwriter Aimee Mann and the National's Matt Berninger. The two discuss the iconic record store and the creative importance of having physical spaces dedicated to musical community, plus we hear how they're managing to work during the pandemic, and Matt reveals that he's both writing a musical and launching a label imprint. The Other Music doc features many wonderful artists that have appeared on our show — TV on the Radio, the Magnetic Fields, Superchunk, Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Jason Schwartzman, Animal Collective, William Basinski, Frankie Cosmos and more — this is truly a #talkhousecore film! Other Music is currently being screened via a "virtual theatrical release," with more than 200 independent record shops and movie theaters offering it to rent, and splitting the profits 50/50. This is a wonderful chance to support your local purveyor of brilliant art, and catch one of the must-see music films of the year. Click here to find your local favorite store or theater that's screening it! (Our producer Mark Yoshizumi rented it from his alma mater Reckless Records in Chicago; Talkhouse Film's Editor-in-Chief Nick Dawson supported Permanent Records in L.A., and I went with Record Grouch in Brooklyn, where I've spent many and many a happy hour amongst the hallowed racks.) Enjoy today's show, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast, including upcoming talks like Jarvis Cocker (Pulp) with the Magnetic Fields’ Stephin Merritt, and Black Belt Eagle Scout with Sasami. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer This week’s show was recorded by Aimee Mann, Matt Berninger, Nick Dawson, and myself in our respective #stayhome studios. The Talkhouse Podcast's co-producer is Mark Yoshizumi. Our theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com.
Apr 28, 2020
David Bazan (Pedro The Lion) with Joe Pera
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Comedian Joe Pera (Joe Pera Talks With You) and singer-songwriter David Bazan (Pedro The Lion) have elevated self-aware open-heartedness and detailed observation of humanity into, well, art. When David discovered Joe's show, he fell for it hard, and reached out to Talkhouse to see if we could arrange a convo. We loved the idea, and think you'll really enjoy the result. Joe and David discuss a lot, including: their granular writing techniques; appreciating the gentle joys of life, like wearing green hats on St. Patrick’s day; how some performers only achieve their maximum authenticity onstage; and why live performers must be doms. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast, including upcoming shows featuring Jarvis Cocker (Pulp) with the Magnetic Fields’ Stephin Merritt, and Black Belt Eagle Scout with Sasami. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer This week's show was recorded by Joe Pera, David Bazan, Talkhouse's Executive Editor Josh Modell, and myself in our respective #stayhome studios. The Talkhouse Podcast's co-producer is Mark Yoshizumi. Our theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol, and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com.
Apr 23, 2020
George Saunders with Dana Spiotta
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Today’s episode is produced in collaboration with Murmrr Ballroom and Community Bookstore. We are so pleased to, for the first time on the Talkhouse Podcast, present two authors in conversation. And what authors! To celebrate George Saunders’ new short story in the New Yorker, his appearance on Cheryl Strayed’s new podcast Sugar Calling, and many of us having a little more time to read now, we wanted to share from our digital vault his wonderful 2018 talk with Dana Spiotta. George and Dana share quite a bit in their conversation, including: why it’s important to read fiction right now; trying to write in the style of '90s chat rooms; Jesus the Temple-trashing tough guy; and… dreaming of goiters. This show includes great readings by both authors, and kicks off with a live intro from Michael Miller of Bookforum. It closes with an audience q and a. Check it out. Huge thanks to Brian Kelly and all at Murmrr. Also to Community Bookstore in Park Slope, Brooklyn; they’re one of the greats here in New York, and during this time of social isolation, are still open for deliveries, with free media mail. Regular listeners might remember we collaborated with these great folks on previous episodes including Jeff Tweedy with Abbi Jacobson and Judd Apatow with David Duchovny. Today’s show was recorded in Brooklyn by Justin Hrabvosky, Eric Lemke and our co-producer Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com or @eliaeinhorn on Twitter.
Apr 16, 2020
Revisited: Jeff Tweedy (Wilco) with Abbi Jacobson
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This harrowing virus and quarantine have brought infinite terrible things with them. Still, I want to take a moment to celebrate a ray of sunshine — some truly incredible live-from-their-home sets from brilliant artists. “The Tweedy Show,” the nightly show that Wilco‘s Jeff Tweedy and his family stream on Instagram each weeknight is not to be missed. Jeff, his wife Susie, and their sons Spencer (The Blisters, Tweedy… um, the band, that is) and Sammy broadcast whatever they feel like: impromptu live versions of Wilco songs, Jeff’s from-a-dream lyrics for a song called “Grandma’s A Cyborg Now,” or a chat with Curb Your Enthusiasm‘s Jeff Garlin. So this week, we’re re-airing a wonderful live talk between Jeff Tweedy and genius comedian Abbi Jacobson (Broad City, Disenchantment). After you listen, make sure to check out the new Mavis Staples song “All In It Together” that Jeff produced and sang on, as well as Spencer Tweedy‘s past Talkhouse Podcast episodes with NE-HI (RIP) and Whitney.  ~~~ Until catching this talk live last month, it would never have occurred to me that there could be a deep similarity between Jeff Tweedy’s songs and Abbi Jacobson’s Broad City character, but—there is! Jeff (Wilco, Tweedy) and Abbi (Broad City, Disenchantment) sat down at the beautiful Murmrr Theater in Brooklyn to celebrate the release of Jeff’s memoir Let’s Go (So We Can Get Back): A Memoir of Recording and Discording with Wilco, Etc. and his new solo album Warm. Their thoughtful and funny conversation took in a lot, including the difficulties they each had writing books after focusing their careers on other types of writing; opening up about mental health and addiction; Jeff breaking into comedy; and so much more. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. Feel free to DM me to let me know which artist(s) you’d love to see appear on a future episode. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer This episode was recorded by Mark Yoshizumi with Eric Lemke and Justin Hrabovski at Murmrr Theater, and at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn. It was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. Big thanks to Brian Kelly at Murmrr. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol, and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com.
Apr 09, 2020
Katie Crutchfield (Waxahatchee) with Whitmer Thomas
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Singer-songwriter Katie Crutchfield, aka Waxahatchee, and comedian Whitmer Thomas have each released perhaps the best work of their careers thus far in the past month or so: Waxahatchee with her new LP, Saint Cloud, Whitmer with his HBO comedy special The Golden One. The two are huge fans of each other's emotionally vulnerable work; having recently met, they have, as Katie puts it in this talk, “a weird kismet connection." In their open and honest conversation, Katie and Whitmer take us through their careers, from their beginnings as teenage rockers in Alabama to their current professional successes, and the processes of making their powerful new works. We also hear about the benefits of a slower professional trajectory; pre-album-release shame when you’ve been completely open about your life in your art; and how Katie getting sober changed her music. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast, including upcoming shows featuring Jarvis Cocker (Pulp) with the Magnetic Fields’ Stephin Merritt; Black Belt Eagle Scout with Sasami; and George Saunders with fellow author Dana Spiotta. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer  This week's show was recorded by Claire Morison at Bedrock.la and in Brooklyn by Talkhouse Film's Editor-in-chief Nick Dawson and myself in our respective #stayhome studios. The Talkhouse Podcast's co-producer is Mark Yoshizumi. Our theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol, and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com.
Apr 02, 2020
Black Thought (The Roots) with Wyatt Cenac
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, we feature a very special conversation recorded live at On Air Fest in Brooklyn earlier this month between The Roots’ lead MC Black Thought (aka Tarik Trotter) and comedian Wyatt Cenac. The two friends have a hilarious, highly entertaining talk about everything from beard grooming and the need for adult playgrounds, to their initial forays into showbiz (Tarik went to school with Questlove, Boyz II Men and Beanie Sigel!), to Wyatt’s disastrous gig hosting a CMJ hip-hop show and the awful time Tarik forgot the lyrics to the Jay-Z song he was performing – as part of a tribute to Hov himself! For more filmmakers and musicians in conversation, visit Talkhouse at talkhouse.com and subscribe to the Talkhouse Podcast to stay in the loop about future episodes. This episode was recorded by Sam Bair at On Air Fest, Elia and Nick recorded themselves in quarantine, and was co-produced Mark Yoshizumi.
Mar 26, 2020
Revisited: Chuck D (Public Enemy) with Tom Morello (Rage Against The Machine)
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With Public Enemy in the news recently, and Rage Against the Machine active this year, we were immediately reminded of this talk with Tom Morello and Public Enemy's Chuck D. A lot has changed since we recorded the new intro for this episode a week ago. We want to wish all of our listeners good health. Talkhouse will be continuing to publish new and archival conversations with your favorite musicians, actors, and filmmakers at our usual pace. Take care and thanks for listening.   ~~~ Chuck D (Public Enemy) and Tom Morello (Rage Against The Machine, Audioslave, the Nightwatchman) have been sending radical political messages up the pop charts for decades. On the occasion of the debut LP by their new supergroup, Prophets Of Rage, the two musical revolutionaries bum-rush the Talkhouse Podcast to discuss protest music. Their conversation also covers why new groups are afraid to be overtly political, the democratization of music via technology, how Rage Against the Machine fooled MTV and Viacom, and "Puff the Magic Dragon." Check it out, and subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today's episode was recorded by Susan Valot, and mixed and co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi.
Mar 19, 2020
A.C. Newman with Post Animal
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A.C. Newman of The New Pornographers and Wesley Toledo, the drummer for psych/prog rockers Post Animal, are big fans of each other's music. When we paired 'em up for a Talkhouse convo, the guys were thrilled to dive deep on embracing irony and ridiculousness in their songwriting. Their talk also takes in how hip hop and psych are getting closer and closer, what can be learned from Electric Light Orchestra, and the lengths Andrew Bird will go to to get the right take. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast, including upcoming episodes featuring Jarvis Cocker with The Magnetic Fields' Stephin Merritt; The Roots' Black Thought with comedian Wyatt Cenac; and George Saunders with Dana Spiotta.  —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer  Wesley Toledo was recorded by Talkhouse's dear pal Alex Hall at Reliable Recorders in Chicago, A.C. Newman recorded himself, and Annie Fell and I were committed to 1s and 0s by our co-producer Mark Yoshizumi at Hook and Fade Studios, Brooklyn.  The Talkhouse Podcast theme song was composed and performed by The Range.  Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol, and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com.
Mar 12, 2020
Kelly Reichardt with Olivier Assayas
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, two of the greatest living filmmakers, Kelly Reichardt and Olivier Assayas, sit down for an intimate conversation. Recorded last fall when Reichardt’s First Cow (in theaters March 6 through A24) and Assayas’ Wasp Network were both playing at the New York Film Festival, this talk sees the two comparing notes on the intricacies of their respective creative processes, from writing through to editing. They discuss the ways in which they differ (such as Assayas’ enforced spontaneity and Reichardt’s love of preparation), the personal backstories to Assayas’ films Cold Water and Summer Hours, Reichardt’s past growing up in a law-enforcement family in Miami, the way new technology figures in their work, and much more. For more filmmakers and comedians talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse Film at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast.
Mar 05, 2020
Maria Bamford with Chris Gethard
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, there’s a meeting of kindred spirits as Maria Bamford sits down with fellow stand-up Chris Gethard. Bamford and Gethard are both famous for having put their own mental health struggles at the center of their comedy, and Bamford’s new Topic show, What’s Your Ailment?, is a series of in-depth discussions with other comedians about depression, addiction and the like. Unsurprisingly, the two swap stories about meds and therapists, but also share their fantasies of quitting comedy (and what other jobs they dream of doing), debate the relative merits of different hotel franchises, and dish on social media attacks, how to deal with hecklers, and much, much more. For more filmmakers and comedians talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse Film at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast.
Feb 27, 2020
Robbie Robertson (The Band) with M.C. Taylor (Hiss Golden Messenger)
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Robbie Robertson is a songwriter and guitarist who redefined American music with The Band, redefined what a concert film could be with The Last Waltz, and redefined movie soundtracks via his scoring of critical Martin Scorsese films like Raging Bull, The King of Comedy, and, most recently, The Irishman. To celebrate the release of the new documentary Once Were Brothers: Robbie Robertson and The Band, Robbie sat down for an incredible Talkhouse conversation with an artist at Americana's vanguard, M.C. Taylor, AKA Hiss Golden Messenger. The guys chop it up on some truly incredible stories, including (but by no means limited to!) Robbie's touring with Bob Dylan, working with Martin Scorsese, and corresponding with the brilliant classical composer Krzysztof Penderecki. Their talk also takes in the meaning and process of songwriting, Levon Helm absolutely hating country music, and Robbie’s “incredible jukebox in the sky." Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast, including upcoming episodes with authors George Saunders and Dana Spiotta, filmmakers Olivier Assayas and Kelly Reichardt, and musicians A.C. Newman (The New Pornographers) and Post Animal. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today's episode is brought to you by Current.com. It was recorded in North Carolina by M.C. Taylor, in Los Angeles at Village Studios by Karl Wingate, and in Brooklyn at Hook and Fade Studios by our co-producer Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com
Feb 20, 2020
Judd Apatow with David Duchovny
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Today's episode is produced in collaboration with Murmrr Ballroom and Community Bookstore.  Judd Apatow and David Duchovny absolutely adored their friend and collaborator Garry Shandling. Since Garry's death in 2016, Judd has been memorializing the game-changing comedian, first with his HBO documentary The Zen Diaries of Garry Shandling, and more recently through the book, It's Garry Shandling's Book, comprised of journal entries, photos, and contributions from peers. To celebrate Garry's life via the book's release late last year, Judd and David sat down at a sold-out Murmrr Ballroom to share some heartfelt and hilarious stories, and to answer audience questions.  In this very special episode, tune in for tales of boxing and meditating with Garry; on-set shenanigans; wild times at his famous Hollywood basketball games with the likes of Adam Sandler, George Clooney, and Brad Pitt; and so much more.  Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast, including upcoming episodes with George Saunders and Dana Spiotta (another Murmrr Lit collaboration), the New Pornographer’s AC Newman and Post Animal, Robbie Robertson of The Band and Hiss Golden Messenger, and filmmakers Olivier Assayas and Kelly Reichardt.  —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer  Huge thanks to Brian Kelly and all at Murmrr, and to Community Bookstore in Park Slope, Brooklyn. Today’s show was recorded in Brooklyn by Justin Hrabvosky and our co-producer Mark Yoshizumi, at Murmrr and Hook and Fade Studios.  The Talkhouse Podcast theme song was composed and performed by The Range.  Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com
Feb 13, 2020
Michael Shannon with Jason Narducy
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Michael Shannon (Knives Out, The Shape Of Water) and Jason Narducy (Superchunk, Bob Mould) met while playing in a Lou Reed cover band put together by Robbie Fulks, and their friendship has only gotten more interesting from there.  On the occasion of the new musical Verböten — which tells the story of Jason’s real-life punk band that formed when he was just 11 years old — opening at Chicago's Chopin Theatre, the old friends sat down for a wonderful conversation.   Tune in for insider stories of Michael's newest film Knives Out, Jason's journey to seeing Verböten through to curtain, hangs with The Pretenders' Chrissie Hynde, and so much more. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast, including upcoming episodes with Judd Apatow and David Duchovny, The New Pornographer's AC Newman and Post Animal, and Robbie Robertson of The Band and Hiss Golden Messenger.  —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer   Today's show was recorded in Chicago by Stephen Shirk at Shirk Studios, and in Brooklyn by our co-producer Mark Yoshizumi at Hook and Fade Studios.   The Talkhouse Podcast theme song was composed and performed by The Range.   Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol, and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com  
Feb 06, 2020
Revisited: Steve Albini with Jerry Casale (Devo)
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This week on the show, we revisit a fan-favorite episode: legendary producer and musician Steve Albini, and the game-changing Devo's Jerry Casale. Enjoy! The Talkhouse Podcast recently headed out to the fantastic Desert Daze festival at Moreno Beach at Lake Perris in Southern California. When we weren't catching sets by Tame Impala, King Gizzard, and My Bloody Valentine, we recorded a trio of great talks; this week, we present the first. When I saw that both Steve Albini and Devo's Jerry Casale were going to be at Desert Daze giving talks, I knew we had to pair these two icons of alternative music. They're big fans of each other's work, and halfway through their conversation, Steve said, “This is the sort of stuff no one ever talks about. These are the questions I’ve had for 30 years.” Their fascinating talk takes in the beginning years of Devo’s existence; their complex relationship with Neil Young; Brian Eno’s proclivity for ménage à trois; the differences between poker and making records; and how the name Devo became a category alongside jocks, squares and nerds. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. Feel free to DM me to let me know which artist(s) you’d love to see appear on a future episode. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer  This episode was recorded by Keenan Kush at Desert Daze, and by Mark Yoshizumi at Hook & Fade Studios in Brooklyn. It was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Big thanks to Desert Daze for hosting the Talkhouse Podcast. Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol, and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com
Jan 30, 2020
Juliana Harkavy with Ryan Hurst
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, we feature the second of our talks recorded live at last year’s LA Comic Con. Though the pairing of actors Juliana Harkavy (aka Black Canary on Arrow) and Ryan Hurst (best known as Opie on Sons of Anarchy) came together at the last minute, the two clicked instantly, helped by their joint love of dogs (Ryan has 12 and is a dog trainer!) and the fact that both of them have acted on The Walking Dead. As well as swapping stories about eating lunch with zombies, the two discuss the bliss of sky-diving (which Ryan has done about 1000 times), their (sometimes embarrassing) early acting experiences, Ryan shares a hilarious Marlon Brando story, and Juliana teases a possible sideways career move into music. For more filmmakers on film, go to talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. Today’s show was recorded at LA Comic Con by Ali Nikou, and at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn by our co-producer Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Jan 23, 2020
Dev Hynes (Blood Orange) with Beverly Glenn-Copeland
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Devonté Hynes, aka Blood Orange, had an incredible 2019. He dropped the mixtape Angel's Pulse; scored the critically acclaimed film Queen and Slim; released a classical album with Third Coast Percussion; directed a music video for Beck; and, as a fan, finally saw the brilliant composer/vocalist Beverly Glenn-Copeland live. Glenn-Copeland (as he prefers to go by in his day-to-day life) had his own amazing year: At the age of 74, he had his first international tour, released the new LP Primal Prayer, and saw his previously obscure, decade-spanning seven album catalog finally embraced in music communities around the world. And he met Dev, whose music he adores. We introduced Dev and Glenn right here on the Talkhouse Podcast, and the ensuing convo was warm, vulnerable, funny, and potent. The two sat on a sofa at Hook and Fade Studio in Brooklyn, and instantly formed a world all their own; they stared into each other's eyes, and spoke so softly that it was difficult to hear them from even a few feet away. In their wide-ranging conversation, Glenn and Dev discuss discovering parts of themselves by traveling out of their home countries; the way they each approach their songwriting; and the story behind Glenn’s seminal 1986 album Keyboard Fantasies. We also learn the importance of nature and its role in their music; how recently Dev began to honor music as the foundation of all his creativity; and the trick Glenn’s mother used to make him a musician while still in utero. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer @eliaeinhorn Today's show was engineered and co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. Additional editing by Katie Lau. Research by Reese Higgins. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Please direct all podcast-related ideas, vitriol, and compliments to elia@thetalkhouse.com
Jan 16, 2020
Suzi Quatro with Donita Sparks (L7)
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Suzi Quatro and L7's Donita Sparks are iconic rockers who have each paved the way for generations of women in music. And on today's show — for the first time ever — they meet! To celebrate the theatrical release of the documentary Suzi Q, which Donita appears in, as well as the L7 doc L7: Pretend We're Dead and new LP Scatter The Rats, the two chop it up in a wide-ranging, rapid fire convo. They talk refusing to "do gender" when it comes to their music, while also knowing when to pull what they call the “female card” and charge a “pussy premium” for their work. We also hear about Suzi's astrological studies; Donita’s time-travel crush; Suzi’s life mantra — in lyrics — and what she's gonna do to get ready when it comes time for her to kick the bucket. Today's show was recorded at Elevate Studios in Hamburg by Jan Strehl, in Los Angeles by Ali Nikou, and at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn by Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Jan 09, 2020
Damien Jurado with Nick Thune
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, singer-songwriter Damien Jurado and standup comedian and actor Nick Thune sit down together in advance of their upcoming joint “Sad Music, Sad Comedy” tour, which is hitting the East Coast this January. The two became friends after the passing in 2018 of their mutual friend, producer and musician Richard Swift, who both Nick and Damien made records with. As well as swapping stories about Swift, the two discuss how Swift’s death pushed Nick to get sober, how comedians want to be musicians (and vice versa), Nick teaching his kid manipulative behavior so he can excel at Made You Look and how Damien discovered the Beatles in his forties, plus they set the ground rules for their tour – Cracker Barrel, look out! For more filmmakers and musicians in conversation, subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. Today’s show was recorded at Bedrock.LA by Eric Rennaker and at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn by our co-producer Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Jan 02, 2020
The Best Moments of the Talkhouse Podcast (2019)
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What a FOOKIN' TRULY RAD YEAR it's been here at the Talkhouse Podcast! Thx for being on this wild ride with us! As we hurtle towards 2020, I've been doing a bit of year-end tallying; can I share just a few stats with you? Please? Ok, thx. We released a whopping FORTY NINE new episodes in 2019. (WHO DOES THAT?! WHAT WERE WE THINKING?!) This year we featured artists like Brian Wilson, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Tierra Whack, Harmony Korine, Chelsea Peretti, Portugal. The Man, Fred Armisen, Shabazz Palaces, Nikki Glaser, Drew Carey, Chris Redd, The Flaming Lips, Robert Glasper, Snail Mail, The Magnetic Fields, Animal Collective, Karen O, Tim Heidecker, Kate Nash, Karen Gillan, Jon Cryer, and Ariel Pink, plus so many more greats. The Talkhouse Podcast held live tapings from LA Comic Con to Rough Trade NYC, with stops at SXSW in Austin, both Tomorrow Never Knows and Pitchfork x The Art Institute of Chicago's Midwinter in Chi, Life Is Beautiful in Las Vegas, and loads more. Oh, and did you see the videos from our time at FORM Fest in Arcosanti, Az?? They're gorgeous! We celebrate 2019 on the show this week with a roundtable of Talkhouse's editorial team looking back on some of our fave moments from the show this year. Enjoy, and happiest of holiday seasons to you! Can't wait to share the incredible episodes we've already got in store for you next year. xoxo Elia Today’s show was recorded at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn by our co-producer Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Dec 19, 2019
Revisited: Ariel Pink with Cate Le Bon
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Dearest Talkhousers! As we near the end of an incredible year at the Talkhouse Podcast, we wanted to re-air one of our fan fave episodes: Cate Le Bon in conversation with Ariel Pink. Make sure to tune in next week for the Talkhouse Podcast Best of 2019 all-star bonanza show! Sending posi-core choose-your-own-holiday vibez, Elia  ******* To celebrate Mexican Summer’s ten year anniversary, we paired two of the fantastic record label’s most fascinating artists: Ariel Pink and Cate Le Bon. Backstage at A Decade Deeper: Mexican Summer’s 10 Year Anniversary party at Brooklyn’s Pioneer Works arts space, Cate and Ariel—fans of each other’s work who'd never met irl—sat down for a talk before their sets. The two really hit it off, and their wide-ranging conversation takes in a lot: the deep flaws they see in the way music press works; Ariel not always working well with others; and the difficult genesis of Cate’s upcoming LP. Ariel also talks about his favorite site on the internet, and Cate divulges the, um, very weird act she was asked to perform for a shoot. Check it out. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. Big thanks to Justin Frye and Pioneer Works for hosting this taping. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Dec 12, 2019
Chelsea Peretti with Will Schwartz (Imperial Teen)
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Comedian Chelsea Peretti and Imperial Teen's Will Schwartz are working on a secret collaboration. Well it was secret, that is, until they sat down together for this week's podcast! Tune in to hear about their upcoming musical project, Will's wild connection to the Clinton impeachment scandal, Chelsea dishing on her and hubby Jordan Peele's complicated (and hilarious) relationship with ordering in, and “the trick to singing good.” Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s show was recorded at Bedrock.LA by Eric Rennaker and at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn by our co-producer Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Dec 05, 2019
Portugal. The Man with Fred Armisen and Chris Redd
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We announced this surprise Talkhouse Podcast live episode at Life is Beautiful less than 45 minutes before it started. But by the time the venue where we were recording opened its doors, an impossible line snaked through rows of metal dividers, down the block, and out of sight around the corner. How could it not be a standing-room-only situation, though, when the artists on stage were Fred Armisen, Chris Redd, and Portugal. The Man??? Over the next 50 minutes, in convo and Q&A, the guys hilariously tackled impersonating the arpeggiator on a synthesizer; shared the secrets to continuously reinventing their art; and spilled tea on mind-blowing Saturday Night Live moments as well as PTM's most epic onstage meltdown. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Thanks so much to Life is Beautiful for hosting the Talkhouse Podcast! Today’s show was recorded at Life is Beautiful by Logan Shields and Mark Yoshizumi, and in NYC by our co-producer Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Nov 21, 2019
Felicia Day with Jonah Ray
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, friends and Mystery Science Theater 3000: The Return co-stars Felicia Day and Jonah Ray sit down for a live on-stage conversation at LA Comic Con to find out all the stuff they realize they don’t actually know about one another! The two are inveterate multi-hyphenates – Day is an actress (from Buffy the Vampire Slayer to Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along Blog to Supernatural), web video creator (most famously of The Guild) and best-selling author (most recently of Embrace Your Weird) and Ray is a stand-up comedian, podcast host, TV host (Hidden America with Jonah Ray) and writer-director – so there’s no shortage of topics to dive into. In their wide-ranging talk, the two discuss everything from their plan Bs (if showbiz fails), Jonah’s planned indie movie about his Hawaii upbringing (which Bobcat Goldthwait is helping him with!), Felicia’s permissive, poop-friendly parenting approach, early bedtimes, accidentally ripping off Fleabag, and much, much more. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse Film at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast.
Nov 14, 2019
Shannon Shaw (Shannon and The Clams) with Calvin Langman (The Happy Fits)
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On this week's show, we share a talk that took place as a fans-only live taping at Rough Trade NYC last year. Curated by Talkhouse intern Lauren McGrath, the episode sees Shannon Shaw of Shannon And The Clams and Hunx and his Punx chop it up with Happy Fits' singer/cellist Calvin Langman. Their revealing backstage convo takes in the time Shannon met Andre 3000; Calvin’s experience having his very first single blow up on Spotify; recording with The Black Keys' Dan Auerbach; and even Shannon's job working at a mental institution for the criminally insane. Check it out, and catch Shannon and The Clams on tour with the Black Keys through November: all dates @ http://shannonandtheclams.com/ This episode was recorded and co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. Our theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Big thanks to Jill Wheeler and Rough Trade NYC for hosting us!
Nov 07, 2019
CHAI with Stef Smith (Varsity)
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For our fifth consecutive year there, the Talkhouse Podcast crew flew out to the fantastic Pitchfork Music Festival in Chicago this past July to record artists in conversation backstage. Over the years, this series has featured talks between Brian Wilson & Carly Rae Jepsen, Frankie Cosmos & Vagabon, Priests with LCD Soundsystem's Tyler Pope, and many more. This week’s show is our second from the fest this year (the first was Tasha & Lillie West of Lala Lala), and it's Talkhouse's first ever bilingual conversation! In this episode, all four members of Nagoya, Japan's CHAI — whose "neo-kawaii" post-punk-pop record Punk is one of our favorites of the year — talk to Stef Smith from the stellar Chicago-based indie pop band Varsity. With the help of CHAI's translator Rena, they chat about what it’s like touring in a country where you don’t speak the language (and how that’s actually been a good thing for CHAI when it comes to getting interviewed); the real, unexpected danger of being interviewed by Nardwuar; and why dogs make such great musical inspiration. They also cover where to find the best deep dish in Chicago — controversial! — and the food Nagoya is famous for. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast! —Annie Fell, Talkhouse Senior Editor This episode was recorded by Joe Darnaby and Mark Yoshizumi, and co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi, Annie Fell, and Elia Einhorn. Our theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Big thanks to Pitchfork Music Festival for hosting Talkhouse!
Oct 31, 2019
Lee Ranaldo (Sonic Youth) with Ian Williams (Battles)
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Last month, Ian Williams (Battles) and Lee Ranaldo (Sonic Youth) chopped it up in front of a fully packed house at the grand opening of Everlane's flagship store in Williamsburg for a live taping of the Talkhouse Podcast. The experimental guitar legends shared the unusual processes of making their new LPs (Battles' Juice B. Crypts came out last week, and Lee's drops early next year). Their talk also takes in Sonic Youth's versus Wilco's insane touring guitar collections; how a chance encounter with Les Savy Fav led to the first ever Battles show; the cross-genre pollination of 1980s New York; and their thoughts on recently departed icons Ric Ocasek of The Cars and Daniel Johnston. Stay tuned after the talk for an audience Q&A with Lee, Ian, and myself. Links galore: If you enjoy this episode, keep an eye peeled for the wonderful Consequence of Sound podcast This Must Be The Gig's upcoming show featuring Lee Renaldo and his collaborator Raül Refree; I attended the live taping in New York and just loved it. You can also check out past Talkhouse Podcast episodes featuring Battles' Juice B. Crypts collaborators Xenia Rubinos, Tune-Yards, and Shabazz Palaces. And finally, here's Lee and Ian's first meeting on the show from back in 2016. Today's show was recorded by Stephan Kimbel Olson and Mark Yoshizumi at Everlane, and at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn by our co-producer Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Oct 24, 2019
Joseph Gordon-Levitt with Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh
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Ever bring your family to Burning Man? Sorry, let me back up. A bit of context: The Talkhouse Podcast spent a fantastic weekend in Las Vegas last month at Life Is Beautiful Music and Art Festival. We put on two live Talkhouse tapings as part of their comedy lineup: Nikki Glaser x Bachelor Nation superstar Kaitlyn Bristowe, and Fred Armisen x Chris Redd x Portugal. The Man (which'll be released as a podcast soon). We also hosted a live talk under the fest's Ideas banner, featuring legendary entrepreneur Tony Hsieh (CEO of Zappos) and Joseph Gordon-Levitt (insanely famous actor, founder of HitRecord). The two friends take a heady dive into the question of what collaboration will look like in the future. Along the way we hear about parallels between artistic and entrepreneurial creativity; how the '80s show MacGyver shaped Tony's business philosophy; and, yep, taking your family to Burning Man. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer @eliaeinhorn Today’s show was recorded at Life Is Beautiful by Logan Shields and Mark Yoshizumi, and at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn by our co-producer Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Oct 17, 2019
Pete Yorn with Jackson Phillips (Day Wave)
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Singer/songwriter Pete Yorn knows how to pick collaborators — he's worked with The Pixies' Frank Black, Scarlett Johansson, and REM's Peter Buck to name just a few greats. When he and Day Wave's Jackson Phillips began making music together, Yorn knew he'd found the right co-pilot for a new musical undertaking. To celebrate Yorn's new LP Caretakers, co-produced by him and Phillips, the two sat down for a deep dive on the Talkhouse Podcast. They examine the benefits and drawbacks of a musical education; discuss the pluses and minuses of working in both small and big recording studio; and take in how hearing The Cure & The Smiths changed the course of Yorn's life. Check it out, and subscribe to the Talkhouse Podcast to catch upcoming episodes featuring Portugal. The Man with SNL's Chris Redd and Fred Armisen, Lee Ranaldo (Sonic Youth) with Battles' Ian Williams, and CHAI in convo with Varsity. Today’s show was recorded in New York by Dan Arnes and Mark Yoshizumi. It was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Oct 10, 2019
Nikki Glaser with Kaitlyn Bristowe
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What's uuuuuuup!! Dearest listeners, the Talkhouse Podcast team is back from Life Is Beautiful Fest in Las Vegas and we can definitively report that it totally. fookin'. RULES! We saw Billie Eilish start five separate mosh pits; watched famous DJs spin to a rooftop pool full of three-drinks-in, beach-ball-tossing, all-gender hotties at 1:00 in the afternoon; made it rain on 11th Street Records picking up rare original-pressing Smiths 12"s; and danced like fools down strobe-lit alleyways soundtracked by blasting synth-drenched four on the floor. (Fine, I'll admit that those last two were just me...) Oh, yeah, and we also put on three live Talkhouse Podcast events! For the Life Is Beautiful Comedy series, we paired SNL's Chris Redd, Fred Armisen, and Portugal. The Man, then comedian Nikki Glaser with Bachelor Nation mega-star Kaitlyn Bristowe. And as part of the Life Is Beautiful Ideas vertical, we brought together actor Joseph Gordon-Levitt with Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh. This week we share Nikki and Kaitlyn's HILARIOUS talk. Tune in for Kaitlyn spilling tea on Ashley I and Jared's wedding, Nick Vial, JJ Lane, and her beef with The Bachelor creator Mike Fleis. Nikki tells us which Bachelor she's dying to get with, how her stint on Dancing With The Stars left her a wreck, and about her brilliant just-dropped new Netflix special Bangin'. And of course, with these two, we hear all about the benefits of getting tied up in bed; why men should “explore their assholes;” and dating bisexuals. Plus, Nikki changes Kaitlyn’s life by teaching her how to fart silently. Our special guest co-host for this episode is Liam Mathews, co-host of A Beautiful Podcast to Fall in Love, TV Guide’s unofficial Bachelor Nation podcast. Check it out! Today’s show was recorded at Life Is Beautiful by Logan Shields and Mark Yoshizumi, and at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn by our co-producer Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Oct 08, 2019
Drew Carey with Palmyra Delran
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Did you have any idea that Drew Carey is a deep music nerd??? Yeah, that Drew Carey, the one from The Drew Carey Show, Who’s Line Is It Anyway, and The Price Is Right. Did you realize that he hosts a show called Friday Night Freak Out on Little Stevie’s Underground Garage Sirius XM radio station? He does, and it gets wonderfully weird. Drew sat down with legendary Philly musician — and fellow Underground Garage DJ — Palmyra Delran (The Friggs, The Coolies) for a fun trip down the musical rabbit hole. The two chop it up on Drew’s history playing in polka bands; the culture clash that occurred when Palmyra hired a classical cellist for a session; meeting Dick Clark, Brian Wilson, and a couple of Beatles; and so much more. Check it out! Today’s show was recorded by Eric Rennaker at Bedrock.LA in Los Angeles, and Mark Yoshizumi at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn. It was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Oct 03, 2019
Revisited: Jaboukie Young-White with The Drums
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The Talkhouse team just returned back from Life is Beautiful 2019 with an amazing group of talks. This week we revisit one of our favorite conversations recorded out at last year's Life is Beautiful festival. Subscribe today to keep up to date with future Talkhouse Podcasts. In September, the Talkhouse Podcast squad rolled out to Las Vegas for Life is Beautiful Music and Arts Festival. In between performances from Talkhouse faves A$AP Ferg, CHVRCHES, and Death Cab For Cutie, we recorded some epic convos for the show. Comedian Jaboukie Young-White (The Daily Show, American Vandal) and indiepop legends The Drums’ Jonny Pierce are whip-smart queer artists who have intricately bound together their work and sexuality. Backstage at the fest, they and newer Drums' member Bryan de Leon dissected what exactly it means to be a "queer artist." Their talk takes in coming out through one’s art, "conveniently Christian homophobes," Balenciaga daddies, and how the world needs a gay Shrek. Oh, and Bryan also got Jaboukie to give some inside scoop on American Vandal season two... Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. Feel free to DM me to let me know which artist(s) you’d love to see appear on a future episode. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer @eliaeinhorn This episode was recorded by Mark Yoshizumi at Life is Beautiful, and at Hook & Fade Studios in Brooklyn. It was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Big thanks to Life Is Beautiful for hosting the Talkhouse Podcast.
Sep 26, 2019
Devendra Banhart with Alison Mosshart
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Alison Mosshart (The Kills, The Dead Weather) has been painting with remote control cars; Devendra Banhart's been obsessively pondering Christian Slater's '89 skater flick Gleaming The Cube. To celebrate Alison's new art book about cars — Car Ma — and Devendra's LP Ma, the two got together over salted egg brainless shrimp heads to discuss the above as well as skateboarding as a gateway drug to dope music, the multi-hyphenate magic of Captain Beefheart, how Guns N' Roses' November Rain video shaped Devendra's idea of Americans, and so much more. Check it out! Today’s show was recorded by Michael Harris at Electro-Vox Studios in Los Angeles, and Mark Yoshizumi at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn. It was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Sep 19, 2019
Brian Wilson with The Zombies
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Brian Wilson and The Zombies are touring together!!! I repeat, head Beach Boy Brian Wilson and recent Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inductees The Zombies are touring America together right now! To celebrate these legendary artists sharing the stage, we got 'em together at the first gig of the run for a Talkhouse Podcast conversation. The Zombies’ songwriter/keyboardist Rod Argent and singer Colin Blunstone roundtable some wonderful ideas with Wilson, fellow Beach Boys founder Al Jardine, 1970s Beach Boys addition Blondie Chaplin (who also plays with The Rolling Stones), and Darian Sahanaja, who’s played with Brian for two decades and was key in the making of the fantastic Smile LP. Their talk takes in the early days of The Beach Boys and The Zombies, and the bands' love of each other's music; challenges in playing songs you haven’t played in 50 years; recording Friends in Brian’s living room; and "balls out" Hammond B3 organ that'd make Argent proud. Check it out, and stay tuned after the featured conversation for clips of our favorite Brian Wilson and Zombies appearances on the show from 2016, including Brian and Carly Rae Jepsen in a "one-question wonder" chat from Pitchfork Music Festival, and The Zombies chatting with Hollis Brown at the Samsung store in NYC. Catch Brian Wilson and The Zombies on tour: 9/12: Los Angeles, CA — Greek Theatre 9/13: Oakland, CA — Fox Theater 9/16: Seattle, WA — Paramount Theatre 9/17: Portland, OR — Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall 9/19: Sandy, UT — Sandy Amphitheater 9/20: Denver, CO — Paramount Theatre 9/22: Milwaukee, WI — The Riverside Theater 9/23: Cincinnati, OH — Taft Theatre 9/24: Detroit, MI — Masonic Temple 9/26: New York, NY — Beacon Theatre 9/27: Waterbury, CT — Palace Theater 9/28: Upper Darby, PA — Tower Theater Today's show was recorded by Malcolm Harrison of National Southwestern in Las Vegas, and Mark Yoshizumi at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn. It was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Sep 12, 2019
Chris Gethard with Mal Blum
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As I learned from today's episode, comedian Chris Gethard and singer-songwriter Mal Blum are "self-deprecating sad boys from Jersey" who are attracted to “erratic or controlling people who will blow your life up.” What I already knew going in is that the two are old friends, occasional collaborators, and incredibly talented at their art. Gethard and Blum joined us on the Talkhouse Podcast to celebrate the release of Blum's excellent new LP Pity Boy, and their conversation is predictably openhearted, neurotic, and fucking hilarious. Tune in to hear them consider going to a Love Addicts 12-step meeting, share their writing processes (Gethard even opens up his joke notebook and shares some new ideas!), unpack Mal's lack of boundaries, and learn why Gethard wants to wind up his career. Today’s episode was co-produced and recorded by Mark Yoshizumi. It was cut at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn. Research assistance was provided by Madalyn Feltus. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range. With this week's episode, Chris Gethard has joined the (sort of) rare and (moderately) coveted Talkhouse Podcast Hat Trick Club! Check out his previous appearances, talking with Todd Barry and Tim Heidecker.
Sep 05, 2019
Trevor de Brauw (Pelican) and Nate Kinsella (American Football, Joan of Arc)
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Our latest installment of the Talkhouse Podcast at FORM Fest 2019 is a love letter to Chicago's post-rock, punk and emo scenes from the '00s to today. Windy City music legends — and old friends — Trevor de Brauw (Pelican, RLYR, TUSK) and Nate Kinsella (American Football, Joan of Arc, Make Believe) caught up backstage for a warm and hilarious convo, as well as a rad improvised ambient musical collaboration. The guys' talk takes in a lot: playing in bands with family members; having your musician father hate on your experimental work; and balancing parenthood and tour life. Oh and, of course: tone clusters, alternate tunings, death metal, and odd time signatures. This Talkhouse Podcast episode was recorded in the Conservatory backstage at FORM Fest in Arcosanti, Arizona. Pulp Arts and Patreon teamed up to co-present The Conservatory, a dope backstage visual arts installation and recording studio. Talkhouse recorded six episodes there throughout the weekend. You can also check out the other episodes in this series, including Snail Mail with Fred Armisen & Mary Lynn Rajskub, Robert Glasper & Vieux Farka Touré with special guest Lonnie Holley, Julianna Barwick & Mary Lattimore, and Kelsey Lu with Yrsa Daley-Ward. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer @eliaeinhorn Today’s episode was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. It was recorded at FORM Festival in Arcosanti, Arizona, and at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn by Mark Yoshizumi, Danny Clifton, and Ian Jones. Research assistance was provided by Madalyn Feltus. The performance includes Trevor de Brauw on guitar and Nate Kinsella playing the drums. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Aug 29, 2019
Lulu Wang with Ruben Östlund
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, Lulu Wang — writer-director of the summer indie hit The Farewell — chats with one of her favorite directors, Ruben Östlund, the award-winning Swedish director of such acclaimed films as The Square and Force Majeure. Talking from New York City and Gothenburg, respectively, the two filmmakers have a profound and highly entertaining conversation that touches on everything from the crucial role cinema plays in society and the importance of making films from lived experience, to how the internet turns us into shitty people and what Lulu and her boyfriend Barry Jenkins watch when they just want to relax. Special thanks to Katey Rich from Vanity Fair for collaborating on this special conversation, and for joining us on the podcast. Check out today's episode of Vanity Fair's awards podcast Little Gold Men for more from Lulu and Ruben. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse Film at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast.
Aug 22, 2019
Tasha with Lillie West (Lala Lala)
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For our fifth consecutive year there, the Talkhouse Podcast squad rolled out to the fantastic Pitchfork Music Festival in Chicago last month to record artists in conversation backstage. Over the years, this series has featured talks between Brian Wilson & Carly Rae Jepsen, Kamasi Washington & Thundercat, HAIM and Chvrches, and many more. This week's show features two young Chicago singer-songwriters who are both blowing up fast: Tasha and Lala Lala's Lillie West. The two chopped it up on how much they're learning all the time as their careers explode (including adjusting to having teams working around them); dealing with impostor syndrome; and the perils of making jokes onstage. Their talk also took in Jack White's technophobia, the pluses and minuses of freeing the nipple onstage, and Marie Kondo-ing your Instagram. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. — Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer This episode was recorded by Joe Darnaby and Mark Yoshizumi, and co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi, Annie Fell, and Elia Einhorn. Big thanks to Pitchfork Music Festival for hosting Talkhouse.
Aug 15, 2019
Craig Finn, Peter Katis, and Katie Harkin talk Frightened Rabbit
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In honor of the release of Tiny Changes: A Celebration of Frightened Rabbit’s ‘The Midnight Organ Fight’, Talkhouse paired three notable Frightened Rabbit collaborators and friends for a live conversation at Rough Trade NYC. Craig Finn (The Hold Steady), Katie Harkin (Sleater-Kinney, HARKIN), and Grammy-winning producer Peter Katis joined Talkhouse’s Executive Editor Josh Modell — a friend and fan of the band — to share favorite stories about the making of The Midnight Organ Fight, and Scott Hutchison’s life and legacy. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode was produced by Mark Yoshizumi, Josh Modell, and Elia Einhorn. It was recorded at Rough Trade NYC, and at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn by Mark Yoshizumi. Front of house engineering at Rough Trade was by Alex Payne. Research assistance was provided by Madalyn Feltus. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Aug 08, 2019
Yrsa Daley-Ward with Kelsey Lu
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Our latest installment of the Talkhouse Podcast at FORM Fest 2019 pairs the brilliant poet/actress Yrsa Daley-Ward with avant-pop singer/songwriter/cellist Kelsey Lu in powerful conversation and musical collaboration. Their talk takes in a lot, including just how much effort is the right amount to put into a piece of art; how to make spaces your own when on the road; and how important the right clothes and hair are to each of their attitudes. They also touch on what it’s like to date a taurus (comfy!), and the devilish fun of writing disco revenge tracks. This Talkhouse Podcast episode was recorded in the Conservatory backstage at FORM Fest in Arcosanti, Arizona. Pulp Arts and Patreon teamed up to co-present The Conservatory, a rad backstage visual arts installation and recording studio. Talkhouse recorded six episodes there throughout the weekend, so subscribe to make sure to catch upcoming shows, including: — American Football & Pelican — L’Rain & Melanie Faye You can also check out the first three episodes in this series, including Snail Mail with Fred Armisen & Mary Lynn Rajskub, Robert Glasper & Vieux Farka Touré with special guest Lonnie Holley, and Julianna Barwick & Mary Lattimore. For their performance, Lu and Daley-Ward are joined by Max André Rademacher. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. It was recorded at FORM Festival in Arcosanti, Arizona, and at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn by Mark Yoshizumi, Danny Clifton and Ian Jones. Research assistance was provided by Madalyn Feltus. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Aug 01, 2019
Butch Vig with Brian Aubert (Silversun Pickups)
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For today’s show, legendary record producer and Garbage drummer Butch Vig and Silversun Pickups frontman Brian Aubert sat down for some deep musical shop talk. The occasion was the release of Widow’s Weeds, the new album by Silversun Pickups that Vig produced. Their convo takes in the nitty gritty of writing, recording, doing press, and touring. To that end, we hear about: a German journalist being a bit too honest; Butch’s psychic connection with his crack engineer; Brian’s reason for having lots of guests in studio; advice on how to keep your band together for the long haul; and so much more. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. It was recorded in LA by Butch Vig (yes, that Butch Vig), and at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn by Mark Yoshizumi. Research assistance was provided by Madalyn Feltus. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Jul 25, 2019
Julianna Barwick with Mary Lattimore
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Julianna Barwick and Mary Lattimore are two of ambient music's most brilliant artists working today. On our third Talkhouse Podcast episode recorded backstage at FORM Fest, the two sit down for an in-depth conversation, as well as a wonderful improvised musical collaboration. Their talk takes in a lot, including making up stories about your art for the press; creating a 24-hour long score; hanging with an oracle friend of Grouper’s; and a “dead corpse” putting babies to sleep. This Talkhouse Podcast — and video of the performance element of today's show — was recorded in the Conservatory backstage at FORM Fest in Arcosanti, Arizona. Pulp Arts and Patreon teamed up to co-present The Conservatory, a rad backstage visual arts installation and recording studio. Talkhouse recorded six episodes there throughout the weekend, so subscribe to make sure to catch upcoming shows, including: — Kelsey Lu & Yrsa Daley-Ward — American Football & Pelican — L’Rain & Melanie Faye You can also check out the first two episodes in the series, including Snail Mail with Fred Armisen & Mary Lynn Rajskub, and Robert Glasper & Vieux Farka Touré with special guest Lonnie Holley. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. It was recorded at FORM Festival in Arcosanti, Arizona, and at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn by Mark Yoshizumi, Danny Clifton and Ian Jones. Research assistance was provided by Madalyn Feltus. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Jul 18, 2019
Wayne Coyne with Sean Lennon and Les Claypool
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Ahead of their much-anticipated upcoming US co-tour, the Flaming Lips' Wayne Coyne and The Claypool Lennon Delirium's Les Claypool and Sean Lennon catch up on the Talkhouse Podcast. The three legends have known each other for years, and they get into a lot here, including: how Wayne comes up with new ideas for the Lips' incredible stage visuals; CLD playing to pachyderms; life lessons they've learned from Butthole Surfers, Bootsy Collins, and Mike Watt; and having the best New Years Eve ever... every night. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. It was recorded in Sacramento, California at Ace of Spades by Matthew Maxwell, at Wayne's Oklahoma City, Oklahoma studio by Michael Ivins, and at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn by Mark Yoshizumi. Research assistance was provided by Madalyn Feltus. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Jul 11, 2019
Fred Armisen and Mary Lynn Rajskub with Lindsey Jordan (Snail Mail)
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BREAKING NEWS! Indie rock it-band Snail Mail has an all-new lineup! Don't worry, Lindsey Jordan is still there — only now, so is Fred Armisen and comedian Mary Lynn Rajskub (24, It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia). On our second Talkhouse Podcast episode recorded backstage at the wonderful FORM Fest, the three form a group on the spot, then, with instruments in hand, improvise songs about: How they’re actually the new Snail Mail lineup; Chef Boyardee; Neil Young; "lemon squares that Mommy made"; Jesus’ selective saving tendencies (that one's titled called “Here Comes The Son”), and loads more. We also witness spoofs of Queen and Beyonce; hear thoughts on fergiepeepants.jpg; learn about foot fetishists and Wikifeet; take in some sarcastic breakdancing; consider gentle piss modulators; and find out why Mary Lynn is convinced Lindsey needs to get pregnant immediately. This Talkhouse Podcast and video was recorded in the Conservatory backstage at FORM Fest in Arcosanti, Arizona. Pulp Arts and Patreon teamed up to co-present The Conservatory, a rad backstage visual arts installation and recording studio. Talkhouse recorded six episodes there throughout the weekend, so subscribe to make sure to catch upcoming shows, including: — Kelsey Lu & Yrsa Daley-Ward — Julianna Barwick & Mary Lattimore — American Football & Pelican — L’Rain & Melanie Faye You can also check out the just-released first episode from the fest, featuring jazz and hip hop legend Robert Glasper with a giant of African music, Malian guitarist Vieux Farka Touré, plus an appearance by Lonnie Holley. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. It was recorded at FORM Festival in Arcosanti, Arizona, and at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn by Mark Yoshizumi, Danny Clifton and Ian Jones. Research assistance was provided by Madalyn Feltus. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Jul 09, 2019
Revisited: Robin Pecknold (Fleet Foxes) with Nilüfer Yanya & Dev Hynes (Blood Orange) with Raphael Saadiq
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With Pitchfork Music Festival 2019 closely approaching, we thought we'd highlight this double feature from last year's fest. Happy holidays!   Welcome to this week’s bumper double feature of a show! We’re thrilled to bring you two fantastic conversations recorded backstage at Pitchfork Music Festival 2018: a short chat between Fleet Foxes main-man Robin Pecknold and Nilüfer Yanya, and a deep dive between Dev Hynes—aka Blood Orange—and super-producer Raphael Saadiq. PLUS we’ve got a brand new theme song created just for us by one of our favorite artists, The Range! Tune in to hear firsthand accounts of Solange‘s impromptu shopping trips, how Joanna Newsom helped get Fleet Foxes back together, the inside scoop on Yanya’s upcoming debut LP, how Deadheads influenced Saadiq’s musicality, and how Hynes created his powerful brand new album Negro Swan. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. — Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer  This episode was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. Big thanks to Pitchfork Music Festival for hosting Talkhouse, and to Karolina Barej for all of her coordination work. I’m very pleased to write for the very first time that the Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Jul 04, 2019
Robert Glasper with Vieux Farka Touré
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FORM is a festival unlike any other. It takes place in the “eco-city” of Arcosanti, an architectural marvel in the middle of the Arizona desert. Attendance is limited to 2,000, but they still bring in massive headliners like Florence + The Machine and Anderson .Paak. Fans get to see their favorite stadium artists in an incredibly beautiful and intimate space — and discover their next five favorite bands, all in the same day. There’s no VIP section, but there is a cliffside pool with DJs, rooftop yoga, and immersive listening stations. I'd been hearing rave reviews for years from musicians who'd played the fest, so this spring Talkhouse Podcast producer Mark Yoshizumi and I headed out to FORM to get our glamping on, and record some amazing artists in convo. As an added dimension, we also paired them in musical collaboration. Pulp Arts and Patreon teamed up to co-present The Conservatory, a backstage visual arts installation and recording studio. Talkhouse recorded six episodes there throughout the weekend, so subscribe to make sure to catch upcoming shows, including: — Snail Mail, Fred Armisen & Mary Lynn Rajskub — Kelsey Lu & Yrsa Daley-Ward — Julianna Barwick & Mary Lattimore — American Football & Pelican — L'Rain & Melanie Faye Our first episode from the fest features jazz and hip hop legend Robert Glasper with a giant of African music, Malian guitarist Vieux Farka Touré. The two were excited to meet and chop it up, and immediately found a lot of common ground. They get into a lot, including: the role their musician parents played in their own artistic development; the difficulties of being a professional musician in Mali; Vieux’s fear of playing jazz; and the inspiration Vieux drops that Robert wants tattooed on his… well, check it out. After the talk, keep it locked for a trio of breathtaking improvisations between Vieux on guitar and Robert on keys, accompanied by Vieux’s rhythm section of bassist Marshall Henry and drummer Tim Kiper. The uniquely brilliant singer, songwriter, and sculptor Lonnie Holley, who’d stopped in to watch the session after his own incredible set at the fest, also jumped in to sing on a jam. Sinat Giwa, Events Director at OkayPlayer, OkayAfrica, and OkaySpace, joins me to intro this first episode from FORM. You can also enjoy today's show as a video via Talkhouse.com —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer   Today’s episode was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. It was recorded at FORM Festival in Arcosanti, Arizona, and at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn. Research assistance provided by Madalyn Feltus. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Jun 27, 2019
Lake Bell with Santigold
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, two good friends, actor-writer-director Lake Bell and singer Santigold, sit down for a long-awaited chat together. The pair are both very busy performers – Bell is hard at work on the second season of her new show Bless This Mess and can be heard in the new animated feature The Secret Life of Pets 2, and Santi recently dropped I Don't Want: The Gold Fire Sessions and just came back from a U.S. tour – but are also highly involved mothers, and a large focus of their talk is on the challenges of balancing family life with creative work. They discuss how you can’t in fact do it all or have it all, how the making art changes after you have kids, how filmmaking and parenting are (kind of) the same thing, plus Santi’s social media struggles, where the roots of Lake’s comedy lie, what Lake is doing to address the current political situation, Santi’s move into directing, and much, much more. For more filmmakers musicians in conversation, visit Talkhouse at talkhouse.com and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast.
Jun 20, 2019
Father’s Day Edition (Prince Paul, DJ PForReal, Larry Fessenden, Jack Fessenden)
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I'm a father. It's awesome. The best! Seriously. And also simultaneously exhausting and sleepless. And complicated. But eminently worth it! This week, we here at Talkhouse salute the dads, and father figures, of music and cinema. Our Father's Day episode pairs two creative father-and-son duos; one pair defining the sound of hip hop, the others prolific film multi-hyphenates. — Segment one: Prince Paul & DJ PForReal aka Paul Huston Sr. and Jr. The legendary hip-hop producer Prince Paul — known for his pioneering work with Stetsasonic, De La Soul, Handsome Boy Modeling School, Gravediggaz, BROOKZILL! and more — raised his son, DJ PForReal, in the music game. Paul Jr, DJ for rap star Lil Uzi Vert, joined his dad for today's show to discuss pushing one’s comfort zone, never taking the straight path, faking it till you make it, and what it's like when your first ever DJ gig is opening up for Wu-Tang’s GZA. — Segment two: Larry Fessenden and Jack Fessenden The great horror director, producer and actor Larry Fessenden (The Last Winter, Habit) also brought his kid up in his chosen craft. Jack Fessenden, who's still a teenager (!), has already directed one feature, Stray Bullets, and is in pre-production for his next. The two sat down to chop it up on the highs and lows of coming up in a cinematic family, why Larry likes to mentor young people, and the reason Jack hasn’t seen many of his dad’s films. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. DJ PForReal was recorded in Atlanta by Luther Banks at Patchwerk Studios. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Jun 13, 2019
Revisited: Talkhouse x Food Republic: A$AP Ferg with Andrew Carmellini
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To celebrate the release of A$AP Ferg's new joint "Pups," which features fellow Mob member A$AP Rocky, we're re-sharing the Hood Pope's rad 2017 Talkhouse convo with culinary icon — and, as we learn, former rap producer — Andrew Carmellini. Check it out. On Talkhouse's premiere food culture episode (part of its new Talkhouse x Food Republic series), New York City chef and restaurateur Andrew Carmellini meets Harlem rapper A$AP Ferg at the flagship Sonos store in NYC. In their conversation, they discuss the challenges of their respective crafts, their role as leaders, branding, cooking and more. Check out these two New York cultural titans chopping it up, and subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast.
Jun 06, 2019
Stephin Merritt (the Magnetic Fields) with Daniel Handler (Lemony Snicket)
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Stephin Merritt is one of the most brilliant songwriters of our time. Through his projects The Magnetic Fields, The Gothic Archies, Future Bible Heroes, and The 6ths, he’s deconstructed and reimagined the art of the song. Stephin’s lyrics are wonderfully dark and witty, often gender-bending, sometimes intellectual, occasionally utterly heartbreaking. His melodies are addictive enough to be illegal under drug-dealing laws. Stephin is able to make listeners laugh, cry, and think, all in the same song. This year marks the 20th anniversary of 69 Love Songs, widely considered the crown jewel of Stephin Merritt's vast catalog. A three CD (now also a six 10” vinyl) box set, the album is a meta conceit: a record not only full of love songs, but also about love songs themselves. Running 172 minutes and 35 seconds, the songs stylistically jump between indie rock, synth-pop, country, faux punk and jazz, Sondheim-esque showtunes, folk, a capella, '70s singer-songwriter, world music and much more. For today’s show, Stephin sat down with Daniel Handler — aka, A Series Of Unfortunate Events author Lemony Snicket — who played accordion on 69 Love Songs as well as interviewed Stephin for the liner notes. The old friends and collaborators chop it up on the triumphs and occasional difficulties of 69 Love Songs’ improbable existence — the arduous recording, uncharted release campaign, surprising live shows, initial reaction and beloved legacy. Their deep dive talk also takes in: Daniel’s theory that 69 LS has become a children’s album; “tweecore” beefs with Belle and Sebastian and Stereolab; the record release show that found Stephin trapped above the stage; the best music to get busy to; whispering hecklers; and why 69 Love Songs should’ve been sold in sex shops. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. It was recorded at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
May 30, 2019
Avey Tare (Animal Collective) with Ishmael Butler
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This week on the Talkhouse Podcast, we’re celebrating artists who take music in unexpected and brilliant new directions. Tuesday’s show saw Tierra Whack and Nnamdi Ogbonnaya in conversation; today, we bring you a fantastic deep dive between Avey Tare of Animal Collective and Ishmael “Ish” Butler, aka Palaceer Lazaro in Shabazz Palaces, fka Butterfly of Digable Planets. Ish and Avey are massive fans of each other’s work — Animal Collective and Shabazz Palaces have even remixed tracks for each other. This convo takes in a lot: how seeing Animal Collective play live got Ish back into making his own records when he thought he was done with music; what artists they’re both vibing on rn; Ish’s goal to "elasticize minds" with his live shows; and the “secret sauce” that goes into writing Animal Collective and Shabazz Palaces songs. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. Ish was recorded by Dan Arnes at The Knitting Factory in Brooklyn. Avey was recorded by Adam McDaniel at Drop of Sun Studios in Asheville, NC. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
May 23, 2019
Tierra Whack with Nnamdi Ogbonnaya
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Duuudes! Those of you who follow us on Insta may know that Mark The Producer and I just got back from our first festival of 2019. As we glamped and recorded some of the best musicians in the world in convo for upcoming Talkhouse episodes, it occurred to me that full-on festival season is almost upon us. That means, of course, that this summer, Talkhouse will be returning to Pitchfork Music Festival for our fifth straight year of recording backstage talks with many of the brilliant artists rocking Union Park. We're so psyched for this year's lineup; get your tix now to catch Belle and Sebastian (playing Sinister in it's entirety!), Pusha T, Haim, Robyn, Earl Sweatshirt, Khruangbin and more. In anticipation, we wanted to share with you a special bonus episode this week. So, here's a fantastic conversation that happened spontaneously at last year's fest; it was too short to be released as a regular episode, but was too good not to share. Tierra Whack and Nnamdi Ogbonnaya both have sounds and visual aesthetics all their own. When the two met in our trailer studio, they connected immediately, cracking us all the f up in the process. Their hilarious and insightful chat takes in quite a bit in its brief runtime: their production techniques and studio vibes; fave bands and movies of all time (some very surprising answers here); wtf happened to those balloons from the Whackworld video; and some pretty great impressions of Oprah and Leonardo DiCaprio. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Big thx to the fantastic Pitchfork Music Festival for hosting the Talkhouse Podcast. PMF 2019 takes place in Chicago from July 19-21st, 2019. SEE YOU IN THE PIT, er PARK!
May 21, 2019
Grasshopper (Mercury Rev) with Lia Braswell (A Place to Bury Strangers)
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For today’s episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, we sat down backstage at Desert Daze with Grasshopper of Mercury Rev and A Place To Bury Strangers’s Lia Braswell. The two are big fans of each others’ live sets, and were psyched to meet and chop it up. Their conversation takes in a lot: artistic community, DIY culture, the years of work it takes to succeed, and the restorative power of seeing live music. Oh, and we learn how Lia learned to appreciate the feedback. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. You can also now follow us on Spotify! —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. It was recorded at by Keenan Kush at Desert Daze, and at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn by Mark The Producer. Additional recording by Josh Modell. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Big thx for the fantastic Desert Daze for hosting the Talkhouse Podcast. Desert Daze 2019 takes place at Moreno Beach from October 10-13, 2019. The first two announced artists are Animal Collective and Stereolab. Find tix and info at https://desertdaze.org/
May 16, 2019
Mother's Day Moments
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This week, we here at Talkhouse celebrate two monumental things: first off, this is the Talkhouse Podcast's 250th episode (holy shit, how did that happen?!?!? Thank you, listeners!) The second thing we're celebrating officially this week, and unofficially every other day of the year: mothers and maternal figures! For today’s show, we took a deep dive through the past five years of the podcast to share some of our favorite clips of artists discussing the myriad experiences that comprise motherhood. So buckle up for: — Christina Choe and Andrew Ahn on Christina's mom's star turn as an actress. — Tori Amos and Shirley Manson (Garbage) on the sacrifices and uncertainties of motherhood, and the continuing inspiration Tori receives from her own mother. — Fred Armisen and Alix Lambert on the crazy, sad true story of Fred’s stepmother's time in East Berlin. ~~~ — Ben Lee and Jon Cryer on how Ben's mum helped him make a really important career decision when he was a teenager. — Tracy Droz Tragos and Martha Shane on how Tracy's maternal instincts guided her experiences on and off screen while making Rich Hill. — Julia Pott’s mum reviewing Get Out — on Julia's answering machine. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer  Today’s episode was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
May 09, 2019
Knox Fortune with Brandon Wardell
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“All night, I been drinking all night, I been drinking all night, I been drinking, ay ay” sang Knox Fortune on the hook of Chance The Rapper’s mega-hit single "All Night." For this podcast, Knox and his old buddy comedian Brandon Wardell (Yeah But Still) switched it up and did a little day drinking. The guys sat down late last year to chop it up on the Talkhouse Podcast backstage at Life Is Beautiful Music and Art Festival in Las Vegas, where they’d both performed. Their truly freewheeling convo takes in a lot: which pop stars have the best and worst fans; thoughts on Trippie Redd and Juice WRLD; Banksy’s true identity; the drug that fueled both Home Alone and Aladdin; The Beatles vs. Emo Rap; and loads more. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. You can also now follow us on Spotify! —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. It was recorded at National Southwestern Recording in Las Vegas and at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn by Mark The Producer. Additional recording by Josh Modell. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Thanks to Life Is Beautiful and Ronald Corso at National Southwestern Recording. This year’s Life Is Beautiful happens Sept 20-22, and the lineup is, as usual, incredible, featuring Chance The Rapper, Billie Eilish, The Black Keys, Desus and Mero, Pod Save America, and so many more. Tix can be purchased here.
May 02, 2019
Karen O with Sam Spiegel
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Hot on the heels of Karen O (Yeah Yeah Yeahs)'s incredible new LP Lux Prima and Sam Spiegel (N.A.S.A.)'s new single "Perfect," the two old friends and collaborators sat down for a deep dive on the Talkhouse Podcast.  Buckle up for stories of working with everyone from Ol' Dirty Bastard to David Byrne to Danger Mouse; collab-ing with your literal family — Sam's brother is Spike Jonze — and your figurative one, as Karen does in the YYYs; and the rad audio-visual experiences that Sam and Karen created for each of their new projects. Check it out and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. Stay up to date on live Talkhouse events with our Events tab. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. It was recorded in at Sam's house in Los Angeles by Ali Nikou, and at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn by Mark Yoshizumi. Additional engineering by Josh Modell. 
Apr 25, 2019
Tim Heidecker with Hayden Pedigo
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The brilliant composer and two-time Talkhouse Podcast guest William Basinski recently dropped me an intriguing email. He wrote of a “very talented young friend, a fine guitarist from Amarillo” who has “a great story.” If Billy recommends an artist, I look into them; the more I learned about this guitarist from Amarillo, TX — Hayden Pedigo — the more fascinated I became. A born and raised Amarilloan, Hayden is an ambient acoustic guitarist and soundscape composer who's written music dedicated to the landscape and beauty of his hometown. Changing artistic lanes late last year, Hayden undertook a satirical project inspired by Harmony Korine that was composed of a series of bizarre, Tim and Eric-esque fake campaign videos. When the vids went viral, he decided to run for City Council in Amarillo in earnest, and is now a leading contender with a real shot at being elected. With his gonzo comedic approach and dual life in music, we thought that a convo between Hayden and Tim Heidecker — who's fresh off the release of Us — would make for a quite a show. Talkhouse pals Nick Dawson (EIC, Film) and Josh Modell (Executive Editor, Music) join me to introduce this politically-minded conversation between two great weirdos. Check it out and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. Stay up to date on live Talkhouse events with our Events tab. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. It was recorded in Los Angeles by Tim Heidecker, and at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn by Mark Yoshizumi.
Apr 18, 2019
Clem Creevy (Cherry Glazerr) with Kate Nash
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Both Kate Nash and Cherry Glazerr’s Clem Creevy have talent, smarts, and attitude to burn; they've each also got incredible, recently-released music. To celebrate their new bops, the two friends sat down to chop it up at Clem’s home in LA. We hear about the truly unique story behind Kate’s new single "Trash" and the Maharaja musical she’s been writing; the curious empowerment Clem finds in singing from the perspective of a misogynist; and their takes on religion, rebellion, and life in Los Angeles. Check it out and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. Stay up to date on live Talkhouse events with our Events tab. And if you’re in the New York area, come hang April 13 at our Record Store Day event! —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. It was recorded in Los Angeles by Ali Nikou, and at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn by Mark Yoshizumi.
Apr 11, 2019
Harmony Korine (The Beach Bum) with Caveh Zahedi
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, we feature a conversation between two of the most distinctive and original voices in American cinema: Harmony Korine and Caveh Zahedi. The two got together in New York City in advance of the release of Korine’s new movie, The Beach Bum, a wild Florida-set fantasia about cosmic poet Moondog, starring Matthew McConaughey, Isla Fisher, Snoop Dogg, Jonah Hill, Martin Lawrence, Zac Efron and Jimmy Buffett. Korine and Zahedi, who used to be phone buddies years back, discuss seemingly everything under the sun, from The Beach Bum as an autobiographical portrait, to the art of parenting, to Korine’s recipe for joy – plus, Rimbaud vs. Rambo, the awesome thing about Bob Dylan playing minor league baseball grounds, Ripley’s Believe It or Not, Hemingway’s six-toed cats, how Zahedi’s web series The Show about the Show kinda led to his divorce, and much, much more. For more filmmakers musicians in conversation, visit Talkhouse at talkhouse.com and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. Episode recorded by Elia Einhorn, and recorded and co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi at Hook & Fade Studios in Brooklyn. The Talkhouse podcast producer is Elia Einhorn.
Apr 04, 2019
Revisited: Agnès Varda with Kirsten Johnson (Cameraperson)
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To mark the sad passing of the brilliant Agnès Varda, we are revisiting an old episode of the Talkhouse Podcast in which documentary cinematographer and Cameraperson director Kirsten Johnson sat down with the legendary French New Wave auteur when she was in town in 2017 for a gallery exhibit of her art at Blum & Poe and a French Institute film series. In a wonderfully thoughtful and engaged conversation, the two discuss Varda's artwork, how her films play with time, finding permission as an artist, Varda's feelings about New York City, Faces Places, her collaboration with the artist JR, her favorite color (!), and much more. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse Film at talkhouse.com/film.
Apr 01, 2019
Kevin Drew (Broken Social Scene) with John Vanderslice
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Earlier this month, Talkhouse headed down to the legendary insanity that is SXSW in Austin, TX for bands, breakfast tacos, more bands, and — of course — podcasts! We were honored to be asked for the second consecutive year to curate a live Talkhouse Podcast recording on the official SXSW Podcast Stage, where we paired two of indie rock’s prolific singer/songwriters releasing exciting new music this year. John Vanderslice and Broken Social Scene’s Kevin Drew are both fantastic artists and hilarious, thoughtful conversationalists. The two chopped it up in front of an audience of fans on everything from the various forms of therapy that each is currently undergoing (one is micro-dosing) to the Great SX Scooter Scourge of 2019. Their talk also takes in their new music, the economic realities of running a pro recording studio in 2019, Vanderslice’s near-death tour experience, and ordering cocaine on the dark web. Check it out and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. Stay up to date on live Talkhouse events with our Events tab. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. It was recorded at JW Marriott in Austin by Sean Cherry and Kari Erickson, and at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn by Mark Yoshizumi. Additional recording by Josh Modell. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Thanks to SXSW, Cadence 13, and all the Talkhouse fans who roll through our live events.
Mar 28, 2019
Mike Kinsella (American Football) with Andy Hull (Manchester Orchestra)
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We here at the Talkhouse Podcast were psyched when Chicago-based indie festival Tomorrow Never Knows asked us to curate a live taping as part of their January 2019 lineup. So, we paired Andy Hull (Manchester Orchestra) and Mike Kinsella (American Football, Owen) for an exclusive conversation and acoustic performance. Thanks to all of you Midwest listeners who braved the winter chill to pack out Sleeping Village! Andy and Mike are old friends, and big fans of each other’s music. They were excited to catch up for this talk, and the ensuing conversation covered a lot, including: their ever-evolving songwriting chops and philosophies; how having kids changes one’s creativity; and what exactly went down at that craziest Owen show ever… The performance setlist is: Andy — “The Gold” Mike — “Love is Not Enough” Andy — “Untitled (Blue)” Mike — “The Desperate Act” Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. Stay up to date on live Talkhouse events with our Events tab. You can also now follow us on Spotify! While you’re there, make sure to check out American Football’s American Football (LP3), out tomorrow. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. It was recorded at Sleeping Village in Chicago by Joe Darnaby and Greg Obis and at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn by Mark Yoshizumi. Additional recording by Josh Modell. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Thanks to Tomorrow Never Knows, Sleeping Village, and all the Talkhouse fans who roll through our live events.
Mar 21, 2019
Brian Huskey with Timothy Simons
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, we mark the imminent return of Veep for its seventh and final season with a conversation between two of the show's cast members, Timothy Simons and Brian Huskey. Simons and Huskey – who play manchild Jonah Ryan and pesky political reporter Leon West, respectively – have a hilarious and wide-ranging talk that takes in everything from the perils (and occasional positives) of social media and getting sincere in middle age, to shilling for free stuff on podcasts and, of course, their show's swan song season. Plus, we see how long their pledge to not talk about Trump actually lasts and find out exactly what happened when Tim went to a Tony Robbins-designed Pitbull show at a celebrity golf tournament! For more filmmakers musicians in conversation, visit Talkhouse at talkhouse.com and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast.
Mar 14, 2019
Karen Gillan with James Roday
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, friends and fellow actor-writer-directors James Roday and Karen Gillan sit down for a chat at The Grant, James' bar-to-be in Los Angeles' Eagle Rock neighborhood. Roday and Gillan, best known as Shawn from Psych and Nebula from the Marvel Cinematic Universe, respectively, got together to discuss Roday's second feature as writer-director, the slowburning horror, Treehouse, which debuted March 1 on Hulu as part of Blumhouse's yearlong Into the Dark series. To the faint sounds of construction workers finishing The Grant, the two pals chat about Treehouse, Gillan's directorial debut The Party's Just Beginning, their mutual love of horror movies and Lynne Ramsay, Roday's obsession with Highland cows, that time Gillan wrote a letter to Michael Haneke, and much, much more. For more filmmakers musicians in conversation, visit Talkhouse at talkhouse.com and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast.
Mar 07, 2019
Sylvan Esso with Anna Drezen
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When we paired them for a Talkhouse Podcast at the fantastic Life Is Beautiful Fest, Sylvan Esso’s Amelia Meath and Nick Sanborn and SNL writer Anna Drezen got on, as they say in the talk, like a house on fire. A week after meeting, Sylvan Esso were posting pics backstage from SNL! In this chat, the trio do cover some artistic topics: the similarities and differences in the professional lives of bands and comedians; their worst gigs ever; and the emotional brutality of both writing songs and pitching sketches at SNL. And they also get into a tooon of riffing. (Turns out Sylvan Esso can hang with the best!) So we also hear about “egg sluts,” Property Brothers fan fiction, the problem with Steven Seagal flicks, and even witness a fiery debate on whether Sylvan Esso… make good hula hooping music. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. You can also now follow us on Spotify! —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. It was recorded at National Southwestern Recording in Las Vegas and at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn by Mark The Producer. Additional recording by Josh Modell. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Thanks to Life Is Beautiful and Ronald Corso at National Southwestern Recording.
Feb 28, 2019
Revisited: Meredith Graves (Perfect Pussy) with Cameron Lynch
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This week, we're revisiting a unique talk recorded at last year's On Air Fest. On Air is a rad festival devoted to audio storytelling and the creative possibilities of sound. The festival returns later this month in Brooklyn. You can find more info about speakers and how to attend at onairfest.com Today's episode, a collaboration with The Players' Tribune, was recorded earlier this month in front of a live audience at On Air Fest at the Wythe Hotel in Brooklyn. When On Air Fest reached out to Talkhouse about curating a live episode for their podcast festival, we had an idea: What if we, the outlet where musicians and filmmakers write and speak about their experiences, partnered with Derek Jeter's The Players' Tribune, the site where athletes write about their own experiences, for a podcast discussion about what the first-person narrative really looks like? The Players' Tribune loved the idea, and brought in NFL linebacker Cameron Lynch to speak with frequent Talkhouse contributor Meredith Graves (Perfect Pussy). Their thoughtful and often funny conversation takes in a lot, from shutting down the "shut up and dribble" narrative, to the very real pressures of professionally rolling "the dice of life" every single day. It also touches on Fergie's National Anthem blowback, the truth and falsity of people's preconceptions about athletes and rock stars, the perils of Googling oneself, and reckoning with the fact that each of us is "an unpredictable consciousness driving a meat-covered skeleton." Dan Treadway, Deputy Editor at Players' Tribune, and I kick off the live conversation with some background on each of our first-person-driven media outlets. Check it out, and subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. — Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode was recorded by Mark Yoshizumi with Michael Bosworth, and co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Feb 21, 2019
V-Day with 5 Famous Artist Couples!
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Happiest of Valentines Days to ya, listeners! To celebrate the duality of this love-filled and oh-so-fraught time, the Talkhouse Podcast asked five of our favorite artist couples to answer two questions: What’s the best thing about being in a two-artist relationship? And, what’s the worst?? Answering both Cupid’s and our calls are: — Katie Crutchfield (Waxahatchee) and Kevin Morby;  — Maliibu Miitch and Chase Money Marz;  — Heather Matarazzo and Heather Turman;  — Sadie Dupuis (Speedy Ortiz, Sad13) and Dylan Baldi (Cloud Nothings); — Natalie Prass and Eric Slick (Dr. Dog) So get ready to hear about inter-couple artistic competitiveness, the strains of touring in a relationship, having recording sessions on your spouse’s birthday, and the perils of dating “civilians.” As I couldn’t ask these artists to walk through a potential relationship minefield that I wasn’t willing to tread myself, I’m very pleased (and slightly afraid) to welcome my wife—and Pitchfork’s Managing Editor—Amy Phillips on to help intro this episode. Buckle up! Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. You can also now follow us on Spotify! —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. It was recorded by each of the participating couples, and by Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Feb 14, 2019
Jon Cryer with Ben Lee
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, we get to listen in on two friends and recent collaborators in conversation: actor Jon Cryer (of Two and a Half Men fame) and musician Ben Lee. The pair, who teamed up on the musical B is for Beer, which Lee adapted with Tom Robbins from the iconic novelist’s book of the same name – and then roped in Cryer to both direct and play the role of the Beer Vendor. In a wide-ranging chat recorded at Lee’s house in Los Angeles, Jon and Ben discuss being famous in your teens (and then trying to become a grounded adult), their partnership on B is for Beer, how to deal with setbacks and failures in show business, Ben’s life-changing moment being cast at age 7 in Uncle Moishy and His Mitzvah Men, Jon’s memories of working on Superman IV, and much, much more. For more filmmakers musicians in conversation, visit Talkhouse at talkhouse.com and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. Episode recorded by Ben Lee in Los Angeles, and recorded and co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi at Hook & Fade Studios in Brooklyn. The Talkhouse podcast producer is Elia Einhorn.
Feb 07, 2019
Revisited: Jlin with William Basinski
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We're re-airing this talk with the news that Jlin and William Basinski are reconnecting for an upcoming Talkhouse Podcast happening live on Pitchfork Radio at Midwinter. Jlin and William Basinski are two of today's most fascinating and gifted composers. Basinski works with decaying analogue tape loops to create ambient soundscapes, while Jlin constructs brilliant, stuttering reimaginings of footwork rhythms. The friends and collaborators sat down in the Sonos room at Rough Trade NYC for one of three conversations that Talkhouse curated for Northside Festival. The two get into Basinski's tribute to his hero David Bowie, Jlin's boundary-pushing collaborations with cutting-edge dancers, and how a cat on the loose ended up significantly contributing to Basinski’s artistry. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today's episode was recorded and co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi.
Jan 31, 2019
John Grant with Jake Shears (Scissor Sisters)
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Hardcore porn, boring mega-fans, and ANOHNI dropping allegorical knowledge are just the start of this incredibly thoughtful and open conversation between John Grant and Jake Shears (Scissor Sisters, Kinky Boots). The two are huge fans of each other’s work, and were both nervous and excited at the opportunity to sit down and chop it up. Their talk also covers how they’ve each faced, and overcome, their worst performing nightmares; the inspiration chili and cheesecake brought to recording John’s Love Is Magic; and Jake’s uncomfortably intimate encounter with the String Cheese Incident. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. You can also now follow us on Spotify! —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer  Today’s episode was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. It was recorded by Ali Nikou at Shears’ home in LA, and by Mark Yoshizumi at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Jan 24, 2019
Protomartyr with Preoccupations & Geoff Barrow with Annika Henderson
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Today's episode is an action-packed double-header! First up, we've got post-punk heavy-hitters Matt Flegel (singer and bassist of Preoccupations) and Joe Casey (Protomartyr frontman and new entrant into the Talkhouse Podcast Three Timers Club). The recent tour mates discuss their new 7" split Telemetry At Howe Bridge, intra-band fighting, how sports nerds and music nerds can be the same kind of insufferable, and so much more! Plus, we've got a short and sweet clip from a convo with Geoff Barrow (Portishead, Beak>) and Annika Henderson (aka Anika). They talk about how Annika found her band Exploded View just when she was about to quit the music industry forever, and how EV has benefitted from having members from three different countries. Check it out. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. Joe Casey and Matt Flegel were recorded in Kansas City by James Grau; Geoff Barrow and Anika recorded themselves. This episode was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Jan 17, 2019
Vince Clarke with Orbital
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Today’s show is dedicated to the OG electronic music heads! Synthpop wizard Vince Clarke (Depeche Mode, Yaz, Erasure) sat down with U.K. rave gods Paul and Phil Hartnoll of Orbital for a catch-up amidst the drool-worthy vintage synthesizer collection at Hook & Fade Studios here in Brooklyn. The old friends take us on a trip back through the dance scenes they were immersed in throughout the '80s and '90s, analyze the American and British music communities, and compare notes on the differences between the legendary old raves and today’s massive EDM festivals. And while on past podcast episodes we’ve heard very disparate takes on the way artists work up demos — Clams Casino’s iPhone apps, Yoshimi’s train riding — we’ve never heard anything remotely like Paul’s method. (And we’re guessing his dentist hadn’t, either.) Check it out. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Jan 10, 2019
Ariel Pink with Cate Le Bon
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To celebrate Mexican Summer’s ten year anniversary, we paired two of the fantastic record label’s most fascinating artists: Ariel Pink and Cate Le Bon. Backstage at A Decade Deeper: Mexican Summer’s 10 Year Anniversary party at Brooklyn’s Pioneer Works arts space, Cate and Ariel—fans of each other’s work who'd never met irl—sat down for a talk before their sets. The two really hit it off, and their wide-ranging conversation takes in a lot: the deep flaws they see in the way music press works; Ariel not always working well with others; and the difficult genesis of Cate’s upcoming LP. Ariel also talks about his favorite site on the internet, and Cate divulges the, um, very weird act she was asked to perform for a shoot. Check it out. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. Big thanks to Justin Frye and Pioneer Works for hosting this taping. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Jan 03, 2019
Pedro the Lion with Tomberlin
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Tbh, we didn’t mean to make our last episode before Christmas one that explores two fantastic singer-songwriters’ experiences growing up in very religious Christian homes and the effect it’s had on their art, but here we are — and it’s a damn fine talk! David Bazan (Pedro the Lion) and Sarah Beth Tomberlin (Tomberlin) are big fans of each other’s music, and jumped at the chance to meet via a Talkhouse Podcast episode. They got on so well, they’ve decided to hit the road together throughout February! You can find those dates at Talkhouse.com and hopefully catch them in your city; in the meantime, enjoy this conversation that takes in Sarah Beth’s experiences at bible school; David’s assessment of the biggest lie of Christianity; and finding personal salvation in ... the Beatles. Check it out. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. Thanks so much to all of you listeners for an incredible year here at the Talkhouse Podcast; we truly appreciate the millions of you that tuned in, gave feedback, and sent rad suggestions for artists you’d love to see appear on the show. Happiest of holidays! —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode was recorded by Joe Darnaby in Chicago, David Bazan at his home, and Mark Yoshizumi at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn. Our co-producer is Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Dec 18, 2018
Jeff Tweedy (Wilco) with Abbi Jacobson
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Until catching this talk live last month, it would never have occurred to me that there could be a deep similarity between Jeff Tweedy's songs and Abbi Jacobson's Broad City character, but—there is! Jeff (Wilco, Tweedy) and Abbi (Broad City, Disenchantment) sat down at the beautiful Murmrr Theater in Brooklyn to celebrate the release of Jeff's memoir Let's Go (So We Can Get Back): A Memoir of Recording and Discording with Wilco, Etc. and his new solo album Warm. Their thoughtful and funny conversation took in a lot, including the difficulties they each had writing books after focusing their careers on other types of writing; opening up about mental health and addiction; Jeff breaking into comedy; and so much more. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. Feel free to DM me to let me know which artist(s) you’d love to see appear on a future episode. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer This episode was recorded by Mark Yoshizumi with Eric Lemke and Justin Hrabovski at Murmrr Theater, and at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn. It was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. Big thanks to Brian Kelly at Murmrr. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Dec 13, 2018
Adam Conover with Raphael Bob-Waksberg
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, BoJack Horseman creator Raphael Bob-Waksberg chats with Adam Conover, the host and creator of Adam Ruins Everything, now in its third season on truTV. Bob-Waksberg and Conover – who met at Bard, where they were members of the Olde English comedy troupe, and then became post-college roommates – dive deep into their shared past in a conversation that only two longtime friends could have. They talk about everything from how Conover’s personal history informs Adam Ruins Everything, their comedy philosophies (and Adam’s alternate life as a philosopher!) and their time together in Olde English to their “dishes rule,” Howie Mandel’s prank TV show Howie Do It and their favorite tweets that Adam has deleted. Plus, there's a very special song improvised by Raphael during a Googling break! For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast.
Dec 11, 2018
Neko Case with Eric Bachmann
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On today’s Talkhouse Podcast episode, old friends and collaborators Neko Case and Eric Bachmann (Archers Of Loaf, Crooked Fingers) catch up. The two—who most recently collaborated on a duet Eric wrote that they recorded for Neko’s new record Hell On—take in a lot here. We learn about Neko’s plans for when she retires from touring; get a deep dive into their favorite duet recordings of all time; and hear Eric give a long overdue apology for a very wet tour bus accident... Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. Feel free to DM me to let me know which artist(s) you’d love to see appear on a future episode. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Neko was recorded by Jody Peterson at Cliff House Audio in Montpelier, VT, and Eric at his home in Georgia by Joel Hatstat. This episode was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Dec 06, 2018
Jaboukie Young-White with The Drums
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In September, the Talkhouse Podcast squad rolled out to Las Vegas for Life is Beautiful Music and Arts Festival. In between performances from Talkhouse faves A$AP Ferg, CHVRCHES, and Death Cab For Cutie, we recorded some epic convos for the show. Comedian Jaboukie Young-White (The Daily Show, American Vandal) and indiepop legends The Drums’ Jonny Pierce are whip-smart queer artists who have intricately bound together their work and sexuality. Backstage at the fest, they and newer Drums' member Bryan de Leon dissected what exactly it means to be a "queer artist." Their talk takes in coming out through one’s art, "conveniently Christian homophobes," Balenciaga daddies, and how the world needs a gay Shrek. Oh, and Bryan also got Jaboukie to give some inside scoop on American Vandal season two... Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. Feel free to DM me to let me know which artist(s) you’d love to see appear on a future episode. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer This episode was recorded by Mark Yoshizumi at Life is Beautiful, and at Hook & Fade Studios in Brooklyn. It was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Big thanks to Life Is Beautiful for hosting the Talkhouse Podcast.
Nov 29, 2018
Steve Albini with Jerry Casale (Devo)
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The Talkhouse Podcast recently headed out to the fantastic Desert Daze festival at Moreno Beach at Lake Perris in Southern California. When we weren't catching sets by Tame Impala, King Gizzard and My Bloody Valentine, we recorded a trio of great talks; this week, we present the first. When I saw that both Steve Albini and Devo's Jerry Casale were going to be at Desert Daze giving talks, I knew we had to pair these two icons of alternative music. They're big fans of each other's work, and halfway through their conversation, Steve said, “This is the sort of stuff no one ever talks about. These are the questions I’ve had for 30 years.” Their fascinating talk takes in the beginning years of Devo’s existence; their complex relationship with Neil Young; Brian Eno’s proclivity for ménage à trois; the differences between poker and making records; and how the name Devo became a category alongside jocks, squares and nerds. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. Feel free to DM me to let me know which artist(s) you’d love to see appear on a future episode. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer This episode was recorded by Keenan Kush at Desert Daze, and by Mark Yoshizumi at Hook & Fade Studios in Brooklyn. It was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range. Big thanks to Desert Daze for hosting the Talkhouse Podcast.
Nov 15, 2018
Lucy Dacus (boygenius) with Dave Depper (Death Cab for Cutie)
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This week’s show was recorded during The Decemberists’ fantastic Traveler’s Rest Festival in Missoula, Montana. Death Cab For Cutie’s Dave Depper and Lucy Dacus (boygenius) sat down backstage for a freewheeling chat… and a tarot card reading. The two discuss the benefits of artist-curated fests, night terrors on the tour bus, the Sidemen's Guild of the United States, the importance of tuning out the music industry, and much more. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. Feel free to DM me to let me know which artist(s) you’d love to see appear on a future episode. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer This episode was recorded by Keenan Kush at Travelers' Rest, and by Mark Yoshizumi at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn. It was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Nov 08, 2018
Blake Schwarzenbach (Jawbreaker) with Graham Elliot (Masterchef, Top Chef)
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Today’s show features Blake Schwarzenbach (Jawbreaker, Jets To Brazil) and chef Graham Elliot (Masterchef, Top Chef) in conversation live from Virgin Hotels Chicago. Their talk covers some of the big experiences of their respective art forms — the inherent pressures of reuniting with a legendary band, or of being asked to recreate classic dishes in a high pressure public environment; false “perfection” vs. authenticity in the recording studio and in the kitchen — as well as Jawbreaker’s formation, rise and reunion, and the consequences of speaking out politically while being a star on Top Chef. It also takes in wet sax solos, keytars, Auto-Tune, Trump supporters at Jawbreaker shows, menu B-sides, being Gordon Ramsay’s “backup dancer,” and vocal fry vs. frying. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. Don’t be shy to DM me to let me know which artist(s) you’d love to see appear on a future episode. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer This episode was recorded by Greg Panciera at Virgin Hotels Chicago, and by Mark Yoshizumi at Hook & Fade Studios in Brooklyn. It was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi.
Nov 01, 2018
Dave Monks (Tokyo Police Club) with Katie Monks (Dilly Dally)
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“I don’t know if this is a therapy session or a podcast,” says Katie Monks (Dilly Dally) part way through this conversation with her brother Dave Monks (Tokyo Police Club). We here at Talkhouse think it’s a bit of both. We're also excited to premiere a never-before-heard ambient collaboration between Katie and Dave. The sibling frontpeople chopped it up in their hometown of Toronto, and their talk takes in a lot: how they saved each others’ bands; the life lessons they learned from those two kids down the street who copied everything they did; their upbringing, and how it influenced their artistry; and learning about religion through The Simpsons. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. Feel free to DM me to let me know which artist(s) you’d love to see appear on a future episode. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer This episode was recorded at Dine Alone in Toronto, and by Mark Yoshizumi at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn. It was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Oct 25, 2018
Aubrey Plaza with Craig Robinson
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, Craig Robinson and Aubrey Plaza sit down for a hilarious off-the-cuff conversation. Robinson and Plaza are two of the funniest people in Hollywood, and also two of the stars of An Evening with Beverly Luff Linn, the new movie by Jim Hosking, writer-director of The Greasy Strangler and Talkhouse repeat offender. Over the course of their delightfully unpredictable chat, Robinson and Plaza organize a radio call-in show, do a LOT of singing (including that song about the Swedish friend), share Molly Shannon’s sage advice about acting and exhaustion, and discuss dongles, being wheelchair-bound, Aubrey's failed prank on NBA All-Star Chris Bosh, and much more. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. Episode recorded by Gideon Brower and co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi; the Talkhouse podcast producer is Elia Einhorn. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Oct 23, 2018
Elizabeth McGovern with Gretchen Peters
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, Nashville-based singer-songwriter Gretchen Peters sits down for a chat with Elizabeth McGovern, the iconic actress from Ordinary People, Once Upon a Time in America and Downton Abbey, who is a talented musician in her own right. The two friends, who connected just a few years ago via Twitter, discuss everything from their mutual commitment to telling women’s stories (especially women over 30), the pluses and minuses of collaborating creatively with one's spouse, the downsides of early success, what songwriters can learn from watching Inside the Actors Studio, Mary Chapin Carpenter and Rosanne Cash's love of Downton Abbey, and much more. For more filmmakers and musicians in conversation, visit Talkhouse at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast.
Oct 18, 2018
Colin Trevorrow (Jurassic World) with Megan Griffiths (Sadie)
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, Jurassic World's Colin Trevorrow sits down with his fellow director and longtime friend Megan Griffiths, whose new movie Sadie, starring Melanie Lynskey, John Gallagher Jr and emerging star Sophia Mitri Schloss, is in select theaters from October 12. The two filmmakers, both veterans of the vibrant Seattle indie scene, discuss everything from the correct pronunciation of their names (spoiler: people always say Trevorrow's wrong) to how their upbringings shaped them as directors, while also touching on such topics as diversity in Hollywood, Bryce Dallas Howard's footwear in Jurassic World, why Griffiths is an ideal candidate to direct blockbusters, the myth of Trevorrow's “overnight success,” and much, much more. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast
Oct 11, 2018
Ben Gibbard (Death Cab For Cutie) with Alan Sparhawk (Low)
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Today’s episode features Ben Gibbard of Death Cab For Cutie and Low’s Alan Sparhawk—and it's the first to be curated by Talkhouse’s new Executive Editor Josh Modell, who joins me to introduce it. (Welcome, Josh!) Ben and Alan’s talk goes all the way back to the earliest days of their bands, and up to the present with the fantastic LPs they each recently dropped. We hear about the formative teenage moments when seeing bands changed their lives; staying open to new sounds as "men of a certain age playing rock & roll;" Ben blatantly ripping off Low on his earliest Death Cab material; and how Modest Mouse’s Isaac Brock spent a long time looking like he’d just crawled out of a dumpster. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. Feel free to DM me to let me know which artist(s) you’d love to see appear on a future episode. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer This episode was recorded at Bad Animals in Seattle, by Maija Jenson at KUMD 103.3 FM Duluth Public Radio, and by Mark Yoshizumi at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn. It was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Oct 09, 2018
Merrill Garbus (Tune-Yards) with Meghan Remy (U.S. Girls)
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Merrill Garbus of Tune-Yards and Meghan Remy, who performs under the name U.S. Girls, are two of indie’s leftist vanguard. So it’s no surprise that the 4AD labelmates’ conversation takes in a ton of the big sociopolitical quandaries affecting today’s musicians, such as the ethical difficulties of playing festivals (and touring at all) and undoing white privilege. We also hear about how action movies pale in comparison to Meg’s real life; understanding Trump-supporting family members; whether people should be oil or sand in the machine; why Father John Misty must be "rich as fuuuuck," and much, much more. Buckle up! Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. Feel free to DM me to let me know which artist(s) you’d love to see appear on a future episode. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer  This episode was recorded by Christopher Sandes in Toronto, Merrill Garbus in “a coffee shop by my hotel” somewhere in America, and Mark Yoshizumi at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn. It was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Oct 04, 2018
David Lowery with James Ponsoldt
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, director James Ponsoldt sits down with longtime friend David Lowery, whose new movie, The Old Man and the Gun starring Robert Redford and an all-star supporting cast, just opened in theaters. In a conversation recorded at Soho House in Los Angeles, Lowery talks with Ponsoldt about reteaming with Redford on the legendary actor's final movie, his memorable phone conversations with Tom Waits, the joy of making movies with old cars, using the Kinks' “Lola” (at great cost!), the surprising influence of Robocop on the film, and much, much more. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast.
Oct 02, 2018
Mac DeMarco with Neil Finn and Liam Finn
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On this week’s show, Mac DeMarco sits down with Neil Finn (Crowded House, Split Enz, Fleetwood Mac) and Liam Finn on the occasion of the father and son’s new LP Lightsleeper. Their chat took place in Mac’s Los Angeles garage studio (he's gone full Marc Maron!), and covered a lot. We hear about the artistic freedoms and constraints that Mac experiences; the pluses and minuses of falling in love with one’s demos; Neil’s shopping trip with Mick Fleetwood; why hiring a dominatrix can really help the recording process; and so much more. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. Feel free to DM me to let me know which artist(s) you'd love to see appear on a future episode. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer This episode was recorded by Ali Nikou in LA and Mark Yoshizumi at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn. It was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Sep 27, 2018
Angel Olsen with Nic Russo (Dick Stusso)
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When I got an email saying that Angel Olsen was a huge fan of a relatively new, still somewhat obscure singer-songwriter and wanted to record a Talkhouse Podcast episode with him, I knew I wanted to check him out immediately. As soon as I heard the new LP from Nic Russo (who goes by the name "Dick Stusso"), I was in. The two spoke from their homes in Asheville, NC (Olsen) and Oakland, CA (Russo), and covered a lot of ground. Nic talked about his skewed musicality and backstory, Angel spoke a ton about the direction she taking on her next LP, and even revealed which superstar producer she just worked with out in L.A. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. — Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer This episode was recorded by Kenny Harrington in Asheville, Tarek Fouda in Oakland, and Mark Yoshizumi at Hook and Fade Studios in Brooklyn. It was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Sep 20, 2018
Revisited: Terence Nance with Flying Lotus
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To celebrate the release of Terence Nance's acclaimed HBO series Random Acts of Flyness, we thought we'd resurface his fantastic conversation with the inimitable Flying Lotus from last July. Here's that episode in its entirety; check it out. On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, two longtime friends who bridge the worlds of music and film – writer-director Terence Nance, who’s also a musician, and Steve Ellison, widely known as the recording artist Flying Lotus, whose supremely out-there debut feature film Kuso is out now – sit down for a chat. Over the course of their highly entertaining and unpredictable conversation, the pair talks about dick-stabbing, Steve’s traumatic first time getting tested for STDs, the unique mix of crude humor and transcendence in his work, their respective creative struggles, their greatest fears, and much more. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse Film at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now to stay in the loop about future Talkhouse Podcasts. Episode engineered by the Talkhouse Podcast producer Elia Einhorn and mixed by Mark Yoshizumi.  
Sep 13, 2018
Taja Cheek (L’Rain) with Hisham Bharoocha (Soft Circle, Black Dice)
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Welcome to the Talkhouse Podcast’s first ever guest-curated episode! Today’s talk was curated by Brandon Stosuy (Editor-In-Chief of The Creative Independent; manager of Zola Jesus, Diamanda Galas, and more; and curator for The Broad Museum and, until recently, MoMA PS1’s Warm Up) and Melissa Auf Der Maur (former bassist for Hole and the Smashing Pumpkins, and co-founder of the Hudson, New York arts center Basilica Hudson). Stosuy and Auf Der Mauer are part of the team behind the fantastic annual Basilica Soundscape “anti-festival,” which presents boundary-pushing artists creating music, film, visual art, literature and more, inside a converted 19th century forge and foundry for steel railway wheels. They join me to intro today’s episode. Past Basilica Soundscape artists have included Matthew Barney, JLIN, Amber Tamblyn, and Deafheaven. This year’s festival takes place September 14-16, and features a killer lineup. Two of the artists performing are this week’s Talkhouse Podcast guests; Taja Cheek—aka L’Rain—and Hisham Bharoocha (Boredoms, Black Dice, Lightning Bolt, Soft Circle). Fittingly, much of their talk focuses on curation and the line where it blurs with artistic creation; Taja’s day job is Curatorial Assistant at MoMA PS1, and Hisham organizes the large-scale Boadrum events. We also hear about the incredible way Boredoms drummer Yoshimi writes music, how time constraints can stimulate creativity, and the ups and downs of playing with 111 drummers simultaneously. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. — Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer This episode was recorded by Ivan Kuraev, Ali Nikou, and Mark Yoshizumi, and co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi.
Sep 06, 2018
Robin Pecknold (Fleet Foxes) with Nilüfer Yanya & Dev Hynes (Blood Orange) with Raphael Saadiq
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Welcome to this week’s bumper double feature of a show! We're thrilled to bring you two fantastic conversations recorded backstage at Pitchfork Music Festival 2018: a short chat between Fleet Foxes main-man Robin Pecknold and Nilüfer Yanya, and a deep dive between Dev Hynes—aka Blood Orange—and super-producer Raphael Saadiq. PLUS we've got a brand new theme song created just for us by one of our favorite artists, The Range! Tune in to hear firsthand accounts of Solange's impromptu shopping trips, how Joanna Newsom helped get Fleet Foxes back together, the inside scoop on Yanya’s upcoming debut LP, how Deadheads influenced Saadiq's musicality, and how Hynes created his powerful brand new album Negro Swan. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. — Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer This episode was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. Big thanks to Pitchfork Music Festival for hosting Talkhouse, and to Karolina Barej for all of her coordination work. I'm very pleased to write for the very first time that the Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song was composed and performed by The Range.
Aug 30, 2018
Zola Jesus with Circuit des Yeux
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On this week’s episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, another powerful and funny conversation recorded backstage at Pitchfork Music Festival 2018. Zola Jesus—real name Nika Roza Danilova—and Circuit des Yeux, aka Haley Fohr, posses two of the most breathtaking voices in music today. The two sat down backstage at the fest to discuss all things vocals: finding non-traditional places to warm up while on tour, knowing when to party and when to rest, and how to react when your instrument gives out. They got into a lot more, too, including: diva moves for one's show rider; the difficulties of being people who go to 11 all the time; and why Joanna Newsom stayed silent for two months straight. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. — Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer  This episode was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. Big thanks to Pitchfork Music Festival for hosting Talkhouse, and to Karolina Barej for all of her coordination work. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song is “Plastic Man vs. the Giant Red Phase of the Sun” by Iced Ink.
Aug 23, 2018
Julie Byrne with Lætitia Tamko (Vagabon)
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On this week's episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, another of the incredible conversations recorded backstage at Pitchfork Music Festival 2018: a talk between two of the breakout artists of 2017, Julie Byrne and Vagabon’s Laetitia Tamko. Fresh off a national co-headline tour, the friends sat down backstage to discuss the physical and the metaphysical elements of self-care on the road; the often delicate symbiosis of creating art and managing one’s business; the pressures of creating new music when people are watching; and that one guy in the front row in St Louis. Fuck that guy. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. — Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer This episode was produced by Mark Yoshizumi. Big thanks to Pitchfork Music Festival for hosting Talkhouse, and to Karolina Barej for all of her coordination work. The Talkhouse Podcast’s theme song is “Plastic Man vs. the Giant Red Phase of the Sun” by Iced Ink.
Aug 16, 2018
Hannah Fidell (The Long Dumb Road) with Josephine Decker (Madeline’s Madeline)
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The latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast is a conversation recorded at Sundance 2018 between directors Josephine Decker and Hannah Fidell, who were at the festival with, respectively, Madeline's Madeline and The Long Dumb Road. The fact that Decker's and Fidell's movies are so radically different – the former is an intense, female-centric drama about a young woman of color with mental health problems, the latter a fun, masculine road-movie comedy – is a focus of their discussion, but they also find points of connection in the incredible care they took in telling the stories of people of color — and also the remarkably creative storytelling games they played in their youth. Their talk also touches on their upcoming TV projects, how failure and success feel remarkably similar, silencing exercises, clown breakdowns, and much, much more. Madeline's Madeline is in select theaters from August 10 through Oscilloscope, and The Long Dumb Road is forthcoming in November through Universal. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast.
Aug 09, 2018
Michelle Zauner (Japanese Breakfast) with Alex Cameron
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Each summer, Pitchfork Music Festival brings to Chicago musical legends, the hottest new acts, and the artists that are about to become your new favorites. And for the past four years, Talkhouse has been backstage to record these artists in conversation. Over the coming weeks, we'll be bringing you the rad episodes we cut at the fest last month, including: — Fleet Foxes' Robin Pecknold x Nilüfer Yanya — Blood Orange's Dev Hynes x Raphael Saadiq — Tierra Whack x Nnamdi Ogbonnaya — Zola Jesus x Circuit des Yeux — Vagabon's Lætitia Tamko x Julie Byrne This week, we kick off our series of Pitchfork Fest episodes with Japanese Breakfast's Michelle Zauner talking with Alex Cameron. Alex and Michelle chop it up about a lot, including their onstage electrocutions, the triumphs and tribulations of the hometown gig, Michelle's future music production goals, the massive on-stage panic attack that nearly ended Alex's career, and his collaborator Brandon Flowers’ extremely unorthodox way of recording The Killers’ vocals. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. — Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer This episode was produced by Mark “North Side” Yoshizumi. Big thanks to Pitchfork Music Festival for hosting Talkhouse, and to Karolina Barej for all of her coordinating work. The Talkhouse Podcast's theme song is “Plastic Man vs. the Giant Red Phase of the Sun” by Iced Ink.
Aug 02, 2018
Black Thought (The Roots) with Daveed Diggs (Blindspotting)
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, two hip-hop stars who have reshaped how we think about the genre – former Hamilton star Daveed Diggs and The Roots' MC Black Thought – sit down for a fascinating conversation at 30 Rock, recorded after a taping of The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon. Over the course of their talk, the two friends discuss each of their long-gestating projects, Daveed's movie Blindspotting and Black Thought's album Streams of Thought, parallels between the current Oakland film explosion and the Philly music boom of the late '90s, Black Thought's (pre-Hamilton) dislike of musicals, life-work balance, John Malkovich's surprising on-set viewing habits, and much, much more. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast.
Jul 26, 2018
The Best Moments of 2018 (So Far)
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Life is busy, and it can be tough to stay up to date on your favorite shows. So, to highlight a few of the Talkhouse team’s favorite moments from the first six months of 2018, we bring you our semi-annual Best Of episode. This week’s show features clips of: — Aasif Mandvi and Jason Jones talking fashion at the flagship Sonos store — Natalie Prass and Matthew E. White discussing the challenges of writing political pop songs at the Strand — Meredith Graves and Cameron Lynch chatting the intersection of music and sports at On Air Festival (in collaboration with The Players Tribune) — An unreleased clip of Adam Goldberg and The Flaming Lips’ Steven Drozd on confronting Nazi internet trolls — Oscar winners Guillermo del Toro and William Friedkin on Academy nominations and the apocalypse (in collaboration with Vanity Fair) — Broad City’s Abbi Jacobson and writer Samantha Irby recounting their hilarious path to collaborating on the upcoming TV show Meaty, recorded live at Books Are Magic For this special episode, I’m joined by joined by Talkhouse’s Brooklyn team: Film Editor-in-Chief Nick Dawson, Associate Editor Annie Fell and Operations Manager Keenan Kush. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. — Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer This episode is produced by Mark “the new papa” Yoshizumi.
Jul 19, 2018
Devendra Banhart with Tim Kinsella (Joan of Arc)
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On the heels of covering each other’s music as part of Joyful Noise Recordings’ very cool Cause & Effect series, Devendra Banhart and Tim Kinsella (Joan Of Arc) sat down to record a Talkhouse Podcast episode about the project. They touch on it for a moment and then, as one might expect from such restless and prolific artists, veer away, never to return. Their talk instead covers their upcoming books, the poems that came out of Devendra’s “ashram-hopping in India,” and the nuts and bolts of what goes into staying sane as highly productive working artists. Oh, and we also hear their argument for a hallucinatory experience as a prerequisite to lead the United States of America … Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. — Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode was recorded by Tim and Devendra, and co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi.
Jul 12, 2018
Reinaldo Marcus Green with Boots Riley
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, two of the most exciting emerging writer-directors of the moment sit down together for a chat at the Sundance Film Festival. The filmmakers in question – Reinaldo Marcus Green, whose Monsters and Men is forthcoming this fall, and Boots Riley, frontman of the Coup and mastermind behind the current cinematic sensation Sorry to Bother You – talk about the contrasting routes they took to making their debut features, the stresses of selling your movie at Sundance, how internet-age distraction is the enemy of creativity, partying with Idris Elba, and much, much more. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast.
Jul 10, 2018
Revisited: David Cross with Jean Grae and Fab Moretti
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For the Independence Day break, we revisit one of our favorite Talkhouse Podcast episodes of the past year, a conversation recorded live at Sonos' flagship store in Soho NYC featuring Mr Show and Arrested Development's David Cross chatting with two of his longtime friends, comedian and hip-hop star Jean Grae and Fabrizio Moretti, the drummer from the Strokes and Little Joy. Over the course of a hilarious and thoroughly unpredictable conversation, the trio talk about David going into an old people's home, the ills of social media, Jean's inability to ride a bike, the mysterious “gum incident,” the movie and musical of Newsies, conspiracy theories, jobs they were fired from … and David and Fab give Jean an opportunity to prove her talents at the last job she was fired from: a phone sex operator. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse Film at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now to stay in the loop about future Talkhouse Podcasts. Episode engineered and mixed by Mark Yoshizumi and produced by Talkhouse Podcast producer Elia Einhorn.
Jul 05, 2018
Natalie Prass with Matthew E. White
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Natalie Prass' new LP, The Future and The Past, has been a long time in the making. Reeling from the results of 2016's presidential election, Prass made a last-minute decision to cancel the recording sessions she'd booked with producer Matthew E. White, feeling that the songs she'd written about a breakup had to be replaced with new ones which addressed what was unfolding in America. To celebrate the release of this powerful new record, Prass was joined by White at Manhattan's iconic bookstore The Strand for a deep-dive conversation about her creative process and vision for these songs. Their talk also gets into sexism in the studio, aborted attempts at writing with L.A. songwriters, and how Prass almost chose running a dog-clothing company over her music career. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. — Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode is in partnership with The Strand. It was recorded by Jason Kelly and co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi.
Jun 28, 2018
The Raincoats with Protomartyr
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This week’s Talkhouse Podcast episode features a fantastic conversation between The Raincoats and Protomartyr, recorded live at Rough Trade East in London, followed by an audience Q&A session. My special guest host is Jenn Pelly, Contributing Editor at Pitchfork — where she glowingly reviewed Protomartyr’s new Consolation EP last week — and author of the 33 1/3 series book on The Raincoats’ self-titled debut album. The bands’ talk takes in a lot: presenting oneself as you are versus a cultivated rock star image; Protomartyr’s collaboration with Kelley Deal of The Breeders and The Raincoats’ work with Angel Olsen; how Kurt Cobain’s fandom forever changed The Raincoats’ career; and much, much more. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. — Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode is in partnership with Rough Trade. It was recorded by James Spinks and co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi.
Jun 21, 2018
Abbi Jacobson (Broad City) with Samantha Irby
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, Broad City's Abbi Jacobson sits down with the hilarious blogger and memoirist Samantha Irby in a conversation recorded at Brooklyn's Books Are Magic. The two discuss Irby's first book Meaty – which not only just got re-issued in an all-new edition but which Jacobson and Irby are also currently turning into a TV show – as well as how Abbi first “courted” Sam five years ago, the perfect soundtrack to writing a great personal essay, Sam’s dream to put diarrhea on TV (and her other aims for the small-screen version of Meaty), her planned Emmy revenge (!), and much, much more. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast.
Jun 14, 2018
Griffin Dunne with Simon Baker
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, Simon Baker (best known for playing the title role in The Mentalist) talks with fellow actor-turned-director Griffin Dunne, who he has known for two decades. The two friends discuss Breath, Baker's newly released directorial debut – a coming-of-age surfing movie, in which Baker also stars – as well as directing vs. acting, the challenges of making an authentic surfing movie, the documentary Dunne made about his aunt Joan Didion, how “human cinema” will outlast superhero franchises, a hilarious story about Dunne's father giving him “the talk,” and much, more. For more filmmakers talking film, visit Talkhouse at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast.
Jun 07, 2018
Adam Goldberg with Steven Drozd
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, Steven Drozd of the Flaming Lips chats with his longtime friend and sometime musical collaborator Adam Goldberg, the actor (and musician-writer-director-producer-editor-photographer) whose new record under the Goldberg Sisters moniker, Home: A Nice Place to Visit, is out now. In a fascinating, wide-ranging conversation, the two talk about having a split artistic identity, the impact of technology in our lives, the infamously wacky Flaming Lips movie Christmas on Mars, not to mention the reason Adam hasn't watched Breaking Bad or The Sopranos, their respective childhood obsessions with Kiss and Grease, and Drozd's appearances on both Beverly Hills 90210 and Charmed. For more filmmakers and musicians talking film and music, visit Talkhouse at talkhouse.com. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast.
May 31, 2018
Shame with Goat Girl & Konshens with Bad Gyal
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On today's Talkhouse Podcast episode, we bring you a bumper double feature recorded live on Pitchfork Radio at SXSW. To kick things off, Shame's Charlie Steen and Goat Girl's Clottie Cream, L.E.D and Rosy Bones give us some insights that only locals could into the rad young indie and post-punk scene popping off in their hometown of London. Part two of the podcast pairs Jamaican legend Konshens with fab Spanish newcomer Bad Gyal for an international dancehall summit. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. — Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode was recorded and co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi.
May 24, 2018
Will Sheff (Okkervil River) with A.C. Newman (The New Pornographers)
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This week's Talkhouse Podcast episode features Okkervil River frontman Will Sheff in conversation with A.C. Newman, the lead singer and guitarist from the New Pornographers. The talk is a collaboration with the iconic Manhattan bookstore Strand Books, and was recorded live in their Rare Book Room to celebrate the release of Okkervil River's new L.P., In the Rainbow Rain. The old friends, occasional collaborators, and recent neighbors go deep into the writing, structuring and influences on Will’s new album. But they cover a lot more than that, including; predestination vs. free will; the joys and drawbacks of living in a political bubble; the magic of what A.C. calls "the nerd store;" and why the gig after New York City always sucks. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode was recorded by Charles Mueller and co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi.
May 17, 2018
Andrew W.K. with Albert Hammond Jr.
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This week's episode of the Talkhouse Podcast features Andrew W.K. and Albert Hammond Jr. (The Strokes) in an insightful, hilarious conversation. It was recorded in front of a live audience at South By Southwest and is a collaboration with TuneIn. Veterans of NYC's turbo-charged indie-rock aughts, Hammond and W.K. are currently making some of the most vital music of their careers. When the two caught up for this podcast chat, they naturally talked about their new albums, Francis Trouble (Hammond) and You're Not Alone (W.K.) But they certainly didn't stop there; this conversation also covers the pluses and minuses of total creative control, curating the live show experience for their fans, the joys of picking one's nose, glow-in-the-dark condoms, and how Hammond received inspiration for his alter ego ... from his dog. Party this podcast, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today's episode was recorded by Dutch Worthington and co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi.
May 10, 2018
Paul Feig with Alia Shawkat and Miguel Arteta
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, a meeting of great comedy minds: Paul Feig, the creator of Freaks and Geeks and director of Bridesmaids, Spy and Ghostbusters, sits down with actress-writer Alia Shawkat and writer-director Miguel Arteta, whose excellent new collaboration, the comedy drama Duck Butter, is now in theaters and on VOD. The trio, all in New York City for the Tribeca Film Festival, discuss a wide variety of topics including Duck Butter, the upcoming Freaks and Geeks documentary, using your personal problems and experiences in your art, morning routines, their collaborations with one another, why the Trump era is bad for creativity, getting high, and much, much more. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse Film at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. The music featured in the podcast is as follows: 1. Intro / outro underscore: “Plastic Man vs. The Giant Red Phase Of The Sun” – Iced Ink Episode engineered by Charles Mueller and edited by Mark Yoshizumi. The Talkhouse podcast producer is Elia Einhorn.
May 03, 2018
Chelsea Manning with Nadya Tolokonnikova (Pussy Riot)
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The latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, recorded at Day for Night Festival in Houston, features Chelsea Manning and Pussy Riot's Nadya Tolokonnikova. The program includes a talk by Manning on resisting "the data-driven society and the police state"; a conversation between her and Tolokonnikova on their experiences in resistance, incarceration and prison reform; and a talk by Tolokonnikova on bringing "punk feminism" to Russia and the problems with Putin. The two also share their views on how neighborhood communities have better answers than think tanks, the ways empathy can help make real change, and — powerfully — how political action can be more than voting. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer This week’s episode is a collaboration with Day for Night Festival. It was recorded and co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi.
Apr 26, 2018
Guillermo del Toro with William Friedkin Part 2
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, we feature the concluding part of an epic conversation between two Academy Award-winning directors, Guillermo del Toro and William Friedkin. Here, the longtime friends discuss the genesis of and remarkable stories surrounding Friedkin's compelling new documentary about the Vatican's exorcist, The Devil and Father Amorth. In the process, they tackle some of the most substantial topics imaginable, including: Christ, Hitler, religion, evil, reason vs. emotion, empathy vs. fear, free will, the impending apocalypse — and how filmmakers can make a difference in a world on the brink. Special thanks to Katey Rich from Vanity Fair for collaborating on this special conversation, and for joining us for Part 1 of this conversation. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse Film at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast.
Apr 19, 2018
Guillermo del Toro with William Friedkin Part 1
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, a casual cinematic chat between two friends, who also happen to be Academy Award-winning directors: Guillermo del Toro and William Friedkin. In the first part of their enthralling two-part conversation for the Talkhouse Podcast, the pair discuss winning big at the Oscars, surviving award season, how to stay a scrapper despite success, del Toro's apprenticeship under makeup legend Dick Smith, the remarkable story of Friedkin and the Pazuzu statue in The Exorcist, the plagiarism controversy surrounding The Shape of Water, and much more. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse Film at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast.
Apr 17, 2018
Eliza Hittman with Lynne Ramsay
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, Eliza Hittman – the writer-director of It Felt Like Love and Beach Rats – chats with one of the great living filmmakers (and one of Hittman's personal heroes), Scottish writer-director Lynne Ramsay. The two talk about Ramsay's latest film, You Were Never Really Here starring Joaquin Phoenix, which is in theaters now, touching on such topics as the adaptation process, tackling violent subject matter, making a thriller for the first time, staying open to new ideas during all phases of the creative process, balancing life and work, and much more besides. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse Film at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast.
Apr 12, 2018
Billy Bragg
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Today’s show features a talk the brilliant English folk-punk activist Billy Bragg gave on skiffle music at NYC’s Strand Bookstore last year upon the release of his book Roots, Radicals and Rockers: How Skiffle Changed the World. Bragg traces the little-known genre from its distinctly American roots to its British chart-topping success, and consequent all-conquering return to America repackaged as the British Invasion. He describes how the short-lived “hillbilly” sound forever changed the course of Western music via its teenaged adherents, who included Van Morrison and, crucially, the Beatles. This utterly fascinating tale also touches on questions of cultural appropriation (and appropriation of appropriation), how young women wanting to jive created a new gig infrastructure, calypso hitting the U.K. charts due to a cricket match, and how the spread of skiffle — and, for that matter, rap — mimics the fidget spinner. Check it out, and subscribe now to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer This week’s episode is a collaboration with the Strand. It was recorded by Charles Mueller and co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi.
Apr 05, 2018
Meredith Graves with Cameron Lynch
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Today's episode, a collaboration with The Players' Tribune, was recorded earlier this month in front of a live audience at On Air Fest at the Wythe Hotel in Brooklyn. When On Air Fest reached out to Talkhouse about curating a live episode for their podcast festival, we had an idea: what if we, the outlet where musicians and filmmakers write and speak about their experiences, partnered with Derek Jeter's The Players' Tribune, the site where athletes write about their own experiences, for a podcast discussion about what the first-person narrative really looks like? The Players' Tribune loved the idea, and brought in NFL linebacker Cameron Lynch to speak with frequent Talkhouse contributor Meredith Graves (Perfect Pussy). Their thoughtful and often funny conversation takes in a lot, from shutting down the "shut up and dribble" narrative, to the very real pressures of professionally rolling "the dice of life" every single day. It also touches on Fergie's National Anthem blowback, the truth and falsity of people's preconceptions about athletes and rock stars, the perils of Googling oneself, and reckoning with the fact that each of us is "an unpredictable consciousness driving a meat-covered skeleton." Dan Treadway, Deputy Editor at Players' Tribune, and I kick off the live conversation with some background on each of our first-person-driven media outlets. Check it out, and subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. — Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode was recorded by Mark Yoshizumi with Michael Bosworth, and co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi.
Mar 29, 2018
Chris Frantz (Talking Heads, Tom Tom Club) with Richard Lloyd (Television)
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Chris Frantz (Talking Heads, Tom Tom Club) and Richard Lloyd (Television) were key architects of punk and new wave, forever changing what music could be. Lloyd just published his memoir, Everything Is Combustible: Television, CBGB’s and Five Decades of Rock and Roll: The Memoirs of an Alchemical Guitarist, and to celebrate he sat down with his old friend Franz at N.Y.C.’s iconic Strand Book Store for a deep dive into the wild times of his youth and musical hijinks. Tune in to hear about Lloyd hanging with Jimi Hendrix, the advice John Lee Hooker gave him, and how he blew up a Chinese laundry. Plus Tina Weymouth (Talking Heads, Tom Tom Club) pops up in the Q&A with a question of her own! Check it out, and subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode was recorded by Mark Yoshizumi with Garrett Karrberg, and co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. Big thanks to the Strand.
Mar 22, 2018
Sam Harris (X Ambassadors) with Kendra Foster (D’Angelo, Parliament Funkadelic)
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Kendra Foster and X Ambassadors’ Sam Harris know a thing or two about songwriting. Foster is a two-time Grammy winner for her work with D’Angelo on his seminal Black Messiah LP, while Harris has written for Rihanna and scored major song placements with Chrysler and ESPN College Football, and in the Will Smith movie Bright. We paired Foster and Harris for a deep-dive conversation on all things songwriting, and they delivered. This conversation covers co-writing, making time to work on new joints while on tour, how songwriting blends technical and spiritual elements, and working with and without producers. It also takes in the artistic and financial benefits of taking risks, how D’Angelo taught Kendra to be patient with her perfectionism, and the way Imagine Dragons forever changed X Ambassadors’ career. Check it out, and subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi.
Mar 08, 2018
Tom Kalin, Eliza Hittman, Reinaldo Marcus Green and Kirsten Johnson Talk the Oscars
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, filmmakers Eliza Hittman (Beach Rats), Kirsten Johnson (Cameraperson), Tom Kalin (Savage Grace) and Reinaldo Marcus Green (Monsters and Men) talk all things Oscars. In a conversation recorded at Kickstarter HQ in Brooklyn, the four directors discuss this year's (historic!) nominees, notable snubs, changes the Academy has made as part of its diversity push, parallels to the awards in the 1970s, the experience of being a contender and an Oscar voter, and much more. Plus, of course, they offer up their predictions for the big night! For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse Film at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop about future Talkhouse Podcasts.
Mar 01, 2018
Jenn Wasner (Wye Oak, Flock of Dimes) with Jana Hunter (Lower Dens)
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Before Jenn Wasner (Wye Oak, Flock of Dimes) and Jana Hunter (Lower Dens) were famous musicians, they worked long shifts together in a Baltimore restaurant. The friends watched each other's artistic careers explode, and when they sat down in the Sonos room at Rough Trade NYC — for one of three conversations that Talkhouse curated for Northside Festival — their chat was both hilarious and moving. (You can listen to Jlin with William Basinski now, and Suicide's Martin Rev talking with Julianna Barwick will drop soon.) As well as tales of those early days washing dishes and lying to annoying customers, their talk takes in the baggage of being "a girl with a guitar," the pros and cons of ceding control in the creative process, and... Abba. Check it out, and subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer @eliaeinhorn Today's episode was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi
Feb 22, 2018
Christina Choe with Andrew Ahn
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, we feature a conversation between friends and fellow Korean-American writer-directors Andrew Ahn and Christina Choe, recorded at the Kickstarter Lodge during last month's Sundance Film Festival. Choe was at Sundance with her debut feature Nancy (which won her the festival's Waldo Salt Screenwriting Award) and Ahn with his Sundance Now TV show This Close, about two deaf best friends. Over the course of their wide-ranging and extremely unfiltered conversation, Ahn and Choe discuss not only their new projects but also telling stories of one's own community, how Andrew came out to his parents through a short film, Christina's club KGB (Koreans Gone Bad) – and a whole lot about Christina's mom! For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse Film at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop about future Talkhouse Podcasts.
Feb 15, 2018
Jlin with William Basinski
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Jlin and William Basinski are two of today's most fascinating and gifted composers. Basinski works with decaying analogue tape loops to create ambient soundscapes, while Jlin constructs brilliant, stuttering reimaginings of footwork rhythms. The friends and collaborators sat down in the Sonos room at Rough Trade NYC for one of three conversations that Talkhouse curated for Northside Festival. (Upcoming episodes will feature the other two, Suicide's Martin Rev with Julianna Barwick, and Lower Dens' Jana Hunter with Jenn Wasner from Wye Oak and Flock of Dimes). The two get into Basinski's tribute to his hero David Bowie, Jlin's boundary-pushing collaborations with cutting-edge dancers, and how a cat on the loose ended up significantly contributing to Basinski’s artistry. Check it out, and subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today's episode was recorded and co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi
Feb 08, 2018
Revisited: Andy Rourke (the Smiths) with Dolores O’Riordan (the Cranberries)
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Like fans the world over, we here at Talkhouse were devastated to hear of the Cranberries' Dolores O'Riordan's untimely passing. We felt that the best way to honor her was to share her sweet and funny conversation with her D.A.R.K. bandmate Andy Rourke from 2016. ~~~ On this week’s episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, Andy Rourke of the Smiths and Dolores O’Riordan of the Cranberries sit down to discuss their new supergroup, D.A.R.K, and we give their song “High Fashion” its world premiere. The new bandmates and old friends talk about Dolores’ teenage Smiths fandom, Stephen Street (who helmed production duties on iconic records for both groups), initial reaction from their legendary bands’ diehard fans to the new project, and getting pelted onstage at festivals back in the day by a half-eaten apple and a packet of sausages adorned with the note “Meat is Murder.” Take a listen and subscribe now on Apple Podcasts or Stitcher to stay in the loop on future Talkhouse Podcasts. — Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast producer and engineer Today's episode was mixed by Mark Yoshizumi.
Feb 01, 2018
The Best Moments of 2017 on the Talkhouse Podcast
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, we look back on the past year as Talkhouse Podcast host/producer Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Music Editor-in-Chief Amy Rose Spiegel, Talkhouse Film Editor-in-Chief Nick Dawson and Talkhouse’s marketing manager Keenan Kush discuss some of their favorite moments from the Talkhouse Podcasts of 2017. The highlights featured include: Taran Killam and Kyle Mooney discussing exercise routines (and doing a little beatboxing); Frankie Cosmos and Vagabon on setting boundaries with fans; Paul Major talking with the legendary Stephen Malkmus about listening to psychedelic music (but without the psychedelics); David Cross and the Strokes’ Fab Moretti helping Jean Grae recreate her past as a phone sex worker; Sam Esmail (Mr Robot) and Mark Frost (Twin Peaks) discussing TV vs. film (and Frost’s experiences writing Marvel movies); an extract from’s Shamir Voice Memos series; Sinkane dishing to Oddisee on his encounter with Usher; and Rob Corddry reminding Lake Bell about her unsuccessful attempt to be a vegan in Vegas. Check it out, and subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop about future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast.
Jan 18, 2018
Vivian Howard with Cynthia Hill
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The latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast continues our delicious dive into the world of food, following recent episodes that paired Chef Andrew Carmellini with A$AP Ferg, and Chef Paul Kahan with Sonic Youth and Pavement's Mark Ibold.  For today's show, lifelong friends — and now A Chef's Life colleagues — chef Vivian Howard and filmmaker Cynthia Hill sit down to chat about bringing the food and culture of rural North Carolina to the rest of America via their Peabody- and Emmy-winning series, the difficulty of working professionally with one's spouse, and how the hardest critics to please can sometimes be one's own parents. Check it out, and subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop about future Talkhouse Podcasts. Today's episode was recorded by John Plymale, and mixed by Mark Yoshizumi. 
Jan 11, 2018
Aasif Mandvi with Jason Jones (The Detour)
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, friends and longtime former colleagues on The Daily Show Jason Jones and Aasif Mandvi are reunited for a conversation at the flagship Sonos store in Soho, NYC. Over the course of a hilarious and wide-ranging chat, the two talk about their worst fashion choices, their respective exercise regimes, their ambivalent feelings about social media, the new documentary The Problem with Apu (which Aasif appears in), Aasif's desire to be (or to spawn) Hollywood's first Indian-American action star, during all of which Jason Jones Solves Everything. (Including how to repeatedly plug the new season of his show, The Detour.) For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse Film at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop about future Talkhouse Podcasts.
Jan 04, 2018
Talkhouse x Food Republic: Paul Kahan with Mark Ibold (Sonic Youth, Pavement)
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On the second episode of the Talkhouse x Food Republic podcast, Chicago chef and restaurateur Paul Kahan and musician Mark Ibold (of Pavement and Sonic Youth fame) find that they're at a very similar place in life. The two cultural icons are into cooking, music and family, and they trade stories in this special conversation at the flagship Sonos store in New York. The podcast opens with Ibold admitting that he spent the previous evening testing out a recipe from Kahan's new cookbook, Cheers to the Publican, Repast and Present: Recipes and Ramblings from an American Beer Hall, which takes its name from the chef's Chicago institution, The Publican — part of a restaurant and bar group that includes Avec, Blackbird, Big Star and many others. As they chat, Kahan also taps Ibold for recording advice and coaxes out a few stories from the bassist's days on the road with Pavement. It's a rare chance to hear two legendary figures who'd never met before assess where they're at in life, and share hard-earned wisdom. Subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast.
Dec 28, 2017
Michael Chernus (Orange is the New Black) with Sam Beam (Iron & Wine)
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, actor Michael Chernus (aka Cal Chapman on Orange is the New Black) sits down at the flagship Sonos store in New York City with Sam Beam of Iron & Wine, whose latest album, Beast Epic, came out in Summer 2017. The two longtime friends chat about Beam's roots as a painter and filmmaker, how Chernus has entered the Marvel Universe (playing the Tinkerer in Spider-Man: Homecoming), Beam's plans to make a movie in the near future, how Chernus has used Beam's music as part of his acting process, and much more. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse Film at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop about future Talkhouse Podcasts.
Dec 21, 2017
Rainn Wilson with Josh Radnor and Ben Lee
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, actor and comedian Rainn Wilson (aka Dwight on The Office) chats with two old friends, actor-writer-director Josh Radnor (best known as Ted on How I Met Your Mother) and Australian indie singer-songwriter Ben Lee, who now make up the musical duo Radnor & Lee. The three talk about how Josh and Ben became friends (and then later collaborators), the spiritual focus of their debut album, Josh and Rainn's shared history as drama students at NYU, the balance between spirituality and creativity in each of their lives, Ben's children's album about Islam, and much, much more. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse Film at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop about future Talkhouse Podcasts.
Dec 14, 2017
Sasheer Zamata with Noël Wells (Mr. Roosevelt)
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, comedian and actor Sasheer Zamata is in conversation with her former Saturday Night Live castmate Noël Wells, whose debut feature as writer-director and star, Mr. Roosevelt, is out now in select theaters. Zamata and Wells, who shared a dressing room at SNL, talk about a diverse range of subjects, taking in everything from political activism to internet addiction and social media use, from Zamata's stint on The Talk and Brad Pitt's photography and sculpture work to their experiences returning to 30 Rock and Wells' fledgling music career. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse Film at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop about future Talkhouse Podcasts.
Dec 07, 2017
Sinkane with Oddisee
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The latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast features rapper Oddisee and singer-songwriter Sinkane in conversation. The old friends powerfully — and hilariously — share the triumphs and travails of pursuing careers in music as Sudanese Americans. They also chat about the current and historic musical infrastructures of rap and punk, Oddisee’s amazing Hudson Mohawk connection, and how Caribou helped change Sinkane’s life. Plus Sinkane drops some "Sudanese Dad wisdom." Check it out, and subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer This episode was recorded by Elia Einhorn, and mixed and co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi.
Nov 30, 2017
NE-HI with Spencer Tweedy
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, Spencer Tweedy (Tweedy, the Blisters) chops it up with NE-HI’s Jason Balla and Mikey Wells backstage at Pitchfork Music Festival 2017. Their talk takes in why bands ask for “gold-flaked burgers” on their riders, a theory of WWE’s progressivism, and how what really matters in life is rock ’n’ roll … and taxes. Check it out, and subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. Today’s episode is sponsored in part by Shure. Big thanks to Pitchfork for hosting Talkhouse at the festival. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer  This episode was recorded, mixed and co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi.
Nov 24, 2017
Jamila Woods with Ohmme
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Singer Jamila Woods and Ohmme's Macie Stewart and Sima Cunningham are ubiquitous collaborators working at the heart of Chicago's diverse and vibrant music scene. Between them they've worked with Wilco, Chance the Rapper, Twin Peaks, Vic Mensa and many more, and also release their own fantastic records. On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, the old friends catch up backstage at Pitchfork Music Festival 2017. Their wonderfully Chicago-centric talk takes in the city's vital musical infrastructure, free jazz, the Brown Girls web series, and how amazing sci-fi author Octavia Butler is. Oh, and Talkhouse Music Editor-in-Chief Amy Rose Spiegel gets me to revisit my pre-adolescent singing voice. Check it out, and subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. Today’s episode is sponsored in part by Shure. Big thanks to Pitchfork for hosting Talkhouse at the festival. — Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer  This episode was recorded, mixed and co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi.
Nov 21, 2017
Sam Esmail (Mr. Robot) with Mark Frost (Twin Peaks)
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, Mr. Robot creator Sam Esmail sits down to talk with one of his heroes, Mark Frost, the man who created Twin Peaks and Twin Peaks: The Return with David Lynch – and is also a huge fan of Mr. Robot. The two talk about the unique circumstances under which Twin Peaks: The Return was conceived and made, the story behind Episode 8 (one of the great hours of TV in recent memory), the polarizing second season of Mr. Robot, pushing the boundaries of what TV can be, and much more – including insights into projects that Frost and Lynch worked on that sadly never came to fruition. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse Film at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop about future Talkhouse Podcasts.
Nov 16, 2017
Javier Muñoz with Stephanie Beatriz
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, Javier Muñoz (currently playing the title role in Hamilton on Broadway) talks with his friend Stephanie Beatriz, best known for playing Rosa on Brooklyn Nine-Nine. The two touch on a wide variety of subjects, including Beatriz's new film The Light of the Moon (in which she plays a rape survivor), Harvey Weinstein, the joys and perils of social media, the physical toll of performing Hamilton, the famous actors who gave them driving lessons, their love lives, and much more. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse Film at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop about future Talkhouse Podcasts.
Nov 09, 2017
Katie Alice Greer and Daniele Daniele (Priests) with Tyler Pope (LCD Soundsystem)
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, LCD Soundsystem's Tyler Pope and Priests' Katie Alice Greer and Daniele Daniele chop it up backstage at Pitchfork Music Festival 2017. Their talk takes in the fantastic indie labels they run, D.C. punk, and LCD Soundsystem's earliest days. We also hear about the amplifier that nearly broke up Priests, and LCD's little-known Shellac connection. Check it out, and subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. Today’s episode is sponsored in part by Shure. Big thanks to Pitchfork for hosting Talkhouse at the festival. This episode premiered on Pitchfork Radio. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer This episode was recorded, mixed and co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi.
Nov 02, 2017
Voice Memos: Shamir
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Welcome to Voice Memos, a new audio diary series from the Talkhouse Podcast. Our featured artist for this inaugural episode is the brilliant and chameleonic singer-songwriter Shamir. Shamir Bailey rose to fame in 2015 with his oh-so-danceable debut LP, Ratchet, and its ubiquitous single, "On the Regular." Earlier this year, seemingly out of the blue, he self-released a followup, Hope. In stark contrast to its predecessor, Hope was an eminently DIY affair; it was recorded on a four-track over a single weekend in his bedroom in Philadelphia. Critics and fans were surprised and divided. What happened next, though, is the subject of today's podcast. A devastating manic episode saw Shamir admitted to a mental hospital. After being released, he retreated to his home city of Las Vegas to recuperate. As part of this healing, Shamir began speaking diary entries into his Voice Memos, trying to work through what had happened, and what life would look like going forward. He also began writing new songs in earnest all about his current experiences, again demoing them on his phone. Those powerful home-recorded journals and gorgeous unheard compositions comprise this episode. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Shamir is donating a portion of all pre-sales of his upcoming album, Revelations, to The Mental Health Association in Pennsylvania. Order the album and support this fantastic cause. Subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. Today's podcast was recorded by Shamir Bailey. It was co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi. 
Oct 26, 2017
Frankie Cosmos with Vagabon
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, Greta Kline (Frankie Cosmos, aka my absolute favorite current band) and Lætitia Tamko (Vagabon, who released one of the best records of 2017) catch up backstage at Pitchfork Music Festival 2017. The friends and occasional collaborators talk the ins and outs of being mid-level indie musicians in today's musical climate — working your own merch, fans' frequent lack of physical boundaries, managing oneself, how to engage with corporate sponsors, and much more. They also take in Tegan and Sara's deep knowledge of the Brooklyn DIY scene, breaking edge in Paris, and finding wisdom in Kimya Dawson's LiveJournal. Check it out, and subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. Today's episode is sponsored in part by Shure. Big thanks to Pitchfork for hosting Talkhouse at the festival. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today's episode was recorded, mixed and co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi.
Oct 19, 2017
Jackie Chan with Edgar Wright
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, Baby Driver's writer-director Edgar Wright sits down for a chat with the legendary actor, martial arts star and director Jackie Chan, whose latest film, The Foreigner, is in theaters from this Friday. A self-professed “fanboy” of Chan's work, Wright talks with him about his game-changing films Police Story and Project A; making it in Hollywood on his own terms; how he approached doing some of his death-defying stunts (and fearing ghosts were trying to kill him!); his transition from action star to actor, being on set with James Cameron; receiving a special Oscar at this year's Academy Awards; and much more. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse Film at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop about future Talkhouse Podcasts.
Oct 12, 2017
Chuck D (Public Enemy) with Tom Morello (Rage Against The Machine)
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Chuck D (Public Enemy) and Tom Morello (Rage Against The Machine, Audioslave, the Nightwatchman) have been sending radical political messages up the pop charts for decades. On the occasion of the debut LP by their new supergroup, Prophets Of Rage, the two musical revolutionaries bum-rush the Talkhouse Podcast to discuss protest music. Their conversation also covers why new groups are afraid to be overtly political, the democratization of music via technology, how Rage Against the Machine fooled MTV and Viacom, and "Puff the Magic Dragon." Check it out, and subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. —Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today's episode was recorded by Susan Valot, and mixed and coproduced by Mark Yoshizumi. 
Oct 05, 2017
Lena Dunham with Danny Strong
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, Girls' creator and star Lena Dunham sits down with fellow actor-writer-director Danny Strong, whose J.D. Salinger biopic Rebel in the Rye – his debut as writer-director – is now in theaters. The two friends and officemates discuss the challenges of stepping behind the camera for the first time, owning one's failures, how they met, Lena's mentors David Carr and Nora Ephron, their creative beginnings, and much more – including the projects they are currently working on, such as Dunham's previously unannounced stage project at St. Ann's Warehouse. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse Film at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop about future Talkhouse Podcasts.
Oct 03, 2017
Tunde Adebimpe (TV on the Radio) with Ian Brennan
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Tunde Adebimpe (TV on the Radio, Rachel Getting Married) and Ian Brennan (Grammy-winning producer of Tinariwen) are dedicated to making music that lays purposely apart from the mainstream. The old friends and collaborators sat down for the Talkhouse Podcast on the occasion of the release of the Brennan-produced Tanzania Albinism Collective’s White African Power record (my favorite album of 2017 so far). Their conversation takes in the persecution of people with albinism in East Africa, and Brennan’s trip to a remote albino colony in Tanzania where he recorded this incredibly honest and heartrending record. The chat also covers the Western music industry’s proximity bias, artists who prize spirit over virtuosity, the travails and triumphs of the Malawi Mouse Boys, and Celine Dion. Check it out, and subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. — Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode was recorded by Tunde Adebimpe and Ian Brennan. It was mixed and co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi.
Sep 28, 2017
Tyler Pope (LCD Soundsystem) with Thurston Moore (Sonic Youth)
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For today's episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, we paired Tyler Pope (LCD Soundsystem, Interference Pattern Records) and Thurston Moore (Sonic Youth) on the occasion of the release of Moore's new LP, Rock n Roll Consciousness. Pope is a lifelong Sonic Youth fan, and when Pitchfork asked me if I'd like to host an Over / Under with Moore earlier the same summer day that we were due to record this podcast, I asked if he had a subject he'd love to hear Moore's take on. His immediate response? "Ask him about techno." I did, and in his answer, Moore dropped the bombshell that he's got a fully recorded, unreleased techno record. This conversation, recorded minutes after that Over / Under taping, picks up on that teaser. Moore and Pope discuss that unreleased record and nerd out on techno, and their talk also takes in what drew each of them to "subversive" music, amazing black metal band names, Pope's new (mostly) electronic record label, being in a democratic band versus running the ship, and so much more. Today's episode features a special introductory conversation with Pope recorded the week that the new LCD Soundsystem album, American Dream, hit #1 in the charts.  In addition, Moore asked Pope for recommendations on which techno tracks he should hear; you can find that list on Talkhouse.com. Check it all out, and subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. Catch LCD Soundsystem and Thurston Moore on their current world tours. — Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode was recorded by Tyler Pope and Mark Yoshizumi. It was mixed and co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi.
Sep 26, 2017
Helado Negro with Sylvan Esso
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Both Helado Negro and Sylvan Esso are rewriting the rules of what a pop song can sound like. The friends and current tourmates sat down for the Talkhouse Podcast to discuss the creative process and artistic evolution. Their talk takes in the songwriter's quest for self-expression, freedom, money, and transcendence — and just how bonkers searching for all of those things at once really is. It also covers artistically growing up in public, how creating can be a necessary escape during troubled times, vibing on YMCA boot-camp workout music, and how occasionally they write their best work ... while peeing. Check it out, and subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. Catch Sylvan Esso and Helado Negro on tour together through the end of September. — Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode was recorded, mixed and co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi.
Sep 21, 2017
Talkhouse x Food Republic: A$AP Ferg Talks with Andrew Carmellini
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On Talkhouse's premiere food culture episode (part of its new Talkhouse x Food Republic series), New York City chef and restaurateur Andrew Carmellini meets Harlem rapper A$AP Ferg at the flagship Sonos store in NYC. In their conversation, they discuss the challenges of their respective crafts, their role as leaders, branding, cooking and more. Check out these two New York cultural titans chopping it up, and subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast.
Sep 14, 2017
Barry Jenkins (Moonlight) with Eliza Hittman (Beach Rats)
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, Moonlight's Oscar-winning writer-director Barry Jenkins sits down with fellow filmmaker and (and fellow Talkhouse contributor!) Eliza Hittman to talk about Beach Rats, her sophomore feature which is currently in theaters. The friends discuss how they bonded while doing the Cinereach Fellowship (aka “filmmaker therapy”), the parallels between Moonlight and Beach Rats, the challenges of shooting on a beach at night, how they both feared overly muscular actors might “ruin” their films, and much more. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse Film at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop about future Talkhouse Podcasts.
Sep 07, 2017
Courtney Barnett with Julia Shapiro (Chastity Belt)
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Courtney Barnett and Julia Shapiro (Chastity Belt) love each others' songs so much that they admit to feeling like "creepy fans." The friends and frequent tourmates caught up on the Talkhouse Podcast to talk finger tapping, heavy metal guitar pedals, Chastity Belt's new LP I Used To Spend So Much Time Alone, Courtney Barnett's songwriting difficulties and her new project with Kurt Vile, and so much more. This episode premiered on Pitchfork Radio. Check it out, and subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. — Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer Today’s episode was recorded by Courtney Barnett, Bill Marcus and Mark Yoshizumi. It was mixed and co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi.
Aug 31, 2017
Rob Corddry with Lake Bell
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, longtime friends and regular collaborators Lake Bell and Rob Corddry sit down for a conversation, timed to the September 1 theatrical release of I Do … Until I Don’t, which Bell wrote, directed and stars in. As well as Lake’s new movie, the pair talk about how they first met, their time working together on Childrens Hospital, the challenges of maintaining a film career as a parent, why Lake is a natural director (and Rob isn’t), Lake’s transitional phase as a vegan who ate meat, and much more. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse Film at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop about future Talkhouse Podcasts.  
Aug 29, 2017
Paul Major with Stephen Malkmus
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To celebrate the release of Feel the Music: The Psychedelic Worlds of Paul Major, Stephen Malkmus (Pavement, Stephen Malkmus and the Jicks) sat down with Paul Major (Endless Boogie) at NYC's famed Bowery Ballroom for a live conversation. Their talk takes in Major's life as a preeminent private press psych rock collector, dealer and champion; how he was protected by the mob while slinging records in '70s Manhattan; the dog bite that prevented him from accepting Johnny Thunders' offer to shoot up; and so much more. Joining me for this episode's introduction is special guest Matt Sweeney (Chavez, ZWAN, Iggy Pop, Endless Boogie). Check it out, and subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast.  — Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer
Aug 24, 2017
Seth Meyers with Senator Al Franken
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On a very special new episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, two men who straddle the worlds of comedy and politics – Senator Al Franken and Late Night's Seth Meyers – sit down for a conversation timed to the publication of Franken's new book, Al Franken, Giant of the Senate. In a talk organized through NYC's legendary Strand Bookstore, the two friends and Saturday Night Live alums discuss Franken's transition from comedy to politics (including the “dehumorizing” process), our current president's sense of humor (or lack), Franken's take on both Republican adversaries Ted Cruz and Lindsay Graham, SNL memories of George Harrison and the “Fart Doctor” sketch, and much, much more. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse Film at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop about future Talkhouse Podcasts.
Aug 22, 2017
Lizzy Goodman with Kyp Malone (TV on the Radio) and Brian Chase (Yeah Yeah Yeahs)
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On today’s episode, Meet Me in the Bathroom: Rebirth and Rock and Roll in New York City 2001-2011 author Lizzy Goodman sat down with Yeah Yeah Yeah's Brian Chase and TV On The Radio's Kyp Malone at the flagship Sonos store in NYC. In their conversation, they relive those halcyon years and see what everyone's staying busy with. Check it out, and subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop on future episodes of the Talkhouse Podcast. 
Aug 17, 2017
Patrick Brice with Miguel Arteta
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, writer-director Patrick Brice (The Overnight) and Miguel Arteta, the director of Chuck & Buck, The Good Girl and Cedar Rapids, sit down for a conversation at Arteta's house. The two, who are both currently editing films produced by Mark and Jay Duplass, have a lively talk which encompasses everything from Jason Schwartzman's reticence to take off his shirt to a nightmare TV project Arteta worked on with Martin Scorsese, but focuses most on two major topics: parenthood (Brice recently became a father for the first time) and the current political climate (Arteta's new film is the very prescient and Trump-inflected Beatriz at Dinner). For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse Film at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop about future Talkhouse Podcasts.
Aug 10, 2017
Nicole Holofcener with Jenny Slate and Gillian Robespierre
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, Nicole Holofcener – the writer-director of such acclaimed comedy dramas as Walking and Talking, Please Give and Enough Said – talks with two of her biggest fans, Jenny Slate and Gillian Robespierre, the star and writer-director of Obvious Child and the newly released Landline. In a wide-ranging and often hilarious conversation, the trio talk about sex scenes, motherhood, humping furniture, the difference between male and female directors, their struggles with chewing sounds, telling time and counting – and Jenny and Nicole share their very different memories of working together on Bored to Death. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse Film at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop about future Talkhouse Podcasts.
Aug 03, 2017
Taran Killam with Kyle Mooney
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, Saturday Night Live alum Taran Killam sits down with longtime friend and current SNL cast member Kyle Mooney at the flagship Sonos store in New York City, tied to the release of Mooney's new movie Brigsby Bear, which he stars in and also co-wrote. In a conversation rich with '80s and '90s pop culture trivia (and impromptu singing!), the two talk about their favorite karaoke songs, boy bands of decades past, Kyle's legendary collection of VHS tapes, Saved by the Bell and other teen TV shows, working with legends such as Mark Hamill and Arnold Schwarzenegger, and much more. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse Film at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop about future Talkhouse Podcasts.
Jul 27, 2017
Terence Nance (An Oversimplification of Her Beauty) with Flying Lotus (Kuso)
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, two longtime friends who bridge the worlds of music and film – writer-director Terence Nance, who’s also a musician, and Steve Ellison, widely known as the recording artist Flying Lotus, whose supremely out-there debut feature film Kuso is out now – sit down for a chat. Over the course of their highly entertaining and unpredictable conversation, the pair talks about dick-stabbing, Steve’s traumatic first time getting tested for STDs, the unique mix of crude humor and transcendence in his work, their respective creative struggles, their greatest fears, and much more. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse Film at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop about future Talkhouse Podcasts.
Jul 25, 2017
Darren Aronofsky with Alejandro Jodorowsky
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, two cinematic titans are in conversation as Darren Aronofsky sits down with the legendary Alejandro Jodorowsky, to coincide with the theatrical release of the 88-year-old cult director's new film, Endless Poetry. The two have a fascinating, wide-ranging conversation that takes in the challenge of making art within the Hollywood system, the ability of films to heal, the vulgarity of Trump and life's big questions – death, God, aliens, the universe – and Jodorowsky also fulfills a longheld dream of the Black Swan director's by reading his tarot. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse Film at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop about future Talkhouse Podcasts.
Jul 20, 2017
David Cross with Jean Grae and Fab Moretti (The Strokes)
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, we continue our series of episodes recorded live at Sonos' flagship store in Soho NYC with a hilarious conversation between Mr Show and Arrested Development's David Cross and two of his longtime friends, comedian and hip-hop star Jean Grae and Fabrizio Moretti, the drummer from the Strokes and Little Joy. Over the course of a hilarious and thoroughly unpredictable conversation, the trio talk about David going into an old people's home, the ills of social media, Jean's inability to ride a bike, the mysterious “gum incident,” the movie and musical of Newsies, conspiracy theories, jobs they were fired from … and David and Fab give Jean an opportunity to prove her talents at the last job she was fired from: a phone sex operator. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse Film at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop about future Talkhouse Podcasts.
Jul 13, 2017
Talkhouse Podcast Best of Spring 2017
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, host Elia Einhorn sits down with Talkhouse Film's Editor-in-Chief Nick Dawson and then Talkhouse Music Editor-in-Chief Amy Rose Spiegel (with Talkhouse editorial intern Sophie Kemp in tow!) to discuss some of their favorite moments from the past few months, which include discussions of privilege, Tom Cruise's penis, clothing essentials, stripping, among other topics. Featured here are conversations between Talib Kweli and Patterson Hood of Drive-By Truckers, comedy multihyphenates Ken Marino and Paul Scheer, Cosey Fanni Tutti from Throbbing Gristle and Patti Smith Group's Lenny Kaye, standup stalwarts Todd Barry and Chris Gethard, and more. Plus there's an unreleased outtake in which Ryley Walker and Teenage Fanclub's Norman Blake riff on the weirdness of settling back into real life after tour, and a closing moment that would move Alvin Ailey to tears. Subscribe to the Talkhouse Podcast now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop about future episodes, too!
Jul 06, 2017
Rian Johnson (Star Wars: The Last Jedi) with Ana Lily Amirpour (The Bad Batch)
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, writer-director Rian Johnson (Brick, Looper) sits down with the visionary Ana Lily Amirpour, whose debut feature A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night announced her as a major talent and whose second film, The Bad Batch, is released June 23. Their wide-ranging conversation covers the breadth of the filmmaking process, from the trials of writing to post-production anxieties, and takes in cinematic boners, being a “frame fucker,” their respective metaphors for making movies, Rian's experiences making his upcoming Star Wars: The Last Jedi, and much more. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse Film at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop about future Talkhouse Podcasts.
Jun 22, 2017
Norman Blake (Teenage Fanclub) with Ryley Walker
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On today's episode, fingerstyle guitar wunderkind (and massive Teenage Fanclub fan) Ryley Walker chats with that legendary band's frontman, Norman Blake. Their talk takes in songwriting process, challenging oneself onstage, the excitement of collaborating with experimental musicians, studio techniques, and so much more. Check it out, and subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop on future Talkhouse podcasts.  — Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer.  Today's episode was recorded by Ryley and Norman, and mixed and co-produced by Mark Yoshizumi.
Jun 16, 2017
Jim Hemphill with Lea Thompson (The Year of Spectacular Men)
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On the latest episode of the Talkhouse Podcast, writer-director and frequent Talkhouse contributor Jim Hemphill sits down with Lea Thompson, whose feature directorial debut, The Year of Spectacular Men, has its world premiere at the Los Angeles Film Festival on June 16. The two old friends talk about her new movie, collaborating on Jim's movie The Trouble About the Truth, Lea's memories of working on Howard the Duck, Some Kind of Wonderful and All the Right Moves (which includes a frank discussion of her and Tom Cruise's nudity!), sexism in Hollywood, Jim's lack of prowess as an actor, and much more. For more filmmakers talking film and TV, visit Talkhouse Film at talkhouse.com/film. Subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop about future Talkhouse Podcasts.
Jun 15, 2017
Patterson Hood (Drive-By Truckers) with Talib Kweli
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Patterson Hood (Drive-By Truckers) and Talib Kweli both make music to make a difference. On their respective new releases American Band and The Seven (Kweli’s EP in collaboration with Styles P), the lyrics directly address social and political issues. The Southern rocker and NYC rapper sat down for the Talkhouse Podcast last month and covered a lot of ground, including: Kweli’s experiences on the ground in Ferguson; Patterson’s desire to provide a visible alternative to white Southern men as bigots in the media; Dave Chappelle’s planning meeting with Saturday Night Live’s Lorne Michaels; Harry Belafonte’s attempt to make a “We Are The World”-style song with rappers for Ferguson; and so much more. Check it out, and subscribe now on iTunes or Stitcher to stay in the loop on future Talkhouse podcasts. — Elia Einhorn, Talkhouse Podcast host and producer. Today’s episode was recorded by Mark Yoshizumi and Patterson Hood, and mixed by Mark Yoshizumi. Want to take action? Talib Kweli recommends: Indivisible.org is a bunch of congressional staffers, people who have worked in Congress who are giving people tools to be anti Trump, whether it’s to participate in a Hill Day or to go to your local town hall and stuff like that. Indivisible.org, they’re doing great, great work. Adopt-A-State is getting people to change the demographic, change the vote in some of the red states so we can change some of the electoral college nonsense. Very important to me is Sleeping Giants. I’m not sure if they have a website but they’re on Facebook and Twitter. Sleeping Giants is a group of people ... taking on Breitbart.com ... They’re going after their advertisers and getting advertisers to pull their ads and money out of Breitbart. That’s a strategy I feel like is working.
Jun 09, 2017